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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/12/2017 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    This house seemed to come on the urbex scene then vanish.I was asked along on a visit here early March 2017.It was indeed a very interesting explore due the massive content of personal affects left behind as you will see.I understand the house was built 1865 and in the last few decades was converted into four flats.Each flat had a piano and we counted at least six pianos throughout! The house belonged to Doctor Annette Drummond-Rees and I reckoned she was a shopaholic as all over this house in the last few years was bags of china ornaments that was purchased from charity shops,but the thing that surprised me was it appeared she simply put the bag on the stairs unopened never to be looked at again.Lets show you what I mean... The House Part of the conversion has already started falling down A few old cars have been left to rot In the hallway we see the first of many many places to sit The good Doctors lounge or at least one of them! One of six pianos Another lounge Heading upstairs now The sight that greeted us on the landing..flats 2 and three with spare pianos ..more pianos later Those shopping bags containing ornaments from charity shops were strewn on every stair One of my fellow explorers got this to play the Dambusters record..a most surreal thing to hear from a distance I loved this arched window atop of the stairs Flat 2`s lounge..yes another piano! Flat 2 bedroom Dr Fox Flat 3 lounge..yep,complete with piano We are now in the attic rooms now Attic bedroom..looked pretty comfortable And lastly,some essential bedtime reading.. Well that was Mountfield House folks,if you want a more concise walk through,the rest can be seen yer below https://klempner69.smugmug.com/Mountfield-House-2017/
  2. 1 point
    Another stop on our Wales tour was this old mill. Myself @dangle_angle and @GK_WAX and non member Dylan. The mill is in bad condition but I was surprised how bright and good condition the spools had kept. Wasn't a lot to see. But it did have a nice river and waterfall running along side the mill. Here's some history and photos.. History Leri Mills was one of Ceredigions first woolen mills. It was built from around 1809 consisting of several buildings; two tweed mills, a spinning and carding shed, a wool / washing shed, a dye shed and a craft shop. Initially the tweed was sold locally to farmers and miners but for at least the last thirty years of operation the mill was open to the public, with demonstrations of all of the processes on view, and most importantly a shop that sold tweed, garthen (a tapestry used as a bed covering), rugs and postcards. The rise of foreign travel in the late seventies led to a fairly rapid decline in business Sadly the mill finally stopped trading in April 1981 and was initially put on the market for £150,000. A buyer wasn't found and the mill remains in the family that ran it from at least 1950.
  3. 1 point
    My hometown is very particular. It's not a big city and its kind of lost between bigger ones. But at least, we have a famous car race who happens every year here. ... and a giant train depot ! "TGV (French: Train à Grande Vitesse, "high-speed train") is France's intercity high-speed rail service, operated by SNCF, the national rail operator. A TGV test train set the record for the fastest wheeled train, reaching 574.8 km/h (357.2 mph) on 3 April 2007. In mid-2011, scheduled TGV trains operated at the highest speeds in conventional train service in the world, regularly reaching 320 km/h (200 mph) on the LGV Est, LGV Rhin-Rhône, and LGV Méditerranée. Following the inaugural service between Paris and Lyon in 1981 on the LGV Sud-Est ("LGV") (French: Ligne à Grande Vitesse, high-speed line), the network, centred on Paris, has expanded to connect main cities across France and in adjacent countries on combinations of high-speed and conventional lines."
  4. 1 point
    Afternoon All, Here is another hospital i visited whilst in the States. Was about a 3.5 hour drive from where i was staying in Rhode Island so was up early for this one to make our way here. Once there, we parked up and was shocked to see how much more snow there was here than there was in RI. Making our way up the hill out of sight was a mission on its own through the knee deep snow, but once up and in the building, it was all good.....until we had to move to the other buildings, it would be obvious to security someone was there due to us leaving tracks, but we made our way over the the main buildings and got inside. It became apparently that we must have been alone that day as when we were relaxing on the roof in the sun, we hadnt seen anyone else, heard any cars or anything. ALl of the roads inside the campus had been ploughed, but we must have just got lucky i suppose. Some history from the interweb The Hudson River State Hospital, is a former New York state psychiatric hospital which operated from 1873 until its closure in the early 2000s. The campus is notable for its main building, known as a "Kirkbride," which has been designated a National Historic Landmark due to its exemplary High Victorian Gothic architecture, the first use of that style for an American institutional building.[2][3] It is located on US 9 on the Poughkeepsie-Hyde Park town line. Frederick Clarke Withers designed the hospital's buildings in 1867. Calvert Vaux and Frederick Law Olmsted designed the grounds. It was intended to be completed quickly, but went far over its original schedule and budget. The hospital opened on October 18, 1871 as the Hudson River State Hospital for the Insane[4] and admitted its first 40 patients. Construction, however, was far from over and would continue for another 25 years. A century later, it was slowly closed down as psychiatric treatment had changed enough that large hospitals were no longer needed, and its services had been served by the nearby Hudson River Psychiatric Center until that facility's closure in January 2012. The campus was closed and abandoned in 2003 and since then has fallen into a state of disrepair. Authorities struggle with the risk of arson and vandals after suspicion of an intentionally set fire. The male bedding ward, south of the main building, was critically damaged in a 2007 fire caused by lightning. The property was sold to an unnamed buyer in November 2013.[5] Heres afew shots i took 1. Hudson State Hospital by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 2. Hudson State Hospital by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 3. Hudson State Hospital by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 4. Hudson State Hospital by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 5. Hudson State Hospital by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 6. Hudson State Hospital by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 7. Hudson State Hospital by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 8. Hudson State Hospital by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 9. Hudson State Hospital by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 10. Hudson State Hospital by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 11. Hudson State Hospital by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 12. Hudson State Hospital by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 13. Hudson State Hospital by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 14. Hudson State Hospital by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 15. Hudson State Hospital by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 16. Hudson State Hospital by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 17. Hudson State Hospital by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 18. Hudson State Hospital by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 19. Hudson State Hospital by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 20. Hudson State Hospital by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 21. Hudson State Hospital by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 22. Hudson State Hospital by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 23. Hudson State Hospital by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 24. Hudson State Hospital by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 25. Hudson State Hospital by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 26. Hudson State Hospital by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Thanks for taking a ganders DJ
  5. 1 point
    Hey Bella, welcome to OS I moved this post to the general discussion section. You should get yourself a mask to protect yourself from asbestos if you are worried, I think a P3 mask should do the trick. However, asbestos is only a danger when it has been disturbed and it's particles have entered the atmosphere. With that in mind I would recommend always treading carefully so you don't disturb any asbestos in the first place. With dodgy floors I think you just need to use common sense, if it looks sunken then be wary. If there are holes where you can see the floor below, probably best to take another route. If it looks dodgy and you want to try it anyway just take it very slow and test every step with your foot first before putting all your weight on it. There is no exact science to it, my foot went through the floor in a house once, luckily just my leg and not the rest of my body. Also wearing boots is advisable as there can be some nasty nails waiting to stick into you. I hope this helps
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