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  1. 15 points
    Thought i would jump on the tour bus with this one being as its quite close to me. Visited with Lolly92 Some History Saint Cadoc's Hospital is located in Caerloen on the northern outskirts of the city of Newport. The building was designed by Alfred J. Wood FRIBA, London and named after Saint Cadoc. Saint Cadoc's church is located in the town. The hospital, which opened in 1906 as the Newport Borough Asylum, was built to accommodate up to 350 patients. Extensive outbuildings were later added on the site, but since 2005 the number of residents has been very small with the growing emphasis on care in the community. St Cadoc's Hospital provides a number of mental health services, Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services, Adult Mental Health Services are provided by 11 Community Mental Health Teams and Elderly Mental Health Services provided by 5 multi-disciplinary Community Mental Health Teams Pics Thanks for looking
  2. 15 points
    Living just a few minutes drive away, @SpiderMonkey and I decided not to leave this one too long. The place is still pretty clean, just a few leaves around the place now. I'm not sure what the future will hold, maybe it will stay and get overgrown for a bit, who knows... Opening on the 27th May 1993, Pleasure Island was a theme park in Cleethorpes featuring 47 rides including roller coasters amongst the thrill rides and numerous smaller rides for younger visitors. Work began in the 1980s to build the site on the site of a former zoo by the owners of Pleasurewood Hills park near Lowestoft, and the new site in Cleethorpes was set to have the same name. The company went into receivership in the early 1990s and construction was halted. The site was then sold to Robert Gibb, the owner of Flamingo Land in North Yorkshire. Construction resumed and was completed in 1992, opening the following year. View over the park from the top of the roller coaster In 2010 Flamingo Land and Pleasure Island were separated into two independent companies, with Robert Gibb retaining Flamingo Land and his sisters Vicky Gibb and Melanie Wood (formerly Gibb) taking control of Pleasure Island. Unexpectedly, the park was temporarily closed in 2010 while negotiations took place, staff and visitors were turned away at the front gate. A petting zoo was added in 2013, along with a tractor ride replacing an old monorail. In 2016 it was announced the park would be closing at the end of the season, and only the McCormack’s bar would be reopening in 2017. On arriving at the park, visitors were greeted with an Old England themed entrance area with pay booths Making your way, you start to move through the different areas. First up was Morocco... Gravitron Ride The Galleon Pirate Ship Then on to the dodgems.... Tucked away in the corner of the park were the sea lions. The pool was still full of water and I'm not sure whether the inhabitants had been re-homed yet... Continuing around the park we find a few more rides... And a quick stop off at the Astra Slide gives a nice view over the areas we've just looked around Heading into White Knuckle Valley, first we find the Terror Rack... And then come across the main attraction, the Boomerang roller coaster The view from the top was pretty spectacular! Continuing on, we find the Pendulus ride Kids slider and Paratower And the Mini Mine Train Finally, we look at the Carousel ride, which is a really old traditional carousel. My favourite!
  3. 13 points
    New Scotland Yard New Scotland Yard was located on Broadway in Victoria and has been the Metropolitan Police's headquarters since 1967. By the 1960s the requirements of modern technology and further increases in the size of the force meant that it had outgrown its Victoria Embankment site. In 1967 New Scotland Yard moved to the site on Broadway, which was an existing office block acquired under a long-term lease. The Met's senior management team was based at New Scotland Yard, along with the Met's crime database. This uses a national computer system developed for major crime enquiries by all British forces, called Home Office Large Major Enquiry System, more commonly referred to by the acronym HOLMES, which recognises the great fictional detective Sherlock Holmes. The training programme is called 'Elementary', after Holmes's well-known, yet apocryphal, phrase "elementary, my dear Watson". A number of security measures were added to the exterior of New Scotland Yard during the 2000s, including concrete barriers in front of ground-level windows as a countermeasure against car bombing, a concrete wall around the entrance to the building, and a covered walkway from the street to the entrance into the building. Armed officers from the Diplomatic Protection Group patrolled the exterior of the building along with security staff. In May 2013 the Metropolitan Police confirmed that the New Scotland Yard building on Broadway would be sold and the force's headquarters would be moved back to the Curtis Green Building on the Victoria Embankment, and renamed Scotland Yard. Ahead of the move to the Embankment, the Metropolitan Police sold New Scotland Yard to Abu Dhabi Financial Group in December 2014 for £370 million. Staff left New Scotland Yard on 1 November 2016, when ownership of the building was passed to Abu Dhabi Financial Group who plan to redevelop the site into luxury apartments, offices and shops. The Metropolitan Police are due to move to the Embankment in early 2017. Since this appeared on here a couple of months ago I've visited a few times with @Maniac, @KM Punk, @starlight, @extreme_ironing, @Miss.Anthrope, @adders, @Porkerofthenight, @DirtyJigsaw, @TrollJay, @Merryprankster, monkey, suboffender, silentwalker, theriddler, dragonsoop, and many non members. Most of these photos were taken on my first visit when we did a sweep of every floor looking for anything of interest. Much had been stripped before the Met handed it over unfortunately but there was still enough to make it a decent explore. The view from the roof is pretty sensational on a clear evening, made even more special by the fact you are sitting on top of perhaps the most notorious police Headquarters in the world. A great place for a dragon soop and some classic 80s tunes. 1. Starting from the bottom and working our way up, the underground car park. Sadly no bunkers or anything quite so interesting under here. 2. Security control room for monitoring cctv and opening gates. 3. 4. 5. Press conference room 6. Briefing room 7. Locker room, now in use by construction workers. 8. A message from the last officer to leave 9. These marble lift lobbies were the only bit of grandeur really, the lifts were still fully functional which came in handy a couple of times. 10. 11. The remains of a once plush office 12. How most of the building looked....stripped and being prepared for a new lease of life 13. Pretty much every floor had large server rooms in the centre, this one in particular held restricted access servers. 14. Where firearms would have been distributed, there was a similar firearms storage room on the ground floor. 15. Label on the cupboard above 16. Sand boxes presumably for discharging rounds of ammo when handing in firearms 17. safe room 18. 19. Bridge connecting the two buildings together 20. Just off the bridge sat this lecture theatre, a week later it was completely ripped to pieces. 21. 22. Canteen 23. Cctv monitoring work station 24. 25. Plant room on the top floor 26. Engineer's control room 27. 28. And last but not least, the rooftop. 29. 30. 55 Broadway, TfL's art deco Headquarters until recently 31. Buckingham Palace 32. One of the best views in London really 33. 34. 35. Fish eye view from the top of the mast. Scotland Yard, it's been emotional.....
  4. 12 points
    This place was part of a giant complex where they used to build trains for the national railroad company. Most of the site was already demolished by the time we got here, but the lab itself was still worth the visit. It's been abandoned since 2010, which is sort of surprising, if you look at the amount of decay, but well, I'm not complaining about that at all... Actually took 2 visits to get in. First attempt was on a thursday afternoon. Entered the site, walked to the particular building and said to my girl: "what's that noise?!" Peeked inside the building and got instantly spotted by demolition workers... Took a run and returned a few days later in the weekend. More luck that time. Have to say, definitely worth it... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Thanks for looking!!
  5. 12 points
    First report from the latest trip abroad! This old mansion sits in a small village, the gates are wide open and the locals don't seem to even care about it. The highlight here was definitely the grand entrance hall, surrounded by pillars, red carpet, grand staircase, and a lumiere-esque balcony above it. There were also some pretty nice side rooms too. From what I can gather the last use this building had was as a hotel, judging by the slight modernization of some areas. A nice relaxed explore with @AndyK! and Kriegaffe9. Featuring: My tripod because I'm too lazy to shop it out. Cheers
  6. 12 points
    Great Tew Manor was originally built around 1730, with extensions added in 1834 and 1856. Shortly after the First World War the owner died and the house was left empty until the 1960s. A further period of neglect in the 80s left most of the house uninhabitable. One end of the house has now been renovated and is occupied but the majority of the building is still in poor condition, clad in scaffolding and plastic sheeting. Several sections of floor and ceiling have now collapsed, the 'ongoing restoration project' doesn't appear to have got very far sadly. Shame as it's a spectacular building. I'd never heard of this place before, it just popped up while I was doing some research. I soon discovered a flurry of reports from 2010 to 2013, but nothing ever since. A few comments on the old reports suggested the whole place had been fully refurbished but I couldn't find anything online to verify this so we decided to go take a look for ourselves. Glad we did as it's not changed much at all and it's an absolute belter. Shame we only had 45 mins of daylight left though as I easily could have spent hours in there. There were lots of things I didn't capture with my camera, old documents dating back over 100 years and tunnels running underneath the whole of the house. A good end to a quality weekend with my bitches @Miss.Anthrope and Cankles, perhaps we will return here some time for afternoon tea. 1. 2. 3. This was inside the dome shaped roof section, you can just make out the decorative patterns on the walls 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. Roof collapse in the attic 17. and on the floor below.... 18. However this was the best part, the Gothic revival library. An absolute stunner and somehow still in pristine condition. 19. 20. 21. Thanks for looking
  7. 12 points
    History This mortuary was nestled in the Northern Ireland countryside. It was small, quaint & perfect! A small chapel inside accompanied the mortuary. With no body fridges which was one of the first things I noticed I could only put that down to either it was a mortuary whereby bodies were not stored or given the history of Northern Ireland & tradition with death they were not needed as bodies are usually buried within 3 days. Possible that a body fridge could have been removed I guess but no signs that there was ever one there. The main thing I noticed which was pretty hard to miss was the perfectly kept porcelain table. Not only porcelain but a rotating one! I had the pleasure of visiting another in the north of the UK a couple of years ago & that in itself shows how hard to come by these are. Now anyone who knows me & my love for death/mortuaries/embalming etc will know this was like pure porn to me. When searching for new places, the unseen if you like.. to find a fresh one and one of this kind is infact a rareity. To be able to put together the history, including that of the slab is as interesting as visiting it The table was deep, very big lip on it. No drainage channels at all, just a nice recess around the perimeter which deepened leading to a drain at the far end. Then on the foot of the table was the word Twyfords, now I Still haven't got around to seeing 2 Twyfords porcelain tables at another uk mortuary and others which have long gone. Twyfords are known for their sanitary products, toilets, basins etc but they extended in to the mortuary field too. Cliff Vale potteries was built by TW Twyford in 1887. It was Cliff Vale where the slabs were fired in Stoke On trent. The word Twyfords would have been added with a 'flow blue' application..a deep cobalt blue inking. An underglaze pottery printed. The blue tends to flow in to the glaze giving off a blurred effect. This would have been done prior to firing the slab. The slab itself would have been fireclay, as would the belfast sink that you see in the same room. This firing recipe would have required particular firing conditions. Buff Coloured clay body with a bright white enamelled surface built to withstand strength and rough usage it was perfect for mortuary slabs. Lucky enough to find the porcelain slab and a Belfast sink with both wings intact was something of a find. The explore I explored with @hamtagger, we hadnt been out much lately due to family commitments and took the opportunity to put our research to good use while out there. Visiting family over there always gives us a good enough reason. I knew from looking at this place that it was what we thought, it was what was meant to be inside that was questionable. Having made a journey to Frenchay to discover that only the previous week the ceramic slab and all stainless ones had been removed I was holding not much hope. I tend not to get my hopes up nowadays, just take the rough with the smooth. But this... well.. we couldn't have hoped for more. It was somewhere I didn't want to leave, very atmospheric despite being quite sparse. Literally no vandalism or graffitti at all. Just how we like it. There were signs that someone had been in recently but they had respected it as we had. I would definitely go back here, even just to give the old girl a good old polish! On with the pics... 1 2 3 4 An old advert from Cliff Vale & Twyfords (I found this online) 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Thanks for looking
  8. 11 points
    History: Sunnyside Royal Hospital, originally called the Montrose Asylum, was a psychiatric hospital located north of Montrose in Scotland. Sunnyside was the second site for the local psychiatric hospital in Angus. The original Montrose Asylum, which was the first asylum in Scotland, was funded by public subscription established by local woman Susan Carnegie and opened in 1781. Expanding patient numbers led to the purchase of a new site in Hillside and the current hospital buildings opened in 1857. The site was further developed with the construction of a new facility for private patients called Carnegie House in 1899. Despite this addition, overcrowding was a problem, as the asylum’s patient numbers had grown to 670 by 1900. Two new buildings – Howden Villa (1901) and Northesk Villa (1904) – were added. Additional staff were recruited and the Westmount Cottages were built in 1905 to house them. In 1911 the lease of Sunnyside Farm expired and over 52 acres were purchased for £4500. A further development was the addition of Angus House, which was built in 1939 to accommodate elderly patients suffering from dementia. From the 1970s, advances in psychiatric care and greater community resources, including supported accommodation and the set up of three community mental health teams in the 1990s, led to reduced patient numbers and the closure of some of the buildings on the Sunnyside site. The whole site was officially closed in late 2011 and most patients were sent to a new £20 million build at Stracathro Hospital (also in Angus) - the Susan Carnegie Centre. Others were placed in the community. Sunnyside was open for 230 years before its closure, and was the oldest psychiatric hospital in Scotland. Visit: Covering the whole place Vastly in around 8 hours and probably missing some parts out was definitely worth the 12 hour-round trip. Hearing people mentioning silent alarms, secca & police in other reports had me a little skeptical about how short our explore would be, But with a week of planning and very early darting the explore was a success!! Another one ticked off my list! Visisted with a non member. also a thanks to @AndyK! for some info. top man. 1) The front of the hospital 2) Glass corridor 3) One of the main corridors in the main building 4) The main hall 5) Curtains left hanging in a ward 6) Corridors of the many isolation cell wards 7) 8) 9) 10) A different ward from the Infirmary 11) Violent patients would have their teeth removed to minimize "biting" 12) Body Fridge 13) Body fridge with a body lift 14) The chapel of rest 15) Main chapel with pews removed 16) Zodiac roof from the doctors Billiards room 17) More isolation cells in the basement 18) Marble floors are Popular in the outer buildings Thanks for looking GK WAX
  9. 11 points
    This building used to be a monastery but in the first World War it was turned into an emergency hospital for soldiers who fought in the trenches. Many Belgian soldiers were brought into care here, which explains why the ' don't spit on the floor" sign is both in French and English. We came here on a chilly winters day in December. I loved how the warm sunlight supported the nice colours in the building. It's also the first location in which i stripped down to take a selfie, to find out later on, loads of other explorers had been there on the same day. this could had turned out very awkward 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Thanks for watching.
  10. 11 points
    Such a beautiful abandoned villa in Italy. I couldn't believe my eyes when I entered this huge hallway with a stunning ceiling and painted walls. There is also a chapel, but we had to be very quiet, I didn't take a look, cause it was very noisy. Probably you have seen this one before, but I couldn't choose wich one to show you #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12
  11. 11 points
    Its been a long time since I posted a report, so here is my first of 2017. I hope you're all doing well. History (wiki) It was a residence of members of the princely dynasty of the Welsh kingdom of Powys and one of the taî'r uchelwyr (houses of the gentry) in late medieval Wales. It subsequently came into the possession of the Ormsby-Gore family (Lord Harlech). Its English correspondent is sometimes given as Porkington. A manuscript known to have been in the possession of Brogyntyn in 1574 was a copy of the Hanes Gruf(f)udd ab Cynan. The house itself is of brick dating from circa 1730 refaced and much added to between 1813–20 by the architect Benjamin Gummow.[3] It is noted for a portico of four giant unfluted Ionic columns with scrolls and pediment. Outside can be seen an arch with 2 pairs of unfluted Ionic columns. In the entrance hall survives an elaborately carved fireplace dated 1617. Brogyntyn Hall and its 1,445-acre estate, was sold by the 6th and present Baron Harlech in 2001 for less than £5m to a local developer, who divided up the estate, and investigated the potential for a retirement community development in and around the Hall.[4][5] However, the Hall and 234 acres went up for sale for £5m in December 2013.[6]
  12. 11 points
    Last month @SpiderMonkey and I were given the heads-up on this place and after a quick Google we decided to head down to Worcester at the next available opportunity. We noticed a few people had tried before, only to find active security scuppering their success, so we were slightly apprehensive about what we may have to deal with. It would seem we got lucky with timing and found it relatively relaxed. I had serious wind that day! History St Mary’s Convent School was originally Battenhall Mount, an impressive house built around 1865-9 for William Spriggs, a Quaker and Worcester Clothier, in the Italianate style popularised by Prince Albert. In the 1890s the house was enlarged in a matching style by the architect John Henry Williams of Worcester for the Hon. Alfred Percy Allsopp. Allsopp was a local brewer who owned the Star Hotel and was Mayor of Worcester in 1892, 1894 and 1905. The original house is now incorporated into the South West corner of the property. The building was used as a convalescent home during the First World War. It then became the home of the Sisters of St. Marie Madeleine Postel, a Roman Catholic Teaching Order, in 1933. St. Mary’s was a popular and well-regarded independent nursery and school until its closure in 2014. Italianate styled interior, matching the external appearance... Moving into the music room, which was just as impressive with its large fireplace And this drawing room! Entrance lobby and top of the tower Moving further, we find the later addition of buildings that forms the main concentration of classrooms Yes, we tried it out! Nursery St Mary's School also has a nursery in the same grounds, in a separate building set a little away from the main buildings.
  13. 11 points
    Colbert was an anti-air cruiser, later transformed into a missile cruiser, of the French Navy. She served in the Navy from 1956 to 1991, before being converted into a museum ship. She was abandoned off the coast of Brittany in 2007 and in 2016 she was taken away to be scrapped. Having missed this ship when it was moored in Brittany, I was pretty gutted to hear of it's removal for demolition. I didn't think much more about it until it popped up in conversation a few months later and I decided to hunt down it's new location. It turned out demolition was expected to take 18 months so we decided to take a punt seeing as it was only 6 months down the line at this point. All we knew was that it was meant to be moored near a certain bridge. On the first night our taxi driver took us to the wrong bridge so there was no sign of the boat. I asked some locals and they told me it was long gone, absolutely gutted. We soon realised we'd been to the wrong bridge so decided to have another look the following day. At this point we weren't feeling hopeful but as soon as we reached the bridge we spotted her in the distance. Bingo! Unfortunately the missiles were gone and much of the ship had been cleared out but it was still a proper adventure and good to finally get on board the dirty bitch! Bigups to @Maniac @Merryprankster Law & Ben. 1. 2. 3. Ventilation system for the removal of asbestos, this was what stopped us from being able to access much of the ship. 4. Officer's bedroom 5. Bunk bed 6. 7. Laundry 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. Gyroscope 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. & 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. The Bridge 32. 33. 34. Bon appétit
  14. 10 points
    Explore; A very fun weekend in London including rooftops, underground things and opening live doors that seem derps, topped off with a tour of this place. Unfortunatley, they weren't allowing access to other parts of the premises however, the main part was cool. Visited with @SpiderMonkey @AndyK! and @PROJ3CTM4YH3M. Cheers for looking!
  15. 10 points
    So I've been to this location, which was a dancing/disco/club whatever you prefer. But not your usual one, this one exist out of tents! Seen it passing by a few times.. Started searching for it and found it. Now we only had to pick a date and go out on explore! Last weekend was the time! We already left on Friday, and wanted to do this location Friday also. But thanks to our amazing road network in Belgium and their works, we'd end up there after sunset. So we ended up here Sunday , on our way back home! Heard it was actually an easy entrance somewhere upfront the fences where laying down.. They said.. Well looks like they've put them back up! Some of these beta fences you find on every location, decorated with lovely (fresh?) razor-wire! Looked a bit around and seemed like they made work of it closing all the openings. So went around the other side only to find this small piece not having any razor-wire, perfect! Once on terrain it already looked pretty trashed outside, and of course as was inside. Seemed like people needed some club lights for their homes, and alot of other stuff that went missing.. Sadly there was a fire not so long ago, and i believe wind have destroyed on of the main tents ( or could be partial due to fire ). This club was actually already existing for a long time, i believe nearly 20 years. It had to shut down it's door, as less people started to visit the place. It got blown in a second life, but that didn't last long. Naamloos_HDR22 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR18 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR8 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR4 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR6 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR11 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR10 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR2 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR14 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR13 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR12 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr _DSC9607 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr _DSC9613 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr _DSC9599 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR15 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR16 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR16 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Hope it's a bit readable !
  16. 10 points
    History T.G.Green & Co Ltd originally operated from the village of Church Gresley, South Derbyshire between 1864 and 2007. More famous for their blue and white striped 'Cornish Kitchen Ware' produced from the early 1920's (then known as 'E-Blue') the pottery produced many hundreds of patterns from Yellow wares, Victorian transfer prints, colourful hand painted Art Nouveau & vibrant enamelled Art Deco patterns, Wartime utility pottery, avant garde Retro designs and many well known Brewery wares, employing up to 1,000 local staff at the height of production. Now, sadly, the old pottery site lays in ruins, the land under private ownership, never likely to ever see production again, the last of the South Derbyshire potteries has gone, although as it nears its 100th anniversary the traditional Cornishware is still manufactured and sold through a new T.G.Green & Co Ltd. Explore This is somewhere I have wanted to visit for some time so pretty pleased we eventually got around to doing it. Visited with @hamtagger. We got here and spent a little while just venturing round the site, there was a bit of activity from the far side but from what I could see there are various parts of the site being used. Not a hugely massive site but we spent quite a number of hours here. I really loved this place. Although a bit late on getting here and missing out on a few bits I have seen in various other reports there was still enough here to see and the decay is so much more established which made everything much more photogenic. Well worth a trip if you havent already. It was quite nice to see some finished products So, on with the pics. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 One of the companies they supplied to 15 16 17 18 19 Thanks for looking!
  17. 10 points
    This was a fun explore. Presumably there must have been a threat from animal rights protestors when it was active here so the site is well secured. High fences equipped with beam sensors and shake sensors stretch the entire perimeter, with remote controlled infra red cameras pointed at all the weak points. The site is also partly still active as the relocation process hasn't quite reached completion yet. The main building (The Francis Crick Institute) was our main target although we passed many outbuildings along the way; houses, stables, a sub-station and many more. It took us a while to figure out a way into the main building but once inside it was a pretty chilled affair. Unfortunately the labs had already been cleared out so there were no pickled animals in jars lying around, which was a shame, coz you know, that's the kinda grim stuff we were hoping for! However, all was not lost as the building itself had some nice art deco features which sort of made up for it. Visited with @extreme_ironing, and again with @AndyK! and @Miss.Anthrope. History The National Institute for Medical Research (commonly abbreviated to NIMR), is a medical research institute based in Mill Hill, on the outskirts of London, England. It is principally funded by the Medical Research Council(MRC), and is its largest establishment and one of only three designated as an 'Institute'. The Medical Research Council, founded in 1913, was immediately charged with establishing a central research institute in London. Later that year, premises at Hampstead were acquired and the National Institute for Medical Research was founded. In the 1930s, the decision was made to move the Institute to new premises. An imposing copper-roofed building at Mill Hill was designed by Maxwell Ayrton, the architect of the original Wembley Stadium, and construction began in 1937. Occupation was delayed when war broke out in 1939 and the building was given to the Women's Royal Naval Service. The building was returned to the MRC in autumn 1949 and the official opening ceremony took place on 5 May 1950, with King George VI and Queen Elizabeth present. In 1962, Nobel Prize winner Sir Peter Medawar became director and, consistent with his research interests, established NIMR as a major centre for immunological research. Following an illness, Medawar retired as director in 1971 to be replaced by Sir Arnold Burgen. Burgan had an interest in nuclear magnetic resonance techniques and formed the MRC Biomedical NMR Centre at the Institute in 1980. Sir Dai Rees became director in 1982 to be replaced by Sir John Skehel in 1987. Since then NIMR has continued to excel scientifically, reporting perhaps most famously the discovery of the sex determining gene SRY, in 1991. In 2003, as part of their Forward Investment Strategy, the MRC announced plans to consider moving NIMR from its current location to a university/medical school site, to enhance its ability "to translate its biomedical research into practical health outcomes." University College London was selected as a preferred partner institution, and in 2016 the NIMR began its migration to the new Francis Crick Institute, constructed next to St Pancras railway station in central London. The rooms and other locations in the building were used in the film Batman Begins, for the Arkham Asylum scenes. 1. The Francis Crick Institute, Mill Hill Laboratory. 2. Nice art deco entrance hall 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Map of the building layout 10. Some funny scribblings on the wall 11. A few photos from the various laboratories which made up about 90% of the building. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. & 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. A nice safe vault in the basement 22. 23. The Directors 24. 25. Looking down from the roof. The building with a green roof was a nice looking hall but unfortunately locked. 26. 27. Games Room (locked) 28. Refectory 29. 30. 31. Christmas decorations still hang from the ceiling 32. Art deco library, a nice surprise located on the 5th and 6th floors. 33. 34. 35. That's all folks, thanks for looking
  18. 10 points
    Worthen Farmhouse The Explore This was from last April. I can't remember a huge amount about this location as myself and @Urbexbandoned had spent the weekend further south in Wales and we were working our way back up to this area before heading back home. There was a farmer bumming about in a tractor right across the road spreading his animal shite around the place, but from memory it was a nice easy and relaxed mooch. Out in the back garden area there was various abandoned cars and and a couple of old tractors, which were nice to look at, especially the old 3.3 litre Vauxhall Cresta. The History History on this place is pretty vague unfortunately and all that i could find through extensive research (copied from Tracey's report @Urbexbandoned) is that "the former resident passed away some time ago and apparently her son couldn't bring himself to sell the house or sort it out so it has been left to decay naturally." The Pictures 1. 2. 3. 4/5. 6. 7. Bedpans are useful eh? 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. The Vauxhall Cresta 3.3 Litre Straight Six (Thanks to Hamtagger Senior for the vehicle ID ) 20. That's it, thanks for taking the time to have a look and feedback always appreciated
  19. 10 points
    These two old power stations sit on the edge of a live steelworks site. There is some really impressive old industry to see here, including a massive old gas engine hall which still contains one huge engine, which was actually the biggest of its kind in the world. All that's left of the other smaller power station are the boilers and a couple of small control rooms, no turbines But it's still impressive to see some dated industry. Visited with @AndyK! and Kriegaffe9. The first building we entered was the smaller station: After a while walking around on giant suspended pipes and through asbestos we find this compressor room: Gas engine hall: One of two more modern turbines inside the hall: Cheers
  20. 10 points
    History RAF Spadeadam is an active Royal Air Force station in Cumbria, close to the border of Northumbria. Covering 9,000 acres, it is the largest RAF base in the United Kingdom. It is currently used as an Electronic Warfare Tactics Range, to train the Royal Air Force and NATO allies. It is also the only mainland UK location where aircrews can drop practice bombs. Spadeadam has always been a remote and uninhabited part of England, until 1955 when the Intermediate Ballistic Missile Test Centre was constructed for the Blue Streak missile project – a project that was launched to develop a nuclear deterrent missile. The RAF took over the base in 1976 and under their control it became the Electronic Warfare Tactics Range in 1977. The range itself contains ground-based electronic equipment, including some that was manufactured in the Soviet Union, that create simulated threats to train aircrews. Across the site there are different real and dummy targets which include an airfield, a village, portable buildings, tanks, aircraft, anti-aircraft guns and vehicle convoys. The site was originally used in secret as part of Britain’s Cold War nuclear weapons programme. This information was only made public in 2004 when tree-felling work uncovered the remains of abandoned excavations for a missile silo. Since then, the RAF and English Heritage have attempted to survey the site and record what was so secret about the place, because there are no official records or plans for the base still in existence from the Cold War period. What is known, however, is that Spadeadam was chosen as a launch site because of its isolation, access to road connections and the surrounding environment which supported it with plenty of water. It is thought that Spadeadam was meant to be one of sixty launch sites across the UK, but most of these were never built. This report is based on the practice airfield area of RAF Spadeadam. It is hidden away in a small forest and completely surrounded by a peat bog. The airfield itself comprises a triangular shaped runway which features a number of aircraft (mostly MIG fighter jets), military vehicles and anti-aircraft guns. Our Version of Events It was a decent sunnyafternoon and we were a little tired of being indoors, so we decided to follow up a lead we had on an abandoned airfield somewhere in Northumbria. The journey was great, all the way up to the borders of Northumbria at least. But, from that point on the heavens opened and what had previously been a glorious day was now a very shit one. Nevertheless, rather than turn back we figured we’d just get wet and have a look for abandoned aeroplanes anyway. We arrived, in the middle of absolutely fucking nowhere and were getting slightly concerned about how long it had taken us to get there. It took a moment to get our bearings, since there is no signal out in the sticks, but we had a vague idea which way we had to walk. So, ready to rock and roll we ditched the car at the side of the road and headed off into the vast bog in front of us. Fortunately, at this point the rain had stopped, but unfortunately we instantly got soaked as we plodded across land that deceived us into thinking it was solid. This epic struggle continued the entire way. If anyone has ever seen the Vicar of Dibley sketch, where she jumps into the puddle and completely disappears, this was exactly like that. After much scrambling around in the bog, and wandering through dense patches of forest, we were well and truly lost. No signal, no map, no food, but plenty of water… It was bad craic. For some reason, though, we decided to have one last wander through some pine trees. We were feeling pretty deflated at this point, so I’m not sure what was driving us on, but in the end we were glad we did carry on. After another ten minutes of aimless wandering, we caught a glimpse of something that looked conspicuously like the tail of a fighter jet. I’ve never heard of mirages in a peat bog before, so I instantly decided that what we were seeing must have been real. Instantly forgetting about how miserable we’d been feeling, we waded on, working our way towards a great big silver MIG that was glistening in the fading sunlight. Once we reached the runway, we were surprised to discover that it wasn’t tarmac. It was some shitty gravel substance that was just as waterlogged as the damn bog. But, right in front of us were two shiny MIG fighter jets, and they looked fucking awesome after all the walking. So, conscious that daylight was rapidly turning into night, we whipped out the old cameras and began our invasion of the airfield. We began with the first two jets and then made our way towards what appeared to be an abandoned fuel truck further in the distance. It took a few minutes to get there, but it was well worth it since we could suddenly see six or seven more aircraft and several guns a little further ahead. Our assault had been successful, and we soon found ourselves surrounded by more guns and bombs than even Rambo could handle. We also found a few unused smoke grenades which is something we’ve never encountered on an explore before. We hung around the airfield until darkness was nearly upon us, then decided to call it a day because we suddenly remembered we had to walk back through a forest and a bog to get back to the car. So, still having been undetected by the RAF, we made our way back to the treeline. A little more worried about stepping on a mine now after discovering the grenades, or some sort of unexploded bomb, we headed off back into the bog. The same shit journey we’d endured an hour or so previously began all over again. Splish, splash, splosh… Those three sounds were back again, and they all sounded just as shit as before. Explored with Rizla Rider. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22:
  21. 9 points
    Here's a little selection of some of the more random, less-obvious shots from 10 years of exploring asylums. One shot each from most of the ones I've visited. Thought I'd try and avoid the obvious shots a little. Aston Hall (Nottinghamshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Ward block Bangour Village (West Lothian District Asylum, opened in 1906) Main administration block Barrow (2nd Bristol Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1938) Main corridor Bethel (Charitable public asylum, opened in 1713) Day room Bethlem Royal (4th incarnation of "Bedlam" (founded in 1247), initially for private middle-class patients, opened in 1930) Admin block staircase Cane Hill (3rd Surrey County Asylum, opened in 1883) Chapel altar Carlton Hayes (Leicestershire & Rutland County Asylum, opened in 1904) Chapel Cefn Coed (Swansea Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1932) South-eastern view of ward block and water tower Colney Hatch (aka Friern, 2nd Middlesex County Asylum, later 2nd London County Asylum, opened in 1851) Admin block tower Denbigh (aka North Wales Asylum, opened in 1848) View from ward block window towards admin block clock tower Fairfield (Three Counties Asylum (for Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire & Huntingdonshire), opened in 1860) South east view of main block Fair Mile (Berkshire County Asylum, opened in 1870) South-east view of main block Fulbourn (Cambridgeshire & Ely County Asylum, opened in 1858) Main elevation (admin block in centre) Gartloch (Glasgow District Asylum, opened in 1896) View from dormitory window Glenside (Bristol Borough Asylum, opened in 1861) Chapel window Goodmayes (West Ham Borough Asylum, opened in 1901) Gallery with cell doors Hanwell (Middlesex County Asylum, later first London County Asylum, opened in 1831) Main corridor in female wing Harperbury (Middlesex Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1934) Dormitory Hartwood (Lanarkshire District Asylum, opened in 1895) Jump-proof fire escape Heckingham (former Norwich Union Workhouse, converted into 2nd Norfolk County Mental Hospital, opened in 1927) Main elevation Hellingly (East Sussex County Asylum, opened in 1903) Corridor network (with random portable bathtub) Hensol (Glamorganshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Interview room High Royds (3rd West Riding County Asylum, opened in 1888) Glazed-tile doorway Horton (8th London County Asylum, opened in 1902) Administration block The Lawn (Charitable Public Asylum, opened in 1820) View from eastern wing Lennox Castle (Dunbartonshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1937) Admin block coaching entrance Leybourne Grange (Kent Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1936) OT room Little Plumstead (Norfolk Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Discarded training material Mapperley (Nottingham Borough Asylum, opened in 1880) Southern aspect Middlewood (2nd West Riding County Asylum, opened in 1872) Chapel Napsbury (Middlesex County Asylum, opened in 1905) Recreation hall (left) and ward block (right), with water tower in background Pen-Y-Fal (Monmouthshire County Asylum, opened in 1851) Ward blocks Pool Parc (Overspill annexe to North Wales Mental Hospital, opened in 1937) Main corridor Rauceby (Kesteven County Asylum, opened in 1902) Administration block Rosslynlee (East Lothian & Peebles District Asylum, opened in 1874) Recreation hall Runwell (East Ham & Southend-on-Sea Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1937) Chapel Severalls (2nd Essex County Asylum, opened in 1913) Gallery with cell doors St Andrew's (Norfolk County Asylum, opened in 1814) Mortuary St Brigid's (Connaught District Asylum, opened in 1833) Ward corridor St Cadoc's (Newport Borough Asylum, opened in 1906) Window in day-room. St Clement's (Ipswich Borough Asylum, opened in 1870) "Quiet room" in medium-secure annexe St Crispin (Northamptonshire County Asylum, opened in 1876) Staircase in Superintendent's residence St David's (Joint Counties Asylum for Carmarthenshire, Pembrokeshire & Cardiganshire, opened 1865) Observation room in annexe St George's (Northumberland County Asylum, opened in 1859) Corridor network St John's (Lincolnshire County Asylum, opened in 1852) Admin block main reception St Mary's (Gateshead Borough Asylum, opened in 1914) Corridor network Stone House (The City Of London Asylum, opened in 1866) Dining hall Strathmartin (aka Balvodan) (Charitable Public Idiot Asylum, opened in 1855) Eastern side of main building Sunnyside Royal (Montrose District Asylum, opened in 1858) Congregation area outside recreation hall Talgarth (Joint Breconshire and Radnorshire County Asylum, aka Mid-Wales Asylum, opened in 1903) View from ward window The Towers (Leicester Borough Asylum, opened in 1869) Main corridor in ward section of eastern block West Park (11th London County Asylum, opened in 1915 as Canadian War Hospital, reopened in 1923 as mental hospital) Geriatric ward day room Whittingham (4th Lancashire County Asylum, opened in 1873) Entrance into ward block from corridor network
  22. 9 points
    Having seen some older reports on this place and being a sucker for old theatres, it’s one that has always been on my list. Taking the long drive back from work (Bangor to Stockport) I get an email with info that this place is open and doable. I decided to pick @eastyham up and take the 1.5hr trip over to Donny. Ideally I’d of gone during daylight but I didn’t want to miss out on it. So complete darkness it is. Had a bit of bother of some goons who work in the shopping centre but still managed to sneak in another way. Really enjoyed it in here. The floors are mega dodgy towards the front of the building but it is rather lovely along that side where the old dressing rooms are. I particularly loved the fly loft level with the old painted signs and poster remains. History The Doncaster Grand was constructed in 1899 and originally stood on a prominent site in a shopping street facing the main railway station. However, town centre improvements robbed it of any sensible context and it is no longer in a street, but attached rather indirectly to the Frenchgate shopping centre. It still faces the station, however is separated from it by a busy inner ring road which comes so close that it has actually snipped off a lower corner of the stage house. It was threatened with demolition until an energetic local campaign and Friends group secured statutory designation in 1994. The frontage, which, with an improved setting, could again become a local landmark, is three-storeyed. Baroque in treatment, with a complex rhythm of bays articulated by coupled and single pilasters and groupings of arched windows and doorways all rendered. There is a large broken segmental pediment over the three central bays with date 1899. It retains an intimate auditorium. Two well curved balconies with good plasterwork on fronts, the upper gallery is benched. Single pedimented and delicately decorated plasterwork boxes in otherwise plain side walls, flanking a decorative plasterwork rectangular-framed 7.9m (26ft) proscenium. More decorative drops to the ante-proscenium walls, bolection mouldings and plasterwork panels to the stalls and ceiling. Deep central oval ceiling dome. The Grand could quite readily be restored and reopened. It could offer amateur and community drama and musical productions, small scale touring and other activities to complement Doncaster's new venue, Cast. Pics It’s so weird seeing a building as grand as this just surrounded by utter tripe. The old dressing rooms. There was some pipework from the old gas lamps remaining in here. And then the newer porcelain roses with brass? Conduit. This whole side of the building was rotten. It looks like the flat roof bit behind the grand façade is holding water and pissing in when its bad. one of too proper cool dated bar areas. My idea of heaven. A theatre brewdog. For the la la la la LADZ Not sure if this was a ticket or a newspaper clipping? This tiling reminds of any sort of leisure site back when I was a kid. The other bar on the top level. This was suoer cool for me. Not looking good for itself here. Some great art deco styling on the seats. Im guessing this upstairs part was shut off for years whilst it was a bingo hall. LBL? and some old pictures I found on google from when it was a bingo hall.
  23. 9 points
  24. 9 points
    Solo jaunt, part 2/3 of my (temporary) swansong. Well, this was epic. The best asylum I've had the pleasure of exploring, and possibly the best asylum of the "post-classic" era when most closed. And definitely one of the most memorable explores I have ever done. If it was any one site that inspired me to finally visit the Emerald Isle, it was this. As always, I turned up at the site completely unprepared and without any idea of what to expect. As I walked round the building, I see the grounds are well maintained, and someone is there walking their dog. Is it security? What are those cars doing at the top of the site? I didn't have a clue. I wasn't feeling that nervous, so I spotted my (possible) way in and ran straight for it. Hidden from the view of the street, I searched for a way in, which didn't take long; though far from trashed, I can see where others managed to gain access and followed their path. I was inside, and was overcome with a really strange feeling; nervous, but like I was in another world (stay with me, I'm not talking about ghosts). I'm inside the building, and with the exception of the water dripping down there's a dead silence. The windows facing the outside are boarded, forcing me to use torchlight. All the rooms are empty and have been tagged with crap like "redrum" and the usual "haunted house" jibber jabber. One of the patient rooms on the ward. Small, secluded rooms were a contrast to the likes of the dorms found in places like Our Lady's in Ennis. As I make my way to the other wards of the vast complex, I randomly flick a light switch and boom! The room flickers back to life; the power is still on! Not only that, in so many rooms so much has been left behind. Unlike the likes of Fairmile and its empty, non-descript wards, this felt so much more real. So much more personal, even if it's just furniture. With no security to contend with, and hearing so little outside beyond cars going past, I was in a different world. I had stepped through the looking glass, and was lost within the walls of the institution, lost in my own thoughts. I'm alone, disconnected from the outside world. I feel no fear, but a feeling of peace and serenity as I wander the almost endless corridors. Apart from the crumbling walls and ceilings, it feels like this place is trapped in a time warp from when it closed in 2009. It is for this reason this has been one of the most memorable moments in my life exploring. Look into the mirror as two storks look down on you... it feels like a Hitchcock film. As I continue to wander the corridors, further away from where I was, there was less evidence of anyone coming here. No graffiti, no smashed glass, no footprints; things felt like they had been left as they were since closure. The ward below was only accessible from a single, long corridor. No idea what kind of patients were kept here, but there was once an identical ward at the other end; this had since been demolished, though when I don't know. There was no main hall designed into the asylum, so I went for a look through the industrial side of the hospital. This place kept on giving and giving. As the last port of call, I checked out the ground floor of the administration. The power was still on, and the check-in machine on the desk was still powered up and showing the correct date and time! I didn't turn on the telly to check if the CCTV was still live though, ha! Behind this room, there were tons of books piled up on the desks; inside were reports going back years regarding patient finances, admissions and discharges, in addition to letters written to and from patients (though not medical records). For privacy reasons no pictures were taken. I made my way back to my entry point, and made a swift exit. I was absolutely overjoyed to have seen what I saw, until I realized I made a ridiculous blunder... I forgot the bloody clocktower! D'arrrrrghhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh! But instead of going back inside, I followed the dog walkers and locals and decided to have a sniff round the outbuildings. The signs said there was a mortuary nearby, but before I did that I had a look at the chapels. I can't work out why, but on this site were an original chapel AND a newer built one a little bit further up. Both, however were locked. The mortuary/chapel of rest was different... This had been completely boarded up, but here the door in the hoarding was unlocked. The best way to describe this mortuary, which was a modern build and not the original would be like an an "airing shelter", free to walk into but with rooms inside. I sneak inside, and there's a gurney in the corner. The door into the chapel of rest (which was still rammed with stuff) and two other doors (probably the toilets, unlikely to be fridges) were locked. I find one of the glazed windows unlocked, so I open it only to find it covered inside with protective mesh! Double d'arrrrrrrrghhhhhhhhhhhhh! Across the way was possibly occupational therapy and the farm buildings, accessible but full from floor to ceiling with beds and paraphenalia from the hospital when it was closed, making it impossible to take photos or navigate. The additional ward at the head of the site was completely sealed, and next door to the last live building on site so no access there. Inevitably any comparison to those two iconic Surrey asylums is anathema, but if you never saw either of these then a trip to St Brigid's should be at the top of your list. This is one of the best asylums I have ever seen, so get out there and have a look whilst you still can. You will NOT be disappointed! Lots of love, TBM x
  25. 9 points
    After a work conference, I decided a trip to the rather nice Belfast Mortuary was in order to help cure the immense hangover I had from drinking many pints and many whiskies the night before. Closed for a while, and slowly disintegrating from the local delinquents attention. Clear and Concise DSC06568 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Fridges DSC06599 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Fridge Close Up DSC06602 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Main Entrance DSC06606 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Scales DSC06566 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Stainless Slab DSC06584 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Another View DSC06586 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr# The other slab DSC06572 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Drain DSC06578 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr
  26. 9 points
    1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: A legal visit during a photo base on 21-10-2017. Felt like a last chance because renovation is being prepared. We could notice the painting done during the filming of 'a cure for wellness' very well since we did the bathhouse an men's complex illegal in 2016. Still an impressive location of course and the photo's won't be much of a surprise i guess. I already had a fascination for abandoned buildings, but my first visit at Beelitz Heilstatten in 2014 really kicked of my passion for photography of the abandoned world. Hope you enjoyed viewing this thread! grts, Peter
  27. 9 points
    Last time I was here i never got to climb up the tower, due to some mindless kids smashing things up and the the old Bill turning up. I no theres not much to see in the tower but it was something i wanted to do, just to have a look for myself really and so glad i did as you get some lovely views of just what is left on site. I visited with a non member, who kindly took the last photo St Crispins was a large psychiatric hospital on the outskirts Northampton and established in 1876 as the Berrywood Asylum and closed in 1995. thanks for looking
  28. 9 points
    At first glance, the huge psychiatry campus with its historical buildings reminds you of certain pieces of literature or films. The early morning haze lies over the hospital grounds and really adds to that somewhat uncanny atmosphere. It´s still pretty early in the morning. Thus, we almost don´t meet any people. A situation, that changed completely on our way back, when we had to keep as insconspicious as possible among patients, nursing stuff and "normal" visitors. Yet, everything´s still pretty calm and we can enjoy the morning silence as we walk across the park-like grounds of the hospital, walking on paths which are bordered by beautiful flowers. Here and there, beautiful buildings appear. Everything occurs to be peaceful and neat. Almost a place for your well-being, at least form the perspective of a non-patient. Not before we pass by a building, fenced up by thick bars, reality sets in. As if by command, we can suddenly hear screams coming out of the building. The hospital is largely still active. Only a small part has been disused out of unknown reasons. It seems like time´s been standing still here for a pretty long time. Old benches would´ve been disappeared in a jungle-like thicket entirely, if it wasn´t for their bright red colours. Across an architectural more than beautiful patio we enter the building in front of us. Inside, particularly striking are the numerous toys scattred around the building. What exact purpose the old building served remains a mystery.
  29. 9 points
    This chateau is located within about 50 metres of a huge abandoned sanatorium so presumably it was connected in some way, perhaps used for training or for senior management accommodation? I don't know, but it's still in pretty good condition for the most part and has some nice features despite being practically empty. An unopened pack of orange juice cartons suggests it has been abandoned since 2005. I'll post a report up from the sanatorium separately when I get time. 1. 2. 3. Scale model of the sanatorium 4. 5. 6. 7. & 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. & 13. 14. 15. 16. & 17. 18. 19. 20. We nearly missed this little chapel, still in amazing condition 21. 22. 23. Au revoir
  30. 9 points
    Visited this old house a few months back.from the outside it just looks like a very small run down derelict cottage.but once inside its like a little time warp.nothing had been touched for a very long time.the pictures still hung on the wall.cobwebs everywhere.the place was a nightmare to shoot and very dark and dingy in most rooms
  31. 9 points
    History (taken from The_Raw) Great Tew Manor was originally built around 1730, with extensions added in 1834 and 1856. Shortly after the First World War the owner died and the house was left empty until the 1960s. A further period of neglect in the 80s left most of the house uninhabitable. Visited after a meal in a nice pub with @The_Raw and @Maniac. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
  32. 9 points
    Doughty House is a large 18th century Georgian house overlooking the Thames. It was built around 1770 with later additions. The house was named after Elizabeth Doughty, who lived there from about 1786. In 1849 it was acquired by Francis Cook, a famous merchant and art collector who went on to become one of the richest men in Britain. It remained in the Cook family for almost a century until just after the Second World War. In 1885 Francis had a 125-foot-long neo-classical gallery built to house his extensive art collection. Much of the art collection was taken elsewhere after the house was damaged by a bomb in 1944, subsequently the Cook family left the property behind. The house was put on the market in 2012 with a guide price of £15 million. Both the house and gallery are Grade II listed buildings. Planning Permission and Listed Building Consent were granted to retain the main property as a single dwelling and to convert the gallery into ancillary accommodation, along with re-instating Doughty Cottage as the link between the house and gallery. Works have now started on site. While in the area with @Miss.Anthrope we took a look to see if this place had changed much since @AndyK! posted it last year. It turned out to be pretty much the same although a little bit worse off. A few bits of graffiti have appeared and sadly the ceiling of the gallery has begun to collapse in places. Still an amazing place however and hopefully renovation work will be completed before it the damage is beyond repair. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. Stay classy
  33. 9 points
    I think we all know that: places that we have visited, which no longer exist as a "abandoned place" today. Demolished, destroyed or renovated. They live on only in our memory and on our photos. I have collected here a selection of such places. Maison Heinen (LUX, visited 08/2010) - renovated and re-inhabited - 1 2 3 4 5 Maison Thiry (LUX, visited 08/2010) - demolished - 6 7 8 9 Maison Traufler (LUX, visited 08/2010) - partly demolished, partly renovated and re-inhabited - 10 11 12 13 14 Maison Zahles II aka Maison des Gouttes (LUX, visited 08/2010) - demolished - 15 16 17 18 Villa Lambin aka Maison Rose (BE, visited 03/2014) - demolished - 19 20 21 Tree Mansion aka Maison de Paille (BE, visited 05/2012) - demolished - 22 23 24 Villa Albert (BE, visited 05/2013 - demolished - 25 26 27 28 Villa Hektor aka Maison Champagne (BE, visited 05/2012) - demolished - 29 30 31 32 Maison Denis aka Maison dans la soirée (BE, visited 05/2012) - renovated and re-inhabited - 33 34 35 Chateau PR aka Chateau Clochard (FR, visited 07/2012) - burnt down - 36 37 38 39 40 41 Villa DAS aka Villa Wallfahrt aka Maison de la Croix (BE, visited 08/2011 - renovated and converted into a retirement home - 42 43 44 45
  34. 9 points
    The old Soviet military camp is one of my favourite ones in Germany. It was built during the Nazi era and later used by the Red Army. After the fall of the Iron Curtain and the withdrawal of the Soviet troops from the former German Democratic Republic (GDR), the area has been abandoned. I´ve visited this place three times so far, because I´ve been so deeply fascinated by still finding so many authentical remnants of the past, and I´m sure there´s still more to explore.
  35. 9 points
    History The Rest has an eventful history: it was conceived as the project of Victorian doctor James Lewis and his wife Charlotte, who were determined to provide a convalescent home for working men, women and children from the local area. Florence Nightingale lent her support to the scheme in 1869, after which Dr Lewis acquired the site. In 1877 The Rest admitted its first patients: the 7 survivors of the Ty Newydd Colliery disaster, who had been trapped underground for 10 days. The Rest was also used as an Auxiliary War Hospital from 1915, providing a safe haven and care for more than 2,500 wounded British, Australian, New Zealand and Canadian soldiers during World War I and again during World War II, before being returned to civilian use in 1946. A local one for me and a real shame that many of the original features of this building have long disappeared. Now there are plans to turn the building into 59 luxury sea view apartments which will save the building as its in a sorry state at the moment. Pics Thanks
  36. 9 points
    So, I was in Bristol for a mate's birthday and we ended up in the most random of places, a sausage fest. They love a good sausage fest these Bristolians, @WhoDaresWins and @END-PROC jumped in the car as soon as they heard a mention of it. Anyway, a couple of beers later they kindly showed me around this grand bank in the city centre so much thanks to those guys. Renovation was well under way at this point but it didn't make the banking hall and vaults any less impressive. The former Lloyds Bank is a Grade II listed building, built in 1854 on Corn Street in Bristol. It was originally the headquarters of the West of England and South Wales Bank until it went bust in 1878. It then became a branch of Lloyds bank until it's closure in early 2014. It has now been turned into a boutique hotel so if you're planning to visit and do an urbex, you're too late I'm afraid. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Thanks for looking
  37. 8 points
    History Barbour Mill has a long and prestigious history in Lisburn and as the end of an era draws near many local people will be recalling their own memories of Barbour Threads. In 1784 John Barbour, who hailed from Scotland, established a linen thread works in Lisburn. At the same time his son, William, bought a derelict bleach green at Hilden and set up business. Later, the thread works were transferred to Hilden and as early as 1817 it was employing 122 workers. In 1823 William Barbour bought a former bleach mill at Hilden and built a water-powered twisting mill. The Linen Thread Company was founded 1898 and it quickly became a large international company. In fact it became the largest linen thread mill in the world, giving Lisburn a richly deserved international reputation. By 1914 it employed about 2,000 people and until recently some 300 workers were still employed there, with the work- force dropping to just 85 in recent years. Among the company's varied products were nets, which could be made into snares and fishing nets. The company built a model village for its workforce in Hilden, which consisted of 350 houses, two schools, a community hall, children's playground and village sports ground. Lisburn became the envy of the world thanks to its Linen and Thread industry and now the last remnant of that history is to close its doors for the last time. The Explore Although I think we were about 6 years too late with this one. This was somewhere I have wanted to go for quite some time but with other commitments and other places to explore while in NI it always got shoved to the back seat. This trip we finally got to go, explored with @hamtagger we had quite a leisurely stroll round this one. The first thing I noticed when getting close was how it was becoming crowded with new housing and developments. Still, it sits proud within its place. A bit of the site has already been demolished. The place is bloody massive! It is easiest the biggest site I have been to. Spending numerous hours there and still not getting around the whole site led us to leave before darkness fell. The architecture was pretty impressive with the stonework and iron gables or whatever you call them. Surprisingly, despite being closed several years and falling victim to vandalism, graffiti & metal theft it still has so much to offer. There were little cupboards dotted about in most sections with linen/ thread materials. Loads of hand painted signs that were of little importance but I like stuff like that. The decay was pretty cool and I loved how trees were growing out of the top floors. Nature really was reclaiming it. A few of the ceilings had fallen in with those areas a bit more decayed than others. Right on to the pics The whole site (not my pic) Some old advertising material I found online 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 (I swear this hasn't been edited at all!) 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Thanks for looking!
  38. 8 points
    On this trip, we found this litte but nice asylum in the near from the actual objective. Fast in - fast out with realy nice motive's 1. Pflegeheim 60 01 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 2. Pflegeheim 60 02 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 3. Pflegeheim 60 03 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 4. Pflegeheim 60 04 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 5. Pflegeheim 60 05 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 6. Pflegeheim 60 06 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 7. Pflegeheim 60 07 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 8. Pflegeheim 60 08 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 9. Pflegeheim 60 09 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 10. Pflegeheim 60 10 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr
  39. 8 points
    This location is the one where you quickly hear the stories about: impossible, the mount everest of the urbex, don't even try ... But sometmes this steel giant likes some company over too and there were rumours of a slight chance to get in. The date was set already and actually something else was on the program but when one fellow exploer had heard that there were loopholes in the net of the impenetrable hell gate (read: fences, 3 rows of nato wire and another 200V power wire as icing on the cake) we wanted to attempt. The hell gate was only a smaller obstacle, because once you pass you are on the playground of little demons in white vans that approach almost without any sound, or with a shepherd dog at their side. With all of the above in mind, I had a very turbulent night's sleep 3 nights in advance. In the end, the steel gods favoured us that day, which enabled me to enjoy this beautiful exploration. Very briefly it became exciting when there were 5 people in the building with helmets and hi-visability jackets. After some back-and-forth texting with my mates, and some cat and mouse tricks to avoid thm, I first hid in a closet and then rushed me to the top where the rest of our team was. Once there, I crossed the 5 fluos ... 5 eyes on me, 2 of them with open mouth. A French voice 'mais, elle est ici tout seule?' 'vous n'avez pas peur'? It turned out to be just the most flashy explorers you can imagine, not to mention the decibels they produced. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
  40. 8 points
    lil place in my backyard... i've been coming to this spot for over a decade. tragically i've only picked up a camera a few years back. it's nice to be able to visit a location many times in the continuation of self improvement and documenting the destruction of a location. heres a few shots from over the past year: pano from last summer. i ran here one day as the sun set. i wanted to catch the lighting. belly of the boiler. behind the controls. another scrapper hard at work i see. test shop. looking down the next year would be sad times as kids from all over began to populate this place. i used to be able to walk around for weeks without running into a soul, and now there could be 30 kids here. in a short period of time shity taggers would desicrate the temple. angering the gods. even the snow doesnt cover that grime. she sure is a beauty tho. i've been to quite a few generating stations and none compare it felt like a train station grande hall. standing in the freezing cold taking a pic of snow falling (or ceiling) so ladylike everyones favorite hallway which was in a movie for 3 seconds. (relax-its photoshopped.....or is it???) until next time . . .
  41. 8 points
    I don't have any history on this little place except for the fact that it was a farm in a remote village in Norfolk. As you can probably tell I have a little backlog. With various personal events over the last year allthough I have been out a bit I havent had much time to post so catching up on it now Thanks to @Mikeymutt for some details on this place! Helpfl as always mate Visited here with @hamtagger, we had a really relaxed explore with this one. Probably one of the fullest interior wise of the residential places we have visited but stacked with personal memoroes just such a shame to have been left behind. I remember thinking I wouldnt like to rifle through someones personal posessions but it is really nice to build upa picture of the people that once lived here. Can't remember much else except this was another place welcomed for @hamtagger having an urbex shit. I swear there is not one place we have been to where he hasn't christened the almighty ceramic throne! Anyway, on to the pics 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Thanks for looking!
  42. 8 points
    Bletchley Park was the central site for British codebreakers during World War II. It housed the Government Code and Cypher School (GC&CS), it regularly penetrated the secret communications of the Axis Powers – most importantly the German Enigma and Lorenz ciphers. The official historian of World War II British Intelligence has written that the "Ultra" intelligence produced at Bletchley shortened the war by two to four years, and that without it the outcome of the war would have been uncertain. Peely paint, cobwebs, code breaking machines, organs, film memorabilia, and an immeasurable amount of WWII history; this place has it all. Tons of stuff left behind here in D Block, most of it just slung in corners left to rot. Shame really as I expect most of it is well worth preserving and there's a massive fuck off museum next door! HELLO..... Anyway, onto the pictures.... I didn't stage any of these scenes myself, they were like this upon arrival. Made for some nice piccies though so I don't mind really. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Sign from the Enigma cinema which closed in 2015. Enigma was the name given to the machine the Germans used to encrypt their messages. An electronic current passing through the machine's rotors would change alphabets in the message to other letter. 10. Some equipment neatly set up. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. Someone let the staging get a bit out of control here but it looked kind of cool to be fair.... 20. 21. 22. 23. A replica of the 'Bombe' code breaking machine designed by Alan Turing to crack the German Enigma code 24. The Bombe machines in use back in the day. Women code breakers apparently used to hang their underwear up to dry on top of the machines. *This is where the phrase 'knickers in a twist' comes from. *Possibly not true. 25. @Lenston hiding from the sun And that is all. Check out 'The Imitation Game' movie if you've not seen it before, a pretty good dramatisation of what went down at Bletchley Park. Thanks for looking
  43. 8 points
    Akarmara - the former mining town in Abkhazia. After collapse of the Soviet Union and Abkhaz–Georgian conflict it was almost abandoned.
  44. 8 points
    Been wanting to see this place for a while so I was well happy to finally get a nose round here. G Block was the first area we covered. Would have been better doing it the other way round with hindsight but, we where not to know at the time. This block is pretty much stripped with some nice peeling paint and decay in places. This was the traffic and deception operations block and was later used by the GPO. A nice relaxed wander around a interesting and history steeped building. Visited with non member Paul. Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/135648593@N02/albums/72157680397416355/with/32775422922/
  45. 8 points
    My friend told me about this outdoor pool hidden in the woods and showed me a few pics.i just knew I had to see this.always one for something unusual and different.fast forward a few months and I was travelling back from my last trip to Scotland.i popped in on the way home.i took the stroll through the woods and there it was sunken below in the trees.it is in the grounds of a Manor House.i have no idea when it was built.but it's in a state now.the coloumns around the pool use to have statues on them.you can still see the original tiles and hand rails.it sits in a bit of a sun trap.the pool is filled with natural spring water.which has been been filtered off to feed the pool.the water still flows next to the pool.with holes in the concrete everywhere.i would say this pool was for the more well off.i fell in love with this place.the peace and tranquility was lovely.and can imagine it was grand in its hey day. The pool how it was in the sixties How it looks now from above the water filter system. Bathers steps from the changing rooms The deep end steps Pool lights I would guess this was the diving board frame
  46. 8 points
    A early start was need for Winnington soda ash myself along with @dangle_angle and friend tom. And doing a little reasearch on where we needed to be to get into the various parts of the huge site we wanted see. This place has security patrols and lots of cctv dotted around. But we managed to get around ok and see most of what we went for.apart from the control room so here's a few photos from the day a some history.. The original Brunner Mond & Company was formed in 1873 when John Brunner and Ludwig Mond built Winnington Works at Northwich, Cheshire and produced their first soda ash in 1874. The company grew steadily over the next 50 years including, in 1924, acquiring the Magadi Soda Company of Kenya. In 1926 Brunner Mond merged with three other British chemical companies to form Imperial Chemical Industries (ICI), a venture that grew to become one of the world's largest and most successful companies. In 1991 Brunner Mond was re-created as an independent Company by the acquisition of the UK and Kenyan soda ash businesses from ICI. In 1998 Brunner Mond acquired the soda ash activities of Akzo Nobel in The Netherlands where Brunner Mond B.V. now forms a wholly owned subsidiary company of the Group. In 2006 Tata Chemicals Limited - part of the Tata Group of India - acquired the Brunner Mond Group. Along with Tata Chemicals' established operations in India and those acquired through the purchase of the soda ash assets of General Chemical Industrial Products Inc. in the USA, today the combined Brunner Mond/Magadi Soda/Tata Chemicals group is the second largest producer of soda ash in the world and the only one with manufacturing and supply chain capability on four continents
  47. 8 points
    This one is quite a personal report for me. My mum remembers with fondness visiting the local cinema. During the 1940's and 50's before homes had TVs it wasn't just films that were shown - this is where you could see footage of the important news events of the day. For example she remembers school visits to see the Queens coronation and the celebration of Edmund Hillary conquering Everest. The Coliseum opened in 1931 with "Romance" starring Greta Garbo. It was partly art-deco style and seated 630. Its sound system was state of the art for its day and widely acknowledged as being perfect. Fast forward to 1983 and the management decided that it was no longer financially viable. However, the locals were not prepared to see their beloved picture house bite the dust so they clubbed together and it re-opened in 1984 and was mostly run by volunteers. 1,000 residents bought £50,000 worth of shares. Things seemed to be going well - in 1995 it hosted a European Premiere of First Knight starring Sean Connery and Richard Gere (although they didn't appear on the red carpet). Sadly despite all the efforts the venture couldn't carry on and the doors finally shut in January 2011. Worse news was to arrive 2014, when the group set up to save the cinema had its plans rejected by the Coliseum Shareholders, who voted to sell the property rather than grant a long-term lease to the Friends of The Coliseum. Once in the hands of the developers the game was up. I had been keeping an eye on the place for some time in the hope that I could have a sneaky mooch around inside. No such luck, I also asked for a permission visit but as there's no money in it for the developers this was ignored. So one day last February I happened to get speaking to the guy who was taking the seats out ready to be shipped to Sheffield. I was only able to take a few crap hurried shots in the dark auditorium. A couple of days later I had another look around the back and... BOOM.... an entry point! Perseverance had paid off in the nick of time. The photos you see were taken just a few days before demolition began. Almost one year on there's no apartments or redevelopment, just an empty space. The projectionists room A poignant reminder There were many quotes on the walls upstairs from classic films written by the projectionists over the years The lost property box I just wondered about all the people that would have gone up these stairs full of anticipation... Finally an exterior shot (not mine) taken during the good times. Some much older photos show it originally had a porch above the front steps and some 'embellishments' either side of the name. Well that's all folks - thanks for looking
  48. 8 points
    The estate with the main-villa, a side building with chapel and a surrounding park was built from a textile manufacturer at the end of the 19th century, more specifically in 1899 (not in the 18th century, as is to be read often). The textile factory was closed in the 1980s, the villa has been uninhabited for more than 16 years now. Due to stupid vandalism a lot of things were destroyed, so also the piano in 2013. The villa itself burned down in summer of 2014. (about 1908) My fist visit was six years ago, in 2010. Now I’ve visited it again, to take some comparison shots. The current state is very sad ... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Finally, a few more photos from 2010. 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
  49. 8 points
    Solo jaunt. Part 1/3 of TBM's (temporary) swansong. So I'd never been to the ROI or Northern Ireland before this. As I write this, tomorrow I will be gone to Taiwan to take a sabbatical from England and exploring for a while, teaching English and learning Mandarin. The past few weeks had been dull and uneventful, so on impulse I decided to go for a short jaunt to Ireland to do some exploring, and what a terrific move that was. I always wanted to go, but I never made any plans to follow through. It was Camera Shy's recent reports that really got my attention and got me thinking about getting out to the Emerald Isle. The first of three successful explores, I give you Our Lady's asylum. I had no idea what to expect, which is pretty much the TBM way nowadays. I was in a land I had never set foot upon, all alone, out to do what I do best. I was pretty nervous, considering unlike in the UK trespassing can easily slip from civil into criminal territory simply by getting someone nervous in the process. But I carried on. After a long, long train ride from Dublin and long walk in the rain, I see a grey tower: it's the asylum. I see cars parked inside, and dog walkers, but no fence. Security? Not thus far. However, there was something that got me on edge as I looked at the imposing administration from the front; the building was vandalised, but lights in the upper rooms were still on. An alarm box is visible from the front. Squatters? Alarmed? I didn't know. It took less than 5 minutes to find a way in, but this is what got me really nervous; if entry is this easy, then to me there is a far greater chance of either running into or being followed by hostile types. I'm alone, so I can't take risks. I immediately take the stairs to the top floor, get myself immersed in my surroundings and get ready to take photos. I can't relax. In the main staircase I do see some PIRs on each floor, but despite there being electricity in this area none were responsive. A relief. The building is stripped of almost anything that would indicate its former use, but is interesting because what it shows is the kind of conditions that patients were living in; very few (well, it's possible) seclusion cells/private rooms, instead cramped dormitories. The partitions have been removed in this room, so is not the best example but downstairs was different. One of very few items remaining. The date of closure is said to be 2002, but who knows if this genuinely was the same as it was in July 1995. Despite the tagging and typical "haunted building" graffiti in places, the peeling paint and decay was spectacular to see. Some wards felt untouched. The main hall in the complex, very austere and minimalist. From here I went on to look through the industrial side of the hospital, hoping for a mortuary but found nothing of interest. I returned to the darkness of the ground floor, in search of what more there was to find. The architecture was no different but there were some interesting murals based on Irish folklore and tradition. I'd seen everything I needed to see in the hospital, so I swiftly made my way out and round the back in search of anything that had eluded me before. Alas, the rear buildings were reoccupied, and those derelict well in view of those inside. There was little left to see, and nothing that caught my eye, so I made my way off to the chapel which was locked. The buildings are listed, and presently up for sale. I honestly don't know what the the future holds for the site now, but it won't take much to turn the place into a Talgarth-esque ruin. Time is running out. Stay tuned for part 2. Love as always, TBM x
  50. 8 points
    The old sanatorium was once used as recreation home for staff of a well-known German company. At the beginning of the 20th century, the building was donated by the daughter of the company founder to the spa town X. It has been abandoned since the early 1990s. The building is now in a heavy state of decay. Yet, there are some plans to revitalize the area. While exploring that place I also made new friends... This fellow suddenly just sat right in front of me...:
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