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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/05/2017 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    I found this church from the 13th century, almost 3.5 hours from London, during the research for my last UK tour. I only knew that it was no longer used and had no idea if it would be accessible. I had little hope of that, but at least I wanted to try it. After a seemingly endless drive I reached the really tiny village in the rain, which only consisted of one handful of houses. And, contrary to expectations, one of the old doors could be opened. Inside, there was a wonderful scene of decay. Parts of the ceiling already had larger holes, and a thick layer of dust and debris covered the inventory. Old books, memorial plaques on the walls, broken heads of statues - it seemed as if this church had been forgotten for a long time. While I looked around and took the first pictures, outside raged a violent thunderstorm, which gave the place a very special atmosphere... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
  2. 2 points
    A modern diesel power plant! Great place to explore. No masks needed for entry Thanks!
  3. 1 point
    Oakwood Farm The Explore A farm in Norfolk with a blue toilet which I liked. Good quality mahogany seat which was a bit dusty and the flush was defective. Toilet roll was scratchy on the anus area and dusty too. A farmer and his wife and possibly kids lived here at some point in the past. My guess is the farmer liked cars. There were lots of things to photograph here and from my 1% memory of this 'explore' that room with the wardrobe was pitch black and I called my camera lots of names that day, when in reality it was my inability to use it correctly that was the problem. And I had a poo there, while @Urbexbandoned laughed and photographed me, but that's the norm for pretty much every time we're out exploring. The History A farm in Norfolk where nobody lives anymore. The whole extended family died and it became a derp. The Pictures 1. 2. Vaseline - Empty... 3. Something for the bum grapes 4. 5. The dark room which was a twat to photograph.. 6. 7. "with 3 doors!" 8. 9. There was pretty much nothing in this room apart from this old tea box. 10. 11. Impactual eeriebex photo showing some kind of past.. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. Thanks for having a look and feedback always appreciated
  4. 1 point
    History St. James Hall, which is Presbyterian (reformed Protestantism), was built in 1885.The church next door was built five years later, in 1900. Both are good examples of early roughcast church building, but the hall is a Gothic style structure while the church is said to be neoclassical Edwardian. Both the structures were designed by Robert Watt and John Mitchell, two notable architects in the early 1900s, and they are currently Category B listed heritage buildings. The church closed sometime between 2012 and 2013, after Auckland Council deemed it too dangerous to enter. After also being inspected in 2016, the hall has now been forced to close its doors. One of the roof trusses has shown signs of movement and several significant pieces of timber around the unreinforced concrete/masonry walls are reportedly rotten. According to the heritage architect that conducted the assessment on the building, this raises the potential of ‘catastrophic failure of the walls’. It has been reported that the congregation wish to remain at St. James Hall; however, the cost of the repairs and additional strengthening work are way beyond what they can afford. They say the parish is too small to raise the necessary funds. Our Version of Events After driving around half of Auckland looking for a place to pull over and sleep, we eventually found ourselves outside St. James Church and Hall. At the time, bearing in mind it was dark, we were pretty sure the church was abandoned, but we couldn’t tell if the hall next door was. So, before hitting the hay, we had a quick poke around both sites to do a spot of investigating. As it turned out, both buildings were in fact abandoned, with boards covering all the essential areas. Following that discovery, then, we decided to sleep in the car right outside, so we could wake up to a spot of exploring right away before breakfast. Inside the car, it was as uncomfortable, as it always is. There were three of us, so that made putting the seats back slightly awkward – especially with someone who was baked sprawled across the back seats – and we hadn’t washed for days. The smell was interesting, as was the shit that’d accumulated in the car. All we could do, to put all of that out of our minds, was dream about how epic the explore we were about to do in the morning was going to be. We woke early, eager to get out of the car and enter a building that would, by comparison, be much cleaner and airier than our current environment. So, we grabbed the gear and headed back over to the church hall. We did that building first as it looked as though it was going to be the more interesting of the two. Thanks to our recce the previous evening, we had a good idea about how we might access the place. Once inside, we quickly realised that the old hall had been redeveloped into a church. At first, we weren’t sure if it was actually abandoned either, since there were still instruments set up and various pieces of paperwork with recent dates on them. We did a bit of on the spot digging, though, and discovered that the hall had been deemed too dangerous to enter, by order of the council. It appeared, then, that the local parish were still using the premises right up until the last minute. Their last activity in the place, by our assessment, seemed to have been January 2017. Anyway, even in the knowledge that the hall was now abandoned, we still felt as though the vicar was about to walk in at any moment to begin Sunday service. After having a good look around the former hall, we made our way over to the church. Unfortunately, this building was much more fucked. The local goons have ensured it no longer has any windows left. As we stepped inside, the heavy stench of damp and decay made it clear that the elements have settled in nicely, along with hundreds of pigeons. Everywhere we looked there was a bird carcass. Nevertheless, we squelched on, across the waterlogged carpets and took a quick look around the place. All in all, there wasn’t a lot to see, but it was good to have seen the whole site as opposed to only half of it. Explored with Nillskill. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24:
  5. 1 point
    Not sure on dates of closure, but a beautiful power plant. This was used to power the Iron works next door which has now become a museum. Thanks!
  6. 1 point
    This was a chance find in late 2015 with a second visit in early 2016. Although someone - presumably a family member - had tried to do some 'sorting' they hadn't got very far. At the time it had been un-lived in for quite some years I'd say. There wasn't much to reveal specific detail about who had lived there and everything seemed to point to a perfectly middle-class respectability. Magazines about gardening, commemorative crockery etc. A cupboard for bottles of booze, almost all unopened, so a picture of restraint and moderation. However I then saw a full carousel of slide photographs. I picked one out expecting it to probably be a holiday snap from a seaside resort. It wasn't pictures of Bournemouth, although they could have been taken in the 70's. The whole lot was of very well-endowed gentlemen who must have been somewhere really hot because they had to take all their clothes off In the interest of taste and decency these have not made the final collection but I hope you still enjoy the report. Beware the giant butterfly Update - work has now started on major renovations to the house and gardens
  7. 1 point
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