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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/13/2017 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    This abandoned porcellain manufactur was founded at the end of the 19th century. It produced until 1974 when it went bankrupt and finally folded. #1 DSC05275 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC05230 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC05220 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC05221 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC05237 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC05231 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #7 DSC05232 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #8 DSC05247 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #9 DSC05262 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #10 DSC06557 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #11 DSC06558 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #12 DSC05253 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #13 DSC05264 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #14 DSC06578 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #15 DSC06559 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #16 DSC06574 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #17 DSC05266 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #18 DSC06564 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #19 DSC05271 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #20 DSC06562 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #21 DSC06565 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #22 DSC06566 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #23 DSC05251 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #24 DSC06571 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #25 DSC06573 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #26 DSC06575 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #27 DSC06576 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #28 DSC06577 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #29 DSC05261 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
  2. 2 points
    Visited recently on my first foray over to the European side of life (can't believe it has taken so long). It was excellent / cold in the snow! History: On May 9, 1899, Kaiser Wilhelm II laid the first stone of Fort St. Blaise. Group Fortification Verdun group is built on top of two hills, it consists of two forts, the fort Sommy 30 ha in the south, and Fort Saint-Blaise 45 ha on the north. Group Fortification Verdun has four 150mm howitzers and six short 100mm guns. Fort St. Blaise was planned for 500 men and fort Sommy for 200 men. It could then receive two infantry companies, in addition to the gunners. St. Blaise, whose fortified barracks could receive 500 people, has 10 observation domes and 12 lookout posts.[4] The water tank's capacity was 1,300 m. 4 diesel engines of 25HP each, providing the energy necessary for Fort St. Blaise. The fort Sommy, including the fortified barracks, could accommodate 200 people, and has 6 observation domes and 8 lookouts. Its water tank could hold 600 m and it had 3 diesel engines of 20HP each, to provide the energy needed for its operation.[4] The coat of arms of Count of Haeseler is carved on the pediment of the door of the fort. It caused the Americans a huge headache in WW2 and proved its worth as a fortified location. Patton underestimated their strength immensely. Fort St. Blaise: The first of the two forts, complete with short 100mm funs in place showing battle damage. Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Collapsed structure / battle damage Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr The thing you don't realise until you get there is that the French Army have not removed any of the barbed wire entanglements, complete with foot spikes and in some places, unexploded ordnance Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Fort Sommy: The smaller outer fort, with a machine gun cupola and two turrets with guns and a tonne more battle damage, with craters and wall collapses all over the shop! Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr
  3. 2 points
    This fortress was constructed by the Germans from 1907-1914. It served German soldiers during the First World War but saw little action. Then it was occupied by the French between 1919 & 1940, where it was incorporated into the maginot line for WWII. After the departure of French troops in June 1940, the German army took back the fort. On September 2, 1944, it was declared a fortress of the Reich by Hitler. The stronghold must therefore be defended until the last extremity by German troops, whose chiefs all took an oath to the Führer. In October 1944, the fort was captured by the American 3rd Army in the Battle of Metz. Definitely one of the best military sites I've visited yet. Amazing to think it served both WWI & WWII yet remains in such good condition today. There are dozens of murals dating back over a century, and 1,700m of tunnels connecting various sections. I had to be dragged away as I could have spent a week in here. Visited with @Maniac @extreme_ironing and @Andy. "Flourish German fatherland" "Cameroon child in Munich" / "Man does not agree" "Booze kills, so do not drink so much!" (or something to that effect....) "Beautiful is the recruit life" "Whoever quarrels or rushes gets the hell out of it" "May God punish England" Thanks for looking y'all
  4. 2 points
    1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Little house somewhere in Belgium. Seems there lived an 103 year old lady and after a fire on the upper floor she left the house. Her son still comes there every week to feed the cat.
  5. 1 point
    1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: A legal visit during a photo base on 21-10-2017. Felt like a last chance because renovation is being prepared. We could notice the painting done during the filming of 'a cure for wellness' very well since we did the bathhouse an men's complex illegal in 2016. Still an impressive location of course and the photo's won't be much of a surprise i guess. I already had a fascination for abandoned buildings, but my first visit at Beelitz Heilstatten in 2014 really kicked of my passion for photography of the abandoned world. Hope you enjoyed viewing this thread! grts, Peter
  6. 1 point
    This was my first ever trip down a mine. So a massive thanks to @EOA for making it happen and another massive thanks to @monk and his daughter for being excellent guides. It was bloody awesome, I could've spent all day poking around the sheds at the top tbh. Underground however was just amazing. It's bloody big this place so a return visit over a couple of days with many more mine beers is a must. History copied from the ever faithful Wikipedia. Obviously. Maenofferen was first worked for slate by men from the nearby Diphwys quarry shortly after 1800. By 1848 slate was being shipped via the Ffestiniog Railway, but traffic on the railway ceased in 1850. In 1857 traffic resumed briefly and apart from a gap in 1865, a steady flow of slate was dispatched via the railway. The initial quarry on the site was known as the David Jones quarry which was the highest and most easterly of what became the extensive Maenofferen complex. In 1861 the Maenofferen Slate Quarry Co. Ltd. was incorporated, producing around 400 tons of slate that year. The company leased a wharf at Porthmadog in 1862 and shipped 181 tons of finished slate over the Ffestiniog Railway the following year. During the nineteenth century the quarry flourished and expanded, extending its workings underground and further downhill towards Blaenau Ffestiniog. By 1897 it employed 429 people with almost half of those working underground. The Ffestiniog Railway remained the quarry's major transport outlet for its products, but there was no direct connection from it to the Ffestiniog's terminus at Duffws. Instead slate was sent via the Rhiwbach Tramway which ran through the quarry. This incurred extra shipping costs that rival quarries did not have to bear. In 1908 the company leased wharf space at Minffordd, installing turntables and siding to allow finished slates to be transshipped to the standard gauge railway there. In 1920 the company solved its high shipping costs by building a new incline connecting its mill to the Votty & Bowydd quarry and reaching agreement to ship its products via that company's incline connection to the Ffestiniog Railway at Duffws. Modern untopping operations at Maenofferen. The uncovered chambers of the Bowydd workings are clearly visible In 1928 Maenofferen purchased the Rhiwbach quarry, continuing to work it and use its associated Tramway until 1953. When the Ffestiniog Railway ceased operation in 1946, Maenofferen leased a short length of the railway's tracks between Duffws station and the interchange with the LMS railway, west of Blaenau Ffestiniog. Slate trains continued to run over this section until 1962, Maenofferen then becoming the last slate quarry to use any part of the Ffestiniog Railway's route. From 1962 slate was shipped from the quarry by road, although the internal quarry tramways including stretches of the Rhiwbach tramway continued in use until at least the 1980s. The quarry was purchased by the nearby Llechwedd quarry in 1975 together with Bowydd, which also incorporated the old Votty workings: these are owned by the Maenofferen Company. Underground production at Maenofferen ceased during November 1999 and with it the end of large-scale underground working for slate in north Wales. Production of slate recommenced on the combined Maenofferen site, consisting of "untopping" underground workings to recover slate from the supporting pillars of the chambers. Material recovered from the quarry tips will also be recovered for crushing and subsequent use. Anyway onto my poto’s My first ever photo down a mine.
  7. 1 point
    So this is my first post on this forum, I found out about these houses on a Abandoned Lincolnshire group on Facebook and thought they were definitely worth a trip, but... the first trip wasn't very successful, the address for these houses took us to two houses on the other side of Withcall that were at one point abandoned but have since been knocked down, so after about half an hour of looking around it became very clear the houses weren't there. After talking to the person who posted them originally and finding out the real location we headed back up to find them. We had to make sure we kept quiet as there is a neighbor attached to the 2nd station house and we weren't sure they'd have appreciated a night time visit from 3 explorers haha. Access to the house is easy, the doors being left open is always convenient. Walking around the houses only took 30 minutes or so , but was still a nice little explore. It's one of them places that besides a few repairs and some serious wallpapering, it looks like the family could just walk back through the front door and pick up their lives where they left off which gave the houses a real creepy vibe. I guess that's all that really needs to be said about these houses. Here's a few pictures: Thanks for reading:)
  8. 1 point
    1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. A former ballhaus somewhere in the eastern of Germany. At the moment they are renovating the building and for a small amount of money you can get acces for taking photographs.
  9. 1 point
    Thats cool as fuck! Great set too mate
  10. 1 point
    With a slightly later Easter weekend start to the day than usual, making my way over to a certain church in Essex to meet with onethirtytwo_ to kick off the days splore. Now before I continue with this, despite our best attempts and even flagging down a local, we did not manage to venture inside the church itself, so in effect was a failed explore. However in true UD fashion a report is a report so I will share the few external shots I did get. There’s very little history on this place so won’t be posting any history with this report unfortunately.
  11. 1 point
    Tin Chapel, North Wales – May 2017 Still way behind on the reports lol! The final leg of mine and Mooksters tour of North Wales back in May; took us to this rather nice abandoned chapel made from Tin, a right trek into the woods. It’s incredibly small here and explored in about 10 minutes, but I really rather liked it. It had canvas chairs instead of pews, and has obviously been abandoned for a very, very long time. It was in amazing condition really! The last site of the May Welsh tour, and the last explore of my old cheap run around, before upgrading to a not so cheap runaround! Onto the photos: #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157684346925431
  12. 1 point
    Thanks. It's another good one near Metz - but as you know, you literally drive past 3 to get to where you want to see! We hadn't really thought about it until we went to Michelsberg and the local there told use the roped off areas were suspected mines
  13. 1 point
    Nice report mate, I've visited a few bits over there this year but not this one. Have to admit, I hadn't thought about unexploded ordnance. I was surrounded by spikes and barbed wire looking for a couple of maginot bunkers, it felt like I was crossing enemy lines
  14. 1 point
  15. 1 point
    Cool blast from the past there Andy. Liking the rusty weights and scissors and the detail shots
  16. 1 point
    The colliery Saint Fontaine was opened in 1908. For the extraction of hard coal, they dug to a depth of 1037 meters. In the 1960s, up to two million tons of hard coal were mined. In 1972 the colliery was closed for the first time, but in 1976 the operation was resumed. In 1986, the final closure, whereupon a large part of the buildings were demolished. Today, apart from the listed tower, only the administrative building including the locker room / pithead baths exists. In recent years, unfortunately, there was a lot of vandalism; last the ceiling lamps were destroyed by some idiots. In Saint Fontaine, there were repeated fatal accidents. On 3 January 1933, 36 miners were killed in a gas explosion. On May 29, 1959, another 26 workers were killed in another explosion. On September 23, 1968, three miners smothered. Visited with @The_Raw. 1. 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
  17. 1 point
    Great set - these bunkers are often a bit boring inside but amazing to see so much and in such good nick. Nice shots too - can't have been the easiest to get right.
  18. 1 point
    I see the mobile operators are taking full advatage of that place! Dont think the photos are crap at all, nice job.
  19. 1 point
    Yea, that much green is never a good sign. Some awesome looking stuff in there though, nice one.
  20. 1 point
  21. 1 point
    Built in 1884 Villa S. ist regarded as the first casino at this coast. After decades of desertion and decay it burned down in 2006. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13
  22. 1 point
  23. 1 point
    Crikey that balcony . Cool set of shots though, the place must be in a bad state nowadays
  24. 1 point
    Nice shots, see what you mean about it being a death trap, I wouldn't want to find myself stood on the balcony in that first shot.
  25. 1 point
    In May I went to Lake Constance for a Vespa Corso. As the wheather forecast was promising I decided to take the chance for a ride through Baden-Württemberg. Feeling hungry once I realised to be close to the French border. Et voila.. Château Lumière. No more words neccessary about Château Lumière I suppose. #1 DSC06840 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC06904 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC06883-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC06891_neu by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC06895-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC06897-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #7 DSC06896-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #8 DSC06898-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #9 DSC06900-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #10 DSC06892-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #11 DSC06894-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #12 DSC06841-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #13 DSC06876 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #14 DSC06868-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #15 DSC06843-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #16 DSC06844-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #17 DSC06877-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #18 DSC06846-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #19 DSC06847-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #20 DSC06848-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #21 DSC06855-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #22 DSC06857 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #23 DSC06858-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #24 DSC06859-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #25 DSC06881-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #26 DSC06863-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #27 DSC06866-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #28 DSC06869-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #29 DSC06871-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #30 DSC06872-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr Behind the scene: Lake Constance Break French way
  26. 1 point
  27. 1 point
    Interesting stuff. I just googled that quote from your last pic.... Gott strafe England" was a slogan used by the German Army during World War I. The phrase means "May God punish England". It was created by the German-Jewish poet Ernst Lissauer (1882–1937), who also wrote the poem Hassgesang gegen England (lit. "Hate song against England", better known as "Hymn of Hate").
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