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  1. Yesterday
  2. It's a great building this and you've worked that fisheye well Those green tiles
  3. Last week
  4. Some good snaps to be had down there
  5. Nice images there mate
  6. Looks a good wander mate
  7. A while back I posted a report from a creme de la menthe location called Chateau a la Mange Tout. This sanatorium sits on the same site, not bad having two half decent explores right next to each other, joie de vivre! I meant to post a report at the time but never got round to it. It wasn't massively photogenic so I only took a load of hand held shots but there was a fair bit of stuff inside. Bon appetit, as the French would say Last but not least we had a quick peek inside the morgue, no slab but some body fridges left behind. Tres bien ensemble
  8. This one is from earlier on in the year during a trip to France/Luxembourg, one I thought worth posting up here! Chateau Lumiere needs no introduction, a magnificent building with such grandeur its hard to believe its been abandoned. The huge glass skylight allows daylight to illuminate all the floors, making for wonderful lighting. During the last few years Chateau Lumiere become a bit of a tourist destination, with vandals smashing the large mirror in the big foyer. Luckily its fared well over its many years of dereliction and is still one of the most beautiful buildings I have had the pleasure of exploring. History Built in early 1900s, this house was owned by a tobacco tycoon from Switzerland. After the owner moved away in 1950s, the house was used for business purposes, and was sold multiple times before finally being left empty. There isn't a confirmed date it was abandoned, but the general consensus seems to say its in the 1980s. The Explore After finally finding the location of it and seeing it was a reasonable distance from Luxembourg where were staying for 2 weeks, it became a must do. We found a charming cheap hotel in the next town over and booked a night there. Finally the day was upon us and were there, stood outside awestruck by the Neo-Baroque styling of Lumiere. We looked for a way inside and quickly found a well beaten track round the back. As we approached I could hear voices inside. We definitely weren't the only visitors that day, in fact there were loads of people wondering around inside! Most other people were explorers like us, however some weren't there to take photos as it turned out a bit later... We started with the basement and worked upwards. The basement actually had quite a bit of stuff still left there, unlike the rest of the floors that were bare to say the least. In fact the house was almost empty from the ground floor up. All the fittings and fixtures remained, but no personal items were left at all. We photographed it from nearly every angle we could think of. The best thing about Lumiere is just how photogenic it is. Its hard to take a bad picture. It was a fairly relaxed explore, until we witnessed a group of 12 year olds smashing the glass skylight and then coming downstairs smashing bricks onto the marble floor. The red-mist descended as I yelled down at them at them from one of the skylight balcony's while waving my arms around like a loony. I must have looked like a madman. They didn't understand my English, I certainly didn't understand their French. Luckily they didn't stick around much longer to do any more damage. With the drama over we got back to the explore, now alone in the house. We spent about 3 hours inside in total, but you could easily spent much longer there if you wanted to photograph everything. One thing that struck me was the quality of every little detail. Silly things like the latches on the windows still work flawlessly and feels better made and smoother than any modern window latch I've used before. Anyway, on with the photos. Photos Externals Internals In the porch there is this notice, translates roughly too: "Many of us have seen that you like this in all its splendor. Photographers, Models, Fans of Urbex, but some unscrupulous individuals do not respect...Alas! Yet you are known everywhere for your splendor, and the sublime cliches that you have brought us. Today April 19, 2015 we owe you this ... to give you a bit of sparkle ... after the vandalism that you have undergone. Thank you to those who will preserve you forever Respect this place as you would at home PLEASE! Do not break! Do not vandalize it.. Do not leave rubbish, paper etc.. Bring your waste back with you.." The entrance hall and foyer. Sadly this used to be where the the large mirror was, but was broken in 2015. A rather interesting choice of wallpaper... Recent damage to the glass skylight. Saw this in the loft and couldn't help but get a photo too The Details The Basement
  9. A piece of British WW2 History hidden under a hillside. HMS Forward, a maritime intelligence centre, was key to monitoring the English channel and and was heavily involved in D-Day. Although it's fallen into dereliction, attempts to restore and maintain it have been carried out by 'Friends of HMS Forward'. History HMS Forward was the Royal Naval HQ, setup up on the 20th of June 1940 in the Guinness Trust Holiday Home. It had responsibility for units along the south cost, including: HMS Marlborough - Eastbourne HMS Aggressive - Newhaven HMS New - Newaven HMS Vernon - Roedean HMS Lizard - Hove The tunnels of HMS Forward began life in March 1941 after an Admiralty direction that ordered channel ports to setup facilities to maintain naval plots and created the need to securely house equipment for plotting and communications. It was decided to built a network of tunnels into the a hillside of South Heighton for operations to take place from. HMS Forward was designed by Lt. Col. F.H.Foster, Commander of the Royal Engineers, and built by the 1st Tunneling Engineers Group and No 172 Tunneling Company. They were completed on the 14th of November 1941. At the time they were a state of the art facility and were kitted out for every eventuality. This including backup power generator and full air conditioning systems with gas filters. They had chemical toilets, sleeping cabins and a gallery. Although the toilet were for emergencies only and it was noted that he veterans who worked here didn't even have knowledge of these toilets. The labyrinth of tunnels had an East and West entrance. The West entrance by the main road was the main entrance. The East entrance was under the West wing of the Guinness Trust Holiday Home (now demolished). There were two Pill boxes at the top of the hill that were accessible from inside the tunnels, but were demolished long ago. During its operational period between November 1941 and August 1945, the tunnels of HMS Forward carried out many key maritime operations. It monitored the English channel from Dungeness to Selsy Bill using ten radar stations from Fairlight to Bogner Regis. It was heavily involved with D-Day as well as nightly raids on the occupied french coast. The Explore A very nice explore in a very nice set of tunnels. They are quite extensive and is quite the maze, however once you get your head round the layout its impossible to get lost. Its quite a shame that such an important piece of history has been left to rot. This is somewhere that really needs to be preserved for future generation. I'd heard that there was intention to turn it into a museum some time ago, but plans for this got scuppered by the local residents up top. It was clear that there was once some kind of open day as there were still laminated signs and notices left up by the 'Friends of HMS Forward'. Photos The West entrance with signs and notices from a previous open day / tour. Looks like it was a good few years ago though. You can see here what looks like a machine gun nest in the brick wall as you turn the very first corner. The large security gate of the West entrance. The long 100m West adit tunnel looking towards the east end. Looking from the East end of the West Adit. The two tunnels going left and right just before are the stairs up to the South and North Pill boxes. Looking up what remains of the stairs to the Northern Pillboxes. It is possible go up to the top of these, but its been sealed up at the top with rubble. The West Airlock. The Air conditioning plant room and standby generator room. The standby generator was a large diesel JP Lister engine. This provided 400V/230V power at 22Kw. Exhaust was piped through to the annex at the back of the engine room where it was exhausted through the ceiling too the surface through a 4" pipe. The start of the operational rooms of the tunnel. The room on the left side is the TURCO Office, and looking right down the long tunnel is down the length of the main tunnel with sleeping cabins. T.U.R.C.O stands for Turn Round Control Organisation, used to 'Assist naval shore authorities in the quick turn around of ships and craft'. The East gallery was used for sleep accommodation, switchboards and coders. The GPO Voice frequency equipment room. The pits in the floor are to fit the equipment in, as the modems were over 8ft tall. Looking down the East Galley and into the Teleprinters room. Looking down the the far end of the plotting rooms. The sleeping cabins. There were 4 of these for personnel on the night duty and split watches. Looking up towards the mock hen house, sealed at the top of course. The stairs up to the eastern entrance with pit at the bottom to slow down would-be invaders. The gate on the way to the East entrance. The remains of a second gate. Thanks for reading!
  10. USA The Ghost of St Nicholas

    must be your internet service they all show up here
  11. Nice one mate, you've really done a good job capturing this place, some epic shots there. Love the one looking down from the top especially
  12. No worries, that's fair enough
  13. UK Mountfield House Devon

    I apologize if I missed this somewhere but, is there an explanation as to why she left the property this way? Did she leave abruptly or just too much stuff?
  14. Oh my giddy aunt There's so much I love about what I see here!!!! The natural decay! The ceiling! The rippling floor! I think I need to lie down...
  15. History- The building is from the 'railway era'. The hotel was a hub of the community, it had a fantastic ballroom and restaurant. Many people came by rail to stay at Sutton Bridge. The hotel from around 2000 was used by an employment agency called StaffSmart to house workers they had lured over to the UK from South Africa to work in the local canning factory. People came from SA on the promise of hotel accommodation and didn't know until they got here that it meant inside the shell of the Bridge Hotel on damp mattresses lined up in each room, including the Ballroom. After StaffSmart vacated the hotel, it stood empty with broken windows until it was bought and restored to a high standard with plush furnishings and chandeliers. However, the hotel rooms were pricey and without the rail trade of people heading to the village, people would be passing through and tended to stay in cheaper accommodation in the area. The hotel wasn't open for long before closing down and ownership passed through several hands whilst falling further into disrepair. In 2015, workmen were spotted on the site removing roof tiles and floorboards to salvage as many building materials before it was demolished but its still standing now, so I don't know what stopped the demolition. Since then the building has unfortunately been vandalised and several fires have been set destroying about 70% of it. The Bridge Hotel in the 50's Explore- The hotel is close to me, so even though I knew the damage of the place it was still worth checking out. Access to the building was easy, a window round back was broken and a board to climb up to it was balanced kind of safely. The cellar floor, ground floor and a few rooms on the first floor were safe enough to walk around but past that there is a lot of fire damage. Pictures-
  16. As above - a warm welcome to OS! Once you got a lead it's worth persevering, as you've found here. I guess an estate agent might say would benefit from some modernisation....
  17. USA The Ghost of St Nicholas

    Thanks for adding this report @yonaguni It looks like a really interesting place. Can you check on the links of some of your images as they aren't showing up properly?
  18. UK Church of St George (visited 07/2017)

    Looks a nice find Andy
  19. UK RAF Folkingham Vehicle Graveyard - October 2017

    Great to see this again..me and Diehardlove visited 2009 and loved it.The owner told us he planned to sell much of his collection,but its clear he is still adding to it.Great shots too.
  20. This one required an early start, but the morning adventure to The Kings Hall was worth the effort. Visited with Zombizza. History "Located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was built in 1916 and was designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The King’s Hall building has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and it was soon screening religious films. By 1926, it was operating as a regular cinema, still managed by the Methodist church. The King’s Hall Cinema was closed in 1937. It then reverted back to a Methodist Church use as the King’s Hall Methodist Church. They vacated the building in January 2013" The Explore Started nice and early, and managed our entrance fairly incident free...if we don't count the massive tear in my trousers.. It's a pretty spectacular place with a wonderful blend of natural decay and marvelous original features/architecture. With little to no daylight, we decided to wonder round the back rooms while the sun came up before the spending too much time on the main attraction, the large auditorium. The rooms around the back are a weird mix of new and old, some of them being more disgusting than others. One room was so pungent that I took 2 steps in before bailing out. There was also one room that was filled with beds, old food packets and needles. Looked a few years old, but squatters for sure. The larger rooms consisted of meeting rooms, prayer rooms and teaching rooms. All of them had funky wavy flooring where the wooden floor tiles had expanded with moisture. Eventually the sun came up and the auditorium started to flood with the golden morning light. After a few hours we left, although the exit was hilariously unsubtle. Photos The Auditorium
  21. Sorry mate I missed this!!! It's the remains of a Land Rover Series II 109"
  22. Very overgrown here but I could go mad with a 50mm all day!
  23. Thanks guys. I liked it here. A lovely warmth throughout
  24. Just a little burnt out mate! I do look for comments, but as you say I don't always get them! I do read them mate. Just flat out continually.
  25. UK Church of St George (visited 07/2017)

    Pretty cool mate, lovely pictures.
  26. Germany Sanatorium E.T. (visited 09/2017)

    Looks a nice wander Andy
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