Jump to content

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/02/2018 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    This one has been long in the making and a good way to end 2017. I've been to the newer bit more times than I care to admit, however the older bit had alluded me for a long time. After multiple visits and too many fails to count we finally managed it with a bit of good timing and dash of good luck. I'd heard that it isn't going to be too long till the place is getting flattened so it was a bit of a now or never explore. History "In 1899, Sutton Cottage Hospital officially opened its doors to the public. At the time, the hospital housed just six beds, and operated from two semi-detached cottages in Bushy Road, Sutton. As the population of Sutton grew, so too did the hospital. In 1902, the hospital moved to a new site, which consisted of four small wards, an administrative block and contained a total of 12 beds. It was at this point that the hospital became known as Sutton Hospital. In 1930, the hospital began the expansion process again, this time with a purpose-built clinic at the current site. In 1931, the new hospital was officially opened. When the National Health Service (NHS) was implemented in 1948, the hospital was incorporated into the St Helier group. The hospital continued to receive support from voluntary activity and charitable organisations. By 1950, further beds for inpatients were desperately needed and two further wards were added. Late in 1957, a new outpatients and pharmacy was added to the complex. By now, people were beginning to live longer and the increasing number of elderly people requiring care was putting added pressure on the hospital. A new geriatric rehabilitation unit was opened in 1959. In 1983, a district day surgery unit was opened, meaning that patients could be treated and discharged within the same day. During 1990, the hospital underwent further improvements, and a work began on building an orthopaedic surgery. Patients first arrived for treatment here in January 1991." There were 3 blocks, Block A, B and C. >Block A is filled with half the pigeon population of Sutton and is truly vile. I might eventually get round to doing it properly, but its not an appealing one! >Block B is well decayed, but still has a quite a few things left inside and isn't too disgusting. The best one IMO. >Block C is very clean apart from a bit of graffiti but is empty and boring. We spent about 30 minutes in here but the camera never came out the bag. Block B is the only one worth doing really IMO. The Explore Visited with Brewtal and Prettyvacant71. A morning adventure that went without too many hiccups. We nipped into Block C first but quickly realised it wasn't very interested and elected to go to Block B instead as I'd heard it was the 'best' bit. Its got some fantastic decay but isn't totally trashed or smashed up. It's got a some nice original features still remaining. You could see where they had cleared some of the pigeon droppings using large sheets, but there was still enough in certain parts to warrant breaking out the dust mask for a less pleasant areas. A nice explore and a good end to a busy year of exploring. Hopefully 2018 brings more great explores! Photos
  2. 1 point
    This place was part of a giant complex where they used to build trains for the national railroad company. Most of the site was already demolished by the time we got here, but the lab itself was still worth the visit. It's been abandoned since 2010, which is sort of surprising, if you look at the amount of decay, but well, I'm not complaining about that at all... Actually took 2 visits to get in. First attempt was on a thursday afternoon. Entered the site, walked to the particular building and said to my girl: "what's that noise?!" Peeked inside the building and got instantly spotted by demolition workers... Took a run and returned a few days later in the weekend. More luck that time. Have to say, definitely worth it... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Thanks for looking!!
  3. 1 point
    Ouvrage Hobling is a lesser work (petit ouvrage) of the Maginot Line. Hobling was approved for construction by CORF (Commission d'Organisation des Régions Fortifiées), the Maginot Line's design and construction agency, in 1931 and became operational by 1935, at a cost of 14 million francs. The contractor was Gianotti of Nice. Hobling consists of four combat blocks. The blocks are linked by an underground gallery with barracks and a utility area (usine). The galleries are excavated at an average depth of up to 30 metres (98 ft). In June 1940 the garrison comprised 115 men and 4 officers of the 164th Fortress Infantry Regiment (RIF). The commanding officer was Captain Boileau. The Casernement de Férange provided peacetime above-ground barracks and support services to Hobling and other positions in the area. The units were under the umbrella of the 3rd Army, Army Group 2. Hobling played no significant role in either the Battle of France in 1940 or the Lorraine Campaign of 1944. After the Second World War it became part of the Mòle de Boulay, a strongpoint in the northeastern defenses against Soviet attack. Hobling remained under Army control until after 1971, when it was declassified and sold. Sold in 1975, Hobling has been partially stripped by salvagers and is abandoned. The salvage work stopped with the removal of all metals, including cloches and turrets, from two blocks. Hobling was the last ouvrage to be stripped. Visited with @The_Raw 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
  4. 1 point
    After a long drive stuck on the glorious M25 for hours on end, the Grove air raid shelters were nearby so took my chance for a quick solo mooch. I have to be honest, these have been on my list for quite some time but wondering around the tunnels the place became somewhat repetitive so I did not walk as far down the shelters as I could as they felt almost endless. None the less, it was great to finally see the shelter and a nice surprise to see graffiti at a minimum, despite nothing other than broken chairs, rusty buckets and a lot of spiders within the shelter.
  5. 1 point
    HISTORY wiki text: Riverside Amusement Park was an amusement park in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA from 1903 to 1970. Originating as a joint venture between engineer/amusement park developer Frederick Ingersoll and Indianapolis businessmen J. Clyde Power, Albert Lieber, and Bert Fiebleman and Emmett Johnson, the park was built by Ingersoll's Pittsburgh Construction Company adjacent to Riverside City Park at West 30th Street between White River and the Central Canal in the Riverside subdivision of Indianapolis. The decade of the 1960s was not a kind one for Riverside Amusement Park, which was losing attendance for the first time since the end of World War II. By the time John Coleman lifted the "whites only" policy (in response to a series of protests organized by the NAACP Youth Council in 1963), the park was losing $30,000 a year. Increased cost of insurance, maintenance, and new rides, coupled with increased competition from the emerging theme parks, were cited by Coleman as the park closed for the last time at the end of the 1970 season. All the rides were sold or demolished by 1978. The land lay undisturbed for more than two decades, until the construction of the River's Edge subdivision in the early 2000s. =========================================================================================================================================== STORY In 1979 my buddies and I heard that they were getting ready to bulldoze the site of the long defunct Riverside Amusement Park in Indianapolis so we decided to drive by to get a final look. When we got there we were amazed to find easy access to the grounds. With my trusty Practica LLC at hand we ventured within and explored for several minutes until we came to the stark realization that this neglected plot of land had become the home to countless wild dogs. Picking up debris for clubs we beat a hasty retreat (pausing of course for a commemorative selfie.) The pictures were taken on 35mm slide film... Back in 2005 I came across the slides and crapily scanned them using a junky flat-bed scanner and used those images to create the Animated GIF below to send cross country via email to one of the krew. If there is a prize for worst images on OS these would surely take it - but even in this 'State' they trigger memories of that adventure; so in that they are still doing their job... Impressionists Views of Riverside Amusement Park (circa 1979) I opened this GIF and extracted the individual images and tried to enhance them to some degree. I then repackaged thumbnails of these into a fresh GIF that is marginally more effective than the original. (shown at end of report) Ticket Booth Shoot 25¢ From Inside Ring-Toss Main Attraction The Weed-lined Path Wheee! Domed (Doomed) Skating Rink Three scared cats in a dog park! (that's me on the right rockin' the Frampton 'do) Take Two If I ever come across the original transparencies again I will have to get some proper enlargements made.
  6. 1 point
    This actually has to be one of my favourite for a while. Crappy pics or not, I love the write up and the fact they are taken before I was born. Very welcome to keep those coming.
  7. 1 point
    Nice one. Almost a year to the day after I was in. Certainly an interesting little block. The basement of C was cool - the art department.
  8. 1 point
    Really enjoyed reading this @Andy - thanks for sharing.
  9. 1 point
    It was great to see someone new talking about OS 😀 mookster is big on his US stuff, it would be well worth your time getting hold of him.
  10. 1 point
    It is too bad :/ I will update if the originals ever surface... at least I got to learn how to post th the boards in the process. Now to get some good stuff going...
  11. 1 point
    The final stop on my most recent American adventure, and an absolute beast. This is in the top five, maybe three, biggest locations I have ever explored. It's probably the second largest industrial abandonment in America, after the Packard Plant in Detroit. Over two million square feet of factory space spread over five enormous buildings linked by sky bridges, falling apart and decaying since the closure of the entire factory in 2002. My friends who live in the city tell me tales of what it was like in the old days when it was full of machinery, but then the scrappers and pikeys found it and practically cleared everything that hadn't been taken when it closed out. This is a shame and, to be honest, this was originally not on our radar at all until the previous day when, during our string of fails at various churches we realised we were very close, having spotted the faded logo of the plant on the side of a building nearby. I knew how big the place was having found it on Google Maps some time previously but my friend had no idea just how enormous the place was, he was open-mouthed as we drove around the outside, and we both noted the incredibly easy way in. After having a string of fails at various schools this time, we both decided to head here as we knew it was a certainty on getting in. I wasn't expecting much from the inside, and thought we may spend an hour or so there before we got bored, but after half an hour or so we were fully engrossed in one huge explore and enjoying it immensely. After a few hours we had worked our way to the top of the building at the back of the plant, furthest away from where we'd entered, and looking out across the buildings was amazing seeing just how huge this place was. We even worked out how to get down into the boiler house utilising, you guessed it, another sky bridge taking us over the active car park of one of the few buildings that had found a subsequent use. All in all, an absolutely brilliant way to spend my final day. I think we saw maybe two-thirds of the place overall, so by no means did we do it all. I'm already planning my next trip, which will hopefully be my biggest and longest one yet. Every building in the photo below is part of the same plant, we entered way over the front side of the tall one in the background. Thanks for looking and I hope you've enjoyed my latest batch of American wanderings as much as I enjoyed being out there.
  12. 1 point
    Bah, the inevitable vacant land and heras defeats another one!
×