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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/27/2017 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    In the silos of the blast furnace Terre Rouge, iron ore and lime was stored, mixed and then burned in the blast furnaces. The gases were used to power the nearby thermal power plant "Central Thermique", which was built in 1951 and closed in 1997. The power plant is currently being demolished. Visited with @The_Raw, @extreme_ironing & @Maniac. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  2. 2 points
    1: Waves and sunshine.... by P Z, on Flickr 2: Suite by P Z, on Flickr 3: All i need is some nice literature.... by P Z, on Flickr 4: it lurks in the shadows... by P Z, on Flickr 5: Personal Hygiene... by P Z, on Flickr Amazing decay in this abandoned hotel, we had a great time here, only the 2 thieves were very uncool..... grts P.
  3. 2 points
    This is a spectacular location for sure, surrounded by wonderful dramatic coastline. If you've got time I'd recommend bringing a packed lunch!! You could be watching the waves crash against the rugged cliffs, maybe if you're lucky you might spot a seal or a puffin passing by. Here in 1951 plans were set up to build a plant which would extract bromine from sea water and by adding sulphuric acid would then create liquid bromine. The bromine was then reacted with ethylene to produce Dibromoethane which was a key component of leaded petrol. With the phasing out of leaded petrol in the 1990's the plant diversified into other bromine chemicals. Production finally stopped altogether in March 2004. Many of the buildings have been demolished but there was enough standing to make this high on my wish list - plenty of natural decay and lots of interesting stuff left on site. Its been fairly undisturbed due to a combination of its remote location, CCTV and onsite security. Sadly though a recent fire has badly damaged one of the buildings (not quite sure which one). The photos in this report are a compilation. I had to make a return visit because the first time I somehow missed the conference room and the main attraction for me - the medical area. I really like how much variety there is, hence why there's quite a few pics
  4. 2 points
    Ouvrage Mont des Welches, a gros ouvrage of the Maginot Line fortifications, is part of the Fortified Sector of Boulay. It comprises two entrance blocks, one infantry block, one artillery block, one observation block and two combination blocks. It is located between petit ouvrage Coucou and gros ouvrage Michelsberg, facing Germany. Relatively small for a gros ouvrage, Mont des Welches saw a brief period of sharp action in June 1940, when German forces moving along the rear of the Maginot Line engaged the position without success. After modest renovations in the 1950s, Mont des Welches was abandoned in the 1970s. Mont des Welches was approved for construction by CORF (Commission d'Organisation des Régions Fortifiées), the Maginot Line's design and construction agency, in June 1930 and became operational by 1935, at a cost of 49 million francs. The contractor was Gianotti of Nice. The comparatively small gros ouvrage comprises two entrance blocks, one infantry block, one artillery block, one observation block, and two combination blocks. It lacks a central "M1" ammunition magazine, and unlike most gros ouvrages, its 60 cm internal rail network was not electrified, relying on human power to move the rail cars. The underground gallery system is compact, about 200 metres (660 ft) from end to end, and unlike larger ouvrages where the gallery system is linear in concept, the central portion of Mont des Welches is a dense network of cross galleries between to main galleries, housing the barracks and utility areas. The galleries are excavated at an average depth of up to 30 metres (98 ft). The manning of the ouvrage in June 1940 comprised 490 men and 17 officers of the 167th Fortress Infantry Regiment and the 151st Position Artillery Regiment, commanded by Chef de Bataillon Tari. The units were under the umbrella of the 42nd Fortress Corps of the 3rd Army, Army Group 2. Visited with @The_Raw, @extreme_ironing & @Maniac. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
  5. 2 points
    This building used to be a monastery but in the first World War it was turned into an emergency hospital for soldiers who fought in the trenches. Many Belgian soldiers were brought into care here, which explains why the ' don't spit on the floor" sign is both in French and English. We came here on a chilly winters day in December. I loved how the warm sunlight supported the nice colours in the building. It's also the first location in which i stripped down to take a selfie, to find out later on, loads of other explorers had been there on the same day. this could had turned out very awkward 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Thanks for watching.
  6. 2 points
    There wasn't much to see at Villa amante del sole but I really love its architecture. Built in the 1930s the whole building was able to rotatet 360 degrees - following the sun. Unfortunately I couldn't visit the whole surrounding of the villa as I felt not to be alone. #1 DSC07902 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC07901 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC07900 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC07899 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC07889 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC07898 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #7 DSC07885 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #8 DSC07897 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #9 DSC07896 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #10 DSC07887 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #11 DSC07895 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
  7. 2 points
    Just a small chapel on the roadside. I don't know anything about the history. Visited with @The_Raw. 1 2 3 4 5 6
  8. 2 points
    @Superully Thanks for posting your video. It would be nice to see a collection of your still photos in a report as i enjoyed the snapshot sections of the video. I understand youtube stuff it 'cool' at the moment but I think your stills of the place would make a really nice account of the location if you have the time to post them
  9. 1 point
    This location is the one where you quickly hear the stories about: impossible, the mount everest of the urbex, don't even try ... But sometmes this steel giant likes some company over too and there were rumours of a slight chance to get in. The date was set already and actually something else was on the program but when one fellow exploer had heard that there were loopholes in the net of the impenetrable hell gate (read: fences, 3 rows of nato wire and another 200V power wire as icing on the cake) we wanted to attempt. The hell gate was only a smaller obstacle, because once you pass you are on the playground of little demons in white vans that approach almost without any sound, or with a shepherd dog at their side. With all of the above in mind, I had a very turbulent night's sleep 3 nights in advance. In the end, the steel gods favoured us that day, which enabled me to enjoy this beautiful exploration. Very briefly it became exciting when there were 5 people in the building with helmets and hi-visability jackets. After some back-and-forth texting with my mates, and some cat and mouse tricks to avoid thm, I first hid in a closet and then rushed me to the top where the rest of our team was. Once there, I crossed the 5 fluos ... 5 eyes on me, 2 of them with open mouth. A French voice 'mais, elle est ici tout seule?' 'vous n'avez pas peur'? It turned out to be just the most flashy explorers you can imagine, not to mention the decibels they produced. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
  10. 1 point
    Paulaner is one of 6 big breweries in Munich. After Paulaner moved its brewery and before the old buidlings were demolished I had the chance to secretely visit the brewery. Unfortunately the tower has been blown up while I was visiting Italy. #1 DSC04091 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC04066 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC04062 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC04135 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC04076 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC04067 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #7 DSC04057-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #8 DSC04129-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #9 DSC04128-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #10 DSC04122-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #11 DSC04068-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #12 DSC04133-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #13 DSC04135-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #14 DSC04088-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
  11. 1 point
    We had a look at this place on a trip down south earlier this year. This part is well fucked now and surely beyond repair. The lack of tiles on the roofs has left these buildings a decayed mess. Still, a couple of hours relaxed exploring was enjoyed, on a warm and quite afternoon. It was cool having a look round here as it was one I'd always fancied the look of from reports I had seen. I just wish I had been aware of the other, no where near as fucked part next door. From the reports I have seen from that part it looks really nice. We seen a lad on the other side of the fence to us and I just thought he trying to find a way into the fucked part. We had no idea at the time what was over their Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY In 1924 Middlesex County Council purchased the Porters Park estate, comprising a total area of 420 acres.The area would eventually become the site of both Harperbury and Shenley hospitals The first patients were 8 adult males detained under The Mental Deficiency Act 1913. When the construction of new buildings began in 1929, these patients were involved in basic labouring. The first of the new buildings were opened in February 1931 and by December housed 342 patients. The site continued to expand - with the addition of female and childrens units - until 1936. After this expansion, the hospital was officially opened by Sir Kingsley Wood - the health minister at the time - in May 1936 and by 1939 the site had 1,194 patients. In 1948 the hospital became part of the NHS and was renamed Harperbury Hospital in 1950. accommodation designed for 1,354 patients was housing 1,587. By 1964 the hospital was suffering severe overcrowding, accommodation designed for 1,354 patients was housing 1,587. Yet the hospital continued to expand up until 1973 when the scaling down process began. and by 1974 a discharge programme had begun moving patients out of Harperbury and back into the outside world. The discharge program continued and by late 2001 there were only about 200 chronically sick patients in residence. Thanks for looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/135648593@N02/sets/72157666820232325/with/26259116425/
  12. 1 point
    Once upon a time there was a prosperous father and his mentally ill son. Instead of giving the son to lunatic asylum he decided to try to cure his son on his own. Breathing his last the father willed to spend all of his property to the research of mental illness. According to his directive Villa Sbertoli was converted into a lunatic aylum after his death. During the times several buildings and a huge park were added. The asylum has been closed in the 1970s. The paintings in the cellar witness the inhabitants situation at the asylum. Although mainly the Villa appears very to be "decoratetd" Villa Sbertoli I felt it's a very impressive place. #1 DSC07975 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC07942 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC07943 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC07945 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC07946 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC07970 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #7 DSC07952 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #8 DSC07953 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #9 DSC07969 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #10 DSC07947 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #11 DSC07948 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #12 DSC07950 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #13 DSC07949 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #14 DSC07955 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #15 DSC07956 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #16 DSC07957 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #17 DSC07959 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #18 DSC07944 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #19 DSC07971 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #20 DSC07973 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #21 DSC07979 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #22 DSC07980 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #23 DSC07981 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #24 DSC07983 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #25 DSC07984 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #26 DSC07985 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #27 DSC07987 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #28 DSC07988 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
  13. 1 point
  14. 1 point
    Some epic shots there mate, much different to what I came away with
  15. 1 point
    I enjoyed it in here more than I expected. Great shots
  16. 1 point
    The infantry base Wolfsberg is a small part of the bigger fortress Kellermann, part of the "Group Fortification Lorraine". It was built in 1904 - 1906. Visited with @The_Raw, @extreme_ironing & @Maniac. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
  17. 1 point
    You did well to get such nice shots in here, not much to see compared to the others we saw
  18. 1 point
  19. 1 point
    Some really nice pics there Andy. Cool selfie too
  20. 1 point
    ANd they say romance is dead... ha! Interesting place and quite enjoyed the write up equally like the bolt shot amazing what rusts beneath us isn't it
  21. 1 point
    History Due to the aircraft stationed at RAF Coningsby there was an external bomb dump, in order to Reduce the quantities of explosives stored and the number of personnel exposed to risk, along with separating explosive processing from storage were the major lessons adopted in what I believe was the reason for a bomb dump further away than normal. Historically I couldn't find much on this place. I did find out about an accident that occurred there in 1971 though. An accident which killed 2 armourers while they were preparing 68mm SNEB Rockets. Without warning, one initiated in the process building they were working in. There was an unexplained electrostatic discharge causing the rocket motor to fire. The Explore Well this is pretty close for me, literally just down the road. I have been here before. Obviously having a connection to the RAF held some interest here. I explored with @hamtagger as per We had a relatively leisurely stroll around. As far as bomb dumps go it was 'normal' in layout and relatively huge. Admin buildings scattered the front section of the site past the picket post and the remainder were process buildings or prep buildings. We ventured in to one and noticed that we hadn't seen it before, on any reports or throughout social media but it was what was inside that caught my attention. Guns & not the handheld sort. I have had to do a bit of research on this because I wasn't aware that firstly they were Royal Navy guns & secondly what type of gun they were. It turns out that there was 2 types, the first was a GCM-A03 twin barrelled Oerlikon. This had a firing seat where someone could sit, almost like a little cabin. It was a bloody tight squeeze as well and I am tiny! Apparently capable of firing 650 rounds a minute. The second which there were 2 of didn't have a firing seat so it was fired by someone either standing up and shooting it or controlled electronically. The first fired 30mm rounds while the second fired 35mm rounds. Both would have been mounted on a ship & both had the barrels removed. Next to this we also found what we believe to be a small communication suite. I have never seen one before and may never do again but it was cosy and compact! We had more or less finished when we spotted 2 blokes part literally right outside & jump over the front gate, they seemed to follow us to the rear side of the site. No camera's or owt then just disappeared. Anyway, enough of my waffle & on to the pics This is where they would have serviced Skyflash & Sidewinder missiles 1 2 This is the communication suite 3 4 The GCM-A03 twin cannon Oerlikon 5 6 7 8 This is it in action (Not my photo, obviously) 9 This was the other gun, a GCM-A01 (I believe, could be wrong) 10 The rest of the site 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 A little mention of tornado here, which became stationed at Coningsby during the Gulf War 18 Mercury Thallium is found in AIM-9 sidewinder missiles 19 20 21 thanks for looking!
  22. 1 point
    That's amazing dafne, really stunning architecture. What a beautiful place!
  23. 1 point
    Hello folks. Thanks for the welcome. I had a feeling something odd went in with my initial post and it was lost in the ether somewhere! Obviously I’ve not had any response from anyone in my area but hopefully that will change now. I’ll keep watching the site and start doing some research for desirable exploring in or around the area
  24. 1 point
    This Grade II listed building was built in 1894-96 and has been altered altered 1931 and 1967. The large children's mural was designed in 1931 by Herbert Wood. In more recent times it has been The Taj Banqueting Suite which was evacuated in 2014 when when an explosion caused a fire in the kitchen. (http://www.examiner.co.uk/news/west-yorkshire-news/around-200-people-evacuated-after-7648171)
  25. 1 point
    Solo jaunt, part 2/3 of my (temporary) swansong. Well, this was epic. The best asylum I've had the pleasure of exploring, and possibly the best asylum of the "post-classic" era when most closed. And definitely one of the most memorable explores I have ever done. If it was any one site that inspired me to finally visit the Emerald Isle, it was this. As always, I turned up at the site completely unprepared and without any idea of what to expect. As I walked round the building, I see the grounds are well maintained, and someone is there walking their dog. Is it security? What are those cars doing at the top of the site? I didn't have a clue. I wasn't feeling that nervous, so I spotted my (possible) way in and ran straight for it. Hidden from the view of the street, I searched for a way in, which didn't take long; though far from trashed, I can see where others managed to gain access and followed their path. I was inside, and was overcome with a really strange feeling; nervous, but like I was in another world (stay with me, I'm not talking about ghosts). I'm inside the building, and with the exception of the water dripping down there's a dead silence. The windows facing the outside are boarded, forcing me to use torchlight. All the rooms are empty and have been tagged with crap like "redrum" and the usual "haunted house" jibber jabber. One of the patient rooms on the ward. Small, secluded rooms were a contrast to the likes of the dorms found in places like Our Lady's in Ennis. As I make my way to the other wards of the vast complex, I randomly flick a light switch and boom! The room flickers back to life; the power is still on! Not only that, in so many rooms so much has been left behind. Unlike the likes of Fairmile and its empty, non-descript wards, this felt so much more real. So much more personal, even if it's just furniture. With no security to contend with, and hearing so little outside beyond cars going past, I was in a different world. I had stepped through the looking glass, and was lost within the walls of the institution, lost in my own thoughts. I'm alone, disconnected from the outside world. I feel no fear, but a feeling of peace and serenity as I wander the almost endless corridors. Apart from the crumbling walls and ceilings, it feels like this place is trapped in a time warp from when it closed in 2009. It is for this reason this has been one of the most memorable moments in my life exploring. Look into the mirror as two storks look down on you... it feels like a Hitchcock film. As I continue to wander the corridors, further away from where I was, there was less evidence of anyone coming here. No graffiti, no smashed glass, no footprints; things felt like they had been left as they were since closure. The ward below was only accessible from a single, long corridor. No idea what kind of patients were kept here, but there was once an identical ward at the other end; this had since been demolished, though when I don't know. There was no main hall designed into the asylum, so I went for a look through the industrial side of the hospital. This place kept on giving and giving. As the last port of call, I checked out the ground floor of the administration. The power was still on, and the check-in machine on the desk was still powered up and showing the correct date and time! I didn't turn on the telly to check if the CCTV was still live though, ha! Behind this room, there were tons of books piled up on the desks; inside were reports going back years regarding patient finances, admissions and discharges, in addition to letters written to and from patients (though not medical records). For privacy reasons no pictures were taken. I made my way back to my entry point, and made a swift exit. I was absolutely overjoyed to have seen what I saw, until I realized I made a ridiculous blunder... I forgot the bloody clocktower! D'arrrrrghhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh! But instead of going back inside, I followed the dog walkers and locals and decided to have a sniff round the outbuildings. The signs said there was a mortuary nearby, but before I did that I had a look at the chapels. I can't work out why, but on this site were an original chapel AND a newer built one a little bit further up. Both, however were locked. The mortuary/chapel of rest was different... This had been completely boarded up, but here the door in the hoarding was unlocked. The best way to describe this mortuary, which was a modern build and not the original would be like an an "airing shelter", free to walk into but with rooms inside. I sneak inside, and there's a gurney in the corner. The door into the chapel of rest (which was still rammed with stuff) and two other doors (probably the toilets, unlikely to be fridges) were locked. I find one of the glazed windows unlocked, so I open it only to find it covered inside with protective mesh! Double d'arrrrrrrrghhhhhhhhhhhhh! Across the way was possibly occupational therapy and the farm buildings, accessible but full from floor to ceiling with beds and paraphenalia from the hospital when it was closed, making it impossible to take photos or navigate. The additional ward at the head of the site was completely sealed, and next door to the last live building on site so no access there. Inevitably any comparison to those two iconic Surrey asylums is anathema, but if you never saw either of these then a trip to St Brigid's should be at the top of your list. This is one of the best asylums I have ever seen, so get out there and have a look whilst you still can. You will NOT be disappointed! Lots of love, TBM x
  26. 1 point
    fantastic set here. great to see some more of this place instead of just only the 'classic'shot.
  27. 1 point
    Great report @Ferox - being seeing this one pop up every so often for years so surprised its still there. What a beauty this is; @Sammydxx81 - any photos or stories from your grandads stay that you would like to share?
  28. 1 point
    Looks a very nice place and well captured. Probably the greyest chapel I've ever seen!
  29. 1 point
    This is amazing! What a wonderful way of reclaiming what was once yours. Nature at its best eh. Nice work, pics cool as always
  30. 1 point
    This is ace mate, really like it. You are coming out with some cracking stuff, keep it coming!
  31. 1 point
  32. 1 point
  33. 1 point
    I was only watching this film about a month ago. This is absolutely incredible, I'd love to know what its original use was for too?
  34. 1 point
    Woah! What an amazing place. Any idea what this was for?
  35. 1 point
    Great photos...... have a personal meaning as my unknown Grandad I have just found out was a resident here for many years. I was recently in Morpeth but didn't know this at the time so missed an opportunity to go have a look!!!! As they are demolishing this now, these pics are probably my only insight into some of his life!! Epic pictures........ You also need to go and have a look inside Cliffe Fort in Kent !
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