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Showing content with the highest reputation since 02/19/2018 in Posts

  1. 8 points
    Did you ever went to an Island full of creepy dolls??? NO??? Let me take you with you! On my holiday in December 2017 to Mexico I heard about this place so I had to go. There is no holiday without finding some decayed stuff! The story goes as followed: The guy who lives on this Island found a girl who was drowned around the island. He also found a doll floating nearby and, assuming it belonged to the deceased girl so he hung it on a tree as a sign of respect. After he did that he heard whispers and foodsteps around his hut where he lived. He started to collect and hang more and more old dolls to calm down the spirit of the drowned girl. In 2001 the owner of the Island died and was found on the same spot where the girl was found. When I wanted to go to this place I had to find someone who wanted to bring me there because it was hard to reach according to people around there because of latest hurricanes and earthquakes . After a lot of negotiations I found someone with a little boat to go there and to be honest it was worth the whole trip!! I hope you liked it! Let me know what you think! Marco Bontenbal https://pixanpictures.com
  2. 7 points
    I've visited this former state hospital site a few times and over the last few years they've torn down a few buildings and unfortunately before I was able to make my first visit the morgue and lab were two of those :(. I wished I'd gotten to see them but alas...I did not. Here are a few photos from various trips. I didn't take great photos when I first started exploring and my editing sucked! Most of the buildings are rather boring and not much was left inside. One of the areas of this complex was/is a bowling alley which for years was flooded and no one was able to photograph it. However when they were preparing a building beside it to be demoed the water was removed from it. It's completely dark there so no available light except by light painting which I detest This building above they removed the cupolas for what reason I don't know and they are sitting behind fence at the building in the background This building was demoed 2016.
  3. 7 points
    One of my favorite hospitals...the Kirkbride. This example of one was built in 1858 and had unfortunately some rather hideous modification done over the years mainly in the admin section. I contacted the state archives where this building is located after I visited my second time asking if they had any old photos of the interiors and sadly they did not. I also asked for any information they had which turned out to be very little. They did direct me to a small group of students from college that did some research and gave presentation a few years ago as well as some PDF files of what they did have in their collection. The "chapel" or amusement hall looks like it was really beautiful originally and from what I can discern they made it into 2.5 floors from the original open space it once was. There is a really decorative stenciling in the "attic" portion which should have been seen from what is now the first floor along with pretty stained glass windows which again are "cut" up due to the floor addition. Admin has some ghastly suspended ceilings with piping all over. The front entry was covered up partially and made smaller as well from what I can tell. Why they did such hideous things I do not know. Lack of common sense or wanting to preserve the originality of the building. There really isn't much information about this place as I mentioned but I do know in the 1930's they changed the wards to mainly open ones hence really no patient rooms. There were also several other buildings that have been torn down over the years which were quite nice and some modifications done to the outside of the kirk which I found out about when I found an old postcard view of it. Anyway here's the photos from my various 4 visits. It's 11 hrs from me or I'd gone more than that
  4. 6 points
    This was the first stop in Italy with Elliot5200 & @shaddam last month. I don't know any history unfortunately but it's a stunning building and I wouldn't mind living in it! I normally write a lot more than this but I'm not sure what else to say. Oh, we went for a pizza afterwards. Pics: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. & 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. Thanks for looking
  5. 6 points
    Yep, it's another Italian asylum! Last one from this trip. We changed our plans at the last minute to check on this instead of visiting one of the better known spots. It was a bit of a gamble as we had no info and it was going to be the last explore of the trip, but it could be epic. I'm glad we did as it turned out to be a banger. Something interesting in every room and corridor pretty much. Lights still on in places and parts that looked not long abandoned. Probably the closest thing I've seen to one of the classic UK asylums in their hey day. We only had time to get around half of it unfortunately so I'm sure there is a lot more to see in here. Visited with elliot5200 & @shaddam Freaky bastard door, like something out of a horror film creaking and banging of it's own accord. Never heard anything like it. The first of many in here. Lights still on in some parts This semi-circular section was a secure wing for violent patients. Inside one of the cells and the adjacent corridor We popped our heads into the chapel just before we left as it was a bit bait. Very nice in there but it looked very much still in use so we didn't hang about. And that's all for now. Thanks for looking
  6. 6 points
    Mineral Springs Bath House History The construction of the Mineral Springs Bath House began in 1907. This was in order to bring in more tourism and wealth into the area. The town it was built in was an excellent location to host a bath house, as it was well known for it's rich mineral water sources which was believed to have medicinal properties. During the start of the 20th century mineral baths were a very fashionable and popular leisure activity. It took 3 years to build, with the help of local residents and neighbouring villages. It was finally unveiled with a ceremony in 1911. The materials which were used for the interior were designed in Vienna, France and Belgium and it was the most expensive healing bath in Bulgaria at that current time. Typical to most bath houses, it was separated into two sections, one for the men and another for the women. Both areas accommodated for it's visitors with a large circular pool, changing rooms and 10 bathtubs. The baths also provided central heating facilities, the main parts of the building were kept consistently at 15°C, the changing rooms at 28°C and the baths themselves were 32°C. The bath house was also equip with a clinic, admin offices and a large laundry room. Sadly the Mineral Springs Baths eventually closed in 2001, due to the decline in interest and popularity along with the lack of investment by the local government. Visit As always, visited with @darbians on a long weekend trip to Bulgaria. We were both feeling pretty optimistic once we'd seen the grand looking exterior on arrival and fortunately the interior certainly lived up to our expectations. Externals Internals If you've got this far, thanks for reading
  7. 6 points
    Peppermint Powerplant I've seen this particular location a few times before online but I decided to post up a report on it anyway because I think it's quite special with some unique characteristics. History The Peppermint Powerplant was built in conjunction to a nearby paper mill with the purpose of supplying electricity to the mill. The plant features a stunning peppermint colour scheme on the singular turbine and control panels. The turbine itself was produced by Siemens, a company established in 1904 in Berlin and is currently one of the most prominent manufactures of high powered gas turbines worldwide. The plant n also hosted two Steinmüller boilers. One of which was commissioned in 1954 and the other in 1965. Both the power station and the paper mill were decommissioned around 1999. From what we could see the paper mill had been stripped. But despite being closed for nearly 20 years the power station has remained in very nice condition. Visit Last stop for the day on a Euro trip with @darbians. We both wanted to see this site so we decided it was worth having a quick look before it got too dark. Even though it wasn't a large site there was still a good amount to photograph, in fact I wish I took more but here are the ones I did manage to get. (Excuse the awkward handheld shot) (Getting pretty dark by this point so we called it a day) Hope you enjoyed reading my report.
  8. 6 points
    First post on here guys so hope it works! Tipped off by a friend Matt about this house I decided to go one cold winter morning to see it for myself on a solo run. Entry into the house a tricky assault course through the overgrown garden which hasn't been tended to for decades by the look of it. A very peculiar house this in that its location is in a sleepy little village of pure chocolate box quintessential Englishness. A more desirable a place to live would be hard to find to get away form the chaos of city life. Clean air and peaceful surroundings, the parish church all capture the imagination yet this house contradicts everything around it. Somewhat derelict with overgrown gardens, a rusty old iron gate with a disappearing path leading up to the house don't fit in to its surroundings. What the local residents make of it I'd love to know. Why it has been left to fall into such a bad state is anyone's guess. I would imagine the house itself is worth a lot of money having 4 bedrooms and a lot of land regardless of the location which I'd imagine to be quite expensive to live in. Doesn't anyone own the house and if so why have they just left it for so long to fall into disrepair? It's not really secured either so it doesn't seem like anyone ever goes to the house to check on it. Very strange. From the decor and the possessions still left inside I'd date it becoming abandoned around the mid 1980s. Piles and piles of newspapers - mainly The Daily Mail & The Telegraph - clutter each room. Using a tripod proved tricky as the floors were covered in stacks of old newspapers. The most recent date I could find without checking all the hundreds left around was 1984. Maybe one of the former residents was a hoarder of newspapers? In the entire house there were literally thousands left behind no room escaped their occupancy. There were few clues as to who lived here, just names on envelopes which obviously won't be revealed. What their occupations were I have no idea. Downstairs were two reception rooms littered with vintage possessions including several televisions a typewriter a Bakelite rotary telephone amongst other things. The most interesting items were the framed portraits of children. Who were they and where are they now? Piles of old photographs and personal documents were left behind on the writing/study desk seemingly unwanted by anyone. A double split staircase leads to the upstairs bedrooms. Two were empty so weren't photographed, the other two still had everything left behind including clothes and yet more newspapers. I always think that every abandoned home must have an owner somewhere. It seems this one - despite its obvious appeal to potential buyers - seems to be truly abandoned with no one left to have any interest in it. Enjoy the images
  9. 6 points
    One of the more fun powerplant explores i ever did. This location was pretty active and there was still a lot of electronics and lights turned on. I've been here twice, and still didn't have the chance to see the whole location. The highlights of these place (for me) are the modern controlroom with all the screens, photographing the lights outside on the roof, climbing the 143m/469feet chimneys (twice) and watching the security car doing its rounds on the terrain from the chimney. Combine this with great weather and great friends, and this makes it one of my favorite locations. Oh, and i also shot some photos: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  10. 6 points
    Thanks and yes Forgot to add the old view of the kirk above
  11. 5 points
    This was a fun one. A small part of the hospital is still in use so there were lots of vehicles coming and going. Security kept driving up and down the main road as well like it was groundhog day so we had to stay on our toes. The hospital was built in 1930 for the treatment of people suffering from mental illness. Towards the end of WWII, in 1945, a famous massacre took place here. Seventy five Italian Social Republic soldiers were brought here as prisoners and around 50 of them were brutally executed. Some of them being tied up with wire and crushed under the wheels of two trucks. Anyway, as I was saying, a fun place to hang out, with something to see in most of the buildings. I'd say we got around 75% of the abandoned stuff. Here's some pics: 1. Chapel 2. Not too impressive inside 3. 4. & 5. 6. Beds bolted to the floor 7. 8. 9. Not entirely sure what this was, some kind of meals on wheels type body trolley? 10. 11. Several buildings full of old documents 12. 13. 14. X-ray scans 15. Theatre/Cinema 16. Amazingly the projector has survived Thanks for looking
  12. 5 points
    An oil refinery being decommissioned... I went there with my bicycle, managed to get it past the first fence which was nice xD I hope i didn't put too many photos... D90 with sigma 17-70 cheers
  13. 5 points
    Hello, This was my 16th visit to Belgium for Exploring! Was a great little explore, only history I could find is below. It is a mix between DLSR and phone photos. This power plant was built in 1960 and operated on gas . In 2014, the plant was closed. 40 jobs were lost. It turns out that the electricity in the whole place is still working and the computers are still running!
  14. 5 points
    This is Manicomio Di V (Mental asylum). The hospital was built in 1930 due to growing demand for mental support in the region. The hospital closed in 1991 due to new laws. [ The overgrown church [ The entrance of the theatre The decaying theatre The old projector Fences to prevent patients escaping or committing suicide The overgrown roads through the facility The entrance of the shower building The shower rooms Decaying bathroom Picture of one of the patients This was the section were alcohol addicted people would be taken care of Old poster of a Lancia Prisma Backstage the theatre The stockroom One room were the patients would sleep a couple of phones thrown in a corner Thanks for looking!
  15. 5 points
    Stoke Hospital Morgue. Been closed a fair while now, been here 3 times and never been able to gain access to this part of it due to it being locked off and being caught by secca once!
  16. 4 points
    Bowling World – Belgium Closed in late 2015. It closed due to a decline in custom and proposed development on the site of this bowling alley and dance hall next door.
  17. 4 points
    Visited with The Kwan on a rainy Saturday, some lovely bits left in the area and we missed quite a bit so theres always an excuse for a return visit. Some History The name Ratgoed derives from “Yr Allt Goed”, which means the steep, wooded hillside. Ratgoed mine was also sometimes known as “Alltgoed”. The Ratgoed slate workings lie at the head of what was originally called Cwm Ceiswyr but became known as Cwm Ratgoed because of the quarry. It lies north of Aberllefenni and northwest of Corris in, what is now, the Dyfi Forest. The slate that was quarried at Ratgoed was the Narrow Vein. This runs from south of Tywyn, on the coast, to Dinas Mawddwy about 18 miles inland and follows the line of the Bala Fault. The Narrow Vein was worked along its length at places such as Bryneglwys near Abergynolwyn; Gaewern & Braich Goch at Corris, Foel Grochan at Aberllefenni and Minllyn at Dinas Mawddwy. The slate at Ratgoed dips at 70° to the southeast, the same as Foel Grochan. Ratgoed was a relatively small working, it was worked from around 1840 until its closure in 1946. Pics [ [ Le Kwan Thanks for looking
  18. 4 points
    When I started urban exploration 27 years ago (I'm getting old ... ), I always wanted to discover forgotten pianos in abandoned houses. It took some time to get the first piano in front of my lens. In the meantime I have found several ones and I still like them a lot. Here is a little selection of my photos of pianos and other instruments. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41
  19. 4 points
    I have long dreamed of visiting an abandoned school. From what I was able to read on the internet, the school was closed in 2003. After a few years, the facility was reactivated, an environmental center was created. Unfortunately, the plan did not work out. So the little kids marched to another school. The old facility stands and waits ... thousands of people take a course on it like believers on Jasna Góra. It is probably the most recognizable school in Poland, of course those abandoned. My only regret is that only now I managed to come here. You can see traces of demolition ... in the sleeping area where the youngest ones were napping, you can see traces of alcoholic libations. Crosses turned upside down, I personally am not a believer, but I put most of the crosses as it should be. Very childish play, although even the children probably would not do it, because for what. If any of you have plans to visit a school ... do not postpone it for later ... because there is no reason to go. The school has an amazing atmosphere. (Translator....sorry )
  20. 4 points
    Hello everyone, We have been working hard over the last 6 months to improve this website and keep it as enjoyable as possible. Websites and forums are not however free to keep, and this generally comes out of the Admins pockets. We do run ads, but the revenue generated by these are minimal, essentally - donations are very important (and appricated!). Any member who donates will receive a badge (not a blue peter one, sorry!) and lose all advertisements for a period. You can do this by using the donate box on the right hand side of the home page or simply paypal your donation to donate@oblivionstate.com - please let us know your forum username if you do this. All in all the costs run into a few hundred pounts a year any help we can get towards that would be appriciated. Many thanks, Oblivion State admin team.
  21. 4 points
    The Station Hotel is a grand Victorian building situated in the heart of Ayr town centre. The hotel consists of 71 bedrooms, complete with en-suite bathrooms, plus a host of suits for functions and a cocktail lounge. The hotel, which is attached to Ayr railway station, was originally opened by the Glasgow and South Western Railway in June 1866 and become part of the British Transport Hotels (BTH) at Nationalisation. It was sold by BTH in October 1951 and has changed ownership a number of times, having been owned by Stakis Hotels, Quality, and Swallow Hotels. The Station Hotel is currently the oldest and most famous hotel in Ayr. The hotel has retained almost all of its original features inside and out. The hotel started to turn away customers in 2014 and closed around 2015. After suffering neglect for some time beforehand, the building is now deteriorating; the railway station have had to take action to safeguard their customers from falling debris. Visited with @SpiderMonkey The car park is fenced off due to parts of the exterior falling off Entrance and staircase Reception Lift and staircase on the first floor Into the cocktail lounge.... The corridor leading to the next parts was suffering decay due to leaks in the roof The Arran Suite... Restaurant... The restaurant's kitchen Other public spaces around the hotel... The Kyle Suite bar area The Carrick Room The Kintyre Suite And finally, the hotel rooms... View of the decaying rear facade overlooking the railway station
  22. 4 points
    In the middle of the city ... the entire ground floor is flooded ... mold ... demolition .... Sports and medical clinic connected to the hotel. Another building written down for losses. Probably soon will be razed to the ground ... especially that in its vicinity grow new residential buildings. One can only imagine what sport stars were in this object. Have a look at the photos that remained inside ... (TRANSLATOR...sorry)
  23. 4 points
    Was reminded that I didn't posted anything yet so, here's a post of a recent visit to this mine. This one is not the safest one :-) . Some parts are already collapsed. There are several levels but the lower did we skip. Heard that the air quality is not the best there and we didn't bring the rope ladder . Was nice to explore. Hope you enjoy looking at this.
  24. 3 points
    When I die, honey when I part with the sun and I will be a long rather sad thing will you take care of me then? you will embrace your arms and you'll fix what broke cruel fate ...
  25. 3 points
    Hi! Thank you for acceptation and your message on my Facebook Page! I've some times so i'll post some pictures of my exploration of "Slides of the Past" aka "Maison Alexa", located in Belgium. I don't post every pictures because i've done 51 photos... If you want to see the others, you can go on FB / Flickr and search "PixRoads"! Thanks! ^^ Let's go, have a nice visit and day #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17
  26. 3 points
    Hope the photo file sizes are good as I had to reduce them due to the cap. Brockmill first began operations around the mid-1700s and further expanded when the Earl of Balcarres bought the mill and built a furnace at Haigh foundry half a mile downstream. The two sights prospered building large steam cylinders and fire engines also building the first locomotive for Lancashire, and plenty more to follow. Later the mill expanded into brick and textile making, however, the works closed in 1885 more recently the mill was used for the production of herbal medicine Unfortunately, i found no date as to when production stopped I'm sure you'll agree though guy's it's a wonderful explore in a serene location.
  27. 3 points
    Haus der Offiezere My first report. I have had this account for about a year but never posted anything from fear of my photos not being good enough to post. Decided to pluck up the courage to start contributing more but I apologise if there are any mistakes. Anyway, on to the history! History The Haus der Offiezere was originally established as a shooting range between Kummersdorf and Jüterbog in 1888. It wasn't until 1910, when construction of the Berlin to Dresden railway line took place, it was decided that Wunsdorf held a significant strategic advantage and because of this it became a military headquarters two years following. A telephone and telegraph office was built in 1912. By the start of the first world war, Wunsdorf had already become Europe's largest military base, boasting 60,000 acres of land. A year later, the first mosque was built in Germany on the site. This was to accommodate for the Muslim prisoners of war which were housed there. They were known as the Halbmondlager or Crescent Moon camp. After the war, the Wunsdorf Headquarters was converted into a military sports school in 1919. It was even used to train athletes for the Olympic games in Berlin in 1936. During the uprising of the Third Reich, a network of highly modernised tunnels and bunkers were built, including a communications centre, known as the Zeppelin. A year Maybach I and II were built which coincided with the Zeppelin bunker. A ring tunnel connected all the bunkers to each other and were disguised as ordinary homes on the ground, to avoid suspicion. The construction of these bunkers wasn't completed until 1940, a year after war was declared. From 1943 the Haus der Offiezere was temporarily converted into a hospital to treat wounded German soldiers. Two years later, in 1945 the Red Army had invaded East Germany and quickly seized control of Wunsdorf. This was when it was renamed the Haus der Offiezere which translates to House of the Officer. During Soviet occupation of Wunsdorf in the GDR, the Haus der Offiezere became a place of art and culture. The former sports halls and gymnasiums were torn down and replaced with elaborate theatres and concert halls. Daily deliveries of supplies came all the way from Moscow on a direct train line and the locals nicknamed it 'little Moscow' due to the number of roughly 60,000 Russian inhabitants. This continued for almost 50 years, until the reunification of Germany when it was handed back. The last remaining Russians eventually left in 1994 and it has remained unoccupied since. Visit The photos I have compiled for this post were taken on two separate occasions. Wanted to give a good representation of the location, as there is a lot to see. Unfortunately some of my photographs were taken when I first started getting into the hobby, so I hope they do enough justice and excuse the quality of said images. Second visit was on a solo trip to Germany, giving me plenty of time to mooch. Would consider the Haus der Offiezere one of my favourite locations and I hope you enjoy my report. Externals Internals Thank you for reading.
  28. 3 points
    Hidden behind the trees of a small wood I found this nice mansion. It is abandoned at least since 4 years and nevertheless happily free of any kind of vandalism. #1 DSC00404-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC00449-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC00423-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC00422-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC00444-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC00410-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #8 DSC00417-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #9 DSC00413-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #10 DSC00445-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #11 DSC00412-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #12 DSC00446-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #13 DSC00408-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #14 DSC00409-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #15 DSC00406-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #16 DSC00448-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #17 DSC00443-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #18 DSC00442-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #19 DSC00424-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #20 DSC00426-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #21 DSC00436-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #22 DSC00437-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #23 DSC00441-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #24 DSC00428-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #25 DSC00439-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #26 DSC00432-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #27 DSC00430-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
  29. 3 points
    History Green Lodge Naturopathic Centre is located in Halstead, Essex. One naturopathy journal article indicates that the centre opened in 1988 and that the site was once part of a residential care home. However, little else has been written about its history. What is known is that Green Lodge became a centre for Integrated Natural Medicines and it set up a complete medical infrastructure according to naturopathic principles. Naturopathic philosophy claims to be a science, art and practice. It argues that if the body is left to its own devices, or encouraged by a skilful physician, it can heal itself and regain harmony and balance without the use of drugs. The philosophy behind the practice follows the idea that we are all individuals with certain ‘habits’ (poor diet, inadequate exercise, taking harmful substances, attaching ourselves to possessions, negative psychology etc.) which create ‘obstacles’ that disturb our normal, natural functioning. It is argued that our habits are difficult to eradicate with medicine, and that we lose our ability to recognise we are unwell if we do not seek treatment. Naturopathic research goes on to suggest that it is the only form of treatment that can ‘lead us back to the right track’, by offering an approach that is sensitive, compassionate, empathetic and personal. Nevertheless, some professional doctors refer to this type of practice as being a pseudo form of medical treatment that offers little more than a Placebo effect. At Green Lodge Centre great emphasis was placed on the ‘Lifestyle Assessment’. In other words, each patient’s dietary habits, daily routines (at work and home) and environmental circumstances would be recorded. After the initial assessment, the centre would look at the detailed medical histories of patients to further piece together their physical and mental characteristics. Finally, the third part of the naturopathic assessment at Green Lodge involved an Iridology investigation (a close look at the structure of the iris and sclera) to uncover deficiencies and malfunctions which might otherwise go undetected. Sometimes additional examinations were conducted, such as pulse, urine and tongue analyses. Once all the above information about a patient was gathered, a treatment programme would be carefully selected to address the cause their problems. The community at Green Lodge was said to have been 2000 strong. It included a range of people, including children, monks, nuns and refugees from Tibet and the South of India. However, the centre closed sometime after 2012. It is not known why the centre closed, and there is little evidence to suggest that the centre and its staff relocated. Since its closure a nearby care home has used the site to store old equipment. Our Version of Events This epic tale begins with us searching for a secret derp that’s hidden deep in a forest. Among the fresh, hayfevery, grasses, blooming flowers and trees, we followed a well-trodden trail. Clearly many other explorers had attempted to visit this derp before us, so to call it secret is a blatant lie. The further we walked, though, the more dense the trees, ivy and nettles became, so maybe others before us had given up their search before reaching it. Eventually, the trail led up to a red bricked structured that was heavily coated in a dark green moss. We’d found it! Without further ado, we soon found ourselves inside a fetid-looking bedroom, which looked as though it was regularly visited by the local goons. It was disheartening. Nevertheless, we’d walked this far, so it was time to whip the cameras out regardless of our disappointment. We set about taking a few shots of the heavily decayed rooms we’d found, then moved on towards a building that looks as though it was an old stable. Unfortunately, as we quickly discovered, this was full of shit and a mountain of old care home equipment that’s slowly being consumed by vines and nettles. At this point, the pair of us split up and I decided to inspect some of the junk, in the hope I’d find something photogenic. That’s when I came across a good-looking old red bicycle that was standing next to a rotten wooden piano which was teeming with life. After the stable, which in hindsight might have been a barn, it was time to move on to a large building just ahead of us. This is when we were greeted by those suspected radgies mentioned earlier, who in the end turned out to be alright since they saved us the effort of having to look for access. Once inside, we realised that the building was mostly fucked. There were a couple of cool features, such as the swimming pool – but even that’s filled with old zimmer-frames. There was also a ‘herb room’ that was still filled with herbs; however, after spending all our time looking for one specific herb, we failed to discern what the others actually were. Still, it was an interesting room. Towards the end of the explore, we started to notice that the corridors had begun to fill with the immediately distinguishable smell of a skunk rolling around in ragweed. Some have likened the pungent odour to the fragrance of ‘God’s vagina’. So, we went to investigate and soon discovered that a group of fourteen year olds had managed to get their hands on a stash of ganja. It would appear that tastes have improved significantly since the days of consuming White Lightening in the underpass – either they beat us to the herb room, or they have well paid paper rounds… Anyway, at this point we felt a bit dodgy, so we decided to leave the local goons to their little session of self-discovery. We headed back to the dark forest and foggy meadows with our fingers crossed that the fuckers hadn’t traded our tyres in for their bag of herbs. Explored with Ford Mayhem and Sx. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27: 28: 29: 30:
  30. 3 points
    This Avro Shackleton is one of three aircrafts situated at Long Marston. After the small aviation museum had sadly closed its doors, the Shackleton MR3, serial number WR985, was among a group of larger airframes that were not relocated, and is still sat at the old World War 2 airfield today. With plans to tear up the old runways (one of which had been latterly used as a dragstrip) and build thousands of new homes on the site, the future prospects of the decommissioned Shackleton seem bleak. WR985 first flew in 1958 and was later relegated to ground training duties under the maintenance serial 8103M. It was disposed of in 1988 and moved to Long Marston airfield. Also there's the Percival Sea Prince T.1 ex WM735 (ex G-RACA) ex Staverton, on display at the airfield entrance. And finally a Gloster Meteor T.7 WL332 ex Cradiff. More Pictures from the explore... Come along on the explore and check out the video i made. If you enjoyed Videos like this be sure to SUBSCRIBE to my channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/rosswallaceadventures
  31. 3 points
    After finding ourselves in a live swimming baths in Birmingham we had a short trip to West Brom to have a look at this place which from the outside doesn't look too big but once inside its huge, loads of interesting stuff! Visited with @hamtagger & @Fatpanda Cheers for looking
  32. 3 points
    Explored here a couple of weeks ago seems a bit destroyed now which is a shame bet it was a decent explore at one point. A bit of history, Royal Army Ordnance Corp (RAOC) Marchington, was built around 1957 and dealt with the supply and maintenance of weaponry and munitions and various other military equipment until 1993 when the Corp amalgamated with the Royal Logistics Corp. The site is now an industrial estate. It was also a Central Vehicle Depot during this time until the barracks closed in 1970, and the Territorial Army took over. Until it finally closed the site in the early 1980s. Marchington also housed the Armys fleet of Green Goddesses which came under the jurisdiction of the Office Of The Deputy Prime Minister (ODPM).The site is now an industrial estate. The Barracks lie bare and derelict and the married quaters have are all now private housing.
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  35. 3 points
    Hey everyone! It's been a while since our small Belgium/Luxembuorg/France-Roadtrip in September, but now I finally had the time to recall this one and edit some of the images. As I'm totally new to photography, I would be very delighted to hear your opinion on the photos and processing! (: 1st day:Usine Barbele The entrance was quite easy. The place where the hole in the fence should be seemed to have been closed a few times already; but everytime a new hole was opened just a few steps further. Arriving at the heart of the plant, we quickly made our way up to the rows of coking furnaces. It was a rather dark day, clouds hanging heavily in the sky, and we stopped many times when some loose parts made loud crashing noises, moved by the wind. We did not feel comfortable here, it seemed like we were not welcome. After taking some portraits at the big fans, my girlfriend told me she was hearing engine sounds, and we decided to rush into a small cabin at the side of the road and hide. And really, she was right: A black Dacia made its way slowly around the plant, passing the shed where we were hiding. We heard it stopping somewhere, opening and closing it's doors again, and we were in complete agreement we should leave this place as fast as posible. Hiding behind everything we found, we fled along the side of the way, stopping and quietly peeking back every now and then. 2nd day: HFB We decided to be quick with this one when thinking back to the day before. We made our way to the blast furnace, took some photos and left again. We'll have a look at the rest of the site on our tour in march. ET Phone Home I found this one online just the day before, and after a short research, I had the coordinates. After having a stop at a small park to have a look at a sculpture we wanted to see, we quickly headed over the fields toward this one. We arrived at sunset, and after strolling through high grass and climbing the small fence, we stood in the middle of those antennas. I really liked the view, but I'm not at all pleased with the pictures I made. Maybe we'll repeat that one someday. 3rd day: Diesel Power Plant Not much to say. The door that was said to be open was closed again, so we moved on to the sea and did not any exploration that day. 4th day: Salle des Compresseurs We made our way in from the west. According to the parts we found in this wasteland, it used to be some kind of power station. There are also some basement structures where you can still find some electrical gear. The compressor house was a nice little place - nice machines looking like ducks, rust, peeling paint, plants. Beautiful. 5th day: Power Plant X The access to this one was said to be "a bit dirty", but i really enjoyed it. We took some shots in the boiler room and moved on to the pumping room in the next building. Sadly we didn't get to see the big hall with the gas motors as renovation work was going on - the space was lit up like a soccer field and plastic sheets were covering windows and machines. Let's hope it gets well preserved for the posterity so they can enjoy that view too! Terres Rouges This one was easy. We heard stories of police driving around and were careful, but luckily nothing happened. The place isn't as impressive as HFB or Usine Barbele and in a quite bad shape, but there were some nice perspectives. It was raining cats and dogs, so we didn't have much time to shoot the nice reflections. That's it for now. There aren't so much images as we also did a bit of sightseeing and I sorted out a bunch that I didn't like or weren't able to process to the point where I could post them with a good feeling Hope you still like them! If you like to see some (but that's not THAT much) more images, you can hit up my flickr page: https://www.flickr.com/photos/152392524@N08/albums We'll do another tour in March (Be, Lux, Fr, Es, It, Ch) and hopefully we'll come back with more pictures. Maybe I'll also add some of my older images. And of course, thanks a lot to the people that helped me with the locations and confirmed my researched coordinates - it's really nice to know how to get in and somebody has been there recently. I won't publish the names here so that you don't get flooded with requests, I hope that's ok. You rock! best wishes from Germany, Nico
  36. 3 points
    I took some pics of beautiful fireplaces and old stoves on my trips in recent years, so here is my collection of them. If you also have some, feel free to post them below. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42
  37. 3 points
    Pagefield mill - photographic report - Feb 2018 I must admit guys this place is one of my favorite explores up to now, from researching the history to seeing just how dilapidated it has become. It truly was a marvel for the eyes. Rylans mill or page field as it was later known, was built for Manchester's first millionaire John Rylands in 1866/7. The mill was later taken over by Wigan technological college and became known as Pagefield campus. There have been numerous fires on the premises since its closure sadly destroying some of the remaining beauty of the place, but also creating a different kind at the same time. There was also a network of bunkers below the mill which had unfortunately been sealed off due to the danger to the local youth. Any feedback greatly appreciated thanks.
  38. 3 points
    Beat me to it with the St Josephs Seminary @hamtagger lol That one at Sleaford maltings is EPIC!!!
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    The hospital was closed less than three years ago. The facility has functioned, among others orthopedics and traumatology, rheumatology, pulmonology and surgery. The total area of the facility is about 2.38 ha. As of today, little souvenirs remain in the middle. The only thing left was the lamps in the operating rooms and some glass equipment somewhere in the attic. Despite everything, the hospital has an amazing atmosphere ... until you want to walk the long corridors. The hospital is not haunted, it has no ghosts ... it is guarded ... motion detectors, cameras and a dog make the entrance into the wild border with a miracle. Thanks to this the building is in very good condition .... (Sorry, translator)
  40. 3 points
    Here's a few of my doors and doorways. I'll start with asylums, you're guaranteed to see lots and lots of photogenic doors... Nuclear bunker blast door Vagrants ward (remnant of an old workhouse) Prison H15 Sheffield courthouse cell Pritzer Fac Cambridge Military Hospital Childrens ward And of course possibly the most iconic doors ever....
  41. 3 points
    Glen Parva was constructed on the site of the former Glen Parva Barracks in the early 1970s as a borstal and has always held young offenders. Since its opening in 1974 the establishment has seen considerable expansion and change and now serves a catchment area of over 100 courts, holding a mixture of sentenced, unsentenced, and remand prisoners. In 1997, Her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Prisons walked out of an inspection at Glen Parva because conditions were so bad. After a subsequent inspection a year later, the report stated that there was "hope for the future" for the prison but added that a lot of work still needed to be done, and recommended that some staff should be moved because of their attitude towards inmates. Our Explore: Late night mission to this place made the entry a slight more easy then in the daylight, secca made this explore a lot more challenging haha! but a shame it had to be in the dark and access to most of the rooms made me see only a slight percentage of this place. but i seen what i wanted to thankfully! And cheers to the lot that helped! Enjoy the pics the few of them the rest are for the archives
  42. 2 points
    This is my first video of this 60s hotel located somewhere in Italy. I hope you liked the video!
  43. 2 points
    Taxal Lodge - Photographic Report - 2018 #TaxelLodge Photographic Report - 11th March 2018 Built-in 1904 Taxal Lodge was once the home of Lt. Col. H. Ramsden Jodrell, Who passed away in 1950. The home became a Special School, for disruptive and emotionally disturbed kids that lived on site 5 days a week. It replaced an older Taxal Lodge that originally stood further up the valley. Over the years there have been various reports of abuse within the school and a lot of visitors and students claim that the lodge is haunted. Once the plug was pulled by the authorities the school was closed in 2005. Since its closure, the lodge fell victim to vandals & arson. Now other nature has now begun to stake her claim... The Urban Collective We Film It...
  44. 2 points
    Ok trip out with Critical Mass,Hanel Dante & Host to a partly demoed chemical plant After a while trudging through mud and reeds we had a small climb to make then on site ,a pretty relaxed explore but this site has its obstacles.....on with the pics 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. Short but sweet ,its been along day cheers for looking Oldskool
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    Hello mate and welcome What a great first report on here, cheers for posting
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    Just browsing urban exploration on face book.
  48. 2 points
    Daresburyhall - Photographic report - Feb 2018 Daresbury Hall is a former Georgian country house in the village of Daresbury, Cheshire, England. It was built in 1759 for George Heron. the hall descended in the Heron family until 1850, when it became the property of Samuel Beckett Chadwick. By 1892 it had been acquired by Sir Gilbert Greenall, later Baron Daresbury. During the Second World War, it was used as a military hospital and also by a charity, now known as Scope. It became semi-derelict after being bought by a millionaire who died before restoration could take place. In April 2015, a huge cannabis farm containing six hundred plants with an estimated street value of 750.000 was discovered at the estate. In 2016 there were plans to partly demolish and convert the house but in June of that year the empty building was badly damaged by fire. Unfortunately, during our visit, we were asked to leave the sight by security via a speaker system on the estate. We did, however, stick around for 20 mins until it went off again, to be honest, I'm not sure whether the system is automated and linked to motion sensors. There is a lot of cameras on the sight too as shown the last pic. Any way we couldn't enter the property as it is completely sealed now with boards on all windows and doors etc except for a stable and a few dilapidated sheds. We did the best we could in the situation we had. Thanks for any feedback.
  49. 2 points
    I've checked my photos and put together a collection of (more or less) endless corridors. Some pics are already very old and my editing from that time is ... hmm ... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33
  50. 2 points
    Thank you very much! Glad you like the photos :D. I liked the pink color there...very relaxing Thank you Andy. BTW...I believe you're the person I contacted on Deviant art about one of your photos a few months ago. My name is pewter2k there but I don't use that site very much.