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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/07/2017 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    Another drive past find on a trip to Italy last year, never seen pics of it, so we called it Powerplant Percy. It was a sub-station of some sort, but stripped out and not much to see, but it was rather nice inside, so here you have it. Well there you have it, a stripped out shell, but they need a bit of love too, or maybe not, you got this far, so you must have enjoyed it
  2. 1 point
    So I've been to this location, which was a dancing/disco/club whatever you prefer. But not your usual one, this one exist out of tents! Seen it passing by a few times.. Started searching for it and found it. Now we only had to pick a date and go out on explore! Last weekend was the time! We already left on Friday, and wanted to do this location Friday also. But thanks to our amazing road network in Belgium and their works, we'd end up there after sunset. So we ended up here Sunday , on our way back home! Heard it was actually an easy entrance somewhere upfront the fences where laying down.. They said.. Well looks like they've put them back up! Some of these beta fences you find on every location, decorated with lovely (fresh?) razor-wire! Looked a bit around and seemed like they made work of it closing all the openings. So went around the other side only to find this small piece not having any razor-wire, perfect! Once on terrain it already looked pretty trashed outside, and of course as was inside. Seemed like people needed some club lights for their homes, and alot of other stuff that went missing.. Sadly there was a fire not so long ago, and i believe wind have destroyed on of the main tents ( or could be partial due to fire ). This club was actually already existing for a long time, i believe nearly 20 years. It had to shut down it's door, as less people started to visit the place. It got blown in a second life, but that didn't last long. Naamloos_HDR22 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR18 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR8 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR4 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR6 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR11 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR10 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR2 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR14 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR13 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR12 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr _DSC9607 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr _DSC9613 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr _DSC9599 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR15 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR16 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR16 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Hope it's a bit readable !
  3. 1 point
    Just a crappy stripped out church, but something about it would tickle the nipples of a god fearing nun. But I liked it enough to take a few pictures anyway. I 'm almost sorry you had to look this report, I am scraping the barrel, but I'm not really sorry
  4. 1 point
    Hello, another from my long long long list of shitty cottages I have to post up on here tp convert you to the deeply weird realm of cottaging! Found this almost my accident whilst exploring with a couple friends, after walking what felt like miles through small forests, over streams, up and down heather marsh lands and over several feilds to visit some of the shittest derps you could probably imagine, I spotted this on the way down the wild hills. We took a chance as it was on a live farm, found the door open and decided to pop in for 30 mins and grabbed some pics. We all felt a bit uneasy as it was a live farm and decided to get out quickly, just as we were closing the door a car came down the drive way, and we bolted like a mini heard of highland cows stampeding our way down the side of the house and over a few fences to safety. Never been back, but one day I will! Thanks for cuming cottaging with me
  5. 1 point
    History- The building is from the 'railway era'. The hotel was a hub of the community, it had a fantastic ballroom and restaurant. Many people came by rail to stay at Sutton Bridge. The hotel from around 2000 was used by an employment agency called StaffSmart to house workers they had lured over to the UK from South Africa to work in the local canning factory. People came from SA on the promise of hotel accommodation and didn't know until they got here that it meant inside the shell of the Bridge Hotel on damp mattresses lined up in each room, including the Ballroom. After StaffSmart vacated the hotel, it stood empty with broken windows until it was bought and restored to a high standard with plush furnishings and chandeliers. However, the hotel rooms were pricey and without the rail trade of people heading to the village, people would be passing through and tended to stay in cheaper accommodation in the area. The hotel wasn't open for long before closing down and ownership passed through several hands whilst falling further into disrepair. In 2015, workmen were spotted on the site removing roof tiles and floorboards to salvage as many building materials before it was demolished but its still standing now, so I don't know what stopped the demolition. Since then the building has unfortunately been vandalised and several fires have been set destroying about 70% of it. The Bridge Hotel in the 50's Explore- The hotel is close to me, so even though I knew the damage of the place it was still worth checking out. Access to the building was easy, a window round back was broken and a board to climb up to it was balanced kind of safely. The cellar floor, ground floor and a few rooms on the first floor were safe enough to walk around but past that there is a lot of fire damage. Pictures-
  6. 1 point
    This extravagant castle was originally built in 1605 to a more simple design. During the 19th century it underwent an Arabian style makeover which took 40 years to reach completion. No attention was spared to detail, with each and every one of the 365 rooms given its own identity. During the second world war it was looted by the Germans. After that it became a luxury hotel until it closed it's doors in 1990. Since then various plans have fallen through and a very recent sale attempt was upheld by Italian courts so its future remains unknown. I visited here with @Miss.Anthrope, a place we'd both had firmly at the top of our wish lists for some time. We could've spent hours in here but decided to air on the side of caution and keep our visit relatively short as we'd been asked to leave the area by security the day before. I guess it was pretty obvious what we were up to with camera bags and tripods peeking over the fence and we'd been spotted on cctv. On our return we made sure not to make the same mistake as they are definitely keeping an eye on the place. Derelict buildings don't come much more stunning than this. Ciao bella
  7. 1 point
    At first glance, the huge psychiatry campus with its historical buildings reminds you of certain pieces of literature or films. The early morning haze lies over the hospital grounds and really adds to that somewhat uncanny atmosphere. It´s still pretty early in the morning. Thus, we almost don´t meet any people. A situation, that changed completely on our way back, when we had to keep as insconspicious as possible among patients, nursing stuff and "normal" visitors. Yet, everything´s still pretty calm and we can enjoy the morning silence as we walk across the park-like grounds of the hospital, walking on paths which are bordered by beautiful flowers. Here and there, beautiful buildings appear. Everything occurs to be peaceful and neat. Almost a place for your well-being, at least form the perspective of a non-patient. Not before we pass by a building, fenced up by thick bars, reality sets in. As if by command, we can suddenly hear screams coming out of the building. The hospital is largely still active. Only a small part has been disused out of unknown reasons. It seems like time´s been standing still here for a pretty long time. Old benches would´ve been disappeared in a jungle-like thicket entirely, if it wasn´t for their bright red colours. Across an architectural more than beautiful patio we enter the building in front of us. Inside, particularly striking are the numerous toys scattred around the building. What exact purpose the old building served remains a mystery.
  8. 1 point
    Kings Hall Cinema, Southall, London - September 2017 Interesting one this one! I'd wanted to do this for a while and had been planning to in the coming weeks but had been put off with the idea of its "unique access" which requires some planning in terms of times of entry! Situated on a very busy road with lots of passersby and businesses open till the very wee hours, there is a very small window to get inside as the Night Shift commute changes to the Early and Day Shift Commute. When we arrived it was around midnight and the streets were busy. We were in London so went for a little drive for an hour or so before returning. Visited with a non-member back in September;when inside we had a little lie down in a dark corner for an hour or so to allow the sun to rise just a little bit, and spent about 2 hours light painting the rooms which were boarded and anything which the abundance of daylight wouldn't help. It's a very interesting building with lots to shoot photos of and with my "loaded" parking meter fast running out, we didn't have as much time inside as we would have liked. The air inside is terrible (understandably) and the damp has caused the parquet floors inside much of the building to bow upwards, making an interesting effect! We started shooting inside the main hall at around 6am and spent some time chilling here and getting photos as the sun came up, but we only had till 8am on the car park. The street was already very busy down below by 6am and the main hall had a hue of red from some of the shops signage. When it did become time to leave, we had to jump into a street full of commuters. We were not getting out without being seen. It was 7:45am and the bus stops had queues of people at them. As I was leaving I did attempt to not be seen, but a middle aged chap turned round and looked right at me. I wished him a good morning, jumped down and walked off to get my externals. He certainly looked slightly bewildered. The cinema come Methodists Church is located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was constructed in 1916; designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The site has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was originally operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and was soon playing religious films. By 1926, Kings Hall was operating as a regular cinema; but was however still managed by the Methodist church. The Cinema was closed in 1937. It then converted back to its original Methodist Church use, and today is the King’s Hall Methodist Church. Some interesting and otherwise controversial quotes taken from comments when closure was announced. The church vacated the site in 2012. More Info at: http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/31352 #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157688232708403
  9. 1 point
    History The Waterloo Tunnel is a 779 metre (852 yards) long disused railway tunnel in Liverpool. It opened in 1849. At its Eastern end, the Waterloo Tunnel opens into a short cutting (approximately 63 metres long) which connects to the Victoria Tunnel which is 1.536 miles (2.474 kilometres) long. Effectively, both tunnels are one long tunnel with an open-air ventilation cutting in between; however, they were given different names initially because trains in the Waterloo Tunnel were locomotive hauled while trains in the Victoria Tunnel were cable hauled. In terms of tunnel architecture, the Waterloo Tunnel features a semi-circular opening, wide enough to accommodate three separate tracks. The westernmost section has been backfilled and there are occasional accumulations of calcite on the brickwork. Most of the Waterloo Tunnel is brick-lined; however, it is not listed. The Victoria Tunnel, on the other hand, is Grade II listed. It features a rusticated arch flanked by buttresses, together with a modillioned cornice and ashlar-coped parapet. The first two-hundred yards of the tunnel are brick-arched, but after that it is unlined up to the fourth ventilation shaft. There are five visible air shafts in the Victoria Tunnel, and an additional five hidden shafts. A drain also runs down the length of the tunnel, but this has collapsed in certain places. Both tunnels were constructed because the city of Liverpool is built on a densely populated escarpment (a long, steep slope) that drops down to the River Mersey. This meant building on the surface would have been difficult without causing major disruption, but also that the landscape was ideal for the construction of a line that could be placed beneath the ground. Nevertheless, cutting both tunnels still proved to be a difficult task as care had to be taken to avoid disturbing the buildings above due to their shallow depth. The work from Byrom Street eastwards proved the most difficult and perilous and, despite efforts to excavate carefully, the soft clay in the area caused several houses to give way, rendering them uninhabitable. All the inhabitants were forced to abandon their homes at short notice. What this means is that the design of the tunnel – becoming two separate structures – was a result of circumstance. The first goods traffic travelled through the tunnels in August 1849. However, a three-foot section of Victoria Tunnel collapsed in September 1852. The collapse was quickly repaired and the tunnels were used by goods traffic without any further major incidents until 1899, when a freight train consisting of a tank, twenty-three loaded wagons and a brake van separated when a coupling between the seventh and eighth wagons fractured. Two wagons and the van were destroyed in the incident, and two of the three men aboard were killed. A train that was travelling towards the docks was also caught up in the accident as it collided with the debris and partially derailed. Although both the Waterloo and Victoria Tunnel were initially part of a freight line, they were opened to passenger traffic in 1895. Passenger services continued to run up until February 1971. Many of the large docks in Liverpool ‘dried up’ as they were affected by declining industry across the UK and this resulted in a significant decrease in traffic on the line. Both tunnels were officially closed on 19th November 1972; although, a small section of the Edge Hill line was retained as a headshunt. It is rumoured that this track is still used very occasionally today. Whether this is true or not, though, is another matter. The futures of both the Waterloo and Victoria Tunnel are uncertain. However, the Merseyrail Network have proposed to use part of them to create a connection to the low-level Liverpool Central Station. Creating the connection would reduce journey times to Edge Hill. Unfortunately, though, so far all plans have fallen through due to some local opposition and budget constraints. The last attempt to revive the line was made in 2007, driven by plans to redevelop the north shore area of Liverpool. Our Version of Events After meeting up with a couple of Liverpool based explorers, and hitting an old industrial site first, we decided to head over to the Waterloo/Victoria Tunnel. It was good to meet a couple of locals for a change because they both had an exceptional knowledge of the area – something we lack when it comes to exploring in Liverpool, unfortunately. Anyway, this saved us having to do much research and scouting for a change. So, thanks fellas! When we initially rocked up outside our chosen access point, several Network Rail guys were busy standing around a couple of shovels and one guy down a hole. Rather than leave and come back, though, we decided to sit in the car and wait for them to fuck off. Our patience paid off pretty quickly since the boys in orange decided to down tools literally five minutes after we’d parked up. Once they’d left, we gave them an additional five minutes before we grabbed our gear and made our way into the tunnels, to account for any of them who might have left their beloved tape measure or spirit level behind. The first tunnel, the Waterloo Tunnel, smelt strongly of tar or creosote. We weren’t sure of the source, but the floor was fairly manky, giving an indication that there may have been a recent spillage. That, however, was perhaps the most interesting part of this section of the explore. All in all, it didn’t seem especially exceptional – even if it was quite wide. Hoping the explore would be better in the latter half, then, we cracked on and made our way towards the open-air section. As several other reports have revealed, the open-air section/accident between the two tunnels is full of shit. It seems Liverpool folk don’t bother visiting the local tip, they simply lob their old goodies off the bridge on Fontenoy Street. Anyone seeking spare lawnmower parts, or a second-hand seatee, should get themselves straight down to the Waterloo Tunnel. Sadly, we didn’t need either, so we had to clamber over the mountain of shit instead, to reach the Victoria Tunnel on the other side. Once inside the Victoria Tunnel, we began our long walk towards Edge Hill Station. At this point, we weren’t aware how long the bloody thing is, but it soon became clear to us that the light at the end of the tunnel wasn’t getting much closer any time soon. Nevertheless, we plodded on, heading towards the small dot of light in the far distance. The Victoria Tunnel was much more interesting that its sister. A large proportion of it is brick-lined, but there are also large unlined sections that have simply been carved out. There are several ventilation shafts to look at along the way too, and each one is different to the last. It’s only now, having been inside the Victoria Tunnel, that we understand what a few of the random structures are on the surface directly above. Finally, the tunnel ends with a short section of railway track that is still in situ, which is always nice to find. The only things to be careful of down this end are Network Rail workers and, so we have been told, a camera waiting for unsuspecting visitors to the tunnel. Explored with Veryhighguy and The J Man. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27: 28: 29: 30:
  10. 1 point
    Château de la Favorite , also called "Château du Prince Charles", was built in 1734 according to the plans of the architect Germain Boffrand and under the direction of Jean Marchal. It was owned by Charles Alexander. After his death in 1780, Emperor Joseph II inherited the castle, which offers it for sale. Until the 1990s the castle was still in good condition. After another sale, the castle was gutted. The roof was secured and windows were walled in the 21st century. A few years ago, it was still accessible through a window, unfortunately no longer today. 1 2 3 4 5
  11. 1 point
    History Malsis School located at a mansion known as Malsis Hall in the village of Crosshills, in North Yorkshire, England, was a co-educational independent pre-prep and preparatory school for pupils aged three to 13 years. The school was founded in 1920 and closed due to falling pupil numbers in 2014. Facilities at the school included 3 km mountain bike trail, 9-hole golf course, swimming pool, all weather pitch, rifle range and 40 acres of grounds. The school closed on 10 December 2014, when the final assembly started at 11 am and concluded at 1 pm. The next day the school trust went into administration with Ernst & Young of Leeds. The school's assets were auctioned off and the land and building sold by Eddisons, and having fully paid off its debts it passed into creditors voluntary liquidation and the company was finally dissolved on 4 August 2017. In January 2015, The Old Malsis Association (OMA) was formed to represent the views of school alumni from down the years. Malsis Hall and its grounds have been sold to Seddon Construction, which plans to build 100 new homes on the site and transform the former school building into a specialist rehabilitation centre - subject to planning permission being granted. Proprietors Jonathan and Jamie Seddon were both former Malsis pupils in the 1980s. Explore Me & @hamtagger had seen this pop up online a few times & ventured over to yourkshire. We met @Moz88 while in the grounds before we even got in and was nice to explore with someone new. A rather ungraceful entry by all 3 of us added comedy to the explore. This place was as interesting as it's history. Literally everywhere you looked there was something ornate or some thing that caught our eye. Probably one of the nicest places I have visited. The tower had been unused for some time with no steps up to the top. The place wasn't in bad condition at all. With the main mansion house being where the interesting stuff was the back end of the school which was the newer part did hold some nice bits to see. Some of it was quite sad with pictures of the girls and boys still littering the tables and art/french work adorning the walls. I loved all of the ornamental ceilings & architecture, the pediments outside the headmasters office & main building were very 'stately home'. Anyway on to the pics. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Thanks for looking!
  12. 1 point
    The Mcneil Mansion burlington city new jersey..Mcniel was a pipe maker he created his own enclosed town..he had his own electicty factory,his own firehouse,all next to his pipe factory as it once looked There was amovement to tear it down...i tried my ancient hebrew curse resh resh...to stop it..and so far its worked t parts of the mansion are dangerous..my foot sank a few times that a sign to move quick the main stair case..there are a few other stairways up each room has its own decay it had its own elevator he had huge walk in safes in the basement some parts of the mansion wre in good shape the mansion is ust one of the bjuildings on the site theres many more..some are in the video...a few ghost voices are caught including my name being called
  13. 1 point
    Number 1 stands out for me. Captured brilliantly.
  14. 1 point
    What do you mean obviously re-decorated for the photos? Are you trying to say people should never move things to get a better picture? Only shoot places that exactly as you find them... If that is what this forum has come too?! I did not realise in the time since I left being a mod here, things have gone to that level of superiority has arisen and the open mindedness of the team has left.
  15. 1 point
    Thanks guys, appreciate it, took a longer break than I expected, a lot of shitty reports to come hahah!
  16. 1 point
    Thank you all very much! As wished, some more pics... :-)
  17. 1 point
    The History There isn't really a great lot to say about this place as its only a train tunnel but the reason behind this being built in the first place is still a little funny. Located in Derbyshire, the 967 meter tunnel was constructed for the sole reason of hiding the view of the railway where this passed Haddon House from the Duke of Rutland. This was clear sign of the Dukes determination to preserve his countryside view . The tunnel was opened in 1863 and remained this way until 1967 when the line eventually closed. There are plans for a future restoration of the tunnel to extend heritage rail services however this will likely require some fundraising to be a possibility. The Explore Again there isn't really a lot that i can about the explore as this is just a walk from one end of the tunnel to the other but the ventilation shafts do create some cool shots in here however I only ended up coming out with a handful. Even though it was only small and not much of a challenge it was still a fun visit and was worth the wander. Thanks for looking!
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