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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/10/2017 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    My friend told me about this outdoor pool hidden in the woods and showed me a few pics.i just knew I had to see this.always one for something unusual and different.fast forward a few months and I was travelling back from my last trip to Scotland.i popped in on the way home.i took the stroll through the woods and there it was sunken below in the trees.it is in the grounds of a Manor House.i have no idea when it was built.but it's in a state now.the coloumns around the pool use to have statues on them.you can still see the original tiles and hand rails.it sits in a bit of a sun trap.the pool is filled with natural spring water.which has been been filtered off to feed the pool.the water still flows next to the pool.with holes in the concrete everywhere.i would say this pool was for the more well off.i fell in love with this place.the peace and tranquility was lovely.and can imagine it was grand in its hey day. The pool how it was in the sixties How it looks now from above the water filter system. Bathers steps from the changing rooms The deep end steps Pool lights I would guess this was the diving board frame
  2. 1 point
    This chateau is located within about 50 metres of a huge abandoned sanatorium so presumably it was connected in some way, perhaps used for training or for senior management accommodation? I don't know, but it's still in pretty good condition for the most part and has some nice features despite being practically empty. An unopened pack of orange juice cartons suggests it has been abandoned since 2005. I'll post a report up from the sanatorium separately when I get time. 1. 2. 3. Scale model of the sanatorium 4. 5. 6. 7. & 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. & 13. 14. 15. 16. & 17. 18. 19. 20. We nearly missed this little chapel, still in amazing condition 21. 22. 23. Au revoir
  3. 1 point
    History Lombard Street is reputed to be one of London’s streets that is steeped in seven hundred years of banking history. It began life in the Roman times of Londinium as a wealthy city road. It later became a notable banking street on account of several Jewish goldsmith occupants sometime during the Norman conquest. However, the street did not acquire its name until Italian goldsmiths, the Longobards from Lombardy, were granted the land during the reign of Edward I. The badge of the Medici family, the three golden pills, was first displayed here, and since then it has remained as a traditional sign of the pawnbroker. It is reported that most of the large present day UK banks share history with Lombard Street. For instance, Lloyd’s of London, an insurance market now located in London’s primary financial district, began as Lloyds coffee House in 1691. From around this time, most banks established their headquarters on Lombard Street. Many remained there right up until the 1980s; the decade that signalled the end of ‘runners’ donning top hats to deliver bills of exchange to the Bank of England. Number 60., which is the rooftop this report is based on, was occupied by T.S.B for many years and it was the last bank to move its headquarters out of the street. T.S.B have assured people that their legacy will continue to be an important part of the street and that their colourful sign hanging from the front façade will be a tribute to this. On the topic of signage, Lombard Street is said to be famous for being one of the few places in London where 17th and 18th century-styled shop signs still survive, jutting from buildings on wrought-iron brackets. However, it is said that some lateral thinking is required to decipher what the old signs signify: Adam and Eve meant fruiterer; a bugle’s horn, a post office; a unicorn, an apothecary’s; a spotted cat, a perfumer’s. Many of those that remain today were the emblems of rich families and Edwardian reconstructions of early goldsmiths’ signs. It is well-known that many early 20th century banks, such as Barclays with their eagle and Lloyds with their horse, re-appropriated some of these signs as company logos. It is important to note, though, that they all chose to adopt lifeless signs as their logos, as opposed to ‘breathing signs’ (cats in baskets, rats and parrots in cages, vultures tethered to wine shacks etc.), which were very fashionable at one time. Finally, another interesting fact about Lombard Street, but one that is completely unrelated to banking, is that it is where the first love of Charles Dickens lived. The girl’s name was Maria Beadnell, and she was the daughter of a bank manager. It is said that Dickens would often walk down Lombard Street in the early hours of the morning to gaze upon the place where she slept. By today’s standard that certainly would not be considered a romantic gesture – Dickens may well have landed himself in a spot of bother if he tried peeping through girl’s windows in this day and age. Our Version of Events Despite havinghigh aspirations for the night,all of them failed. So, we were heading back to the car to call it a night when we noticed some scaffolding thatlooked ‘a bit bait’ as the locals might put it. It involved a bit of a climbing and there was no way of avoiding any onlookers from seeing us. But, since we were very desperate for a rooftop at this point, we decided to have a crack at it anyway. In the end, and contrary to all appearances, getting onto the roof of 60 Lombard Street was easy, and it wasn’t long before we were ascending the last bit of scaff to get up to the highest point on the roof. One by one we gathered in a small sheltered space, waiting for everyone to catch up before we climbed the last ladder that took us up to the highest point. But, it was at that moment we noticed that there were suddenly a lot more people around than what we’d first started out with. As it turned out, another couple of lads had decided to have a crack at the bank rooftop too. It seemed that they were just as surprised to discover us lurking about up there. At first we had thought it might some over-zealous security guards on the verge of losing their jobs if they didn’t catch us, but thankfully we were wrong. Fortunately, there was enough space up top for all of us to congregate. Since it was pretty chilly, though, we wasted no time setting up the cameras to grab a few shots. As always, the views of London were spectacular. Sadly, however, all the buildings we had wanted to get on top of were the ones surrounding us, taunting us from every direction – and they looked even more enticing from where we were standing. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Slayaaaa and Stewie. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7:
  4. 1 point
    History The building this report is based on is the old art deco Filter House. The building housed all of the equipment and tanks that were needed to complete the chemical filtration process. It also contained a laboratory which was used to handle chemicals and conduct tests, to ensure the water was fit for human consumption before being sent to the nearby reservoir. The site on which the old chemical filter building at Sandford Mill sits began life as a corn mill. The timber mill was constructed sometime in the early 19th century, directly over a stream that would run underneath the centre of the building. The stream drove a large water wheel, which provided power to the corn mill. By the end of the century, a steam engine was installed to generate additional power. It is noted that coal used to run the engine was supplied from Newcastle-under-Lyme, which was transported along canals via horse drawn barges. In 1923 Chelmsford Corporation purchased the site for the construction of a new Borough Waterworks. Construction of the new facility began in 1926, around the time milling in the area ceased. The old corn mill was subsequently demolished, save for two cottages which were built in 1905. They are the only surviving remnants of the original mill. The waterworks started operating in March 1929, despite the fact that it was not fully completed until July 1930. The preliminary site consisted of a large red brick building which became known as the ‘Engine House’. Water from the River Chelmer, and from a 650ft deep borehole was both treated and pumped inside this building using electrically-driven pumps. These were powered by diesel driven alternators during the day and the mains electricity supply by night. The capacity of the waterworks was improved in 1956, following the construction of a new building that was known as the ‘Filter House’. The entire water treatment process was transferred over to the new building, and additional pumps were installed in the Engine House. Three further pump houses were also erected across the site, to move the water around the site through the various stages of the treatment process. The largest pump house, positioned over by the weir, became known as the River Pump House. After being treated the water was transported via the Engine House over to Galleywood Reservoir, approximately four miles away, for use in Chelmsford. Although local rumour has it that the building was designed and constructed by the same Scottish architects, Dunn and Watson, who are responsible for the construction of the Marconi factory in Chelmsford, this is in fact not true. Dunn and Watson’s practice closed in 1912, forty-four years before the chemical building was completed. While the Filter House follows a very similar late art deco design, whoever constructed it remains unknown. During the mid-70s, the water industry was nationalised and the site was acquired by the Essex Water Company. To avoid the operating two duplicated sites in close proximity of one another, the water company decided to transfer all operations to a site further down the River Chelmer, at Langford. By 1984, all water pumping at the Sandford Mill site ceased and the facility was made completely redundant. Most of the equipment was removed that same year, and the land was returned to the Borough Council. Our Version of Events At the end of areasonably successfulday of exploring over in Colchester, where we’d ended up finding ourselves in a semi-abandoned hospital, we decided to meet up with Xploring and DRZ_Explorer. For the rest of the evening we fucked around trying to get into a cinema, then in the clock tower of the Britvic site and finally, rather randomly, a cemetery. After that, we arranged to meet up the next night because there was some sort of chemical filter building nearby that sounded like it was a good wander. From what we were being told, the place sounded like it was something a bit different and unique. The following evening came, and we all met up down a small country lane by the side of a canal. Getting onto the site wasn’t particularly difficult; although, finding a way inside the building itself presented its own set of challenges. However, it wasn’t long before we were all inside the building, gathered at the bottom of the main staircase that leads into the main tank room. It was at this point we realised visiting during the night perhaps wasn’t the greatest idea ever conceived. Once we climbed the stairs and entered the large hall housing the chemical tanks it suddenly dawned on us that the room is has windows on every side, and overlooking the building are the former mill cottages and the museum – where there were lights switched on. We did our best to take photos throughout the building, but not being able to light-paint too well meant that most of the shots came out a bit shit. In the end, we gave up and decided we’d pop back the following day, during daylight hours. We returned the next day, and were disappointed to find a white van parked outside. So, for the next hour or so we had to play the waiting game and a couple of rounds of dominos, until the van and its occupants finally fucked off. Thankfully, they did eventually leave, so we made our way back to the entrance we’d found the previous night. Fortunately, it was still open. Once inside, visibility was incredible. Plenty of natural light was pouring through the windows, making our job of snapping up some photos much easier. What is more, now we could properly take in our surroundings. The lads from the previous night had been right, the place looked amazing. With all of the tiles around, it was kind of like standing in an ancient swimming baths, crossed with an old-school batman-styled chemical factory – the type where bad-guys and scientists have a high risk of falling into a vat of unspecified chemical waste. Much to our disappointment, neither batman nor the joker turned up. The only weird thing we stumbled across were a few skeletons of rabbits and squirrels. As others have said before, it looked like a small-scale massacre had taken place. Our theory, then, is that the animals had somehow managed to get inside the building, because, as with all explores, it has been broken into a few times. This means at some point the doors and windows may have been open to the little critters. Since all the skeletons look fairly intact, it looked more like the animals died due to poisoning – they are inside a former chemical filtering building after all, where there is an abundance of chemical residue. How they all managed to end up in the same room, however, is a harder phenomenon to explain. Our guess is that Poison Ivy may have inhabited the building at some point, and she moved all the corpses into that room where she was able to have a bit of a barbeque. We found her cans of special brew; evidence that she definitely cooked something up in that room. Anyway, we’re certain that this theory surpasses all others in terms of its validity and reliability. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Slayaaaa, Stewie and Xploring. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27: 28: 29:
  5. 1 point
    With a few spare hours to hand i thought i'd pay a visit, it was almost a year since the last time i was here. I had a bit of a game of hide and seak and would have perfered to have stayed a little longer but it never turned out that way, so i left. whilst walking back to the car i noticed a very nice sunset developing so i got in a good position and come away with some stunning photos. History Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory (MRAO) is home to a number of large aperture synthesis radio telescopes, including the One-Mile Telescope, 5-km Ryle Telescope, and the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager. Radio interferometry started in the mid-1940s on the outskirts of Cambridge, but with funding from the Science Research Council and a donation of £100,000 from Mullard Limited, construction of the Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory commenced at Lord's Bridge,[1] a few kilometres to the west of Cambridge. The observatory was founded under Martin Ryle of the Radio-Astronomy Group of the Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge and was opened by Sir Edward Victor Appleton on 25 July 1957. This group is now known as the Cavendish Astrophysics Group. A portion of the track bed of the old line, running nearly East-West for several miles, was used to form the main part of the "5km" radio-telescope and the Cambridge Low Frequency Synthesis Telescope. on with the photos thanks for looking
  6. 1 point
    Been wanting to see this place for a while so I was well happy to finally get a nose round here. G Block was the first area we covered. Would have been better doing it the other way round with hindsight but, we where not to know at the time. This block is pretty much stripped with some nice peeling paint and decay in places. This was the traffic and deception operations block and was later used by the GPO. A nice relaxed wander around a interesting and history steeped building. Visited with non member Paul. Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/135648593@N02/albums/72157680397416355/with/32775422922/
  7. 1 point
    This spot has been getting a lot of attention recently, here is mine take on the place. Solo visit this one back in August. The site was really overgrown at the time, it was like navigating through a small wood in parts. There is some lovely decay in this place and the damp is playing havoc with the wallpaper. A nice relaxed, peaceful explore. One of the better RAF sites I visited in 2016. HISTORY Plans for a new airfield adjacent to the village of Church Fenton were announced in June 1935, it was subject to protest from the local population particularly concerning the waste of valuable farming land and was close to an existing airfield 2 mi (3.2 km) away at Sherburn. Despite the protests construction started in early 1936 on the 260 acres (1.1 km2) site, a mixture of private and West Riding County Council-owned farm land. Opened in 1937, it saw the peak of its activity during the years of the Second World War, when it served within the defence network of fighter bases of the RAF providing protection for the Leeds, Bradford, Sheffield and Humberside industrial regions. During September 1940 it became home to the first RAF "Eagle squadron" of American volunteers being No. 71 Squadron RAF initially with the Brewster Buffalo I for one month before changing to the Hawker Hurricane I. The airfield was also home to both the first all-Canadian and all-Polish squadrons, with No. 242 Squadron RAF for the Canadians and No. 306 Squadron RAF for the Polish. As technologies evolved, the first night fighter Operational Training Unit (No. 54 OTU) was formed at Church Fenton in 1940 and stayed until 1942. Some of the squadrons stationed there flew the famous de Havilland Mosquito. After the war it at first retained its role as a fighter base, being among the first to receive modern jet aircraft, namely the Gloster Meteor and the Hawker Hunter. Between October 1950 and March 1957 it was the base of No. 609 Squadron RAF, within the Royal Auxiliary Air Force and named "North Riding". The unit was equipped with Gloster Meteors. In later years, its role was mainly flight training. No. 7 Flying Training School was based here between 1962 and 1966 and again between 1979 and 1992, equipped with Hunting Aircraft Jet Provost T3 trainers. For some years it was home to the Royal Navy Elementary Flying Training School (RNEFTS) using the Scottish Aviation Bulldog, and again 1979-1992, triggered by the introduction of the Panavia Tornado, being the first station to receive the new turboprop-powered Short Tucano T.1 basic fast jet trainers. From 1998-2003 Church Fenton was the RAF's main Elementary Flying Training airfield. On 25 March 2013 it was announced that Church Fenton would close by the end of 2013. The units would be relocated to RAF Linton on Ouse by 31 December 2013. By 19 December 2013, all units had relocated and the airfield was closed. Some equipment will be relocated to RAF Topcliffe. MoD security continued to secure the site until disposal. A NOTAM was issued suspending the air traffic zone (ATZ) at the end of 2013. Thanks For Looking Flickr Page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/135648593@N02/albums/72157671805823422/with/29064016471/
  8. 1 point
    The former inn with a ballroom was already built at the end of the 19th century. After the closure in the 1990s, the building became more and more ruined. The rest of the building was completely stripped and empty, so no photos from other rooms. Unfortunately, I couldn't find an old interior shot, when the ballroom was still in use. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  9. 1 point
    thanks for the share! I'll give this a read at lunch today.
  10. 1 point
    Interesting place, the following website is a good read for it http://www.centraliapa.org/
  11. 1 point
    Love 7! The wallpaper in 9 is bloody awesome! And 16 is my fave! Great place. That chandelier is nice! So many little bits in one place
  12. 1 point
    Good to see folk personally associated with the place being reasonable and getting involved -nice one.
  13. 1 point
    Quite a long video but an interesting perspective, being 360 degrees. Looks crazy on the forum, but cool when i had a look on my phone Cheers for posting
  14. 1 point
    Well made video that mate, thanks for posting
  15. 1 point
    Colbert was an anti-air cruiser, later transformed into a missile cruiser, of the French Navy. She served in the Navy from 1956 to 1991, before being converted into a museum ship. She was abandoned off the coast of Brittany in 2007 and in 2016 she was taken away to be scrapped. Having missed this ship when it was moored in Brittany, I was pretty gutted to hear of it's removal for demolition. I didn't think much more about it until it popped up in conversation a few months later and I decided to hunt down it's new location. It turned out demolition was expected to take 18 months so we decided to take a punt seeing as it was only 6 months down the line at this point. All we knew was that it was meant to be moored near a certain bridge. On the first night our taxi driver took us to the wrong bridge so there was no sign of the boat. I asked some locals and they told me it was long gone, absolutely gutted. We soon realised we'd been to the wrong bridge so decided to have another look the following day. At this point we weren't feeling hopeful but as soon as we reached the bridge we spotted her in the distance. Bingo! Unfortunately the missiles were gone and much of the ship had been cleared out but it was still a proper adventure and good to finally get on board the dirty bitch! Bigups to @Maniac @Merryprankster Law & Ben. 1. 2. 3. Ventilation system for the removal of asbestos, this was what stopped us from being able to access much of the ship. 4. Officer's bedroom 5. Bunk bed 6. 7. Laundry 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. Gyroscope 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. & 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. The Bridge 32. 33. 34. Bon appétit
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