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  1. 9 points
    Campina Youth House Haven't seen this one posted anywhere so I decided to chuck a quick report up on it. I would say this particular location could be described as disused rather than abandoned, as it looked like there was redevelopment work going on when we arrived. Hence why it is so nice and pristine. Anyway, onto a little bit of history I found.. History The Youth House was orginally built as a leisure centre in Campina. A city situated roughly around the South East of Romania. It was constructed by local authorites in order to create a space for young people to participate in a range of sporting activities such as: aerobics, matrial arts and boxing. It was also established in order to promote culture and education and the house provided various facilities for the arts. The Youth House hosted a large auditorium to showcase fairs, exhibitions, conventions, concerts and festivals. Visit Visited with @darbians and Gina on a long weekend trip to Romania. We were driving past and saw what we orginally thought was a hotel and decided to check it out. Finding this place was defintely an unsuspected susprise and I'm very glad we decided to pull over. I really enjoyed photographing this one and I espiecally liked the mosiacs which reminded me of the ones at Buzludzha I had seen the previous year. I hope you enjoy my report! When you find a window open on the top floor, gotta get a few photos from the roof Thanks for reading!
  2. 9 points
    On first sight, there´s only a plain building hidden between bushes and coniferes. It´s located on the grounds of a former Soviet military base in Germany. It seems to be like other barracks, nothing special. Yet, while approaching the barrack, attached high walls with barbed wire appear forming a small yard. Rustling branches of the trees which are now growing all over the yard and an icy wind add to the somewhat eerie atmosphere. On entering the building, the darkness is starting to hit you in an instant. Only sparse light shines in. Additionally, the walls were painted with dark and unfriendly colours. Surely, not without reason - simple, yet efficient psychologial means. Here, at the latest, the purpose of the building becomes crystal-clear: it was used as a jail by the Soviet occupiers. What kind of offenses were punished with a stay inside one of these dark cells with bald walls - only equipped with some wooden plank beds - is unknown. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
  3. 8 points
    To discover such a time capsule always gives you a lot of pleasure. Whereby you can not speak of small here, because in this beautiful place there were many motifs over several floors. Starting with a huge cellar that was filled to the ceiling with unused materials, over several floors that were used for the production of clothing to an attic that was converted into a warehouse disused for sewing machines. However, the long history of the company is relatively fast to tell. A brave entrepreneur founded a small factory in the mid-19th century whose productivity could be increased very quickly. When the GDR emerged, the company was expropriated to disappear after the turnaround because they had missed the ravages of time. Meanwhile, you can not enjoy this time capsule so much, because after the discovery of the object, it was not long before much was destroyed and stolen, which ultimately led to the city secured the building and walled the entrances. More pictures of this huge location can be found here -> http://www.patrick-hertel.de/veb-dessous/
  4. 8 points
    Information about this old brewery is rare. It must have been shut down in the late 1990's when the owner built a modern one in order to increase productivity. #1 DSC00779-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC00781-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC00780-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC00788-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC00830-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC00793-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet-2 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #7 DSC00797-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #8 DSC00801-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #9 DSC00802-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #10 DSC00804-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #11 DSC00806-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #12 DSC00817-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #13 DSC00825-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
  5. 7 points
    And old 18 century house with had a bank function.The building is stripped of all furniture an will probably be renovated in some future. Needed to be a little bit inventive to gain access to this one. But later I was all alone, with the only sound coming from the people in front of the building. 1 IMG_1541 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 2 IMG_1534-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 3 IMG_1519-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 4 IMG_1488 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 5 IMG_1453 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 6 IMG_1441-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 7 IMG_1450-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  6. 7 points
    I first visited this former mental hospital back in June 2012 and alot has changed since that time ...some good some bad. This hospital started it's life in the 1920's and closed in 1994. At it's largest capacity it had 5,818 patients. Like many other state hospitals in the U.S it had it's own farm , laundry, bakery, refrigeration plants etc and various other buildings were built in later years such as a chapel and larger separate hospital built in 1966 for infirm patients which had, an operating room, laboratory, diagnostic equipment, clinics, medical library and mortuary. When I first visited here it was overgrown with poison ivy, tall grass....just unkempt and relatively easy as no one seemed to be watching it. There were plans to convert it to senior housing but that never happened and in 2013/2014 a group bought it to convert it into a college. I had planned to visit about that time when a friend who visited said they'd already taken out the morgue contents of the larger building. He also said they'd oddly started fixing up the auditorium but other things left untouched. He also discovered had started doing illegal abatement and word got out and they were shut down. It still sits partially abated which gives a new look to what I'd seen before but it also took away some of the charm. I of course wanted to see the big morgue when I went back...whenever that was I wasn't sure. Well last summer I was able to get back and the place is much trickier to do since there's a damn security guy 24/7 who seems to make usual rounds. All the doors have been screwed shut with the exception of a few....of course way out in the wide open. We got there very early in the morning so I took a few night shots. I might add the old morgue thankfully is still there in the older hospital building although all the doors have been taken. I would like to add that this place is sheer hell due to the tunnels which I didn't need to use in 2012 (since we were able to freely walk around) and is most known because of these horrific tunnels LOL. You basically are crouched in some while going down or up very steeply (depending on how you enter the campus) and are narrow as well as filled with the white crap (most likely asbestos) from the pipes that have fallen on the floor. I did not enjoy them at all and we actually left earlier than I wanted because we were both exhausted from carrying the heavy backpacks and navigating the tunnels trying to find a new way out so we didn't go back up the tunnels. I plan to go back though and get pics of things we missed. So here are some pics from my early visit which are crap. I can't re-edit them due to losing them via the cat who knocked the external HD to the floor a couple years ago. I was not a good photographer of buildings back then as I came from nature so this "architecture" was a whole new game for me. I struggled a bit with composition and lighting.....and used a fisheye at times Unfortunately I don't have the same pics of old trip of auditorium to compare with how it is now. I never edited and uploaded the old ones Forgot to add I stopped by in the winter last year to take a few exteriors hence the snow pics
  7. 7 points
    We had no idea how we would get on here. After driving through the night and arriving in the early hours, our entry was just awful! As we sat in the freezing cold, and the light started to appear at the windows, we could see it was worth the effort. Visited with @SpiderMonkey, obvs! History The Royal High School was constructed between 1826 to 1829 on the south face of Calton Hill in Edinburgh, at a cost of £34,000. Of this £500 was given by King George IV ‘as a token of royal favour towards a School, which, as a royal foundation, had conferred for ages incalculable benefits on the community’. It was designed in a neoclassical Greek Doric style by Thomas Hamilton, who modelled the portico and Great Hall on the Hephaisteion of Athens. After the Old Royal High School was vacated in 1968, the building became available and was refurbished to accommodate a new devolved legislature for Scotland. However, the 1979 devolution referendum failed to provide sufficient backing for a devolved assembly. Its debating chamber was later used for meetings of the Scottish Grand Committee, the committee of Members of Parliament in the United Kingdom House of Commons with constituencies in Scotland. Subsequently, the building has been used as offices for departments of Edinburgh City Council, including The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award unit and the Sports and Outdoor Education unit. With the passage of the Scotland Act 1998 and the introduction of Scottish devolution in 1999, the Old Royal High School was again mooted as a potential home for the new Scottish Parliament. Eventually, however, the Scotland Office decided to site the new legislature in a purpose-built structure in the Holyrood area of the Canongate. A number of uses have been suggested for the building, including a home for a Scottish National Photography Centre. As of 2015, Edinburgh City Council – the building’s current owners – have initiated a project to lease the building to be used as a luxury hotel. Finally a few shots of the grand neoclassical exterior...
  8. 6 points
    One of the more fun powerplant explores i ever did. This location was pretty active and there was still a lot of electronics and lights turned on. I've been here twice, and still didn't have the chance to see the whole location. The highlights of these place (for me) are the modern controlroom with all the screens, photographing the lights outside on the roof, climbing the 143m/469feet chimneys (twice) and watching the security car doing its rounds on the terrain from the chimney. Combine this with great weather and great friends, and this makes it one of my favorite locations. Oh, and i also shot some photos: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  9. 5 points
    History Butternut is a foulwater storage tank in the suburb of Saint Henri. It was built in the 1980's with the increasing population of the local area. Essentially this is two long box sections, divided by pillars every 7 feet and split into 3 sections by 2 trenches for the soup to flow back into the sewerage system. Explore By this point in the week, our numbers were dwindling. Still a fun evening which was finished with mimosas on a friends balcony, before sleeping on said balcony. Although being entirely made of concrete, this was very photogenic. There was plenty of evidence of it's purpose on the floor, but the worms didn't seem to mind. There were hundreds of them. Great end to an epic week. (1) (2) (3) (4) Cheers for Looking
  10. 5 points
    In January I visited this abandoned part of a hospital that is still in use. Unfortunately most of the rooms were almost cleared - but nevertheless worth to be shown. #1 DSC09857-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC09858-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC09861-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC09856-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC09832-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC09833-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #7 DSC09830-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #8 DSC09862-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #9 DSC09835-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #10 DSC09836-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #11 DSC09828-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #12 DSC09829-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #13 DSC09838-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #14 DSC09841-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #15 DSC09844-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #16 DSC09846-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #17 DSC09850-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #18 DSC09847-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #19 DSC09848-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #20 DSC09851-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #21 DSC09854-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #22 DSC09852-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
  11. 5 points
    Not a lot about this place, I believe the bowling part shut down in 2009 and then the crystal maze part shut down in 2010. Oakwood own this place and have no plans for it besides letting it rot away. Whoever is trying to look after this place is attempting to keep people out. Heard about this place from a different site, easy to find, such a pain in the arse to get into as there's a very tight gap to try and squeeze through.. Thee maze is bigger than first thought, only uploaded a few pictures of that.
  12. 5 points
    History Owned and operated by Philadelphia Electric Company (now Exelon), the Port Richmond power generation station was built from 1919 to 1925. Designed by architect John T. Windrim and engineer W.C.L. Eglin, the coal-fired electrical generation plant was placed into service in 1925 and the station’s Neoclassical Revival design was used by the company to reflect permanence, stability, and responsibility. As designed, the station was to contain three distinct generating components; each component was to consist of a boiler house to produce steam, a turbine hall, and a switch gear building to control power distribution. At its peak, the Port Richmond station’s four huge steam turbines had a capacity of 600 megawatts. Explore This was the first mooch of a 3 week trip to the States. Philadelphia was a very interesting experience. Within 36 hours of arriving in Philly, I witnessed a racial gun incident, got pulled by the local law enforcement and saw a cop attacked with a firework. A week before I arrived the Eagles won their first Superbowl and the locals trashed the city in celebration. Interesting city, Philadelphia. Mooched around here with a guy from Montana and we enjoyed a few beers while walking around. Nice quiet explore, only interrupted when a scrappy followed us around briefly. I had been looking forward to this for months, and it was made better by the mist that had rolled in from the Delaware River. (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) ( (16) (17) (18) (19) (20) (21) (22) (23) (24) (25) Cheers for Looking
  13. 5 points
    I found this small house in the woods near Munich. Almost cleared it still got a certain charme as it hides a little local treasure - the mask of a Krampus. The Krampus is a figure appearing in the Bavarian tradition of St. Nicholas. Whilst St. Nicholas rewards the brave kids on the 6th of December the Krampus dsiciplines the naughty ones. Each year on the 5th of December there are Krampus walks in the Bavarian cities. A group of Krampus dressed in fur and scary masks walk through the cities trying to frighten the kids. The kids on the other hand try to annoy the Krampus without getting disciplined. These handcrafted wooden masks are often very old an therefore quite precious - at least in a traditional sense. Typical scene from the Krampus walk. But now back the main topic - Haus Krampus #1 DSC09942-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC09939-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC09915-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC09916-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC09940-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC09919-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #7 DSC09922-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #8 DSC09930-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #9 DSC09912-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #10 DSC09927-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #11 DSC09932-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #12 DSC09914-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #13 DSC09910-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #14 DSC09913-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #15 DSC09925-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #16 DSC09911-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
  14. 5 points
    Visited on a freezing cold snowy Sunday morning with Scrappy NW and Katy. Long overdue visit this one but access isn't always possible. Inside its dark and decrepit yet enough remains to get an idea of how it looked when it was in full flow. The stage area was a no go as it has now collapsed. Structuraly it was fairly sound even in the upper areas. Things were made to last in 1894 obviously. Theatres have so much history and are always wonderful places to explore and photograph even if their condition is so poor. On with some history. I'm sure you have all read the history of this pace in other reports but i'll put a brief summary here: The Burnley Empire Theatre has a profoundly poignant history that starts in the 19th Century when it was first designed by GB Rawcliffe in 1894. Owned and managed by WC Horner, it was a theatre of high regard and continued to such following works in 1911, when the auditorium was redesigned by Bertie Crewe, well respected architect, much of whose work is no longer standing – pulled down to make way for housing, shops or other amenities, or victims of the war that destroyed so many beautiful buildings. The interior boasts ‘two slightly curved wide and deep balconies, terminating in superimposed stage boxes framed between massive Corinthian columns supporting a deep cornice. Segmental-arched proscenium, with richly decorated spandrels and heraldic cartouche. Side walls feature plaster panels, pilasters and drops. Flat, panelled ceiling with circular centre panel and central sun burner. Restrained heraldic and Greek plasterwork on balcony and box fronts’ . The Theatre opened on Monday the 29th of October 1894 with a variety show and could originally seat 1,935 people. During its time as a theatrical venue, Charlie Chaplin, Margot Fonteyn and Gracie Fields are just a few of the names to have appeared on the now broken stage. In 1938 The Theatre was converted for cinema use by the Architects Lewis and Company of Liverpool, and the seating capacity was reduced to 1,808 in the process. Like so many other Theatres around the Country the Empire was eventually converted for Bingo use in 1970 but even this ceased in 1995 and the Theatre, despite being a Grade II Listed building, has been empty ever since and is in serious decline, and listed as one of the Theatres Trust's buildings at risk. On with the pics
  15. 4 points
    History The holiday home was built around 1905 and used as a hotel for almost 50 years. In the mid-1950s, it was converted into a recreation home of the NVA (National People's Army of the former German Democratic Republic). The house was closed and abandoned in the 1990s and in 2003 it was bought by a businessman from Heilbronn. However, for this person it apparently only serves as a deduction product for the tax return. Because instead of investing and bringing the building back to life, he ignored it, so it fell into decay. In recent years, the house has been used as a sleeping place by homeless people and has repeatedly been vandalized. On the upper floor, almost all walls are completely sprayed with very bad graffiti now, but I haven't taken any photos of them. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
  16. 4 points
    Hi mates, few days ago mi brother and I visited a huge abandoned textile factory sorrounded by nature. Hope you enjoy!
  17. 4 points
    One from the vault. Did a quick search on this one and surprisingly saw very little in the way of reports - so thought I'd share my take on it. Back in the day this place was quite infamous - mostly it seems due to the few 'bad apples' that lurk within the exploring community. Stories of looting and selling out to the media were rife. It is quite a special place for me as its the kind of place that's close to where my ancestors lived and I can imagine its the kind of place they would call home. Its located in a wild and isolated place, it would have been a harsh and bleak landscape to live in at times but in its own way stunning and beautiful. I visited twice in the early part of 2015. The house had obviously been left unoccupied a very long time until it suddenly appeared on the radar. The owners had become aware of this and tried securing it. On my first visit I noticed a big new shiny padlock was in place on the outhouse. When I returned about a month later the whole door had been smashed. A little later all doors and windows were boarded up, leading to an unofficial renaming by one clever wordsmith as Shroud Cottage. It appears that also didn't deter those with no sense of respect in the search for 15 minutes of Facebook fame. Enough of the backstory and on with the pictures:
  18. 4 points
    I had another idea for this new topic. Here's a selection of my photos of rotten, moldy and dusty books. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
  19. 4 points
    History After the beginning of the 1860s gas was widely used as a means of lighting So the first gas works of Eisenach were put into operation on 1 October 1862. However, the line capacity was no longer sufficient soon, because the gas consumption had quadrupled from 1888 to 1912. Therefore, the construction of the new gas works began in 1898, and the old gas works were shut down in 1899. The new gas works had its own rail connection for coal transport. In 1901, already more than 1.5 million m³ of city gas were produced. In 1912 there were a total of 938 public gas lanterns in Eisenach. The street lighting cost 46600 marks per year, equivalent to 1.20 marks per inhabitant. In 1912, 150 gas lanterns were remotely ignited and extinguished from the factory. This saved considerable costs for lantern guards. 300 street lamps were still under construction. In 1982, the gas plant's technical facilities were worn out and barely usable efficiently. For this reason, the gas plant was shut down. Until 1990, the area was still used as a transfer station for coal trains. After that, the buildings were abandoned, since then, they disintegrate. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
  20. 4 points
    Again, not seen anything for this so why not, should be a fairly easy one
  21. 4 points
    When i was a kid this was known as Crazy Marys house...The rumor was she froze to death but had pleanty of money to put the heat on....it wasent true..she was a mean old lady for sure who scared the crap out of me screeching at me when i walked by..Her Husband was a doctor and who killed himself in the house..he was an old fashiong doctor...back in his day you never went to a hospitol you went to the doctors house...he amputated arms, legs, preformed surgury in the basement.. He died in the late 1960s his wife in the 1980s...the house has never see anyone stay there for long..they alway seem to move out After crazy mary died workers came to clean out the house..my friend knew one and he went in..i was still too scared..he came out with an skeltons skull and jaw...old time doctors used to have them...he lured me in and i saw a room filled with sinks and it was all to creepy for me its been empty for years..and looters took the starecase and all the copper.. check out the floors a homless person had moved in an kept himself warm almost burning the house down For such a big house the doctor never had any children th The house is for sale but it needs alot ofrepairs andthe neighborhood has declined so no one can afford it heres my video walkthough i hear a few ghostly voices
  22. 4 points
    History The Canada Malting complex was designed by David Jerome Spence, and was built in 1904. On the west side of the complex there are nine violet coloured silos. They are covered in treated clay tiles that were manufactured by the Barnett and Record Co. of Minneapolis. These silos are rare examples of using this technique to cover and insulate silos. The cement silos on the other side were added in the 1940s, and were used to store the barley used to produce the malt. The barley was germinated and dried in the buildings that lined Saint-Ambroise Street. The factory had an enormous output of 250,000 pounds (110,000 kg) of malt per year, and distributed it to distilleries and breweries. The closing of the Lachine Canal in 1970 forced the company to transport its malt by train only, and around 1980, the building was actually too small and the transportation costs too high, so the company abandoned the site and moved into a new malting complex located at 205 Riverside and Mill Street, Montreal. The building was then sold for $500,000 and became a soya and corn storage facility for Quonta Holding Ltd, before it was abandoned in 1989 when Canadian National ceased its rail line service to factories in this area of the canal. The original clay silos are now protected as part of the Lachine Canal National Historic Site. They have been so battered from both the elements and vandalism, that it is no longer possible to restore them. There have been applications for it to be converted to accommodation, but all plans have been refused so far. Since being abandoned in 1989, the factory has been covered in graffiti on the outside as well as the inside of the building. Construction of the original silos in 1903 Explore After a little trouble getting through customs, I was here 3 hours after first stepping foot on Canadian soil. I spent my first two nights sleeping here, one helping set up, another partying. Sadly my experience with customs was more costly than I initially thought. After guiding me to a search room, they tipped the contents of my rucksack out and my lens got damaged. £150 for the repair, and they had loads of questions regarding the contents of my luggage. *Note to self, don't take waders next time*. After an hour and a half, I was on the bus to my friend's apartment. This place is massive. When we returned a few days later, the 4 of us spent around 4 hours in here and only covered about 3 quarters of it. Sadly, I can see this lasting just a couple of years more before it gets knocked down, or it goes down of it's own accord. While on the rooftop we looked at the façade of the main building, and the wall is coming away at the corners. The local explorers have done an admirable job making this their own. They've cleared areas for social events, clear walkways for people to get around safely and have added features, like a wood burner and a bar. Considering I usually prefer underground stuff, I really enjoyed this place. The rooftop is among the best I've seen, it looks over downtown Montreal and Mont Royal. This is somewhere I would return to. (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17) (18) (19) (20) Cheers for Looking
  23. 4 points
    The old Lloyds bank in Bristol. Now converted into a hotel
  24. 4 points
    Nice thread idea... heres some of mine
  25. 4 points
    Nice pics! Here are some of mine: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
  26. 3 points
    A former powerplant that ran on gas from blast furnaces, now being demolished. ----
  27. 3 points
    Not seen this one about, so why not!
  28. 3 points
    nice idea
  29. 3 points
    A stunning grade two listed gem decaying right on the high street. Featuring the stunning architecture of Alfred Waterhouse who also designed Strangeways prison the Manchester town hall. The main building has been used for many different purposes over the years as well as Prudential themselves. And the basement club was once a Berni inns restaurant (Cafe Monico) a chain that served a post-war British public such delight's as sherry schooners steak and chips and black forest gateau as well as becoming a dance club in the 90's. We had a wonderful two hours in this grade two listed time capsule. Hope you guys enjoy the pics as much as we enjoyed the explore. Thanks for any feedback The Urban Collective We Film It...
  30. 3 points
    History It's been pretty hard to find history on this one, especially with all the information being in French Canadian. Located in the Villeray-Saint-Michael-Parc area of Montreal, Saint Bernadine de Sienne was a Catholic church built between 1955 and 1956. As well as providing religious services and confession, the church served as a hub for the local community. It provided room for nurseries, sunday school, youth activities among other community services. With the local community changing, less people regularly attending church and the rising cost of maintenance, Saint Bernadine de Sienne closed it's doors for the last time in April 2017. Explore This was one explore in a week of shenanigans. With 3 Brits, 2 Canadians, an Aussie and a Slovenian, this was very much an international affair. Access was laughable. While in there, photos happened, then we spent a couple of hours pissing around. This is probably the most relaxed I've ever felt in a derp. This is a beautiful building, it'll be a shame if it fell into disrepair or got torn down. I'm not a big fan of religion, but religious structures like churches, temples and mosques can be stunningly beautiful. For a twentieth century church, this was mesmerising and very photogenic. (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) Cheers for Looking
  31. 3 points
    Black and white or B&W shots The best of your black and white shots Here's a couple to start off with
  32. 3 points
    Bretton Hall Gymnasium The history A teacher training college founded by Alec Clegg. The collage boasted in the design and the architecture of the veroius 'new' buildings scattered around the collage campus including the Gymnasium and the student centre. The collage merged with the University of Leeds in August 2001. Most of the music, fine art and teacher training courses were moved to the Leeds campus, but visual and performing arts education and creative writing remained at the Bretton site, which became home to the University's School of Performance and Cultural Industries. The Gymnasium also stayed but later became disused. The building now is a showdow of its former glory. The explore Ive always fancied to have a look around this building and never got the chance too... until recently. Its quite an unusual looking building but that said it would make a very nice modern Gym. Entry was fairly easy if you have common sense, and its nice to get out with a new member. Theres not much really else to say about this building... just watch out for the tourist who don't share the same interest as you when it comes to abandonment. The pictures @SILVERSKULL2004 if your still on the forum nice meeting you and a good mooch that... Cheers for reading I know it's a bit of a small one but o'well LBE
  33. 3 points
    Here's a couple... Wigston Pool Leicestershire with me around May 14 Benenden Hospital.. featuring @Urbexbandoned Malsis School..
  34. 2 points
    Here are some of my pics on this topic. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
  35. 2 points
    It is Romania was a communist state until the late 80's
  36. 2 points
    Loving that! What a cool building By the way I've noticed your pics take a while to load, they will load much quicker if you resize them usually. I resize mine to under 2MB in lightroom before I export them. They don't seem to lose any quality, it just makes the file much smaller and easier to upload
  37. 2 points
    About 3 months after he fractured his spine, I went down to Nailsworth to visit my friend Oort. After a quick coffee and a catch up, we headed straight to the mine for Oort's first mooch after his accident. Not much online. The early history of these quarries is vague. Presumably quarrying of the fine oolite stone has been carried on at the outcrop since Roman times. Due to the steep hillsides, the overburden soon became too great and thus they went underground. There are a number of small scale developments. According to a 90 year old inhabitant of Nailsworth, a Mr William Mortimer who died in 1970, such places were worked in the winter months by cottagers employed in casual agricultural work during the summer. Graffitti dating 1900-1947 (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) Cheers for Looking
  38. 2 points
    Made by a bunch of Melbourne Cave Clan members and used by even more Melbourne Cave Clan members. It was so much fun. Definitely worth doing on a waterway near you It's a bit epic, but maybe someone out there will enjoy a look.
  39. 2 points
    One of my favorite hospitals...the Kirkbride. This example of one was built in 1858 and had unfortunately some rather hideous modification done over the years mainly in the admin section. I contacted the state archives where this building is located after I visited my second time asking if they had any old photos of the interiors and sadly they did not. I also asked for any information they had which turned out to be very little. They did direct me to a small group of students from college that did some research and gave presentation a few years ago as well as some PDF files of what they did have in their collection. The "chapel" or amusement hall looks like it was really beautiful originally and from what I can discern they made it into 2.5 floors from the original open space it once was. There is a really decorative stenciling in the "attic" portion which should have been seen from what is now the first floor along with pretty stained glass windows which again are "cut" up due to the floor addition. Admin has some ghastly suspended ceilings with piping all over. The front entry was covered up partially and made smaller as well from what I can tell. Why they did such hideous things I do not know. Lack of common sense or wanting to preserve the originality of the building. There really isn't much information about this place as I mentioned but I do know in the 1930's they changed the wards to mainly open ones hence really no patient rooms. There were also several other buildings that have been torn down over the years which were quite nice and some modifications done to the outside of the kirk which I found out about when I found an old postcard view of it. Anyway here's the photos from my various 4 visits. It's 11 hrs from me or I'd gone more than that
  40. 2 points
    From some old offices for a steel works in France
  41. 2 points
    This was the first stop in Italy with Elliot5200 & @shaddam last month. I don't know any history unfortunately but it's a stunning building and I wouldn't mind living in it! I normally write a lot more than this but I'm not sure what else to say. Oh, we went for a pizza afterwards. Pics: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. & 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. Thanks for looking
  42. 2 points
    Monkton Farleigh Down, Ammunition Tunnel, Wiltshire – December 2017 Moving on through my backlog of explores; to one myself and Mookster visited back in December. It was to be a nice, slow paced Pre-Christmas day of explores; but sadly this was to be the only site we explored that day. Unfortunately my car had developed an exhaust leak that morning and the rest of the day was rather noisy until the vehicle was repaired. The Monkton Farleigh ammunition depot made use of an old stone quarry below a plateau; around 450 feet above the valley floor in which ran the main line railway. This railway was its principal source of supply. Before the depot could be commissioned, an efficient means was required to bring in ammunition from the railway at Farleigh Down Sidings. These sidings were just over a mile from the depot as the crow flies but over four miles by road along pretty heavy going, tortuous country lanes. The tunnel at Monkton Farleigh was designed to handle around 1000 tons of ammunition each day. Completion was not scheduled until 1941. The tunnel to the railway sidings at Shockerwick was a big player in the Monkton Farleigh mine; offering a secure route which in turn, was invisible to aerial reconnaissance. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 As Always everyone, Thanks! More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157665020437557
  43. 2 points
  44. 2 points
    Visited with The Kwan on a rainy Saturday, some lovely bits left in the area and we missed quite a bit so theres always an excuse for a return visit. Some History The name Ratgoed derives from “Yr Allt Goed”, which means the steep, wooded hillside. Ratgoed mine was also sometimes known as “Alltgoed”. The Ratgoed slate workings lie at the head of what was originally called Cwm Ceiswyr but became known as Cwm Ratgoed because of the quarry. It lies north of Aberllefenni and northwest of Corris in, what is now, the Dyfi Forest. The slate that was quarried at Ratgoed was the Narrow Vein. This runs from south of Tywyn, on the coast, to Dinas Mawddwy about 18 miles inland and follows the line of the Bala Fault. The Narrow Vein was worked along its length at places such as Bryneglwys near Abergynolwyn; Gaewern & Braich Goch at Corris, Foel Grochan at Aberllefenni and Minllyn at Dinas Mawddwy. The slate at Ratgoed dips at 70° to the southeast, the same as Foel Grochan. Ratgoed was a relatively small working, it was worked from around 1840 until its closure in 1946. Pics [ [ Le Kwan Thanks for looking
  45. 2 points
    Awesome shots from all! Nicely decayed pools.
  46. 2 points
    I don´t know why, but for me there´s something special about abandoned swimming pools. That´s why I thought this might be a nice new topic. 1 2 3 4 5
  47. 2 points
    Oh I do like a nice pool! Great shots
  48. 2 points
    Love the idea... here is one for you
  49. 2 points
    Thanks everyone! I forget to include my selfies, might be a nice addition to the topic:
  50. 2 points
    A few more photos. I really like the moss and the fern on the cars.
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