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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/02/2018 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    HISTORY: Thanks for looking at my pictures, I hope you enjoyed them. Give my facebook page a like & follow if you want to see what else my friends and I get up too - 0151 Outdoors. E.
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    After visiting a different location in the city we got a tip off from others about a possible entry point so decided to take a look. Having assessed the building for security we made our way to the entry point. The building is situated in the Neepsend area of the city and forms part of Kelham island one of the oldest industrial sites in Sheffield which as an heritage for producing high-quality cutlery and edge-tools and its pre-eminence in manufacturing heavy specialist steels. The victorian grade II listed building once occupied by Barnsley resides in 37 thousand Sq ft of industrial heritage and is the last significant development opportunity in Kelham island. Today Kelham is a mixed use riverside development which compromise the creation of old and new use of buildings forming apartments, bars & restaurants, and commercial space on the riverside site of former workshops. The development is part of an ongoing regeneration of the area by AXIS and others, which started in the 1990s with Cornish place. The development is intended to create a desirable place to live with a brand new public square, and continuation of the Don riverside walk project. Due to increasing competition from imports, Sheffield has seen a decline in heavy engineering industries since the 1960s, which has forced the sector to streamline its operations and lay off the majority of the local employment. George Barnsley's is a little like stepping back inside a time machine, most of the original machinery and features still exist and for this alone is well worth a visit before the inevitability of re development. Also noteworthy is the local artists that decorate the building with graffiti and art which gives the explore a real urban edge. And to end off a pic from modern day... I went back to this place the other day... Opening the gate to enter i didn't bother going in, the old man was right it is a dump in there and natural decay has took over... but that said if you have never been in take a look, you can get some nice shots even with a crappy iPhone
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    I thought I had seen this report, but it was a nice surprise to see that I hadn't. Some quite different shots to the norm there - nice one Still kicking myself for missing this on my trip to sheff a few years back.
  4. 1 point
    Ushaw Seminary 2014 -2015 Introduction: I was hoping I'd be able to get my first report up on here sooner than this, but I've been busier than anticipated! Here it goes then... A compilation of images from Ushaw Seminary - A place that I've covered extensively during the past couple of years. Most of the images that you're about to see can already be found scattered through various reports of 28DL but this will be the first time in which a few of my favourites from each location will be compiled to make a complete Ushaw Report. History: I'll be adding more information and history as relevant as we go, but here's a brief overview of the sites history, one I'm sure most of us are familiar with regarding the much derped junior seminary. Wikipedia: "In 1804 Bishop William Gibson began to build at Ushaw Moor, four miles west of Durham. These buildings, designed by James Taylor, were opened as St Cuthbert's College in 1808. There was a steady expansion during the nineteenth century with new buildings put up to cater for the expanding number of clerical and secular students. In 1847, the newly built chapel, designed by Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin was opened. This was followed by the Big Library and Exhibition Hall designed by Joseph Hansom, 1849-1851. The Junior House, designed by the distinguished architect, Peter Paul Pugin, was added in 1859. St Cuthbert’s Chapel, designed by Dunn and Hansom, was opened in 1884, replacing an earlier one by Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin, which the seminary had then outgrown. The Refectory was designed and built by E. W. Pugin. The final development came in the early 1960s with the opening of a new East wing, providing additional classrooms and single bedrooms for 75 students. The main college buildings are grade II listed, however the College Chapel is grade II* and the Chapel of St Michael is grade I.” Junior Seminary & Chapel 2014: The bit we've all seen, countless times... Well, here it is again... (This report will get more interesting, honest!) Alright, lets get out of this sh!thole! The Barn: The barn, explored in early 2015, this part of the seminary is neglected by most, I'm not too sure why either, it has quite a nice feel to it I felt... Wouldn't be a Barn without animals would it The Pool: A new find by myself and BoroLad at the time back in 2014, me been the first down the rope! Was quite amusing trying to find a way into whilst dancing about on the seminary rooftop! Canon AT-1 Film Camera Taken on Ilford XP2 Film The Live Building: This was an interesting one, managing to creep in during a meeting, just months later the building would be opened to public tours anyway ffs! Ahhh well, least we had the fun of getting round undetected... And that's all from here! I have plenty more pics as you can imagine, but that's the base of the complex covered. Thanks for reading! TAW
  5. 1 point
    Hey Everyone! Welcome to my very first Urbex..! My group and I went to these houses south of Atlanta that have been abandoned for a few years now. Unfortunately, they are going to be torn down soon, so anyone who may want to visit them, DM me ASAP! Anyway, The first house we went to was just empty and peaceful. The second house, not so much... We found graffiti telling us to leave; we should have listened. We stepped into the garage of the house and saw blood on the floor, and drag marks leading to the attic. Not wanting to see a dead body, we left. We're planning on going back to the attic soon in daylight. The third house was almost worse. We found some evidence that a serious crime may have happened there, as well as a swastika and a Confederate flag. We left without exploring too much of that house. On our way out, one of my friends looked back at the top floor of the house and saw someone in the window. We left quickly. I hope you guys like the pictures, some of them may be NSFW, the swastika. Otherwise, have a great day everyone! Be safe! Link to Google Drive with all pictures: https://drive.google.com/drive/u/1/folders/12y4aEjooNREuzS5ZMrjztkwrx2gIiinc
  6. 1 point
    You have made pretty small space look quite good, those stairs as well - NOICE!
  7. 1 point
    Nice features still to be seen & well done on getting in
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  9. 1 point
    I have not seen it before. Some nice rooms and I especially like the spiral staircase.
  10. 1 point
    Oh thats a bit nice Not seen this pop up before
  11. 1 point
    Some really nice features in there, that staircase is beautiful! The mural is a nice historical touch
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