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Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/17/2017 in Posts

  1. 8 points
    So I've been to this location, which was a dancing/disco/club whatever you prefer. But not your usual one, this one exist out of tents! Seen it passing by a few times.. Started searching for it and found it. Now we only had to pick a date and go out on explore! Last weekend was the time! We already left on Friday, and wanted to do this location Friday also. But thanks to our amazing road network in Belgium and their works, we'd end up there after sunset. So we ended up here Sunday , on our way back home! Heard it was actually an easy entrance somewhere upfront the fences where laying down.. They said.. Well looks like they've put them back up! Some of these beta fences you find on every location, decorated with lovely (fresh?) razor-wire! Looked a bit around and seemed like they made work of it closing all the openings. So went around the other side only to find this small piece not having any razor-wire, perfect! Once on terrain it already looked pretty trashed outside, and of course as was inside. Seemed like people needed some club lights for their homes, and alot of other stuff that went missing.. Sadly there was a fire not so long ago, and i believe wind have destroyed on of the main tents ( or could be partial due to fire ). This club was actually already existing for a long time, i believe nearly 20 years. It had to shut down it's door, as less people started to visit the place. It got blown in a second life, but that didn't last long. Naamloos_HDR22 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR18 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR8 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR4 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR6 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR11 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR10 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR2 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR14 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR13 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR12 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr _DSC9607 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr _DSC9613 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr _DSC9599 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR15 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR16 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR16 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Hope it's a bit readable !
  2. 8 points
    This one required an early start, but the morning adventure to The Kings Hall was worth the effort. Visited with Zombizza. History "Located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was built in 1916 and was designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The King’s Hall building has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and it was soon screening religious films. By 1926, it was operating as a regular cinema, still managed by the Methodist church. The King’s Hall Cinema was closed in 1937. It then reverted back to a Methodist Church use as the King’s Hall Methodist Church. They vacated the building in January 2013" The Explore Started nice and early, and managed our entrance fairly incident free...if we don't count the massive tear in my trousers.. It's a pretty spectacular place with a wonderful blend of natural decay and marvelous original features/architecture. With little to no daylight, we decided to wonder round the back rooms while the sun came up before the spending too much time on the main attraction, the large auditorium. The rooms around the back are a weird mix of new and old, some of them being more disgusting than others. One room was so pungent that I took 2 steps in before bailing out. There was also one room that was filled with beds, old food packets and needles. Looked a few years old, but squatters for sure. The larger rooms consisted of meeting rooms, prayer rooms and teaching rooms. All of them had funky wavy flooring where the wooden floor tiles had expanded with moisture. Eventually the sun came up and the auditorium started to flood with the golden morning light. After a few hours we left, although the exit was hilariously unsubtle. Photos The Auditorium
  3. 5 points
    The abandoned mining hospital, located in Hungary, dates back to the nineteenth century. A coal mining company in 1898 began construction of a small mining hospital, which began operations with the approval of the Minister of the Interior on December 17, 1900. The hospital. According to descriptions, it has been adapted for 50 beds. There was a surgical, internal and infectious department. The building was full of lighting, sewage and bathrooms. The facility was one of the most modern hospitals at the time. The care was extended to include the epidemic (1909) and the pharmacy. In 1911 the number of residents increased to such an extent that the hospital was no longer able to meet this number. In 1911, a new hospital was started, which started operating in 1912. The necessary buildings were built in the courtyard of the hospital (morgue, a section of the hospital, a chapel, a house for doctors and nuns, a horse farm). The three-storey hospital had 129 beds for patients who were placed in 23 units. The mining company was responsible for maintaining the hospital, covering all personnel and all costs. Despite many years of change, the mining hospital developed with the development of mining. The hospital was relocated in 1998 to a new hospital complex. Hungarians are tightly attached to the old building and have been trying to save one of the oldest buildings in the city for several years. It was sold for approximately HUF 276 million ($ 1 million). I am planning a rehabilitation center, an oncological center and a nursing home. I invite to visit my site on facebook. Link to the full album: https://www.facebook.com/pg/urbexdestruction/photos/?tab=album&album_id=143007552995318 [/url]
  4. 5 points
    This pool is closed in 2011... 1. SüdWest Stadtbad 01 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 2. SüdWest Stadtbad 02 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 3. SüdWest Stadtbad 03 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 4. SüdWest Stadtbad 04 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 5. SüdWest Stadtbad 05 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 6. SüdWest Stadtbad 06 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 7. SüdWest Stadtbad 07 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 8. SüdWest Stadtbad 08 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 9. SüdWest Stadtbad 09 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 10. SüdWest Stadtbad 10 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 11. SüdWest Stadtbad 11 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 12. SüdWest Stadtbad 12 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr
  5. 5 points
    lil place in my backyard... i've been coming to this spot for over a decade. tragically i've only picked up a camera a few years back. it's nice to be able to visit a location many times in the continuation of self improvement and documenting the destruction of a location. heres a few shots from over the past year: pano from last summer. i ran here one day as the sun set. i wanted to catch the lighting. belly of the boiler. behind the controls. another scrapper hard at work i see. test shop. looking down the next year would be sad times as kids from all over began to populate this place. i used to be able to walk around for weeks without running into a soul, and now there could be 30 kids here. in a short period of time shity taggers would desicrate the temple. angering the gods. even the snow doesnt cover that grime. she sure is a beauty tho. i've been to quite a few generating stations and none compare it felt like a train station grande hall. standing in the freezing cold taking a pic of snow falling (or ceiling) so ladylike everyones favorite hallway which was in a movie for 3 seconds. (relax-its photoshopped.....or is it???) until next time . . .
  6. 4 points
    Jumanji - a Manor with a litte special part... 1. Jumanji 01 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 2. Jumanji 02 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 3. Jumanji 03 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 4. Jumanji 04 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 5. Jumanji 05 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 6. Jumanji 06 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 7. Jumanji 07 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 8. Jumanji 08 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 9. Jumanji 09 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr
  7. 4 points
    At first glance, the huge psychiatry campus with its historical buildings reminds you of certain pieces of literature or films. The early morning haze lies over the hospital grounds and really adds to that somewhat uncanny atmosphere. It´s still pretty early in the morning. Thus, we almost don´t meet any people. A situation, that changed completely on our way back, when we had to keep as insconspicious as possible among patients, nursing stuff and "normal" visitors. Yet, everything´s still pretty calm and we can enjoy the morning silence as we walk across the park-like grounds of the hospital, walking on paths which are bordered by beautiful flowers. Here and there, beautiful buildings appear. Everything occurs to be peaceful and neat. Almost a place for your well-being, at least form the perspective of a non-patient. Not before we pass by a building, fenced up by thick bars, reality sets in. As if by command, we can suddenly hear screams coming out of the building. The hospital is largely still active. Only a small part has been disused out of unknown reasons. It seems like time´s been standing still here for a pretty long time. Old benches would´ve been disappeared in a jungle-like thicket entirely, if it wasn´t for their bright red colours. Across an architectural more than beautiful patio we enter the building in front of us. Inside, particularly striking are the numerous toys scattred around the building. What exact purpose the old building served remains a mystery.
  8. 4 points
    Kings Hall Cinema, Southall, London - September 2017 Interesting one this one! I'd wanted to do this for a while and had been planning to in the coming weeks but had been put off with the idea of its "unique access" which requires some planning in terms of times of entry! Situated on a very busy road with lots of passersby and businesses open till the very wee hours, there is a very small window to get inside as the Night Shift commute changes to the Early and Day Shift Commute. When we arrived it was around midnight and the streets were busy. We were in London so went for a little drive for an hour or so before returning. Visited with a non-member back in September;when inside we had a little lie down in a dark corner for an hour or so to allow the sun to rise just a little bit, and spent about 2 hours light painting the rooms which were boarded and anything which the abundance of daylight wouldn't help. It's a very interesting building with lots to shoot photos of and with my "loaded" parking meter fast running out, we didn't have as much time inside as we would have liked. The air inside is terrible (understandably) and the damp has caused the parquet floors inside much of the building to bow upwards, making an interesting effect! We started shooting inside the main hall at around 6am and spent some time chilling here and getting photos as the sun came up, but we only had till 8am on the car park. The street was already very busy down below by 6am and the main hall had a hue of red from some of the shops signage. When it did become time to leave, we had to jump into a street full of commuters. We were not getting out without being seen. It was 7:45am and the bus stops had queues of people at them. As I was leaving I did attempt to not be seen, but a middle aged chap turned round and looked right at me. I wished him a good morning, jumped down and walked off to get my externals. He certainly looked slightly bewildered. The cinema come Methodists Church is located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was constructed in 1916; designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The site has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was originally operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and was soon playing religious films. By 1926, Kings Hall was operating as a regular cinema; but was however still managed by the Methodist church. The Cinema was closed in 1937. It then converted back to its original Methodist Church use, and today is the King’s Hall Methodist Church. Some interesting and otherwise controversial quotes taken from comments when closure was announced. The church vacated the site in 2012. More Info at: http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/31352 #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157688232708403
  9. 4 points
    Another drive past find on a trip to Italy last year, never seen pics of it, so we called it Powerplant Percy. It was a sub-station of some sort, but stripped out and not much to see, but it was rather nice inside, so here you have it. Well there you have it, a stripped out shell, but they need a bit of love too, or maybe not, you got this far, so you must have enjoyed it
  10. 4 points
    During a Italian trip waaaay back in 2016, I visited this rather lovely Manicomio in the heart of a seaside Italian City, it was impressive to say the least. Huge stairs, huge windows, high ceilings, but sadly rather empty, but I enjoyed it enough to go back this year with Baroness Von DerpBangers. Thanks for looking
  11. 4 points
    In the former limestone mine a production for oxygen was shifted to the underground during World War II. Visited with The_Raw. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
  12. 4 points
    A while back I posted a report from a creme de la menthe location called Chateau a la Mange Tout. This sanatorium sits on the same site, not bad having two half decent explores right next to each other, joie de vivre! I meant to post a report at the time but never got round to it. It wasn't massively photogenic so I only took a load of hand held shots but there was a fair bit of stuff inside. Bon appetit, as the French would say Last but not least we had a quick peek inside the morgue, no slab but some body fridges left behind. Tres bien ensemble
  13. 4 points
    This one is from earlier on in the year during a trip to France/Luxembourg, one I thought worth posting up here! Chateau Lumiere needs no introduction, a magnificent building with such grandeur its hard to believe its been abandoned. The huge glass skylight allows daylight to illuminate all the floors, making for wonderful lighting. During the last few years Chateau Lumiere become a bit of a tourist destination, with vandals smashing the large mirror in the big foyer. Luckily its fared well over its many years of dereliction and is still one of the most beautiful buildings I have had the pleasure of exploring. History Built in early 1900s, this house was owned by a tobacco tycoon from Switzerland. After the owner moved away in 1950s, the house was used for business purposes, and was sold multiple times before finally being left empty. There isn't a confirmed date it was abandoned, but the general consensus seems to say its in the 1980s. The Explore After finally finding the location of it and seeing it was a reasonable distance from Luxembourg where were staying for 2 weeks, it became a must do. We found a charming cheap hotel in the next town over and booked a night there. Finally the day was upon us and were there, stood outside awestruck by the Neo-Baroque styling of Lumiere. We looked for a way inside and quickly found a well beaten track round the back. As we approached I could hear voices inside. We definitely weren't the only visitors that day, in fact there were loads of people wondering around inside! Most other people were explorers like us, however some weren't there to take photos as it turned out a bit later... We started with the basement and worked upwards. The basement actually had quite a bit of stuff still left there, unlike the rest of the floors that were bare to say the least. In fact the house was almost empty from the ground floor up. All the fittings and fixtures remained, but no personal items were left at all. We photographed it from nearly every angle we could think of. The best thing about Lumiere is just how photogenic it is. Its hard to take a bad picture. It was a fairly relaxed explore, until we witnessed a group of 12 year olds smashing the glass skylight and then coming downstairs smashing bricks onto the marble floor. The red-mist descended as I yelled down at them at them from one of the skylight balcony's while waving my arms around like a loony. I must have looked like a madman. They didn't understand my English, I certainly didn't understand their French. Luckily they didn't stick around much longer to do any more damage. With the drama over we got back to the explore, now alone in the house. We spent about 3 hours inside in total, but you could easily spent much longer there if you wanted to photograph everything. One thing that struck me was the quality of every little detail. Silly things like the latches on the windows still work flawlessly and feels better made and smoother than any modern window latch I've used before. Anyway, on with the photos. Photos Externals Internals In the porch there is this notice, translates roughly too: "Many of us have seen that you like this in all its splendor. Photographers, Models, Fans of Urbex, but some unscrupulous individuals do not respect...Alas! Yet you are known everywhere for your splendor, and the sublime cliches that you have brought us. Today April 19, 2015 we owe you this ... to give you a bit of sparkle ... after the vandalism that you have undergone. Thank you to those who will preserve you forever Respect this place as you would at home PLEASE! Do not break! Do not vandalize it.. Do not leave rubbish, paper etc.. Bring your waste back with you.." The entrance hall and foyer. Sadly this used to be where the the large mirror was, but was broken in 2015. A rather interesting choice of wallpaper... Recent damage to the glass skylight. Saw this in the loft and couldn't help but get a photo too The Details The Basement
  14. 4 points
    The sanatorium Ernst T. was built in 1915. Later it was in use as a military hospital and FDGB holiday home. In 1995 it was abandoned. 1. 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
  15. 4 points
    Thank you all very much! As wished, some more pics... :-)
  16. 3 points
    For my debut at this forum I introduce you to this hotel that was closed in 2009. Although it is situated perfectly in a nice touristic town there is no conclusive concept for the building. Currently the owner is in discussion with an investor who has a, let's say, quite "progressive" idea concerning the old fashioned town. I wouldn't give € for the investor's idea in this surrounding area. I visited the hotel twice (2016 and 2017). Decay starts. Here you go.. #1 DSC09378-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC09380-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC09367-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC09366-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC09369-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC09374-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #7 DSC09377-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #8 DSC09382-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #9 DSC09383-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #10 DSC09384-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #11 DSC09385-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #12 DSC03137-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #13 DSC09386-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #14 DSC09387-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #15 DSC03143-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #16 DSC09391-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #17 DSC09392-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #18 DSC09394-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #19 DSC09396-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #20 DSC09398-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #21 DSC09399-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #22 DSC03140-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #23 DSC09402-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #24 (reason of the titel) DSC09403-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
  17. 3 points
    A very big and nice abandoned Clay factory in germany... 1. Tonwerk Blumenpott 01 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 2. Tonwerk Blumenpott 02 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 3. Tonwerk Blumenpott 03 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 4. Tonwerk Blumenpott 04 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 5. Tonwerk Blumenpott 05 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 6. Tonwerk Blumenpott 06 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 7. Tonwerk Blumenpott 07 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 8. Tonwerk Blumenpott 08 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 9. Tonwerk Blumenpott 09 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 10. Tonwerk Blumenpott 10 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 11. Tonwerk Blumenpott 11 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 12. Tonwerk Blumenpott 12 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr
  18. 3 points
    Just a crappy stripped out church, but something about it would tickle the nipples of a god fearing nun. But I liked it enough to take a few pictures anyway. I 'm almost sorry you had to look this report, I am scraping the barrel, but I'm not really sorry
  19. 3 points
    Hello, another from my long long long list of shitty cottages I have to post up on here tp convert you to the deeply weird realm of cottaging! Found this almost my accident whilst exploring with a couple friends, after walking what felt like miles through small forests, over streams, up and down heather marsh lands and over several feilds to visit some of the shittest derps you could probably imagine, I spotted this on the way down the wild hills. We took a chance as it was on a live farm, found the door open and decided to pop in for 30 mins and grabbed some pics. We all felt a bit uneasy as it was a live farm and decided to get out quickly, just as we were closing the door a car came down the drive way, and we bolted like a mini heard of highland cows stampeding our way down the side of the house and over a few fences to safety. Never been back, but one day I will! Thanks for cuming cottaging with me
  20. 3 points
    The fortress with a lot of murals in its bunkers is part of the second fortified belt of forts of Metz and had its baptism of fire in late 1944, when the Battle of Metz occurred. The Fortification was part of a wider program of fortifications called "Moselstellung", encompassing fortresses scattered between Thionville and Metz in the valley Moselle. The aim of Germany was to protect against a French attack to take back Alsace-Lorraine and Moselle from the German Empire. The fortification system was designed to accommodate the growing advances in artillery since the end of XIXth century. Based on new defensive concepts, such as dispersal and concealment, the fortified group was to be, in case of attack, an impassable barrier for French forces. Covering an area of 83 ha, the Fortress is constructed from 1907 to 1914. The group fortification has 2 fortified barracks and can accommodate a total of 560 men. It has 8 pieces of artillery, 6 of them 100mm and 2 of them 77mm. It has eight domes and twenty observation points and lookouts. The various items are connected by 1,700m of underground galleries. In its water tanks, it has 2,640 m3 of water. The energy required for its operation is ensured by seven diesel engines of 27 hp each. During The Annexation of Alsace-Lorraine, the fort receives a garrison of gunners belonging to the XVIth Army Corps. From 1914-1918, it served as a relay for the German soldiers at the front post. Its equipment and weapons are then at the forefront of military technology. In 1919, the fort was occupied by the French army. After the departure of French troops in June 1940, the German army reinvests the fort. In early September 1944, at the beginning of the Battle of Metz, the German command integrates the fort into the defensive system set up around Metz. In Second World War, on September 2, 1944, Metz is declared fortress Reich by Hitler. The fortress must be defended to the last by German troops. Visited with The_Raw, extreme_ironing and Maniac. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37
  21. 3 points
    Been a little while since I posted anything. Derp Cottage, located in what some consider Miserable Scotland, visited on a windy and cold day, but it had rather nice views. Thanks for looking
  22. 3 points
  23. 2 points
    Hi m8s! This is the last adventure I lived with my brother, exploring and old hotel and some random abandoned houses. Cheers!
  24. 2 points
    A piece of British WW2 History hidden under a hillside. HMS Forward, a maritime intelligence centre, was key to monitoring the English channel and and was heavily involved in D-Day. Although it's fallen into dereliction, attempts to restore and maintain it have been carried out by 'Friends of HMS Forward'. History HMS Forward was the Royal Naval HQ, setup up on the 20th of June 1940 in the Guinness Trust Holiday Home. It had responsibility for units along the south cost, including: HMS Marlborough - Eastbourne HMS Aggressive - Newhaven HMS New - Newaven HMS Vernon - Roedean HMS Lizard - Hove The tunnels of HMS Forward began life in March 1941 after an Admiralty direction that ordered channel ports to setup facilities to maintain naval plots and created the need to securely house equipment for plotting and communications. It was decided to built a network of tunnels into the a hillside of South Heighton for operations to take place from. HMS Forward was designed by Lt. Col. F.H.Foster, Commander of the Royal Engineers, and built by the 1st Tunneling Engineers Group and No 172 Tunneling Company. They were completed on the 14th of November 1941. At the time they were a state of the art facility and were kitted out for every eventuality. This including backup power generator and full air conditioning systems with gas filters. They had chemical toilets, sleeping cabins and a gallery. Although the toilet were for emergencies only and it was noted that he veterans who worked here didn't even have knowledge of these toilets. The labyrinth of tunnels had an East and West entrance. The West entrance by the main road was the main entrance. The East entrance was under the West wing of the Guinness Trust Holiday Home (now demolished). There were two Pill boxes at the top of the hill that were accessible from inside the tunnels, but were demolished long ago. During its operational period between November 1941 and August 1945, the tunnels of HMS Forward carried out many key maritime operations. It monitored the English channel from Dungeness to Selsy Bill using ten radar stations from Fairlight to Bogner Regis. It was heavily involved with D-Day as well as nightly raids on the occupied french coast. The Explore A very nice explore in a very nice set of tunnels. They are quite extensive and is quite the maze, however once you get your head round the layout its impossible to get lost. Its quite a shame that such an important piece of history has been left to rot. This is somewhere that really needs to be preserved for future generation. I'd heard that there was intention to turn it into a museum some time ago, but plans for this got scuppered by the local residents up top. It was clear that there was once some kind of open day as there were still laminated signs and notices left up by the 'Friends of HMS Forward'. Photos The West entrance with signs and notices from a previous open day / tour. Looks like it was a good few years ago though. You can see here what looks like a machine gun nest in the brick wall as you turn the very first corner. The large security gate of the West entrance. The long 100m West adit tunnel looking towards the east end. Looking from the East end of the West Adit. The two tunnels going left and right just before are the stairs up to the South and North Pill boxes. Looking up what remains of the stairs to the Northern Pillboxes. It is possible go up to the top of these, but its been sealed up at the top with rubble. The West Airlock. The Air conditioning plant room and standby generator room. The standby generator was a large diesel JP Lister engine. This provided 400V/230V power at 22Kw. Exhaust was piped through to the annex at the back of the engine room where it was exhausted through the ceiling too the surface through a 4" pipe. The start of the operational rooms of the tunnel. The room on the left side is the TURCO Office, and looking right down the long tunnel is down the length of the main tunnel with sleeping cabins. T.U.R.C.O stands for Turn Round Control Organisation, used to 'Assist naval shore authorities in the quick turn around of ships and craft'. The East gallery was used for sleep accommodation, switchboards and coders. The GPO Voice frequency equipment room. The pits in the floor are to fit the equipment in, as the modems were over 8ft tall. Looking down the East Galley and into the Teleprinters room. Looking down the the far end of the plotting rooms. The sleeping cabins. There were 4 of these for personnel on the night duty and split watches. Looking up towards the mock hen house, sealed at the top of course. The stairs up to the eastern entrance with pit at the bottom to slow down would-be invaders. The gate on the way to the East entrance. The remains of a second gate. Thanks for reading!
  25. 2 points
    This; Feels like something fresh out of a movie set. Wow!
  26. 2 points
    This Airbase was the largest underground military base and airport in all of the former Yugoslavia. The property is located on the current border of Bosnia and Croatia. The complex was built in 1948 - It was codenamed 505. The construction was completed 20 years later. The purpose of the facility was to establish, integrate and coordinate the nationwide early warning network of the Socialist Federated Republic of Yugoslavia, similar to NORAD (North American Air Defense Command). There were semicircular concrete shields, spaced ten meters apart to reduce the impact of the attack on the object. The complex had an underground water source, power generators, crew quarters and other strategic military facilities. Aircraft was used in 1991 during the Yugoslav War. Yugoslav People's Army During the withdrawal, it destroyed the runway by detonating explosive charges. In order to prevent any further use of the complex, Serbian troops detonated 56 tons of explosives. During exploration, a possible meeting of the police, the border guards of Croatia and the army should be reconsidered. The tunnels are buried, due to the underground connection with Bosnia, which would constitute a "wild" border crossing. Link to my fanpage: https://www.facebook.com/urbexdestruction/ [/url]
  27. 2 points
    @The_Raw @hamtagger I've more material from my native Poland than from Croatia or Hungary. Maybe photos from Poland will interest you?
  28. 2 points
    A abandoned mine in Czech... 2 visit's 1. The Moos Factory 01 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 2. The Moos Factory 02 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 3. The Moos Factory 03 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 4. The Moos Factory 04 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 5. The Moos Factory 05 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr revisit: 6. The Moos Factory revisit 01 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 7. The Moos Factory revisit 02 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 8. The Moos Factory revisit 03 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 9. The Moos Factory revisit 04 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 10. The Moos Factory revisit 05 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 11. The Moos Factory revisit 06 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 12. The Moos Factory revisit 07 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr
  29. 2 points
    Ouvrage A28 is a smaller plant (petit ouvrage) of the Maginot Line. The site was surveyed by CORF (Commission d'Organisation des Régions Fortifiées), the Maginot Line's design and construction agency; A28 was approved for construction in May 1931. It was completed at a cost of 11 million francs by the contractor Duval-Weyrich of Nancy. The petit ouvrage was planned for construction in two phases. The second phase was to provide a separate entrance block a short distance to the rear. Heavy water infiltration required the provision of more extensive drainage work than originally planned. The galleries are excavated at an average depth of up to 30 meters (98 ft). The 1940 manning of the ouvrage under the command of Captain Coste comprised 127 men and 2 officers of the 161st Fortress Infantry Regiment. A28 played no significant role in either the Battle of France in 1940 or the Lorraine Campaign of 1944. After the Second World War it became part of a strongpoint in the northeastern defenses against Soviet attack. A28 remained under Army control until after 1971, when it was declassified and sold. Visited with The_Raw. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
  30. 2 points
    A abandoned Villa in Italy... 1. Villa V 01 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 2. Villa V 02 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 3. Villa V 03 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 4. Villa V 04 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr
  31. 2 points
    Haha, the baby almost scared me to death... I was taking a photo in the corridor right next to that pretty dark toilet with the doll, when I suddenly spotted it out of the corner of my eye.
  32. 2 points
    small chapel, found in east germany... 1. Kapelle grau 01 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 2. Kapelle grau 02 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 3. Kapelle grau 03 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 4. Kapelle grau 04 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 5. Kapelle grau 05 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 6. Kapelle grau 06 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr
  33. 2 points
    Did you confess well? Or did the pastor run away at the sight of you?
  34. 2 points
    History The Waterloo Tunnel is a 779 metre (852 yards) long disused railway tunnel in Liverpool. It opened in 1849. At its Eastern end, the Waterloo Tunnel opens into a short cutting (approximately 63 metres long) which connects to the Victoria Tunnel which is 1.536 miles (2.474 kilometres) long. Effectively, both tunnels are one long tunnel with an open-air ventilation cutting in between; however, they were given different names initially because trains in the Waterloo Tunnel were locomotive hauled while trains in the Victoria Tunnel were cable hauled. In terms of tunnel architecture, the Waterloo Tunnel features a semi-circular opening, wide enough to accommodate three separate tracks. The westernmost section has been backfilled and there are occasional accumulations of calcite on the brickwork. Most of the Waterloo Tunnel is brick-lined; however, it is not listed. The Victoria Tunnel, on the other hand, is Grade II listed. It features a rusticated arch flanked by buttresses, together with a modillioned cornice and ashlar-coped parapet. The first two-hundred yards of the tunnel are brick-arched, but after that it is unlined up to the fourth ventilation shaft. There are five visible air shafts in the Victoria Tunnel, and an additional five hidden shafts. A drain also runs down the length of the tunnel, but this has collapsed in certain places. Both tunnels were constructed because the city of Liverpool is built on a densely populated escarpment (a long, steep slope) that drops down to the River Mersey. This meant building on the surface would have been difficult without causing major disruption, but also that the landscape was ideal for the construction of a line that could be placed beneath the ground. Nevertheless, cutting both tunnels still proved to be a difficult task as care had to be taken to avoid disturbing the buildings above due to their shallow depth. The work from Byrom Street eastwards proved the most difficult and perilous and, despite efforts to excavate carefully, the soft clay in the area caused several houses to give way, rendering them uninhabitable. All the inhabitants were forced to abandon their homes at short notice. What this means is that the design of the tunnel – becoming two separate structures – was a result of circumstance. The first goods traffic travelled through the tunnels in August 1849. However, a three-foot section of Victoria Tunnel collapsed in September 1852. The collapse was quickly repaired and the tunnels were used by goods traffic without any further major incidents until 1899, when a freight train consisting of a tank, twenty-three loaded wagons and a brake van separated when a coupling between the seventh and eighth wagons fractured. Two wagons and the van were destroyed in the incident, and two of the three men aboard were killed. A train that was travelling towards the docks was also caught up in the accident as it collided with the debris and partially derailed. Although both the Waterloo and Victoria Tunnel were initially part of a freight line, they were opened to passenger traffic in 1895. Passenger services continued to run up until February 1971. Many of the large docks in Liverpool ‘dried up’ as they were affected by declining industry across the UK and this resulted in a significant decrease in traffic on the line. Both tunnels were officially closed on 19th November 1972; although, a small section of the Edge Hill line was retained as a headshunt. It is rumoured that this track is still used very occasionally today. Whether this is true or not, though, is another matter. The futures of both the Waterloo and Victoria Tunnel are uncertain. However, the Merseyrail Network have proposed to use part of them to create a connection to the low-level Liverpool Central Station. Creating the connection would reduce journey times to Edge Hill. Unfortunately, though, so far all plans have fallen through due to some local opposition and budget constraints. The last attempt to revive the line was made in 2007, driven by plans to redevelop the north shore area of Liverpool. Our Version of Events After meeting up with a couple of Liverpool based explorers, and hitting an old industrial site first, we decided to head over to the Waterloo/Victoria Tunnel. It was good to meet a couple of locals for a change because they both had an exceptional knowledge of the area – something we lack when it comes to exploring in Liverpool, unfortunately. Anyway, this saved us having to do much research and scouting for a change. So, thanks fellas! When we initially rocked up outside our chosen access point, several Network Rail guys were busy standing around a couple of shovels and one guy down a hole. Rather than leave and come back, though, we decided to sit in the car and wait for them to fuck off. Our patience paid off pretty quickly since the boys in orange decided to down tools literally five minutes after we’d parked up. Once they’d left, we gave them an additional five minutes before we grabbed our gear and made our way into the tunnels, to account for any of them who might have left their beloved tape measure or spirit level behind. The first tunnel, the Waterloo Tunnel, smelt strongly of tar or creosote. We weren’t sure of the source, but the floor was fairly manky, giving an indication that there may have been a recent spillage. That, however, was perhaps the most interesting part of this section of the explore. All in all, it didn’t seem especially exceptional – even if it was quite wide. Hoping the explore would be better in the latter half, then, we cracked on and made our way towards the open-air section. As several other reports have revealed, the open-air section/accident between the two tunnels is full of shit. It seems Liverpool folk don’t bother visiting the local tip, they simply lob their old goodies off the bridge on Fontenoy Street. Anyone seeking spare lawnmower parts, or a second-hand seatee, should get themselves straight down to the Waterloo Tunnel. Sadly, we didn’t need either, so we had to clamber over the mountain of shit instead, to reach the Victoria Tunnel on the other side. Once inside the Victoria Tunnel, we began our long walk towards Edge Hill Station. At this point, we weren’t aware how long the bloody thing is, but it soon became clear to us that the light at the end of the tunnel wasn’t getting much closer any time soon. Nevertheless, we plodded on, heading towards the small dot of light in the far distance. The Victoria Tunnel was much more interesting that its sister. A large proportion of it is brick-lined, but there are also large unlined sections that have simply been carved out. There are several ventilation shafts to look at along the way too, and each one is different to the last. It’s only now, having been inside the Victoria Tunnel, that we understand what a few of the random structures are on the surface directly above. Finally, the tunnel ends with a short section of railway track that is still in situ, which is always nice to find. The only things to be careful of down this end are Network Rail workers and, so we have been told, a camera waiting for unsuspecting visitors to the tunnel. Explored with Veryhighguy and The J Man. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27: 28: 29: 30:
  35. 2 points
    History Malsis School located at a mansion known as Malsis Hall in the village of Crosshills, in North Yorkshire, England, was a co-educational independent pre-prep and preparatory school for pupils aged three to 13 years. The school was founded in 1920 and closed due to falling pupil numbers in 2014. Facilities at the school included 3 km mountain bike trail, 9-hole golf course, swimming pool, all weather pitch, rifle range and 40 acres of grounds. The school closed on 10 December 2014, when the final assembly started at 11 am and concluded at 1 pm. The next day the school trust went into administration with Ernst & Young of Leeds. The school's assets were auctioned off and the land and building sold by Eddisons, and having fully paid off its debts it passed into creditors voluntary liquidation and the company was finally dissolved on 4 August 2017. In January 2015, The Old Malsis Association (OMA) was formed to represent the views of school alumni from down the years. Malsis Hall and its grounds have been sold to Seddon Construction, which plans to build 100 new homes on the site and transform the former school building into a specialist rehabilitation centre - subject to planning permission being granted. Proprietors Jonathan and Jamie Seddon were both former Malsis pupils in the 1980s. Explore Me & @hamtagger had seen this pop up online a few times & ventured over to yourkshire. We met @Moz88 while in the grounds before we even got in and was nice to explore with someone new. A rather ungraceful entry by all 3 of us added comedy to the explore. This place was as interesting as it's history. Literally everywhere you looked there was something ornate or some thing that caught our eye. Probably one of the nicest places I have visited. The tower had been unused for some time with no steps up to the top. The place wasn't in bad condition at all. With the main mansion house being where the interesting stuff was the back end of the school which was the newer part did hold some nice bits to see. Some of it was quite sad with pictures of the girls and boys still littering the tables and art/french work adorning the walls. I loved all of the ornamental ceilings & architecture, the pediments outside the headmasters office & main building were very 'stately home'. Anyway on to the pics. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Thanks for looking!
  36. 2 points
    History- The building is from the 'railway era'. The hotel was a hub of the community, it had a fantastic ballroom and restaurant. Many people came by rail to stay at Sutton Bridge. The hotel from around 2000 was used by an employment agency called StaffSmart to house workers they had lured over to the UK from South Africa to work in the local canning factory. People came from SA on the promise of hotel accommodation and didn't know until they got here that it meant inside the shell of the Bridge Hotel on damp mattresses lined up in each room, including the Ballroom. After StaffSmart vacated the hotel, it stood empty with broken windows until it was bought and restored to a high standard with plush furnishings and chandeliers. However, the hotel rooms were pricey and without the rail trade of people heading to the village, people would be passing through and tended to stay in cheaper accommodation in the area. The hotel wasn't open for long before closing down and ownership passed through several hands whilst falling further into disrepair. In 2015, workmen were spotted on the site removing roof tiles and floorboards to salvage as many building materials before it was demolished but its still standing now, so I don't know what stopped the demolition. Since then the building has unfortunately been vandalised and several fires have been set destroying about 70% of it. The Bridge Hotel in the 50's Explore- The hotel is close to me, so even though I knew the damage of the place it was still worth checking out. Access to the building was easy, a window round back was broken and a board to climb up to it was balanced kind of safely. The cellar floor, ground floor and a few rooms on the first floor were safe enough to walk around but past that there is a lot of fire damage. Pictures-
  37. 2 points
    The Mcneil Mansion burlington city new jersey..Mcniel was a pipe maker he created his own enclosed town..he had his own electicty factory,his own firehouse,all next to his pipe factory as it once looked There was amovement to tear it down...i tried my ancient hebrew curse resh resh...to stop it..and so far its worked t parts of the mansion are dangerous..my foot sank a few times that a sign to move quick the main stair case..there are a few other stairways up each room has its own decay it had its own elevator he had huge walk in safes in the basement some parts of the mansion wre in good shape the mansion is ust one of the bjuildings on the site theres many more..some are in the video...a few ghost voices are caught including my name being called
  38. 2 points
    The chateau is one of the many large abandoned houses that can be found around France. Built in the 1700s by the lord of the village it is within, the house has been modified and expanded over the years. The vaulted basement contains a full size snooker table below the original arched ceiling. A large stone fireplace is the centre-point of a sitting area to one end of the basement. The front entrance opens directly to a small stone staircase, leading up to the main living areas which are slightly raised from ground level, or down to the basement. Visited with @SpiderMonkey
  39. 2 points
    Thanks guys, appreciate it, took a longer break than I expected, a lot of shitty reports to come hahah!
  40. 2 points
    Another one from my little journey to France in july 2017. This is one was a bit doubtfull after stories about police , attentive neighbours, cars on the premises. Apparently neighbours use the backyard to park their cars. A pretty dark house with solid contrasts that made me instinctively decide to go to single shots (do not ask why!) in the process of finishing my photo's at home I had a near heart attack: do I really have so few pictures of this? will it be okay with my window parties? But in the end I'm pretty satisfied with the result of these sibgle raw shots since the place had amazing light and shadow and i think HDR wouldn't do much honour to that. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.
  41. 2 points
    So this is my first post on this forum, I found out about these houses on a Abandoned Lincolnshire group on Facebook and thought they were definitely worth a trip, but... the first trip wasn't very successful, the address for these houses took us to two houses on the other side of Withcall that were at one point abandoned but have since been knocked down, so after about half an hour of looking around it became very clear the houses weren't there. After talking to the person who posted them originally and finding out the real location we headed back up to find them. We had to make sure we kept quiet as there is a neighbor attached to the 2nd station house and we weren't sure they'd have appreciated a night time visit from 3 explorers haha. Access to the house is easy, the doors being left open is always convenient. Walking around the houses only took 30 minutes or so , but was still a nice little explore. It's one of them places that besides a few repairs and some serious wallpapering, it looks like the family could just walk back through the front door and pick up their lives where they left off which gave the houses a real creepy vibe. I guess that's all that really needs to be said about these houses. Here's a few pictures: Thanks for reading:)
  42. 1 point
    The final stop on my most recent American adventure, and an absolute beast. This is in the top five, maybe three, biggest locations I have ever explored. It's probably the second largest industrial abandonment in America, after the Packard Plant in Detroit. Over two million square feet of factory space spread over five enormous buildings linked by sky bridges, falling apart and decaying since the closure of the entire factory in 2002. My friends who live in the city tell me tales of what it was like in the old days when it was full of machinery, but then the scrappers and pikeys found it and practically cleared everything that hadn't been taken when it closed out. This is a shame and, to be honest, this was originally not on our radar at all until the previous day when, during our string of fails at various churches we realised we were very close, having spotted the faded logo of the plant on the side of a building nearby. I knew how big the place was having found it on Google Maps some time previously but my friend had no idea just how enormous the place was, he was open-mouthed as we drove around the outside, and we both noted the incredibly easy way in. After having a string of fails at various schools this time, we both decided to head here as we knew it was a certainty on getting in. I wasn't expecting much from the inside, and thought we may spend an hour or so there before we got bored, but after half an hour or so we were fully engrossed in one huge explore and enjoying it immensely. After a few hours we had worked our way to the top of the building at the back of the plant, furthest away from where we'd entered, and looking out across the buildings was amazing seeing just how huge this place was. We even worked out how to get down into the boiler house utilising, you guessed it, another sky bridge taking us over the active car park of one of the few buildings that had found a subsequent use. All in all, an absolutely brilliant way to spend my final day. I think we saw maybe two-thirds of the place overall, so by no means did we do it all. I'm already planning my next trip, which will hopefully be my biggest and longest one yet. Every building in the photo below is part of the same plant, we entered way over the front side of the tall one in the background. Thanks for looking and I hope you've enjoyed my latest batch of American wanderings as much as I enjoyed being out there.
  43. 1 point
    Nice one. 3 & 5 are my favorites.
  44. 1 point
    Oh wow!! What a lovely old place. Really like this
  45. 1 point
  46. 1 point
  47. 1 point
    Liking the room with a view shot and the cutlery I was wondering where you'd disappeared to, good to see something from you pop up again
  48. 1 point
    Sorry mate I missed this!!! It's the remains of a Land Rover Series II 109"
  49. 1 point
  50. 1 point
    Tha's pretty impressive lads, and yeah it's fookin huge. Looks like a decent explore
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