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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/22/2017 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    Visited with @GK_WAX and @Dangle_Angle. Don't know much about it, it was used as a school up until closing in 2014. Planning permission has been given to build new houses on the grounds.It was a pleasant surprise to be greeted by the grand hallway with no damage done by the local kids.Here are some of the photos I managed to get: IMG_3932 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3939 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3941 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3960 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3959 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3958 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3957 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3956 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3955 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3954 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3953 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3952 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3951 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3950 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3949 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3948 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3947 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3946 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3945 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3944 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3943 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3942 by mike lavin, on Flickr
  2. 1 point
    The Maginot Line, named after the French Minister of War André Maginot, was a line of concrete fortifications, obstacles, and weapon installations built by France in the 1930s to deter invasion by Germany. It was constructed along the borders with Switzerland, Germany, and Luxembourg. Ouvrage translates as "works" in English: published documents in both English and French refer to these fortifications in this manner, rather than as "forts". An ouvrage typically consists of a series of concrete-encased strongpoints on the surface, linked by underground tunnels with common underground works (shops, barracks, and factories etc.). Constructions started in the early 1930s. They served during the Second World War, and were often reused during the Cold War before being gradually abandoned by the French army. This particular ouvrage consists of two combat blocks connected by an underground gallery and was manned by 100 men before surrendering to the Germans in 1940. I put this on the list of things to check despite information suggesting it was secured. Glad I did as it turned out to be pretty nice inside. All items have been removed but it's pretty clean with some nice signage and murals on the walls throughout. Just a small part of a very fruitful trip with @Maniac @extreme_ironingand Elliot5200. 1. Starting from ground level 2. 3. 4. Coat of arms painted on the wall 5. 6. Sealed entrance in one of the combat blocks. 7. Hand painted signage could be found everywhere: 'Victory' 8. 'One for all, and all for one', the motto of the Three Musketeers 9. 'Be a man' 10. & 11. 12. & 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 'Honor work solidarity' 24. 25. 26. 27. 'Secrecy is a matter of honor for communications personnel' 28. Notice the dirty footprints up the wall, not sure how those got there. 29. This mural was definitely the coolest find. 30. Just to finish off, a couple of pics from another petit ouvrage that was also meant to be sealed. It was flooded in here, the water reached waist deep in this brickwork tunnel so we had to give up. 31. Calcite coated the floor throughout. 32. Gun machinery would have been positioned here. Cheers for looking
  3. 1 point
    Krampnitz Kaserne was a military training complex built by the Germans in 1937. It was used for the training of Nazi troops until the end of the Second World War. The Germans evacuated the barracks on April 26, 1945. A day later it was taken over by Soviet troops who had immediately taken control of the area. The 35th Guards Motor Rifle Division was then stationed here until its abandonment in 1992, after the Dissolution of the Soviet Union. The whole complex consists of more than 50 buildings, mostly accommodation and storage, though it also includes an officers' club, a basketball court, a theatre and much more. Movies such as Enemy at the Gates, Inglourious Basterds, The Monuments Men, and Valkyrie shot scenes here. I came here on my own as I couldn't get any of the other lazy fuckers out of bed. I was pretty glad as it happens as I quite enjoy exploring on my own. You get round places far quicker and your senses are heightened so it can be a bit more intense. They weren't bothered anyway, they got to lie in and have kebabs for breakfast. Anyway, this was my third trip to Berlin, and although my previous two trips were fun, they were pretty boozy affairs so I didn't get much done. This time I was on a proper mission. For me these old German military sites are fascinating. To think that this place was full of Nazi troops during WWII is pretty mind blowing in itself, but even more so when you see the size of it in person. Some of the buildings are easily accessible but don't have much to offer. The more interesting buildings have been sealed pretty well but there are still ways inside for the most part. Here's some photos. 1. 2. I think this was the officers' club. Lots of grand grand rooms inside but looking a bit worse for wear now. 3. 4. 5. 6. This staircase sits underneath the famous Nazi eagle mosaic. I didn't have long here as I heard voices and people entering the building through a locked door. 7. Unfortunately however the eagle mosaic has been completely covered up with plaster. I was pretty disappointed by this but I needn't have worried as Krampnitz has tons more interesting stuff if you keep looking. You can see the eagle mural here on an old report > 8. Back outside I spotted this building through the trees 9. A basketball court / gym hall 10. I wonder if this was part of a school for children, as families spent years living here. 11. 12. 13. This small theatre was quite interesting. Only a couple of rows of seating remain. 14. 15. 16. I spotted some old German writing (siegen oder siberia) under the peely paint which translates into English as 'Victory or Siberia' 17. 18. 19. 20. There's a lot of crap graff all over the place unfortunately, I chose to avoid photographing it for the most part. These are some of the better examples I found. 21. 22. 23. Just when I thought I was done I stumbled across this grand old theatre. 24. On hearing voices approaching I made my way out and narrowly avoided bumping into a couple of men with the keys to the building. They weren't dressed like security but I didn't fancy hanging around after that. 25. Finally, some old Soviet signs and murals I found on the outside of the buildings. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. I'd like to go back and find the rest of these as I missed a large chunk of the site so there must be tons more. Thanks for looking.
  4. 1 point
    Spot on that mate @The_Raw . I should really make a trip over there as these places really interest me
  5. 1 point
    History, of which I (believe it or not!!) didn't steal from another poster!! Bletchley Park was the central site for British codebreakers during World War II. It housed the Government Code and Cypher School (GC&CS), which regularly penetrated the secret communications of the Axis Powers – most importantly the German Enigma and Lorenz ciphers. The official historian of World War II British Intelligence has written that the "Ultra" intelligence produced at Bletchley shortened the war by two to four years, and that without it the outcome of the war would have been uncertain. There were 16 huts, mostly timber built. Some of those are still on site, most are demolished. One of them, Hut 4 which was used for Naval intelligence is now used as a restaurant for the museum. There were quite a few brick built blocks too, most of which still stand on the site. Block A: Naval Intelligence. Block B: Italian Air and Naval, and Japanese code breaking. Block C: Stored the substantial punch-card index. Block D: Enigma work, extending that in huts 3, 6, and 8. Block E: Incoming and outgoing Radio Transmission and TypeX. Block F: Included the Newmanry and Testery, and Japanese Military Air Section. It has since been demolished. Block G: Traffic analysis and deception operations. Block H: Tunny and Colossus (now The National Museum of Computing). Explore I visited with @hamtagger & @Session9. We had wanted to visit this place for some time and as we were making our way through the H & V's of Milton Keynes I was vocally expressing my reminiscence at the days I used to take journeys to go raving and got pretty excited when we came across V7 Saxon Street! Anyway when we got there I was quite surprised that this sat literally in the middle of a really built up area. We had a nice dander round Block G and then through to Block D. I really enjoyed it, very leisurely explore. No one around, at all. Everything was perfectly silent and at one point I even sat next to a window listening to visitors of the museum talk about how their wife really did make a shit cup of coffee. I liked the decay, especially in Block D. There was so much memorabilia I could have spent days here just trying to work out what everything was! Really pleased we eventually got around to visiting. Anyway, on to the pics. (apologies, these are completely non edited as Flickr is stillshit but not as shit as photofuckit) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Thanks for looking!
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