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Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/18/2017 in Posts

  1. 9 points
    After a work conference, I decided a trip to the rather nice Belfast Mortuary was in order to help cure the immense hangover I had from drinking many pints and many whiskies the night before. Closed for a while, and slowly disintegrating from the local delinquents attention. Clear and Concise DSC06568 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Fridges DSC06599 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Fridge Close Up DSC06602 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Main Entrance DSC06606 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Scales DSC06566 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Stainless Slab DSC06584 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Another View DSC06586 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr# The other slab DSC06572 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Drain DSC06578 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr
  2. 8 points
    History Barbour Mill has a long and prestigious history in Lisburn and as the end of an era draws near many local people will be recalling their own memories of Barbour Threads. In 1784 John Barbour, who hailed from Scotland, established a linen thread works in Lisburn. At the same time his son, William, bought a derelict bleach green at Hilden and set up business. Later, the thread works were transferred to Hilden and as early as 1817 it was employing 122 workers. In 1823 William Barbour bought a former bleach mill at Hilden and built a water-powered twisting mill. The Linen Thread Company was founded 1898 and it quickly became a large international company. In fact it became the largest linen thread mill in the world, giving Lisburn a richly deserved international reputation. By 1914 it employed about 2,000 people and until recently some 300 workers were still employed there, with the work- force dropping to just 85 in recent years. Among the company's varied products were nets, which could be made into snares and fishing nets. The company built a model village for its workforce in Hilden, which consisted of 350 houses, two schools, a community hall, children's playground and village sports ground. Lisburn became the envy of the world thanks to its Linen and Thread industry and now the last remnant of that history is to close its doors for the last time. The Explore Although I think we were about 6 years too late with this one. This was somewhere I have wanted to go for quite some time but with other commitments and other places to explore while in NI it always got shoved to the back seat. This trip we finally got to go, explored with @hamtagger we had quite a leisurely stroll round this one. The first thing I noticed when getting close was how it was becoming crowded with new housing and developments. Still, it sits proud within its place. A bit of the site has already been demolished. The place is bloody massive! It is easiest the biggest site I have been to. Spending numerous hours there and still not getting around the whole site led us to leave before darkness fell. The architecture was pretty impressive with the stonework and iron gables or whatever you call them. Surprisingly, despite being closed several years and falling victim to vandalism, graffiti & metal theft it still has so much to offer. There were little cupboards dotted about in most sections with linen/ thread materials. Loads of hand painted signs that were of little importance but I like stuff like that. The decay was pretty cool and I loved how trees were growing out of the top floors. Nature really was reclaiming it. A few of the ceilings had fallen in with those areas a bit more decayed than others. Right on to the pics The whole site (not my pic) Some old advertising material I found online 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 (I swear this hasn't been edited at all!) 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Thanks for looking!
  3. 7 points
  4. 7 points
    Another exploration from the past. History In the area were several mining operations in the 19th century and many of the miners suffered from pulmonary tuberculosis. Therefore, in 1897, a sanatorium for the patients with lung disease and anemia was founded. In 1975, this sanatorium was converted into a rehabilitation clinic with physical therapy centre. It was closed in 2002. In January 2009, the former clinic was vandalized for the first time. Unknown people broke into the building and sprayed several fire extinguishers. The police search for the perpetrators remained fruitless. After many years of vacancy, there are plans to convert the building into apartments. My visit The large, L-shaped building had four floors and a newer extension. Exploring the interior was fascinating. The kitchen was almost completely furnished with stoves, large pots, cookware and much more. In many areas there were still furniture and interesting details, and on the lower floor the bathrooms and a swimming pool. I spent several hours there; it was lonely and quiet, and definitely a really worthwhile visit. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 - Title: What Everyone Should Know about Sexuality and Potency 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 Thanks for watching.
  5. 7 points
    Ok, first post on here, so hope you enjoy. Just a small explore from middle of last year but an interesting little one one nonetheless. The Royal Victoria closed bit by bit over the last few years, finally becoming empty last year. Each time we pitched up there was always something still active so we accidentally left it a bit too long without checking. Big mistake, the neds burnt half the place to the ground and a sh!tload was demod to make it safe. Anyway, we managed to explore a good but of it but only took photos of the main block. The old Victorian building despite looking externally brilliant - has been so modernised inside there is no hall anymore - just a bunch of admin rooms. Enough babbling - on with the pics Main Entrance _DSC2237 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Inside the Main Entrance _DSC2229 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Staircase _DSC2228 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Sink anyone? _DSC2227 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Ward _DSC2224 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Spotless Ward _DSC2222 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Spine Corridor _DSC2221 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Mural _DSC2216 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Bed _DSC2214 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Smashed Ward and Bed _DSC2205 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr External _DSC2239 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr
  6. 7 points
    This one has been long in the making and a good way to end 2017. I've been to the newer bit more times than I care to admit, however the older bit had alluded me for a long time. After multiple visits and too many fails to count we finally managed it with a bit of good timing and dash of good luck. I'd heard that it isn't going to be too long till the place is getting flattened so it was a bit of a now or never explore. History "In 1899, Sutton Cottage Hospital officially opened its doors to the public. At the time, the hospital housed just six beds, and operated from two semi-detached cottages in Bushy Road, Sutton. As the population of Sutton grew, so too did the hospital. In 1902, the hospital moved to a new site, which consisted of four small wards, an administrative block and contained a total of 12 beds. It was at this point that the hospital became known as Sutton Hospital. In 1930, the hospital began the expansion process again, this time with a purpose-built clinic at the current site. In 1931, the new hospital was officially opened. When the National Health Service (NHS) was implemented in 1948, the hospital was incorporated into the St Helier group. The hospital continued to receive support from voluntary activity and charitable organisations. By 1950, further beds for inpatients were desperately needed and two further wards were added. Late in 1957, a new outpatients and pharmacy was added to the complex. By now, people were beginning to live longer and the increasing number of elderly people requiring care was putting added pressure on the hospital. A new geriatric rehabilitation unit was opened in 1959. In 1983, a district day surgery unit was opened, meaning that patients could be treated and discharged within the same day. During 1990, the hospital underwent further improvements, and a work began on building an orthopaedic surgery. Patients first arrived for treatment here in January 1991." There were 3 blocks, Block A, B and C. >Block A is filled with half the pigeon population of Sutton and is truly vile. I might eventually get round to doing it properly, but its not an appealing one! >Block B is well decayed, but still has a quite a few things left inside and isn't too disgusting. The best one IMO. >Block C is very clean apart from a bit of graffiti but is empty and boring. We spent about 30 minutes in here but the camera never came out the bag. Block B is the only one worth doing really IMO. The Explore Visited with Brewtal and Prettyvacant71. A morning adventure that went without too many hiccups. We nipped into Block C first but quickly realised it wasn't very interested and elected to go to Block B instead as I'd heard it was the 'best' bit. Its got some fantastic decay but isn't totally trashed or smashed up. It's got a some nice original features still remaining. You could see where they had cleared some of the pigeon droppings using large sheets, but there was still enough in certain parts to warrant breaking out the dust mask for a less pleasant areas. A nice explore and a good end to a busy year of exploring. Hopefully 2018 brings more great explores! Photos
  7. 6 points
    History Officially opened by the Earl of Scarborough in 1957, it was built the year before for £350,000 as headquarters for Leeds chemicals and dyestuffs firm Brotherton and Co and was at the heart of a new business area at the Westgate end of The Headrow. It was named in recognition of the famous Leeds city benefactor family, after the Brotherton Library and Collection at Leeds University, the Charles Brotherton engineering and chemical laboratory, the Brotherton Wing at the Leeds General Infirmary and the Brotherton Charity Trust. It was dubbed as the design of the future with the “latest external and internal structural techniques, automatic ventilation and ceiling heating”. Its ceilings were reported to be “acoustically perfect”, and its floors covered in highly-polished parquet. It was in 1965 – long before the merging of local police forces and the establishment of the current West Yorkshire force, that the old Leeds City Police took over part of the building and ultimately established its administrative headquarters there. In addition to the then Chief Constable and his Assistant Chief, numerous other police departments have been based at Brotherton House over the decades including senior CID, Special Branch, Fraud Squad, Regional Crime Squad, Firearms Registry, Aliens Department, Force Prosecutions, Special Constabulary, Training, Photographic and Fingerprint departments, the then so-called Policewomen’s Department, Pay and Accounts. Most notable investigations to have been carried out at Brotherton house was the notorious "Ripper squad" which was applied to a group of investigators and was the term used by the media for the investigation into the Yorkshire Ripper murders. Including George Oldfield the man in charge of the investigation. Today, the building – which has largely been vacated – overlooks the Leeds Inner Ring Road and is described by its agents as a “substantial high-profile office building with a significant presence.” Explore A day out in Leeds, driving on the ring road I noticed a building covered in green fabric... on closer inspection we found out by locals telling us that the building was abandon. Mostly the building is in good condition with a large amount of original features untouched.. the main hall is really something with original parquet flooring and a grand stair case leading into the main building. Corridors lead to open staircases on both sides of the building which offer access to the buildings six floors including rooftop. Pics 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. and 12 13. 14. 15. 16. and 17. LE FIN
  8. 6 points
    Definitely the explore of the year for me - all the way to County Galway to see an amazing asylum. Almost a fail (as were all the other locations on the list) but to get to spend a few hours in here was totally worth it
  9. 6 points
    Visited with @albino jay and @GK-WAX and thanks again to jay for doing the driving and I also stole your history mate because I couldn’t find any hope you don’t mind. We was passing by the mill on our way home so popped in for a look. And glad we did I like these old mills. And the demo team were already on site so don’t know how long it has left to stand. So here’s the history and pics.. Steam-powered worsted-spinning mill built around 1850 on Black Brook. Owners and tenants of the mills have included James Nutton & Company [1863] John Horsfall & Sons Limited [1896] F. K. Adcock & Company [1936] Part of the Mills are still standing though no longer used. The mill had a 170 ft tall chimney which was struck by lightning in 1967. The chimney was reduced in height – to avoid further strikes – and was finally demolished in March/April 1992 The majority of the Mills were demolished in 2017. The mill by Lavino lavino[/ The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr url=https://flic.kr/p/H2Q9pV]The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  10. 5 points
    One from earlier in the year. This had been on the list for a while and I was really happy to finally see the place. There was some graff and vandalism in evidence when we went, I believe it's even worst now. Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY George Barnsley & Sons Ltd was founded in 1836 and were originally situated on Wheeldon Street, Sheffield. By 1849 they had moved to the Cornish Works, which were much larger premises. They specialised in the manufacture of files and cutting tools for use in the shoe making industry. There are a number of family names that are known to have deep roots in the Sheffield area, and the Barnsley name is undoubtedly one of them. In 1650 George Barnsley became Master Cutler, a role fulfilled by another George Barnsley in 1883. This George Barnsley was of the second generation of the firm of George Barnsley and Sons, toolmakers. The business grew to become the world’s leading producer of tools for shoemakers. The technological revolution of the 20th century saw a decline in the need for traditional tools. George Barnsley’s survived until 2003 when the premises finally closed. . . . Thanks for Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/135648593@N02/albums/72157680722816945/with/32277316163/
  11. 5 points
    History : Casement Park (Irish: Páirc Mhic Asmaint) is the principal Gaelic Athletic Association stadium in Belfast, Northern Ireland, home to the Antrim football and hurling teams. Located on the Andersonstown Road in the west of the city, and named after the Republican revolutionary Sir Roger Casement (1864-1916), the ground has a capacity of 32,600.[1] Casement Park, one of the largest stadia in Ulster, opened in June 1953, with Armagh Harps defeating St John’s of Antrim in the final of the inaugural Ulster Senior Club Football Championship.[2] The newly opened Casement Park hosted the Ulster Championship final less than a month later, which saw Armagh overcome reigning All-Ireland champions Cavan. In all, Casement Park has hosted eight Ulster football finals. However, the Antrim ground has not held the provincial showpiece since 1971, with St. Tiernach's Park in Clones hosting the final every year since except between 2004 and 2006 when it was moved to Croke Park such was the demand for tickets. A major facelift of the stadium took place in 2000, a move which saw more championship games played at Casement Park. In 2006, floodlights were added which allowed hurling and football to be played in the evening. In 2006, proposals were raised to build a new multi-purpose stadium on the site of the old Maze prison near Lisburn, which was intended to host association football, rugby union and Gaelic games. However, opposition to the idea led to it being dropped in favour of a new venue in the Sydenham area of East Belfast. This led to Ulster GAA, which was one of the partners in the Maze project, to pull out in favour of remaining at Casement Park.[3] In 2011, the Northern Ireland Executive announced that it had granted £138m for various stadium redevelopment projects throughout Northern Ireland. Ulster GAA would receive £61.4m of this, which was to be used to redevelop Casement Park into a 40,000 all-seated stadium with £15 million of partnership investment from the Central Council of the GAA, making it the largest stadium in Ulster.[4] In early 2012 it was announced that the redevelopment work would start at the end of 2013 with a view to having the new stadium open by September 2015. It was expected that, after its completion, Ulster GAA would move its headquarters from St Tiernach's Park in Clones to Casement Park,[5] which would then have a seating capacity of about 40,000.[6] In December 2014 the granting of planning permission for the redevelopment of Casement Park was ruled unlawful. On 28 April 2016 the team behind the Casement Park redevelopment proposals launched a consultation process in an effort to see what the general public's views are. On the 14th November 2016 Casement Park was officially included as part of Ireland's 2023 Rugby World Cup bid. 2006 controversy A decision in 2006 by the Antrim County Board to permit the use of Casement Park to host a Republican rally in commemoration of the deaths of Provisional IRA and INLAprisoners in the 1981 hunger strike drew criticisms from unionists. Visited in late 2015, casement lies the same today although work on redevelopment is expected to start very soon. knowing the social club was still in use allowed access to part of the ground and the rest i just had to blagg.
  12. 5 points
    "Wallpaper paper peeling heaven" History Eastmoor Secure Unit for Children, located near the small village of Adel in Leeds West Yorkshire opened in 1857 as the Leeds Reformatory for Boys by the Leeds Society for the Reformation of Juvenile Offenders, on a site deliberately chosen to be removed from the temptations of the city. Reformatories were distinguished from Industrial Schools by taking young people who had actually committed offences such as begging, wandering, consorting with thieves and prostitution, opposed to those who were merely destitute or neglected and in danger of falling into crime. There were around 50 boys at the school in 1858. The south-east range and headmaster’s house was added in 1860, when the attic floor of the initial range was converted to dormitories. The workshops of the north-east range, built by the boys in 1859, were rebuilt in 1881 after a fire, and a separate chapel to the south was added in 1882, The swimming pool beyond the north-west range was added in 1887 and roofed in 1896. A boiler room between the north-west range and the pool was inserted in 1899 to heat the pool. It was used by community groups as well as inmates, and swimming and life-saving were taught. (This swimming pool is now one of the oldest in the country.) The buildings continued in use as an approved school named Eastmoor School from 1933 and then a community home when it was taken over by Leeds CC on 1st April 1973. It was then known as Eastmoor CHE, that is Community Home with Education. A number of separate houses were constructed around the core site from the 1950s onwards, but there has been little change to the buildings externally. In 1993 a secure unit for young offenders was built on part of the site, the Eastmoor approved school which housed some of the countries most dangerous child criminals including one of the Bulger Killers, Jon Venables. The site was leased to Leeds Metropolitan University from the late 1990s when the surrounding houses were used for student accommodation who left when a new campus opened in Headingley in 2003. It has been unused since c2004 and has been marketed for housing development. Explore Little hard to find this one and is some distance from the centre. Having trailed through woodland, through peoples back gardens (sorry) and then finally walking a further distance we came across this desolate hospital. The x-hospital sits next to a brand new secure unit for children, which gives the place a surreal feel. The building is in an extremely poor condition most of the upper floorS have gaping holes through to the lower floors and there is a high presence of asbestos. In the courtyard someone as gone to the trouble to spell out 'HELL IS PCP' using huge stones that have been piled in the courtyard, guessing building works commenced at some point. Theres a lot of atmosphere in the building and a few times we were sure there were others camping around the building. Worth an explore just watch the floors and the local addicts... oh and there a bar in the building (unfortunately not selling beverages) most probably installed for the students. Pics 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. LE FIN
  13. 5 points
    The former hotel has been closed in 2007 and from the outside the building was unmistakably abandoned. But inside, it largely looked as if you only have to perform a few beauty repairs in order to use the hotel again. My visit was already in 2012. I was told that the entrances were sealed later. I don't know what has become with it today. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47
  14. 5 points
    History Bishopgarth was first built in 1891 for the Bishop to live in. In 1946 the site became the West Yorkshire Metropolitan Police Training School. The classrooms were built in 1952 and the new block added in 1969 (the accommodation). There were 14 course's for training police men/women these course's included fingerprints, computer training, firearms, public speaking and traffic management. Bishopgarth could take a maximum of 250 students at any one time and usually there were 200 students staying at the on-site accommodation. To be a policeman you must be 5'9\" tall and for a policewoman 5'6" tall. This is the same as 166cm tall for policemen and 154cm tall for policewomen. The police moved to a new facility in Carr Gate in 2014. The Carr Gate complex houses Firearms, Driver, Public Order, Crime, IT, Foundation and Leadership and Development training. But the question is what will happen to the the now old and abandoned Bishopgarth police training well the first option proposed by the planners would see the entire site used for new homes, believed to be between 120 and 150. The second option would see the number of suggested homes reduced to include space for a residential care home. There is some more info on the matter here https://www.wakefieldexpress.co.uk/news/plans-for-150-homes-and-care-home-at-bishopgarth-1-6890284 1. Explore Upon arriving we noticed a massive metal fence around the perimeter, but we also noticed a lot of gaps in the fence as soon as we got walking down the drive way we got rustled by the security. We Looped around to the back where the alleged bishops palace is and snuck in through there... From getting into the bishopgarth area we headed straight to the accommodation building... we did this because we only really came for that building. When we got there we heard rustling, peeking around the corner and seeing a hi-viz vest it was security so quickly we had to run across the courtyard... thankful we missed the security, walking up the stairs to the main entrance of the accommodation building it was boarded so we looked around the whole permitter and found some boards ripped off at the side... looking around the building was like walking around a maze thankfully not a pitch black one thanks to our exploring light. Once we got past the first few floors what contained the dinning room and the main entrance it was just copy paste bedrooms and corridors. After we explored a floor of the bedrooms we got our assess up to the top floor AKA the roof access, we spent a while looking at the landmarks of wakefield and taking pics of the roof but it was hard because at this point we did not want to get spotted... running down the stairs to get out, had a lot more to explore!!! After the buzz of the accommodation building, we thought it would be hard to beat... ow god was we mistaken. After sneaking across the path we ran into the office/ classrooms... not much going on the outside of the building but once we entered (by opening the door) it was of its rocker! Walking in we had access to the bottom floor, very dark there were a couple classrooms and some office type looking buildings but the real deal was the top floor. We found the stairs after about 15mins of looking around... up the stairs were the IT classrooms and some offices with everything still inside. After we took pics of the upstairs, we wanted to get out but knowing there was the main entrance (with the automatic doors) we had a deeper look... finally we found it, did not expect wooden cladding, a safe, some nice stairs and some trash we was more than happy. But there was still some stairs to climb up... a whole new world (another corridor with some classrooms) the only bit worth looking at up there is the graffiti where the homeless slept. To end of on a positive note we thought we would have a look around the many 'houses' on the site... only getting in one which was a little outhouse at the back of the accommodation building... i say a little outhouse but if we bumped into that when we stared off we would have lost our minds. After that we got some more externals but we just wanted to get off really... PICS 2. 3. 4. Narrowly avoiding security 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. The admin office. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. SAFE 27. 28. 29. 30. LE FIN
  15. 5 points
    After a long drive stuck on the glorious M25 for hours on end, the Grove air raid shelters were nearby so took my chance for a quick solo mooch. I have to be honest, these have been on my list for quite some time but wondering around the tunnels the place became somewhat repetitive so I did not walk as far down the shelters as I could as they felt almost endless. None the less, it was great to finally see the shelter and a nice surprise to see graffiti at a minimum, despite nothing other than broken chairs, rusty buckets and a lot of spiders within the shelter.
  16. 5 points
    Difficult to decide for one place. But I think it was this little church that I discovered during my UK trip in summer.
  17. 5 points
    Carrozzeria Ghia was a car company that designed and build car bodies for other car brands like Volkswagen, Detomaso and Fiat. The company was founded in 1916. In 1970 the company was sold to Ford Motor Company who took the whole designstudio to Detroit. At this time the building was abandoned and is still to this day. The design studio where masterpieces where created like the Volkswagen Karmann Ghia and the Detomaso Pantera The factory halls This is the old factory hall where the low volume models where build like concept cars and limited edition cars This is a comparison from 1969 vs 2015 (Detomaso Mangusta on the picture) I hope you liked my first post! For more history about the Ghia brand:
  18. 5 points
    The old children´s hospital was opened in the 1960s when it was relocated from the original building, which was built around the turn of the century. Personally, visiting the old children´s hospital felt very special to me, as I, a premature baby, had to spent the first weeks of my life in this facility - on the top floor and high above the rooftops of my native town. Of course, my memories of this stay can´t even be described as "vague", as I have none at all. Yet, my exploration of this place remains special to me. I really enjoyed the view across the city - consciously this time and probably as one of the last ones who received this opportunity.
  19. 4 points
    Hi all, Some pictures from "Bureau Central" Hope that you will like these ones
  20. 4 points
    History In the 14th century the Bretton estate was owned by the Dronsfields and passed by marriage to the Wentworths in 1407. King Henry VIII spent three nights in the old hall and furnishings, draperies and panelling from his bedroom were moved to the new hall. A hall is marked on Christopher Saxton's 1577 map of Yorkshire... The present building was designed and built around 1720 by its owner, Sir William Wentworth assisted by James Moyser to replace the earlier hall. In 1792 it passed into the Beaumont family, (latterly Barons and Viscounts Allendale), and the library and dining room were remodelled by John Carrin 1793. Monumental stables designed by George Basevi were built between 1842 and 1852. The hall was sold to the West Riding County Council in 1947. Before the sale, the panelling of the "Henry VIII parlour" (preserved from the earlier hall) was given to Leeds City Council and moved to Temple Newsam house. The hall housed Bretton Hall College from 1949 until 2001 and was a campus of the University of Leeds from 2001 to 2007. Explore Work began on site in march 2016... The MüllerVanTol studio has been appointed to design the interiors of the Grade II listed mansion and the refurbishment of other listed buildings is well underway. Most of the 11 student dwellings which were built in the 1960's and 1970's have been demolished including Eglinton, Litherop, Swithen and Haigh, Grasshopper will be the last to go in late 2017. A real shame considering the position of the college which specialised in design, drama, music and other performing arts with notable alumna attending. The Hall itself resides in 500 acres of park land which is home to the Yorkshire Sculpture park (YSP). (YSP) was the first of it's kind within the UK and his the largest in Europe, providing the only the place to see Barbara Hepworth and Bronzes by Henry Moore. Over 300,000 visitors are said to visit the park each year and on previous visits its been easy to blend into the crowd and walk around the exterior of the old Hall this said access internally as always been restricted. Access to the Hall today is strictly prohibited and is protected by 6ft metal fencing which spans the entire grounds including former classrooms and the stable block and more so their is a high presence of security on site with the developers keen to keep the public away. Recently signs have appeared to restrict the public taking pictures near the Hall itself... typical signs read (restricted use of photography in this area). The developers seem to be going to extreme lengths to protect the design ideas of the Hall and are passing these restriction onto local media and staff working onsite... I'm guessing the developers are wanting to keep their plans secret until the grand opening later in 2019. During the festive Holiday period we decided to pay a visit... making our way to some of the former classrooms and the student centre. This led to the stable block passing by the former dwellings and down to the main hall. We were surprised to have got this far and would have been more than happy with some nice externals of the buildings on site. YSP was very quiet and we were aware of sticking out in the surroundings so decided to head inside. Making our way down to the hall we were sure we would be found before we had chance to pull out our cameras. We were quite taken away by the sheer scope of the refurbishment and the beautiful restoration work been carried out we soon forgot about the threats of been in the Hall. Slowly documenting our visit and proceeding through the Halls rooms we became aware our explore light could be attracting unwanted attention from the outside as daylight was running out. Turning it off where possible it was obvious that it would be shining like a beacon through the Halls many rooms, we decided to head out with the premise of returning in the morning. Unfortunately on our return we were met by the security who TBH was sympathetic in escorting us off the premises. It seems like our well documented day at Bretton Hall was a one off and maybe we will have to wait to see how the restoration unfolds when the Hall is reborn as an hotel. Pics 1. Entrance Arcade belonging to former stable block (circa 1800). 2. Beaumont Bull & Wentworth Griffin above the columns on each side of the archway below the cupola. 3. Lost student art outside the experimental theatre... former carriage house 4. Looking down the Colonnade 5. The stable courtyard 6. The south range of Bretton hall dates back to 1720 9. Giant pilasters supporting the pendent at the north range of Bretton Hall 8. Three storey nine-by-five-bay main range. 9. Pathway leading to the exterior of the former library 10. Former Orangery 11. Plaque detailing the history 12. Former dinning room with marble fireplace 13. Typical Rococo style in the former dining room 14. Typically their would have been a frieze around the fireplace 15. Looking up at the glazed dome 16. Looks like restoration as begun on the pendentives 17. Former drawing room with its spectacular baroque ceiling 18. Close a look at the baroque ceiling 19. Originally Regency Library then later converted to a display room. 21. Left overs from the colleague era 22. looks like works yet to begin in this area of the hall 23. Leading back to the library 24. restoration of the cove Acoustics to amplify sound in the music room 25. Light hanging from the Adam style celling 26. South ranges main staircase 27. Main staircase with a wrought iron railing 28. Stone stairs leading down to the basement 29. A form of art nouveau 30. Inside the main range 31. Coving shelves 32. Beautiful example of a transom window 33. Mid - century scandinavian style chair 34. Adam style celling's from 1770 35. Developer keeping with the original sash windows 36. Groin vaulted passage with three arches and piers decorated with grisaille paintings in the Portico Hall Added buildings from the former college days 37. The gymnasium 38. exterior of former classrooms 39. Former student centre reception 40. Corridoor leading to the classrooms 41. The student centre was empty 42. Damaged computer 43. Locked 44. typical student dormitory 45. recreational room 46. Entrance to one of the very few remaining former dormitory buildings The history of the Bretton Hall could be a thread all on its own ... as could the documentation of the architecture its position as educational faculty and importantly the future usage of the Hall as an entertainment venue. I've done my best to condense this were possible and in doing so have provided a comprehensive report regarding Bretton Hall.. Hope you enjoyed the report
  21. 4 points
    Hi All, Some pictures of a mine. A spot quite dangerous but a great place ! Hope you will like these pictures
  22. 4 points
    In 1847, Joseph Watts of Dewsbury and William Stones (1827 -1894) of Sheffield began brewing together at the Cannon Brewery in Sheffield's Shalesmoor district near Kelham Island. ... He renamed it the Cannon Brewery after his original premises. Stones soon became one of the richest men in Sheffield and worked up until his death in 1894. A light coloured beer, named Stones Bitter, was produced in the early 1940’s and this soon became a popular choice amongst steel workers across Sheffield. Cannon Brewery grew significantly as its reputation increased and sales prospered, to the extent that new offices, stores, workshops and cellars were all improved and developed. At its peak, the brewery produced 50,000 hectolitres of cask conditioned Stones each year and many of Sheffield’s public houses developed close ties to the brewery and Stones Bitter. An on-site public house was also opened within Cannon Brewery in 1964, “ originally named ‘The Underground’, but renamed as ‘The Pig and Whistle’ to service both visitors and workers, and this can still be found today. Cannon Brewery was closed in 1999 following reports that were indicative of a substantial decline in the sale of cask ales. The owner of the site is a demolition contractor and has submitted an application seeking permission for his business, Hague Plant, to bulldoze the buildings on the 0.7 hectare plot which, in documents drawn up by R Bryan Planning, are described as being of utilitarian design and of no historic or architectural significance. The owner is keen to redevelop the former brewery but has said that it is not effectively marketable in its current state, especially as the high cost of demolition and potential decontamination, particularly from asbestos, are a deterrent to developers. Explore Been looking at this as a potential explore for sometime... The buildings and architecture are something else and anyone who's anyone on the Sheffield graffiti scene have decorated the building with some great pieces.. The former brewery is in poor condition but offers explorers a great opportunity to appreciate the history and architecture of the former brewery. A real shame when they decided to pull the building as this is a real part of Sheffields brewing past.. explore whilst you still have chance.. as this building offers plenty for all. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. and 16. Graffiti on site 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. My favourite pic I took of this place Le fin "Times have changed, the place in its current condition is trashed and flooded... (2018)"
  23. 4 points
    One of a Kind Acoustic Places ! Never seen anything like this Fuel Storage of the NVA Troops in Germany
  24. 4 points
    On the last trip to east germany... saw this very nice stage in a very small town. 1. Ballhaus blue stage 01 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 2. Ballhaus blue stage 02 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 3. Ballhaus blue stage 03 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 4. Ballhaus blue stage 04 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 5. Ballhaus blue stage 05 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 6. Ballhaus blue stage 06 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 7. Ballhaus blue stage 07 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 8. Ballhaus blue stage 08 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 9. Ballhaus blue stage 09 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 10. Ballhaus blue stage 10 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 11. Ballhaus blue stage 11 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr
  25. 4 points
    Nipped in here after G.B's last February. Not much to see building wise but there is some nice graffiti knocking about. I have seen some more recent reports and the graffiti has changed in parts now. Some for the better some not. Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY Sheffield Tramway was an extensive tramway network serving the English city of Sheffield and its suburbs. The first tramway line, horse-drawn, opened in 1873 between Lady's Bridge and Attercliffe, subsequently extended to Brightside and Tinsley. Routes were built to Heeley, where a tram depot was built,Nether Edge and Hillsborough. In 1899, the first electric tram ran between Nether Edge and Tinsley. By 1902 all the routes were electrified. By 1910 the network covered 39 miles, by 1951 48 miles. The last trams ran between Leopold Street to Beauchief and Tinsley on 8 October 1960—three Sheffield trams were subsequently preserved at the National Tramway Museum in Crich. . . . . This one was outside Cannons Brewery on the same day. Thanks for Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/135648593@N02/albums/72157680624533806/with/33051734346/
  26. 4 points
    The blue meth church, visit on the last Trip 2k17 in east germany. All doors are closed, so we have to climb in... for me the hell on earth 1. Blue meth church 01 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 2. Blue meth church 02 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 3. Blue meth church 03 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 4. Blue meth church 04 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 5. Blue meth church 05 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 6. Blue meth church 06 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 7. Blue meth church 07 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 8. Blue meth church 08 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr
  27. 4 points
    1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: A legal visit during a photo base on 21-10-2017. Felt like a last chance because renovation is being prepared. We could notice the painting done during the filming of 'a cure for wellness' very well since we did the bathhouse an men's complex illegal in 2016. Still an impressive location of course and the photo's won't be much of a surprise i guess. I already had a fascination for abandoned buildings, but my first visit at Beelitz Heilstatten in 2014 really kicked of my passion for photography of the abandoned world. Hope you enjoyed viewing this thread! grts, Peter
  28. 4 points
    So now is the time you start seeing this type of thread pop up. Favourite cereals, dog walking moments, cheesey tunes etc... Favourite derp should have its place For me, this is pretty easy. After a while out of exploring I finally got my feet the taste of mould and pigeon shit they had so desperately been craving. I got out once, nothing crazy, but it was out. A cash and carry in Leicester.
  29. 4 points
    Didn't get out much in 2017 but I did enjoy this one, Malsis School
  30. 4 points
    Would have to be this for me....without naming it publicly
  31. 4 points
    Ouvrage Hobling is a lesser work (petit ouvrage) of the Maginot Line. Hobling was approved for construction by CORF (Commission d'Organisation des Régions Fortifiées), the Maginot Line's design and construction agency, in 1931 and became operational by 1935, at a cost of 14 million francs. The contractor was Gianotti of Nice. Hobling consists of four combat blocks. The blocks are linked by an underground gallery with barracks and a utility area (usine). The galleries are excavated at an average depth of up to 30 metres (98 ft). In June 1940 the garrison comprised 115 men and 4 officers of the 164th Fortress Infantry Regiment (RIF). The commanding officer was Captain Boileau. The Casernement de Férange provided peacetime above-ground barracks and support services to Hobling and other positions in the area. The units were under the umbrella of the 3rd Army, Army Group 2. Hobling played no significant role in either the Battle of France in 1940 or the Lorraine Campaign of 1944. After the Second World War it became part of the Mòle de Boulay, a strongpoint in the northeastern defenses against Soviet attack. Hobling remained under Army control until after 1971, when it was declassified and sold. Sold in 1975, Hobling has been partially stripped by salvagers and is abandoned. The salvage work stopped with the removal of all metals, including cloches and turrets, from two blocks. Hobling was the last ouvrage to be stripped. Visited with @The_Raw 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
  32. 3 points
    To get to Preventorio R which has been a childrens sanatorium deep in the mountains of Italy was a real torture. Riding on my Vespa through Italy I'm used to navigate by listening to Google Maps on my earphones. After hours of riding Google suddenly instructed me to turn left on a really steep and curvy gravel path that didn't allow more than the first gear for about 10km. Finally arriving at the Preventorio i realised that it is situated next to a well developed main street. F*** Google Maps Navigation! But it turned out to be worth the effort. #1 DSC05555-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC05550 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC05551 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC05548 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC05546 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC05542 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #7 DSC05541 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #8 DSC05554 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #9 DSC05547-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #10 DSC05545 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #11 DSC05553 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #12 DSC05552 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #13 DSC05549 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #14 DSC05544 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
  33. 3 points
    OK, I said on the other thread I would add the older pics of B Block. I also have ones from admin the year before as well. No point boring with history yada yada as it was on the last thread. Visited with DK and IO a couple of times. Admin: DSC02755 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Where admin used to be DSC05467 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Main Entrance DSC02713 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Window DSC02724 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Large Ward DSC02731 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Side Room DSC02733 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Top of the Stairs DSC02736 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Theatre DSC02741 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Little Room with lovely Window DSC02744 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr The Dark Ward DSC02747 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Map DSC02750 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr External DSC02754 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr B Block: Looking out to A Block DSC05427 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Festering mounds of Pigeon Shit DSC05428 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Ward DSC05429 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr 'That' Doll DSC05431 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Stuff DSC05445 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr TTW DSC05452 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Empoty Room DSC05458 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr The O2 Can DSC05462 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Chair DSC05463 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Klaus Wunderlich DSC05469 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Retro DSC05470 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr One Last External DSC05475 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr
  34. 3 points
    History W. T. Henley was a cable/wire company that was founded in a small London-based workshop in 1837. William Thomas Henley is famous for having converted his old lathe into a wiring covering machine which was used to cover wire with silk and cotton as this was in high demand at the time for electromagnetic apparatus. It is reported that Henley’s company progressed at an impressive rate and that he pioneered the submarine cable field (laying cables on the sea bed between land-based stations to carry telecommunication signals across stretches of ocean).It was Henley’s dream that all of civilisation would eventually be linked together telegraphically. As WT Henley’s Telegraph Works continued to prosper, Henley decided to purchase a factory at North Woolwich beside the Thames in 1859 for £8,000. It is said that this development led to the laying of the Persian Gulf telegraph cable which is 1615 miles long, for the Indian Government. As a result, by the end of 1873 Henley’s Woolwich site had spread to cover some sixteen acres and his company also included three cable laying ships and a four-hundred-foot wharf to allow five-hundred-ton ships to load and unload their cargo. Sadly, Henley died in 1882; however, his company continued to grow in his absence and went on to form branches across the country. By 1906 work on a new factory in Gravesend was completed. The new factory is said to have been an impressive development and it included extensive, purpose-built, laboratories and a modern reinforced concrete air-raid shelter under London Road that could hold approximately two-thousand people. The tunnels were built into old caves within the Rosherville Gardens – an area of land located between the cable works and the cliff face. It is likely that the air-raid shelter was factory-owned but also open to the public as Henley’s company did not actually own Rosherville Gardens at the time and it featured a number of amenities and six entrances. Henley’s company continued to thrive as the Victorian era ended; however, its success can be linked directly to the Great War as it was a catalyst for technological and industrial development and change. By the Second World War, Henley’s company was publicly praised for its contribution towards King and Country – particularly its contribution to ‘Operation Pluto’ (the construction of petrol pipelines across the English Channel). Despite this success, a decision was made to close the main Henley factory at Woolwich due to the repeated damaged it suffered during the war years. A new factory was subsequently built at Birtley in the North East due to its reputation for being a ‘misty valley’ that made it difficult for the Luftwaffe to target factories, and this was completed in 1950. Sadly, a change of events occurred in 1958 when AEI acquired Henley’s company, having already taken over Siemens Bros in 1953. However, AEI is now the world’s oldest cable company and recently celebrated its one-hundred and seventy-fifth anniversary. Unfortunately, Henley’s Gravesend site was closed in 2008, though, due to it being ‘no longer viable to operate because of strong European competition’. Our Version of Events Not much by way of events for this one. It’s been a very busy few months and we ended up here to take a break after doing a spot of house viewing. Since we’d spent all day and most of the evening looking at damp, shitty rental properties that all looked as though they ought to be photographed and placed as reports on here, we arrived outside AEI in the early hours of the morning. Armed only with the essentials, our tripods, cameras and cans of Stella Artois, we made our way over the epic bog that you have to cross to find the entrance to the old shelter. We really underestimated how muddy this bit of wasteland was going to be to be honest and very nearly ended up taking a cold midnight mud bath several times. Nevertheless, we eventually made it across, with all our beers intact you’ll be happy to know. From this point onwards, getting into the old shelter was pretty straightforward. Once inside, we immediately set about taking our snaps. There was a shared feeling among us that the heavy feeling of tiredness was impending so we wanted to get the hard bit of the explore out of the way quickly. It didn’t really take long to photograph the place in the end though, once we’d worked out the general layout of the structure which is a grid-like setup. This left us with plenty of time to each pull up a chemical toilet and enjoy a few bevvies. And that’s how it ended. The tins were cracked and we sat wondering what it would have felt like to hear explosions outside and the thunder of guns shaking the paint and dirt from the ceiling. In reality, all we could really hear was a superb silence and the odd drip coming from a room to our left. What better way to finish an explore, with beers in hand and an abundance of chemical toilets at the ready. Explored with Ford Mayhem. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21:
  35. 3 points
  36. 3 points
    The History Largely from wiki: Millmoor was was the home ground of Rotherham County F.C. between 1907 and 1925 and then their successors Rotherham United F.C. until 2008. The team and ground were once owned by C.F. Booth, whose huge Clarence Metalworks and scrapyard overlooks the site. When Ken Booth sold the club in 2004 he kept the freehold to the stadium and leased it back to the club in return for £200,000 a year rent and preferential advertising options and ticket allocations. In 2008 the relationship between the two parties broke down and Rotherham United left Millmoor for the Don Valley Stadium, before moving into their present ground, the New York Stadium, in 2012. The Explore All in all a pretty relaxed mooch. The scrapyard next door is huge and noisy but everybody is too busy to be paying much attention to the stadium. All of the internal areas of the ground are heavily stripped but in good condition, with the custody suite and cells being particularly interesting. The stands are in fairly good condition and the pitch itself appears to be maintained with Wiki suggesting it's seen periodic use for youth football. Being the genius that I am I left everything but a 35mm prime lens at home and arrived about 40 minutes before sunset so apologies for the slightly odd perspectives. The Photos I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. If you're anywhere vaguely near Sheffield and want to link up then drop me a line. Cheers, Thirteen.
  37. 3 points
    A bit of a revisit to see if anything had changed since my last visit in 2014 Well worth a look if your passing. Some History The Culvert in Ebbw Vale is along the River Ebbw Fawr, a stretch of just over a mile of the river was Culverted in 1937 to accommodate expansion of the steel works. The tunnel was originally a brick lined concrete arch for its entire length. In places it has raised walkways on either side, it is well documented that someone died in this Culvert from touching a live wire that some metal thieves had cut some years ago. Pics Thanks for looking
  38. 3 points
    Whats This a report from me NOOOOOO Wayyyy lol. Sorry aint been upping much hopefully that will change. Anyways i know a few been here etc but thought i would up mine. History: Not much im afraid and i aint copying anyone else. What i do know is a pub/club was underneath and its been up for sale quite a bit. Also it has some lovely terracotta walls etc . Explore: Visited on a invite from @GRONK after a little look with @stranton and mentioned it to gronk has it could be worth a visit has me and strant didn't get time. And even though a lot is trashed a lot was deffo worth the trip. And getting in well it was more open than some of the ladies of the night i have seen in both Leeds and Sheffield lol. A big difference from when me and strant went. Anyways on with what you want to see the pics. so enjoy all. A few shots from bar area .. Dont forget your coat lol.. Now my fave bits .. @GRONK getting in my shot lol The smell in here ffs was unreal. #URBEXPOO lol Ok thats it for now enjoy sll. Will deffo try to get some more done. If not before crimbo have a cracking Christmas all and a urbex filled 2018 for all. Thanks for looking.....
  39. 3 points
    Nice captures here! Small dial collection on my part:
  40. 2 points
    Hi, this is my first report, I don't really know what to write but here goes....... Unless you have been on Mars or in a coma for the past couple of weeks you would most probably have heard about this Manor House. Some pictures were posted & the guys who posted them had pretty much made it crystal that they were not going to be sharing its location. The post stated that they hoped that people would forget about it & that it would be saved. Or to put it another way - they threw the gauntlet down big time and by doing that it had made it the UK’s most hunted derp within the UE community, and surprise surprise within a day it had been found by more than one person. The actual post & chats that I had with them gave me a couple of very good clues & to be fair to the guys when I told them that I had it they did clue me up with everything I needed to know. Anyway, It just so happened that I was in the area with some free time on the Wednesday so I popped along. I got there before sun up & had the house to myself for a couple of hours, it was a pretty much ad hoc visit & quickly realised that I needed a wider lens, I knew some guys were planning to hit it on the Saturday & decided a revisit was in order. Messages were sent & arrangements were made for the pre-Sun up meet, I’d gotten wind that there may be a few people there so I was not surprised to see a few other faces when I opened the door at around 7am. The pre-dawn light, or rather lack of it meant that we all sat around having a chat & a schmoke as more & more people turned up out of the darkness. I didn’t count but I’m told that at 08:30 there were 21 of us in the house and that the snack bar had ran out of breakfast rolls & that pin badges & t shirt sales were through the roof. The 19th century house itself is on a massive estate and parts of the estate are live & lived in. There are 2 floors & a basement, the house has some lovely features, the stairs, the swimming pool & indoor courtyard & there’s plenty to spend a couple of hours there photographing. The basement is quite big & has a drive in access point & (GoonTube Click bait warning time) has a FERKIN PANZER TANK in one of the rooms, that’s the headlines and that’s what the Goons will be selling it as but the reality is that it is a home made & nowhere near finished & is made of wood. A bit meh for me tbh. Just outside the house there is a BMW parked half in a bush. The house is ok, the features are great but there’s more to be offered from this site. There’s numerous buildings to visit & as soon as I had shoot the last bits I wanted to shoot myself, Paul & Curt went off to see what we could find, there were some ruins , out buildings & a pyramid near the house that looked cool & as we were walking through the woods we could hear the familiar sound of guns being shot in the not too far distance. We had a bit of a scout around & found the ‘hunters’ in an adjacent field. Now if this was a GoonTube video we’d have become the ‘hunted’ but as this is real life we just ignored them & went the other way. One of our goals was the indoor Tennis courts, this was pretty hard to miss once you got near it. We opened the door & were amazed, yeah it was a tennis court, but it’s last use had been as a venue to watch the Football World Cup on a projector screen, there was a bar set up & every nations flag was hanging up & bunting all over the place, we found a large number of pint glasses depicting the “World Cup 1996” so it appears that it was the last time the courts had been used other than for a bit of storage. TBH it was quite trashy but among the trash we found (click bait warning) a HUMAN SKELETON!! And what you going to do with a skull on a explore? Yep, put glasses on it & a fag in its mouth, named him Dr McCoy and take some pictures. What... you wouldn’t... yeah I know, Exploring is a serious business but I like to have a laugh too while I’m out visiting. We were in the tennis courts for quite some time before going to the wood sheds & then the boat house. The boat house was the main thing on my hit list & it was ok, I was setting up to shoot & among the sounds of gun shots ringing out we heard someone shouting “YOU IN THE WOODS!! STAY STILL!!” so we done what any self respecting Umbexer would do & we bailed back through the wood to the soundtrack of “STAY THERE!” & gunshots. As we were running I got my foot caught and I went down like I’d been shot, Paul & Curt were worried & frantic, and by worried & frantic I mean pissing themselves laughing, I don’t know if it was a dream or not but I’m sure I heard Paul say “what the fuck are you doing on the floor, get up!” and as I got up I could see that we’d run into the guy who was shouting at us. “What you doing on my land?” the ruddy faced man shouted, “We’re photographing the Red Kites” I replied & he told us to go over the fence & “gerroff moi land” & we left. Well, that was my first report, probably my last too :-
  41. 2 points
    Lovely photographs,is there a background story you could tell about your explore here?
  42. 2 points
    Im originally from Lisburn, moved about 9 years ago to the mainland. I never got to explore this place, so i really enjoyed these amazing pictures!
  43. 2 points
    Thanks to all for the response! Beelitz is the best
  44. 2 points
    A good friend, @MiaroDigital, told me about the forum. In the same month of my registration, in October 2014, I already flew to London and got to know the first members of the forum. Since then I met a lot of great people via OS; meanwhile, we had many mutual visits and a lot of great joint explorations in recent years.
  45. 2 points
    My first ever church,and was great to have a mooch about in her,lots of original features,and most important in my view not hit by lead thieves,and people who think its "cool"to trash things....hope it stays like this for years to come..a few picks why not... Thanks for looking...
  46. 2 points
    Urban Reflections... Flipped upside down for the last two.. Your turn...
  47. 2 points
    Hi, I have been urbexing for quite a while but not on the scale of some of the contributions from some the members of OS.. Myself and a few mates were doing it about 30 years ago in old castles, Abbeys or caves. We just called it 'dossing out'. I was the only one with a camera which was in the days of film, not digital. So I'm going to have to rummage through some draws to find any old forgotten places. My favourite place at the time was Hawkstone Follies near Whitchurch in the UK. This place perch high up on a rock overlooking a golf course had an old Chapel arch with a labyrinth of caves and pot holes underneath. With meandering paths through woods and hugging the rockface. Unfortunately English heritage got hold of it and in their idea of making it safe, ruined it by sticking bars all around the caves and filling the pot holes in. They also added a car park on the top, and made a shop under the old arch. Nowadays I visit Wales and go to some quite open locations that have probably been thoroughly covered like Din Lligwy, or Porth Wen brick works. I will in a few days add these to the group along with the odd little abandoned cottage. So thanks for the add and I look forward to enjoying all the photos on here, and look for tips on the way..
  48. 2 points
    I'm usually not a big fan of graffiti, but here are a few that are pretty well done.
  49. 2 points
    History Pinched from other reports on here: Milford was named for its river-crossing, on an ancient route from Derby to the Peak district. Jedediah Strutt, a farmer turned hosier, recognised the potential of the site. The Inventor of the Derby rib machine, Strutt owned a Derby silk mill, and had set up cotton mills in Belper. In 1781, he bought land in Milford to build a cotton spinning mill. It was one of a series of textile milles constructed on the Derwent between Matlock and Derby during the Industrial Revolution. These pioneering developments, which included the creation of new communities to house and cater for the workforce they required, are now recognises as being of international importance. The Milford Mill complex eventually included spinning, bleaching and dying mills, as well as foundries, joiners’ workshops, a gas-works and a corn-mill. The Warehouse, constructed in 1793, was an early attempt by William Strutt, Jedediah’s eldest son, to design a fire-proof multi-storey structure. The Strutt's success transformed Milford from a riverside hamlet into a company village. They built a school, created several farms to supply produce for their workers and helped establish the village’s various religious and social buildings. The remaining buildings are just fragments of a much larger site, mostly demolished through the 1960s and 1970s. More recently the site had been mixed industrial/commercial units, with part of the site forming an antique centre. Currently it sits empty with the forecourt used as a car wash on weekends. The Explore Generally I write something along the lines of things being a 'relaxed mooch' in this section. Having initially headed to Derwentside Industrial Park to see what was left of the Abru factory (A: Lots of rubble) I I had a fairly clumsy entrance over some barbed wire at Milford in full view of the adjacent A-road. Cut my hands and shredded my jeans a little but nothing too disastrous. Inside it's all pretty heavily graffed and stripped. Not sure I'd go so far out of my way to go back. After wandering around for an hour it becomes apparent that there are other people on the site. Given my ungraceful entrance I assumed it was security. Cue a 45 minute game of hide and seek. Transpires there are six people congregated in front of the gate. The site is encircled by a river so there are no alternative avenues of escape. After waiting and watching for a further half hour my patience fails and I decide to approach. Turns out one of the blokes was (I assume) an estate agent. THe look on his face when I, the scruffy, unshaven bloke with ripped clothes and hands covered in blood and rust came towards him was priceless. He was polite but asked me to leave immediately and I walk purposefully towards the gate. I try to open it for the most awkward couple of minutes of my life before an exasperated security guard has to walk over and do it for me. All in all not my smoothest moment. The Photos I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. If you're anywhere vaguely near Sheffield and want to link up then drop me a line. Cheers, Thirteen.
  50. 2 points
    Hi ASOM. I am going to a meeting tomorrow morning with the local council and some former colleagues, one of whom provided me with the photographs I mentioned. I will ask his permission for me to send some of them to you. We are trying to get a permanent memorial erected to the former Moss Side Hospital (AKA Ashworth) highlighting its role in the treatment of WW1 soldiers, not only it's influence worldwide but the significant role for the local community. Feel free to use the images I have attached to this reply, they explain a little about what we are trying to do and why. Ok, I've just tried to load the newspaper photos from our campaign but they are too large according to this website! Any suggestions? Kind Regards rossfergie
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