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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/11/2017 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    This place was part of a giant complex where they used to build trains for the national railroad company. Most of the site was already demolished by the time we got here, but the lab itself was still worth the visit. It's been abandoned since 2010, which is sort of surprising, if you look at the amount of decay, but well, I'm not complaining about that at all... Actually took 2 visits to get in. First attempt was on a thursday afternoon. Entered the site, walked to the particular building and said to my girl: "what's that noise?!" Peeked inside the building and got instantly spotted by demolition workers... Took a run and returned a few days later in the weekend. More luck that time. Have to say, definitely worth it... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Thanks for looking!!
  2. 1 point
    My hometown is very particular. It's not a big city and its kind of lost between bigger ones. But at least, we have a famous car race who happens every year here. ... and a giant train depot ! "TGV (French: Train à Grande Vitesse, "high-speed train") is France's intercity high-speed rail service, operated by SNCF, the national rail operator. A TGV test train set the record for the fastest wheeled train, reaching 574.8 km/h (357.2 mph) on 3 April 2007. In mid-2011, scheduled TGV trains operated at the highest speeds in conventional train service in the world, regularly reaching 320 km/h (200 mph) on the LGV Est, LGV Rhin-Rhône, and LGV Méditerranée. Following the inaugural service between Paris and Lyon in 1981 on the LGV Sud-Est ("LGV") (French: Ligne à Grande Vitesse, high-speed line), the network, centred on Paris, has expanded to connect main cities across France and in adjacent countries on combinations of high-speed and conventional lines."
  3. 1 point
    Visited with @GK_WAX and dangle_angle and another non member this was another place on the Wales tour. And this little old chapel had certainly seen its best days.it was totally rotten with huge holes in the roof. We didn't stay very long and only took a few photos so here's a bit of history to go with them History Salem Methodist Chapel was built in 1833 in Arthog, near Barmouth in North Wales. In 1868 it was rebuilt in the Gothic style of the gable-entry type, by architect Thomas of Landore, and eventually closed in 1973. Apparently the owner of the building moved abroad to avoid paying a bill for a quarter of a million pounds, which means as a result the walls and other works of the structure are unsafe to passing motorists and local residents due to lack of maintenance. It has been assessed and surveyed and is deemed likely to collapse on itself if it does go.
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