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  1. 9 points
    Here's a little selection of some of the more random, less-obvious shots from 10 years of exploring asylums. One shot each from most of the ones I've visited. Thought I'd try and avoid the obvious shots a little. Aston Hall (Nottinghamshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Ward block Bangour Village (West Lothian District Asylum, opened in 1906) Main administration block Barrow (2nd Bristol Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1938) Main corridor Bethel (Charitable public asylum, opened in 1713) Day room Bethlem Royal (4th incarnation of "Bedlam" (founded in 1247), initially for private middle-class patients, opened in 1930) Admin block staircase Cane Hill (3rd Surrey County Asylum, opened in 1883) Chapel altar Carlton Hayes (Leicestershire & Rutland County Asylum, opened in 1904) Chapel Cefn Coed (Swansea Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1932) South-eastern view of ward block and water tower Colney Hatch (aka Friern, 2nd Middlesex County Asylum, later 2nd London County Asylum, opened in 1851) Admin block tower Denbigh (aka North Wales Asylum, opened in 1848) View from ward block window towards admin block clock tower Fairfield (Three Counties Asylum (for Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire & Huntingdonshire), opened in 1860) South east view of main block Fair Mile (Berkshire County Asylum, opened in 1870) South-east view of main block Fulbourn (Cambridgeshire & Ely County Asylum, opened in 1858) Main elevation (admin block in centre) Gartloch (Glasgow District Asylum, opened in 1896) View from dormitory window Glenside (Bristol Borough Asylum, opened in 1861) Chapel window Goodmayes (West Ham Borough Asylum, opened in 1901) Gallery with cell doors Hanwell (Middlesex County Asylum, later first London County Asylum, opened in 1831) Main corridor in female wing Harperbury (Middlesex Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1934) Dormitory Hartwood (Lanarkshire District Asylum, opened in 1895) Jump-proof fire escape Heckingham (former Norwich Union Workhouse, converted into 2nd Norfolk County Mental Hospital, opened in 1927) Main elevation Hellingly (East Sussex County Asylum, opened in 1903) Corridor network (with random portable bathtub) Hensol (Glamorganshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Interview room High Royds (3rd West Riding County Asylum, opened in 1888) Glazed-tile doorway Horton (8th London County Asylum, opened in 1902) Administration block The Lawn (Charitable Public Asylum, opened in 1820) View from eastern wing Lennox Castle (Dunbartonshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1937) Admin block coaching entrance Leybourne Grange (Kent Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1936) OT room Little Plumstead (Norfolk Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Discarded training material Mapperley (Nottingham Borough Asylum, opened in 1880) Southern aspect Middlewood (2nd West Riding County Asylum, opened in 1872) Chapel Napsbury (Middlesex County Asylum, opened in 1905) Recreation hall (left) and ward block (right), with water tower in background Pen-Y-Fal (Monmouthshire County Asylum, opened in 1851) Ward blocks Pool Parc (Overspill annexe to North Wales Mental Hospital, opened in 1937) Main corridor Rauceby (Kesteven County Asylum, opened in 1902) Administration block Rosslynlee (East Lothian & Peebles District Asylum, opened in 1874) Recreation hall Runwell (East Ham & Southend-on-Sea Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1937) Chapel Severalls (2nd Essex County Asylum, opened in 1913) Gallery with cell doors St Andrew's (Norfolk County Asylum, opened in 1814) Mortuary St Brigid's (Connaught District Asylum, opened in 1833) Ward corridor St Cadoc's (Newport Borough Asylum, opened in 1906) Window in day-room. St Clement's (Ipswich Borough Asylum, opened in 1870) "Quiet room" in medium-secure annexe St Crispin (Northamptonshire County Asylum, opened in 1876) Staircase in Superintendent's residence St David's (Joint Counties Asylum for Carmarthenshire, Pembrokeshire & Cardiganshire, opened 1865) Observation room in annexe St George's (Northumberland County Asylum, opened in 1859) Corridor network St John's (Lincolnshire County Asylum, opened in 1852) Admin block main reception St Mary's (Gateshead Borough Asylum, opened in 1914) Corridor network Stone House (The City Of London Asylum, opened in 1866) Dining hall Strathmartin (aka Balvodan) (Charitable Public Idiot Asylum, opened in 1855) Eastern side of main building Sunnyside Royal (Montrose District Asylum, opened in 1858) Congregation area outside recreation hall Talgarth (Joint Breconshire and Radnorshire County Asylum, aka Mid-Wales Asylum, opened in 1903) View from ward window The Towers (Leicester Borough Asylum, opened in 1869) Main corridor in ward section of eastern block West Park (11th London County Asylum, opened in 1915 as Canadian War Hospital, reopened in 1923 as mental hospital) Geriatric ward day room Whittingham (4th Lancashire County Asylum, opened in 1873) Entrance into ward block from corridor network
  2. 7 points
    Villa Scorpio History Unfortunately I couldn't find a great deal of history surrounding this location but from what I have gathered it was built at some point during the late 19th century. The former occupier owned a large cement factory in the same town. I would imagine the family were quite well off, as it was very grand and exquisite building. The design of the villa shared various similarities with the Art Nouveau style of architecture. Featuring a stunning staircase, a beautiful skylight and an decorative greenhouse. Our visit Visited with @darbians and @vampiricsquid on our tour of Italy last summer. As soon as we arrived outside, we knew it was going to be a good explore. Hope you enjoy my photos! Externals Internals
  3. 6 points
    Najbardziej dołujące miejsce, jakie udało mi się zwiedzić do tej pory. Mały stół sekcyjny, kapliczka z miejscem na trumienkę...chłodnia...cokolwiek bym nie robił, jakkolwiek bym nie ustawiał przedmiotów znajdujących w obiekcie...nic nie odda klimatu jaki panuje w środku...i ta myśl, że tu ostatnie swoje chwile spędzali ci najmłodsi... . The most depressing place that I have been able to visit so far. A small sectional table, a chapel with a place for a coffin ... a cold store ... whatever I would not do, however much I would not set objects in the object ... nothing will reflect the climate that prevails ... and the idea that the last one Your little ones spent their time ....
  4. 6 points
    Hi, this is my first report, I don't really know what to write but here goes....... Unless you have been on Mars or in a coma for the past couple of weeks you would most probably have heard about this Manor House. Some pictures were posted & the guys who posted them had pretty much made it crystal that they were not going to be sharing its location. The post stated that they hoped that people would forget about it & that it would be saved. Or to put it another way - they threw the gauntlet down big time and by doing that it had made it the UK’s most hunted derp within the UE community, and surprise surprise within a day it had been found by more than one person. The actual post & chats that I had with them gave me a couple of very good clues & to be fair to the guys when I told them that I had it they did clue me up with everything I needed to know. Anyway, It just so happened that I was in the area with some free time on the Wednesday so I popped along. I got there before sun up & had the house to myself for a couple of hours, it was a pretty much ad hoc visit & quickly realised that I needed a wider lens, I knew some guys were planning to hit it on the Saturday & decided a revisit was in order. Messages were sent & arrangements were made for the pre-Sun up meet, I’d gotten wind that there may be a few people there so I was not surprised to see a few other faces when I opened the door at around 7am. The pre-dawn light, or rather lack of it meant that we all sat around having a chat & a schmoke as more & more people turned up out of the darkness. I didn’t count but I’m told that at 08:30 there were 21 of us in the house and that the snack bar had ran out of breakfast rolls & that pin badges & t shirt sales were through the roof. The 19th century house itself is on a massive estate and parts of the estate are live & lived in. There are 2 floors & a basement, the house has some lovely features, the stairs, the swimming pool & indoor courtyard & there’s plenty to spend a couple of hours there photographing. The basement is quite big & has a drive in access point & (GoonTube Click bait warning time) has a FERKIN PANZER TANK in one of the rooms, that’s the headlines and that’s what the Goons will be selling it as but the reality is that it is a home made & nowhere near finished & is made of wood. A bit meh for me tbh. Just outside the house there is a BMW parked half in a bush. The house is ok, the features are great but there’s more to be offered from this site. There’s numerous buildings to visit & as soon as I had shoot the last bits I wanted to shoot myself, Paul & Curt went off to see what we could find, there were some ruins , out buildings & a pyramid near the house that looked cool & as we were walking through the woods we could hear the familiar sound of guns being shot in the not too far distance. We had a bit of a scout around & found the ‘hunters’ in an adjacent field. Now if this was a GoonTube video we’d have become the ‘hunted’ but as this is real life we just ignored them & went the other way. One of our goals was the indoor Tennis courts, this was pretty hard to miss once you got near it. We opened the door & were amazed, yeah it was a tennis court, but it’s last use had been as a venue to watch the Football World Cup on a projector screen, there was a bar set up & every nations flag was hanging up & bunting all over the place, we found a large number of pint glasses depicting the “World Cup 1996” so it appears that it was the last time the courts had been used other than for a bit of storage. TBH it was quite trashy but among the trash we found (click bait warning) a HUMAN SKELETON!! And what you going to do with a skull on a explore? Yep, put glasses on it & a fag in its mouth, named him Dr McCoy and take some pictures. What... you wouldn’t... yeah I know, Exploring is a serious business but I like to have a laugh too while I’m out visiting. We were in the tennis courts for quite some time before going to the wood sheds & then the boat house. The boat house was the main thing on my hit list & it was ok, I was setting up to shoot & among the sounds of gun shots ringing out we heard someone shouting “YOU IN THE WOODS!! STAY STILL!!” so we done what any self respecting Umbexer would do & we bailed back through the wood to the soundtrack of “STAY THERE!” & gunshots. As we were running I got my foot caught and I went down like I’d been shot, Paul & Curt were worried & frantic, and by worried & frantic I mean pissing themselves laughing, I don’t know if it was a dream or not but I’m sure I heard Paul say “what the fuck are you doing on the floor, get up!” and as I got up I could see that we’d run into the guy who was shouting at us. “What you doing on my land?” the ruddy faced man shouted, “We’re photographing the Red Kites” I replied & he told us to go over the fence & “gerroff moi land” & we left. Well, that was my first report, probably my last too :-
  5. 5 points
    It looks as if someone closed the cinema yesterday after the screening ... cinema room untouched ... projectors in their place, ready to work ... amazing atmosphere.
  6. 5 points
    Haus der Offiezere My first report. I have had this account for about a year but never posted anything from fear of my photos not being good enough to post. Decided to pluck up the courage to start contributing more but I apologise if there are any mistakes. Anyway, on to the history! History The Haus der Offiezere was originally established as a shooting range between Kummersdorf and Jüterbog in 1888. It wasn't until 1910, when construction of the Berlin to Dresden railway line took place, it was decided that Wunsdorf held a significant strategic advantage and because of this it became a military headquarters two years following. A telephone and telegraph office was built in 1912. By the start of the first world war, Wunsdorf had already become Europe's largest military base, boasting 60,000 acres of land. A year later, the first mosque was built in Germany on the site. This was to accommodate for the Muslim prisoners of war which were housed there. They were known as the Halbmondlager or Crescent Moon camp. After the war, the Wunsdorf Headquarters was converted into a military sports school in 1919. It was even used to train athletes for the Olympic games in Berlin in 1936. During the uprising of the Third Reich, a network of highly modernised tunnels and bunkers were built, including a communications centre, known as the Zeppelin. A year Maybach I and II were built which coincided with the Zeppelin bunker. A ring tunnel connected all the bunkers to each other and were disguised as ordinary homes on the ground, to avoid suspicion. The construction of these bunkers wasn't completed until 1940, a year after war was declared. From 1943 the Haus der Offiezere was temporarily converted into a hospital to treat wounded German soldiers. Two years later, in 1945 the Red Army had invaded East Germany and quickly seized control of Wunsdorf. This was when it was renamed the Haus der Offiezere which translates to House of the Officer. During Soviet occupation of Wunsdorf in the GDR, the Haus der Offiezere became a place of art and culture. The former sports halls and gymnasiums were torn down and replaced with elaborate theatres and concert halls. Daily deliveries of supplies came all the way from Moscow on a direct train line and the locals nicknamed it 'little Moscow' due to the number of roughly 60,000 Russian inhabitants. This continued for almost 50 years, until the reunification of Germany when it was handed back. The last remaining Russians eventually left in 1994 and it has remained unoccupied since. Visit The photos I have compiled for this post were taken on two separate occasions. Wanted to give a good representation of the location, as there is a lot to see. Unfortunately some of my photographs were taken when I first started getting into the hobby, so I hope they do enough justice and excuse the quality of said images. Second visit was on a solo trip to Germany, giving me plenty of time to mooch. Would consider the Haus der Offiezere one of my favourite locations and I hope you enjoy my report. Externals Internals Thank you for reading.
  7. 4 points
    HISTORY: Thanks for looking at my pictures, I hope you enjoyed them. Give my facebook page a like & follow if you want to see what else my friends and I get up too - 0151 Outdoors. E.
  8. 4 points
    It is a civil defense hall in a large plant that remembers the times of the Polish People's Republic... it was rather ... because the plant liquidated the room In the event of an armed attack, it would protect the civilian population. The room is falling apart. The equipment is rotting. Nobody cares about it anymore. Fortunately, at the last moment I got a tip and I was able to visit and take pictures. Some of the pictures are directed, but only so I could show the entire contents of this room. Translated in a translator
  9. 4 points
    Sheffield Old Town Hall stands on Waingate in central Sheffield, England, opposite Castle Market. The building was commissioned to replace Sheffield's first town hall, which had opened in 1700 to a design by William Renny. This first structure stood by the parish church, on a site with little prospect for extension. The Old Town Hall was built in 1807-8 by Charles Watson, and was designed to house not only the Town Trustees but also the Petty and Quarter Sessions. The initial building was a five-bay structure fronting Castle Street, but it was extended in 1833 and again in 1866, the most prominent feature was the new central clock tower over a new main entrance that reoriented the building to Waingate. At the same time, the building's courtrooms were linked by underground passages to the neighbouring Sheffield Police Offices. By the 1890s, the building had again become too small, and the current Sheffield Town Hall was built further south. The Old Town Hall was again extended in 1896-7 and became Sheffield Crown Court and Sheffield High Court. In the 1990s, these courts moved to new premises, and since at least 1997 to present, the building remains disused.
  10. 4 points
    First Post Guys! Anyways, my group of friends and I found an abandoned Gas Station south of Atlanta. Apparently, the gas station went bankrupt due to the county screwing them over. A new highway system was out in, and the road to the gas station was relocated, so in order to get to the station, one would have to travel a good 5 minutes out of their way. Not worth it. So the station closed down and now it looks like this. May go back to take more pictures soon, stay posted. Have a great day guys, and be safe!
  11. 4 points
    Been visiting this place for many years apart from the old Workhouse buildings which have almost disappeared, today we visited the chapel. Here are a few pics Added an update of the workhouse conditions too.
  12. 4 points
    Another local one that I've been wanting to do for ages, but never got round to it until now. It's filled full of asbestos, so I made sure to bring my good PP3 mask, but even that wasn't enough probably. History During World War 2, the Southern Railway took over the Deepdene Hotel near Dorking in Surrey for its wartime emergency headquarters. In the grounds they excavated an underground control centre taking advantage of a network of existing natural caves that had been acknowledged 300 years before in the diaries of John Evelyn. Because of the natural protection afforded by the location of the caves they were eminently suitable for the development of a bunker to house both the headquarters' telephone exchange and Traffic Control who also had their underground control centre there with underground divisional controls at Woking (South West Division), Southampton (Western Division), Orpington (South Eastern Division) and Redhill (Central Division) The Explore I got a message in the morning saying it's doable and to go soon. So a few hours later I was there and inside. I'd been meaning to do this one for a long time now, especially as its pretty local, so now was a good a time as any. It's actually not a very large bunker, but its nice for its modest size. The infamous 100 steps lived up to its reputation as terrifying. I only went up a few steps, but that's enough. I actually bumped into another explorer here who got the fright of his life as I turned the corner and shown my light at him in a moment of confusion and panic. Turned out to be someone else who got the memo and took a trip down to see it from a little further afield. A nice little bunker, rich full of history. Photos
  13. 4 points
    Hey Everyone! Welcome to my very first Urbex..! My group and I went to these houses south of Atlanta that have been abandoned for a few years now. Unfortunately, they are going to be torn down soon, so anyone who may want to visit them, DM me ASAP! Anyway, The first house we went to was just empty and peaceful. The second house, not so much... We found graffiti telling us to leave; we should have listened. We stepped into the garage of the house and saw blood on the floor, and drag marks leading to the attic. Not wanting to see a dead body, we left. We're planning on going back to the attic soon in daylight. The third house was almost worse. We found some evidence that a serious crime may have happened there, as well as a swastika and a Confederate flag. We left without exploring too much of that house. On our way out, one of my friends looked back at the top floor of the house and saw someone in the window. We left quickly. I hope you guys like the pictures, some of them may be NSFW, the swastika. Otherwise, have a great day everyone! Be safe! Link to Google Drive with all pictures: https://drive.google.com/drive/u/1/folders/12y4aEjooNREuzS5ZMrjztkwrx2gIiinc
  14. 4 points
    In 1847, Joseph Watts of Dewsbury and William Stones (1827 -1894) of Sheffield began brewing together at the Cannon Brewery in Sheffield's Shalesmoor district near Kelham Island. ... He renamed it the Cannon Brewery after his original premises. Stones soon became one of the richest men in Sheffield and worked up until his death in 1894. A light coloured beer, named Stones Bitter, was produced in the early 1940’s and this soon became a popular choice amongst steel workers across Sheffield. Cannon Brewery grew significantly as its reputation increased and sales prospered, to the extent that new offices, stores, workshops and cellars were all improved and developed. At its peak, the brewery produced 50,000 hectolitres of cask conditioned Stones each year and many of Sheffield’s public houses developed close ties to the brewery and Stones Bitter. An on-site public house was also opened within Cannon Brewery in 1964, “ originally named ‘The Underground’, but renamed as ‘The Pig and Whistle’ to service both visitors and workers, and this can still be found today. Cannon Brewery was closed in 1999 following reports that were indicative of a substantial decline in the sale of cask ales. The owner of the site is a demolition contractor and has submitted an application seeking permission for his business, Hague Plant, to bulldoze the buildings on the 0.7 hectare plot which, in documents drawn up by R Bryan Planning, are described as being of utilitarian design and of no historic or architectural significance. The owner is keen to redevelop the former brewery but has said that it is not effectively marketable in its current state, especially as the high cost of demolition and potential decontamination, particularly from asbestos, are a deterrent to developers. Explore Been looking at this as a potential explore for sometime... The buildings and architecture are something else and anyone who's anyone on the Sheffield graffiti scene have decorated the building with some great pieces.. The former brewery is in poor condition but offers explorers a great opportunity to appreciate the history and architecture of the former brewery. A real shame when they decided to pull the building as this is a real part of Sheffields brewing past.. explore whilst you still have chance.. as this building offers plenty for all. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. and 16. Graffiti on site 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. My favourite pic I took of this place Le fin "Times have changed, the place in its current condition is trashed and flooded... (2018)"
  15. 4 points
    Hi all, Some pictures from "Bureau Central" Hope that you will like these ones
  16. 3 points
    Hey everyone! It's been a while since our small Belgium/Luxembuorg/France-Roadtrip in September, but now I finally had the time to recall this one and edit some of the images. As I'm totally new to photography, I would be very delighted to hear your opinion on the photos and processing! (: 1st day:Usine Barbele The entrance was quite easy. The place where the hole in the fence should be seemed to have been closed a few times already; but everytime a new hole was opened just a few steps further. Arriving at the heart of the plant, we quickly made our way up to the rows of coking furnaces. It was a rather dark day, clouds hanging heavily in the sky, and we stopped many times when some loose parts made loud crashing noises, moved by the wind. We did not feel comfortable here, it seemed like we were not welcome. After taking some portraits at the big fans, my girlfriend told me she was hearing engine sounds, and we decided to rush into a small cabin at the side of the road and hide. And really, she was right: A black Dacia made its way slowly around the plant, passing the shed where we were hiding. We heard it stopping somewhere, opening and closing it's doors again, and we were in complete agreement we should leave this place as fast as posible. Hiding behind everything we found, we fled along the side of the way, stopping and quietly peeking back every now and then. 2nd day: HFB We decided to be quick with this one when thinking back to the day before. We made our way to the blast furnace, took some photos and left again. We'll have a look at the rest of the site on our tour in march. ET Phone Home I found this one online just the day before, and after a short research, I had the coordinates. After having a stop at a small park to have a look at a sculpture we wanted to see, we quickly headed over the fields toward this one. We arrived at sunset, and after strolling through high grass and climbing the small fence, we stood in the middle of those antennas. I really liked the view, but I'm not at all pleased with the pictures I made. Maybe we'll repeat that one someday. 3rd day: Diesel Power Plant Not much to say. The door that was said to be open was closed again, so we moved on to the sea and did not any exploration that day. 4th day: Salle des Compresseurs We made our way in from the west. According to the parts we found in this wasteland, it used to be some kind of power station. There are also some basement structures where you can still find some electrical gear. The compressor house was a nice little place - nice machines looking like ducks, rust, peeling paint, plants. Beautiful. 5th day: Power Plant X The access to this one was said to be "a bit dirty", but i really enjoyed it. We took some shots in the boiler room and moved on to the pumping room in the next building. Sadly we didn't get to see the big hall with the gas motors as renovation work was going on - the space was lit up like a soccer field and plastic sheets were covering windows and machines. Let's hope it gets well preserved for the posterity so they can enjoy that view too! Terres Rouges This one was easy. We heard stories of police driving around and were careful, but luckily nothing happened. The place isn't as impressive as HFB or Usine Barbele and in a quite bad shape, but there were some nice perspectives. It was raining cats and dogs, so we didn't have much time to shoot the nice reflections. That's it for now. There aren't so much images as we also did a bit of sightseeing and I sorted out a bunch that I didn't like or weren't able to process to the point where I could post them with a good feeling Hope you still like them! If you like to see some (but that's not THAT much) more images, you can hit up my flickr page: https://www.flickr.com/photos/152392524@N08/albums We'll do another tour in March (Be, Lux, Fr, Es, It, Ch) and hopefully we'll come back with more pictures. Maybe I'll also add some of my older images. And of course, thanks a lot to the people that helped me with the locations and confirmed my researched coordinates - it's really nice to know how to get in and somebody has been there recently. I won't publish the names here so that you don't get flooded with requests, I hope that's ok. You rock! best wishes from Germany, Nico
  17. 3 points
    One of the objects located in the campsite. Why a house is bad. When I was inside, alone ... there was a squeaky door from everywhere and the cracking of the boards against each other. The blame for all this is borne by the wind and frost ... however, when you sit in such an object yourself, different thoughts come to mind. In fact, I was not alone ... my friend was outside ... but the distance between us (at a given moment and situation) was comparable to the width of the Vistula (in fact it was enough to just walk out the window). Great property, amazing atmosphere ... great rooms .... (Translator...sorry)
  18. 3 points
    Found this small, but nice room in east germany! 1. Ballhaus Dornenglück 01 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 2. Ballhaus Dornenglück 02 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 3. Ballhaus Dornenglück 03 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 4. Ballhaus Dornenglück 04 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 5. Ballhaus Dornenglück 05 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 6. Ballhaus Dornenglück 06 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr
  19. 3 points
    Closed German thermal gym.
  20. 3 points
    Powerful plant, foundry, machinery park. Incredible climate. Three years ago people were working there. Today, everything is gradually exported ... casts for scrap .. part of machines for other plants, the rest for deletion.
  21. 3 points
    This development is about half an hour from my home in Sharm..never realised it was totally abandoned so only had a look round the outsides but I will return...bit of history for yous: A most ambitious hotel this..a former Five star hotel complex comprising of three hotels,Moon,Star and Sun.Raouf gifted this hotel to his american wife who managed and used her artistic touch to decorate the place.The complex comprised a dozen pools,a casino and cinemas,however,there seemed initially that the business was a success but bookings dropped off and eventually the Moon hotel closed followed by Star then the Sun..now,the beach lies abandoned with parasol umbrellas and sunbeds piled up near a beach bar and the entire complex is now abandoned..even the locals give it a wide berth for some strange reason. Only a few pics of interest so....this is the state of the beach No longer busy Pool bar with quite a view. This water ride ran between two hotels Pretty impressive pool Massage anyone? If nothing else,I have brought a few sunny pics to your shore!
  22. 3 points
    HI all Im Urban Cleetus new to this site and photography. I have been Watching the group and waiting to find somewhere which hasn't been done, before i post So here we go, My first post! History: The factory in Harrow first opened in 1891 and was also Eastman Kodak’s first manufacturing base outside America.The factory in Harrow was the largest photographic manufacturing plant in the British Commonwealth and at the height of its output in the 1950s it employed more than 6,000 people. The site provided printing paper for professional use of mural images and also personal use by amateur photographers.Kodak has been present in Harrow for more than 120 years, the factory’s history charting much of the history of popular photography itself. Due to the ever-growing popularity of digital photography, in 2005 track four at the factory was shut and ended the site’s production of film, leading to the loss of 250 jobs.Now due to increasing financial pressures in recent years, Kodak has sold off the Harrow site for development. The last shift was carried out Friday 2nd December 2016 I visited this site three time in the 8 days since its closure with the company of 2 explorers i know. Beware dogs and heavy security on site
  23. 3 points
    The George Hotel as stood empty for just a little over 5 years... considering this it's not half bad inside, stairways are still intact, few if any holes through to other floors, little decay in the form of mold or interior fatigue and there's still gas in the pumps in the bar area. It's a fair size and took us over an hour to appreciate some of the victorian features still visible throughout the building. The building was sold a few years back to a local dentist for £900,000 but nothing if anything as started interns of building works to restore the hotel. which is a shame as the Hotel sits in pleasant surroundings within St George square which recently received a £21 million facelift. The Hotel as a basement area which stores the cask ales & equipment needed to run the Hotel bar. Theres rooms a plenty 60 rooms accommodation with bar(s) , ballroom, pool hall and dining room & rooftop area ... we pretty much covered the entire building in a typically dreary Huddersfield afternoon. Hope you enjoy the thread... Exterior Bar Main lobby Stair case shots Corridor shots Bed rooms The caller The ball room and dinning hall The kitchen The roof Other rooms 45 pics later... Hope you enjoyed...
  24. 3 points
    Unless you've been to Scarborough you've probably never heard of Peasholm Park. They are currently demolishing the old boat house as it was dangerous. The Chinese gardens at the top never seem to be open so while the water is drained I got in. Bad idea was trying to walk across the pond bed, the mud was so deep my leg just sank and I almost got stuck. They made it easy to get around the big locked gate and up on to the bridge. I got some photos from the top looking down.
  25. 3 points
  26. 3 points
    After visiting a different location in the city we got a tip off from others about a possible entry point so decided to take a look. Having assessed the building for security we made our way to the entry point. The building is situated in the Neepsend area of the city and forms part of Kelham island one of the oldest industrial sites in Sheffield which as an heritage for producing high-quality cutlery and edge-tools and its pre-eminence in manufacturing heavy specialist steels. The victorian grade II listed building once occupied by Barnsley resides in 37 thousand Sq ft of industrial heritage and is the last significant development opportunity in Kelham island. Today Kelham is a mixed use riverside development which compromise the creation of old and new use of buildings forming apartments, bars & restaurants, and commercial space on the riverside site of former workshops. The development is part of an ongoing regeneration of the area by AXIS and others, which started in the 1990s with Cornish place. The development is intended to create a desirable place to live with a brand new public square, and continuation of the Don riverside walk project. Due to increasing competition from imports, Sheffield has seen a decline in heavy engineering industries since the 1960s, which has forced the sector to streamline its operations and lay off the majority of the local employment. George Barnsley's is a little like stepping back inside a time machine, most of the original machinery and features still exist and for this alone is well worth a visit before the inevitability of re development. Also noteworthy is the local artists that decorate the building with graffiti and art which gives the explore a real urban edge. And to end off a pic from modern day... I went back to this place the other day... Opening the gate to enter i didn't bother going in, the old man was right it is a dump in there and natural decay has took over... but that said if you have never been in take a look, you can get some nice shots even with a crappy iPhone
  27. 3 points
    Former puppy farm that was often in the local news regarding poor living quarters,alleged mistreatment of dogs and the selling of dogs that often died after new owners took delivery of the young animals..the RSPCA were always closing down the business,but the owner John Lowe simply ignored them and carried on. On February 23rd 2014,Mr Lowe,who purchased Keepers Cottage in 1966,shot and killed his partner and then her daughter,who tried to flee and get help,but died just outside the cottage.Police arrived and arrested Mr Lowe who was found guilty of double murder later that year and jailed for life with a minimum tariff of 25 years so it is likely he will die in prison.From information on several estate agents websites,it seems the 6 acre estate has been sold but last year planning permission was refused for one plan to demolish the cottage and build 3 dwellings so as of January 2018,I have no idea what will happen.We arrived at dawn and immediately noticed red flashing cameras mounted firstly at the gated entrance then further down the track mounted on a telegraph pole and one fixed on the cottage all flashing busily.We were considering retreating however we decided to skirt round the outbuildings to escape the cameras if indeed that is what they are and not dummy alarms which I suspect they are...I have to say I found this explore both intriguing but disturbing at the same time and was glad to leave..I have not felt this way since exploring Cane Hill Asylum in 2008. My pics are only phone shots so please excuse.. Found this on Google Earth to show how haphazard this place is/was We arrive as the sun is filtering through the trees..this cottage sits within a six acre plot nicely hidden by the woods. The farm is surrounded by shanty type buildings largely held together with telegraph poles. Truly awful animal pens..I cannot imagine this was any better before the old man`s conviction. We skirt round the rear of the house avoiding the cameras Amphitheatre style seating/steps. Living room..very surprised to see that this fire place didnt seem to have been used for open fires. View from the master bedroom. And the enormous conservatory built round two elevations. I am glad I saw all this but upon exiting the house,some strange bleeping noise started so it was our excuse to leave!
  28. 3 points
    Not sure if this is in the right forum. Park Hill Estate is a gastly sight today although they are regenerating it. This made for quite a creepy explore. We have wrritten about the history of Park Hill Flats here.
  29. 3 points
    History In the 14th century the Bretton estate was owned by the Dronsfields and passed by marriage to the Wentworths in 1407. King Henry VIII spent three nights in the old hall and furnishings, draperies and panelling from his bedroom were moved to the new hall. A hall is marked on Christopher Saxton's 1577 map of Yorkshire... The present building was designed and built around 1720 by its owner, Sir William Wentworth assisted by James Moyser to replace the earlier hall. In 1792 it passed into the Beaumont family, (latterly Barons and Viscounts Allendale), and the library and dining room were remodelled by John Carrin 1793. Monumental stables designed by George Basevi were built between 1842 and 1852. The hall was sold to the West Riding County Council in 1947. Before the sale, the panelling of the "Henry VIII parlour" (preserved from the earlier hall) was given to Leeds City Council and moved to Temple Newsam house. The hall housed Bretton Hall College from 1949 until 2001 and was a campus of the University of Leeds from 2001 to 2007. Explore Work began on site in march 2016... The MüllerVanTol studio has been appointed to design the interiors of the Grade II listed mansion and the refurbishment of other listed buildings is well underway. Most of the 11 student dwellings which were built in the 1960's and 1970's have been demolished including Eglinton, Litherop, Swithen and Haigh, Grasshopper will be the last to go in late 2017. A real shame considering the position of the college which specialised in design, drama, music and other performing arts with notable alumna attending. The Hall itself resides in 500 acres of park land which is home to the Yorkshire Sculpture park (YSP). (YSP) was the first of it's kind within the UK and his the largest in Europe, providing the only the place to see Barbara Hepworth and Bronzes by Henry Moore. Over 300,000 visitors are said to visit the park each year and on previous visits its been easy to blend into the crowd and walk around the exterior of the old Hall this said access internally as always been restricted. Access to the Hall today is strictly prohibited and is protected by 6ft metal fencing which spans the entire grounds including former classrooms and the stable block and more so their is a high presence of security on site with the developers keen to keep the public away. Recently signs have appeared to restrict the public taking pictures near the Hall itself... typical signs read (restricted use of photography in this area). The developers seem to be going to extreme lengths to protect the design ideas of the Hall and are passing these restriction onto local media and staff working onsite... I'm guessing the developers are wanting to keep their plans secret until the grand opening later in 2019. During the festive Holiday period we decided to pay a visit... making our way to some of the former classrooms and the student centre. This led to the stable block passing by the former dwellings and down to the main hall. We were surprised to have got this far and would have been more than happy with some nice externals of the buildings on site. YSP was very quiet and we were aware of sticking out in the surroundings so decided to head inside. Making our way down to the hall we were sure we would be found before we had chance to pull out our cameras. We were quite taken away by the sheer scope of the refurbishment and the beautiful restoration work been carried out we soon forgot about the threats of been in the Hall. Slowly documenting our visit and proceeding through the Halls rooms we became aware our explore light could be attracting unwanted attention from the outside as daylight was running out. Turning it off where possible it was obvious that it would be shining like a beacon through the Halls many rooms, we decided to head out with the premise of returning in the morning. Unfortunately on our return we were met by the security who TBH was sympathetic in escorting us off the premises. It seems like our well documented day at Bretton Hall was a one off and maybe we will have to wait to see how the restoration unfolds when the Hall is reborn as an hotel. Pics 1. Entrance Arcade belonging to former stable block (circa 1800). 2. Beaumont Bull & Wentworth Griffin above the columns on each side of the archway below the cupola. 3. Lost student art outside the experimental theatre... former carriage house 4. Looking down the Colonnade 5. The stable courtyard 6. The south range of Bretton hall dates back to 1720 9. Giant pilasters supporting the pendent at the north range of Bretton Hall 8. Three storey nine-by-five-bay main range. 9. Pathway leading to the exterior of the former library 10. Former Orangery 11. Plaque detailing the history 12. Former dinning room with marble fireplace 13. Typical Rococo style in the former dining room 14. Typically their would have been a frieze around the fireplace 15. Looking up at the glazed dome 16. Looks like restoration as begun on the pendentives 17. Former drawing room with its spectacular baroque ceiling 18. Close a look at the baroque ceiling 19. Originally Regency Library then later converted to a display room. 21. Left overs from the colleague era 22. looks like works yet to begin in this area of the hall 23. Leading back to the library 24. restoration of the cove Acoustics to amplify sound in the music room 25. Light hanging from the Adam style celling 26. South ranges main staircase 27. Main staircase with a wrought iron railing 28. Stone stairs leading down to the basement 29. A form of art nouveau 30. Inside the main range 31. Coving shelves 32. Beautiful example of a transom window 33. Mid - century scandinavian style chair 34. Adam style celling's from 1770 35. Developer keeping with the original sash windows 36. Groin vaulted passage with three arches and piers decorated with grisaille paintings in the Portico Hall Added buildings from the former college days 37. The gymnasium 38. exterior of former classrooms 39. Former student centre reception 40. Corridoor leading to the classrooms 41. The student centre was empty 42. Damaged computer 43. Locked 44. typical student dormitory 45. recreational room 46. Entrance to one of the very few remaining former dormitory buildings The history of the Bretton Hall could be a thread all on its own ... as could the documentation of the architecture its position as educational faculty and importantly the future usage of the Hall as an entertainment venue. I've done my best to condense this were possible and in doing so have provided a comprehensive report regarding Bretton Hall.. Hope you enjoyed the report
  30. 3 points
    following the decline of industries Sheffield offers plenty interns of urban exploring... from abandoned breweries, redundant steel works and leisure sites. It's difficult to experience all this in a single outing therefore I have compiled this into three years of exploring the city. Having started out at relatively low level explores and advancing this further to more harder to reach buildings here are some of the most important abandoned buildings Sheffield offers. If not for the buildings themselves Sheffield's street art is an important part of the explore. Often explorers take to photography for the art which is of a high standard coming from a far to experience this. Historically the buildings offer more than the art its self... the buildings often dating back to the victorian era give great scope to capture real history of the city. Often buildings have either been destroyed or are in the process of this. Been able to capture the buildings in their original state albeit a derelict one captures the cities past... and more importantly the history of British industry. END
  31. 2 points
    Grimsby Ice Factory Visited with @EOA and @eastyham after our first stop was a failure and without a back up plan we were struggling so up to Grimsby it was. Good choice. Cracking place this. Old as fook, plenty of decay, rot, growth, shonky floors and endless amounts of pigeon poop. I walked across the bridge of doom but couldn’t really go much further as the floors and stairs are collapsing in the other building. It didn’t look too interesting anyway to be honest. Grabbed some old pictures off google so ive wanged them in here too because I think its proper mint when you can compare times gone by with the derps of today. History The Factory was opened on the 7th of October 1901 as a joint venture between the Grimsby Ice Company and the Grimsby Co-operative Ice Company. The Grimsby Ice Company was initially founded in 1863 by local fishermen to import ice from Norway to help them preserve the fish that they caught, by 1900 however it was obvious that they would have to begin to source ice from elsewhere as the for ice, what made matters worse was that the Norwegians began to charge more for exporting their ice and the supply of ice was unreliable... Hence the need for an ice factory at home. The Original Refrigeration Plant on site where 4 steam powered Pontifex horizontal double-acting ammonia compressors which would operate at 50rpm. These where powered by vertical, triple-expansion steam engines, the steam for these engines where generated from six 30ft long Lancashire boilers. A few changes where made between opening and 1931, changes such as the superheating of the Lancashire boilers and the purchase of a few more bits of kit from the Linde British Refrigerating Company however the majority of the facility stayed the same... Until 1931 when a modernization program under the direction of F A Fleming MBE, who was the General manger at the ice factory at the time was put into place. The program included the installation of four J&E Hall Compressors and Metropolitan Vickers Electrical equipment, replacing the Old Pontifex Compressors and Steam Engines. The specification for the new plant demanded an output of 1,100 tons of ice per day under ordinary working conditions, and by utilising the existing tanks without increasing the number of cans. The use of steam was to be entirely dispensed with and means to be provided for heating the thawing water without the use of electrical heaters. Much as today, this had to be achieved with equipment of the greatest efficiency. Sadly the high demands for ice where short lived, episodes such as the cod wars and the general decline in the British fishing industry led to several units been shut down by 1976, and in 1990 the factory closed it's doors and shut down. Today it is owned by Associated British Ports and is left derelict, although preservationists have tried to save the building, their efforts have sadly so far been in vain. Even though the place makes a great opportunity for us explorers I would like to think it would be saved eventually as the factory is now a unique survivor of a now otherwise extinct industry, that said, I do have my doubts... Pics I’ll start off with one from the depths of google. Two blokes looking rather proud next to one of the compressors. Not a clue of the date but it looks fairly clean and new. I didn’t take these pictures with the intention of getting them at similar angles and what not it was purely coincidence, but has worked ok ish. Looking at the same machine now A couple of control panels that were next to the above compressor Another oldie and the same machine now Looking down on the compressor hall and from the same walkway 1930ish? Moving onto other parts of the factory there was a room with these bins filling the whole floor. These were filled with water from the hoses at the end seen here Frozen. Then moved along on these cranes dumped at the end like this (this isn’t Grimsby) Then slid into the crusher So yeah. Unusual. I doubt I will ever explore another Ice factory so that’s pretty cool. Some more shots of the place. I’ll finish on a picture of the old steam powered compressors.
  32. 2 points
    Thanks for your kind words! I'm happy you like it! @jones-y-gog: There'll definitely be more stuff! I'm back in april, hopefully with lots of new pictures If you got some nice tips in Soutwest-Europe, please let me know! I've also found some older pictures of Kraftwerk V/Lightworks (quite crappy), a nearly empty children's sanatorium/home and the remains of Hitler's oxygen plant (not really worth seeing), maybe I'll can get a bit out of them.
  33. 2 points
    Colonia IL / Mono Orphanage History The orphanage was built on the border of Switzerland and Italy. Sadly there doesn't seem to be a lot of information out there regarding this location. From what I've gathered it originally served as an orphanage and at some point in time, it was also used as a summer camp. Despite being closed during the 1970's, it has remained in pretty good condition with minimal graffiti and vandalism. Visit Visited again with @darbians and @vampiricsquid. Unfortunately when we visited the beds had been removed but lucky there was still a lot left to photograph. The chapel was absolutely stunning and it was nice to see that some furniture, including the desks from the classrooms were still there. All in all an excellent location to finish off our Italian adventure.
  34. 2 points
    A bit of a pain in the back side to get in this one, they have really made an effort with those fences! There was no security though, once you find a way past the doubled up security fences it's smooth sailing. We did find one particular part of this place rather creepy, there is a rotten bed in a dark basement that was quite eerie and had a different feel than the rest of the decaying building. More information will follow on our website in a day or so.
  35. 2 points
    The Jordanhill Campus is an historic estate within the boundaries of Jordanhill in Glasgow, Scotland. The buildings have stood empty since 2012, until which time it served as the Faculty of Education of the University of Strathclyde. Sometimes you just can't understand why no one else has posted a report. This is one of those places! Initially @The Amateur Wanderer and I had a look around the place during our Christmas trip to Scotland, and then I returned a short while later with @SpiderMonkey. We only looked around one building, the David Stow Building which is the main attraction, the original and oldest part of the site. There is also a huge 1960s concrete extension behind, but the sooner that gets pulled down the better - we didn't bother with it! History The buildings date back to 1837 when former merchant and educational pioneer David Stow opened the Dundas Vale Normal Seminary, Europe’s first purpose-built training institution for teachers. Some remnants of the old seminary still remain today – rooms with rows of sinks which were more recently used as storage, and wooden lockers can still be found. In 1913 the Glasgow Corporation agreed a deal to buy the estate, and build both a teacher training college and the associated Jordanhill School on the site. A new building was planned to provide teacher training. With the new school completed in 1920 and the college in 1921, the now Grade B listed David Stow Building facilitated all teacher training provided under the unified University of Glasgow. Centrally funded and with no ties with churches, the college was largely non-residential and its range of work was wider. A shortage of teachers throughout Britain in the late 1950s lead to large scale expansion at Jordanhill. Construction of a new purpose-built facility commenced in 1961, replacing a much older manor house on the site. In 1993, the college was required to merge with a higher education facility. The University of Strathclyde approached the college, and an agreement between both institutions was reached. In 1993 Jordanhill College became the Faculty of Education of the University of Strathclyde. With better use of facilities, and an ageing campus at Jordanhill which was highly protected by preservation orders, in 2010 the decision was made to close Jordanhill campus and move the Faculty all courses to its John Anderson Campus. 2011-12 was the last academic year held at the Jordanhill Campus before the move took place. David Stow Building - Entrance Hall Francis Tombs Hall Staircases and Corridors Teaching rooms and facilities Other areas Hidden Relics There were a few areas around the building that hadn’t been refurbished and contained relics from older uses...
  36. 2 points
    One from back In Jan As the weekend approached, as did another explore for myself @eoa and @monk. Seems we are a good trio of bell ends and something usually goes wrong somewhere down the line and Moel Fferna wasn’t going to let us (or shall I say me) down. Anyway, Myself and @EOA started the day with our customary maccies breakfast (minus the spiced cookie latte this time) we then met @Monk nearer to the mine. We’d heard the walk was a bit of a pig upto the mine so we opted to utilise the jeep which took us as close as we could manage, but still a bit of a walk away. Ah well it saved our legs A LOT. The weather was, well, yeah…. you can see from the pictures! So after a bit of a trek through the snow we found the air shaft and @EOA worked his ropey magic and rigged up 2 lines for us noobz (me and @Monk) to covert absolute pro umbex urbseil down the shaft to have amooch around the mine! Top day, the mine is bloody huge, unfortunately we didn’t find the bridge of death as we only had wellies and it was a tad too deep for us to carry on that way. So a return trip isin order. As I said earlier, Moel Fferna wasn’t to let me down. As I was trying to ascend out of the chamber I put all of my weight on my right leg pushed up and POP my knee let go. I managed to get myself out and hobble back to the car. Turns out I have partially tore a ligament off my bone and damaged my meniscus. YAY. All in all another fucking epic mooch with two top blokes in some mint weather conditions playing with ropes, beers, mines and cameras. AWESOME Update. So I have been to the fracture clinic I'm awaiting a scan but the consultant is very confident i have torn my cartilage and will need keyhole surgery. Great History Early workings tended to be in surface pits, but as the work progressed downwards, it became necessary to work underground. This was often accompanied by the driving of one or more adits to gain direct access to a Level. In some rare instances, such as here (Moel Fferna), there is no trace of surface workings and the workings were entiely underground. Moel Frerna has chambers which follow the slate vein, connected via a series of horizontal Floors (or 'Levels'). The chambers vary in size and are divided by 'pillars' or walls which support the roof. The floors are connected by 'Inclines' which used wedge-shaped trolleys to move trucks between levels. At Moel Fferna a team could produce up to 35 tons of finished slate a week. In 1877 they received about 7 shillings a ton for this. After paying wages for the manager, clerks and 'trammers' the company could make a clear profit of twice this amount. This system was not finally abolished until after the Second World War. Pics Here we are at the top of the airshaft whilst @EOA rigs it up. (don’t we look like pros?) @monk abseiling in. we did have an electron ladder there too but its bloody awkward so it was easier to just abseil in past it. @EOA urbseiling in The first few sections of the mine are very damp and a pain to photograph due to the amount f moisture in the air. This was the flooded section. It was just above wellies but we couldn’t be arsed getting wet feet. @EOA did though because he is a balloon. @Monk snapping away It’s hard to gauge the size of these chambers even with myself in the shot you don’t get a true feel for the sheer scale of them Pikied carriages RIP ladder Some of the Graff 33ri3 wheelbarrow pushed around by the headless mine man. On the 12th hour of everyday you can hear the squeak of the pikied wheel. There was plenty of cool little walkways between the chambers. A winch still in situ up at the top too. The most photogenic rusty old pump in existence. Last but not least another groupshot underneath the cog support. Oh and if anyone is interested a quick video chucked together. <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/dc_8V5x3KDo" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>
  37. 2 points
    The hospital was closed less than three years ago. The facility has functioned, among others orthopedics and traumatology, rheumatology, pulmonology and surgery. The total area of the facility is about 2.38 ha. As of today, little souvenirs remain in the middle. The only thing left was the lamps in the operating rooms and some glass equipment somewhere in the attic. Despite everything, the hospital has an amazing atmosphere ... until you want to walk the long corridors. The hospital is not haunted, it has no ghosts ... it is guarded ... motion detectors, cameras and a dog make the entrance into the wild border with a miracle. Thanks to this the building is in very good condition .... (Sorry, translator)
  38. 2 points
    Tiny bit of history: This was once the most expensive house built in Britain, costing 25million, as lovely as it looks from the outside this house should never have been built. It was only built due to a council blunder with allowed the build to continue without planning permission. The explore So the explore began with a quick scout of the area, once we located a good way to scale the 12ft fence, the climb began, slipping and a near miss with my manhood on the spiked fence we was in, we headed straight for a way in. inside the house itself is very empty and looks like a few raves and parties have been held inside, below are a few photos from the explore Big Credit to urban loan wolf for the find
  39. 2 points
    Thank you very much! Will do! You're welcome. More in the vault I'll upload when I get the chance! It's a fantastic location for sure! Thank you Thank you very much! Will do!
  40. 2 points
    Please share your own doors in the comments
  41. 2 points
    Sorry for the mistake. Not where I need to paste a comment. It is a civil defense hall in a large plant that remembers the times of the Polish People's Republic. In the event of an armed attack, it would protect the civilian population. The room is falling apart. The equipment is rotting. Nobody cares about it anymore.
  42. 2 points
    Last year we explored what we could of the mostly demolished Harperbury Asylum. At the time there was a building that intrigued us but was completely closed off and we couldn't get in. Well, we re-visted today and it was all opened up. A few photos from that building below... the full explore information, video and photos are on our website here: http://www.britainsdecays.com/harperbury-hospital-history-the-forgotten-harperbury-mental-asylum-sits-abandoned-decaying/ This is our original explore video:
  43. 2 points
  44. 2 points
    Pretty much summed up by @Urbexbandoned really. Regarding access, while I'm not personally sure what the score is with the place at the moment I'd say that as you're based in Liverpool its not far so you could keep trying - perseverance can often pay off - I can say from experience! Also from experience I know that the more I got involved, interact, share reports etc then others will be more inclined to help with access and locations....
  45. 2 points
    History The woollen mill was owned by Samuel Firth of Gatehead in Marsden, and opened in 1888. He also owned Holme Mill. By the 1960s, it was owned and run by Fisher, Firth & Co. which became Cellars Clough Woollen Mills Ltd, managed by another Firth son, in 1981. The company has now been dissolved. Situated just off the Huddersfield Narrow Canal, the mill’s pond is now a very popular fishing spot. Planning permission was granted for the conversion of the mills and former offices to 101 dwelling units, 9 live/work units, a resident’s gym, pool, shop, meeting room, bike store, car park and improvements to the access road. Previous planning applications have been unsuccessful as bats were found to be residing in the mill. The bats weren’t forcibly removed, so the hope was that they would eventually choose the ‘improved accommodation’ for themselves. Explore We decided to spend a day in Huddersfield looking at some of the heritage of the town... so we ended up in Marsden which is to the east of the town we came across two mill Cellars Clough and Bottoms Mill.. unfortunately we couldn't find a way in Bottoms Mill so instead explored Cellars.. It looks like some work was carried out some years back as part of the mill is demolished with brick piled around in the courtyard. The Mill is in poor condition and its difficult to access the upper floors due to both staircases been blocked by stone rubble although we did manage to climb the staircases the floors look ready to collapse at anytime.. at the top floor theres a ladder to enter what looked liked an office although we did not attempt the climb ... overall worth a look if not for the explore it offers an insight into how mills were constructed and the size of these is truly astounding .. Pics Bad video pics The mill is in a sorry state in 2018 But there is still some nice pics to be had in there...
  46. 2 points
    Hello Thanks for the welcome. I have visited many sites over many years , and have taken a fair few photos. (Not of all the sites) Royal Sea Bathing Hospital Margate Nethern Cemetary Cane Hill Severalls St Peters Mortuary Tooting Hospital Bethlem Clifftonville Lido Brookham Family Centre To name a few
  47. 2 points
    The old Coronation Street Film set is currently sat, abandoned , waiting demolition. This video shows an explore of the purpose built film set at Granada Studios in Manchester. Although this wasn't the very first film set at the studio it's one of the most well known and remembered amongst fans of the popular soap. The TV show's production was filmed at this location for over 30 years until it was sold to Manchester Quays Its in 2013 to be demolished and replaced with flats, offices, restaurants and hotels.
  48. 2 points
    History The "Record" trademark was registered by the firm of C & J Hampton in the Trade Mark Journal in 1909. Charles and Joseph Hampton were Sheffield toolmakers and ironfounders located at Eagle Foundry in Livingston Road, Sheffield, who had originally started their business in 1898 manufacturing marlin spikes and specialist castings. By 1908 C & J Hampton became a limited company. It wasn't until January 1931 that the company introduced a range of woodworking planes, based on the popular patterns of the Stanley Tool brand, in their No. 10 catalogue. By this time the factory had relocated to Ouse Road in Attercliffe, Sheffield, and the new planes were being marketed as "an entirely new British product", benefitting from new Government import tariffs which penalised imports and assisted British manufacturers in combatting the influx of imported planes from America and other countries. Woodworking planes made by Stanley Tools in particular dominated the British market and so a "Buy British" campaign was instigated to help combat the depression in Britain at that time. In October 1934, C & J Hampton bought the manufacturing rights from John Rabone And Sons Ltd. for the entire range of iron planes and spoke shaves formally manufactured by Edward Preston And Sons Ltd. of Birmingham. By the early 1930's it had become apparent that Preston's had fallen into financial difficulties and they were subsequently bought out by Rabone's in October 1932. Prior to this, Preston's had been Rabone's main competitor in the manufacture of rules and levels so the takeover made perfect business sense however, after the acquisition, Rabone struggled with the concept of becoming planemakers as well, and saw it as a deviation from their traditional product lines. They did, however, spend almost two years re-organising the iron plane making department at Preston's Whittall Works before deciding that "certain products were found not to conform readily with the company's other interests.", so the rights were then sold to C & J Hampton. Record continued to add various planes and spokeshaves to its product line over the coming years, but were forced to drop some of their range because of wartime restrictions. It is unfortunate to note that many of these planes and spoke shaves never made it back into production once the restrictions had been lifted. During the 1950's and into the early 1960's, Catalogue No. 16 was frequently reissued in pocket form to keep customers informed of new tools, as well as the availability of certain pre-war planes, spokeshaves and other tools. Price lists were also updated wherever necessary. It wasn't until the firm had moved into new premises at Parkway Works in 1963 that Catalogue No. 17 was issued and that the product line had "stabilised" from its post-war restrictions. In 1972, C & J Hampton Ltd. merged with William Ridgway Ltd. to form Record-Ridgway Tools Ltd. By doing so, Record had taken on the manufacturing of wood boring tools, which was Ridgway's core business. AB Bahco, a Swedish chisel & woodworking tool company, bought Record-Ridgway Tools in March 1981, and renamed it Record Holdings in 1985, before renaming it again three years later to Record Marples (Woodworking Tools) Ltd. Around the same time the names of both "Record" and "Marples" appeared on the body castings of some planes -- predominantly the bench and block planes -- around the front knob. It was obviously a period of great upheaval for the firm as the company was renamed a further three times in the 1990's -- Record Tools Ltd. in 1991, Record Holdings plc in 1993 and then Record Tools Ltd. (a division of American Tool Companies Inc) in 1998. However, the company struggled financially and went into administration in 1998. It was then acquired by US-based Irwin Tools in 1998 but was closed down soon after as the American owners moved production to China. Explore Firstly we scaled the building to accomplish if any security were present & possible entry points... No probs with either so decided to take a look. The building is in poor condition and requires a little climbing and clambering through trees to reach. Theres asbestos present on site so was prepared with masks, the building is a fair size and took a little over an hour to explore. Lots of Sheffield graffiti art which is of a high standard and plenty of original features exist (unbelievably).. The building as come under attack from a lot of vandalism including fire damage, deliberate destruction and pigeons (lots of these present in the building), Theres also high levels of natural damage caused to the building via the weather (some areas the roofs not intact). Theres access to the upper floors via a central staircase (also leads to the roof) and a staircase at the west side of the building... lots of rooms leading off the staircases some safer than others. We were joined by SteelCityUrbex during the explore so shout outs to them... Great explore with lots of graffiti and nostalgia to keep you busy on the explore highly recommended (just watch out for the pigeons). PICS And to end off... a roof shot! Nothing much has changed in it current day form, just some more graffiti.
  49. 2 points
    With a 2.5 meter high, fully reinforced security fence, cameras at every angle and motion sensors tucked away in strategical places, this building was designed to keep people out. A load of good that did, eh? This building is shrouded in mystery, its former use was totally unknown and even google wasn't any help! Turns out it was the old headquarters for the Department of work and pensions, but they could not afford to keep it running, so became a rejected building for social security. No one has ever documented this building and not a single photo of the insides can be found.. Until now. Not my fanciest of camera work but the night time was the best time for this trip. So granted the shots could be better but with not a lot of time on our hands (and maybe setting a motion detector off) we had to make do! The building itself was actually very clean and tidy, in and out. Fair bit of dust and clutter from the stripping off pipes from underneath the flooring but no graffiti, no vandalism.. Not a single sign of "outsiders". Truly trapped in time with 1990's tech scattered, but nothing of worth, just old school things that required Ethernet and a few tapes and old floppy disks. For the most part it was quiet and things were calm, the main worry was watching for the missing floor panels and pesky motion sensors above a certain few doors. So I gather most office blocks like this are still protected (A company called 'clear way') which is kind of surprising considering how long it has been abandoned and I cannot find out anything to do with that buildings future. Originally used as a primary headquarters for the department of work and pensions, handling data and dealing with data to do with peoples income and possibly entitlement of benefits, sits unused and had been abandoned between around 2002 but the exact time is yet to be known. It was being used through the 90's that's for sure with lift service sheets with the last service being 2002 and floppy disks and tapes dating through the 90's. It is unfortunate we could not see the whole building, as out of the three floors it had only the ground and second were explored. The lower ground floor proved to be a challenge as that's were the sensors really were, so we decided to leave it and head out quiet as a mouse. But not without having one last look at the glass atrium of course. Over all this building is still somewhat a mystery and i'm fairly certain we are the only people to document this building, which is mad for me. This is my first real forum and I hope you enjoy the photos, Til the next one! "Take nothing but photos, leave nothing but footprints" 1. scouting a way in 2. The atrium, looking straight through 3. 4. 5. This tells me they were short of funds. 6. 7. The windows for the atrium 8. Lift mechanics 9. The lift motor and pulley system 10. Service history for the lift 11. A letter (with buildings address) for evaluation of the one lift 12. Typical office corridors, minus the health and safety hazard 13. Vintage mounted desk with plug sockets built in 14. Huge computer room 15. Keys still left as they were since closure 16. Media storage units 16. Hand drawn schematics for lift dated 89 17. Lift room 18. Temperature gauges 19. Wiring for the lift 20. Very rusty keys 21. The motor for the lift 22. Lift schematics 23. The original blueprint before the construction of oak house 24. This still works! 25. Flooring lifted for strip down before being abandoned 26. Old school floppy disk dated 91 27. Media room and units 28. Stannah lift lever 29. Inside the vast atrium 30. Another angle 31. Vintage clock and safe
  50. 2 points
    Hi All, Some pictures of a mine. A spot quite dangerous but a great place ! Hope you will like these pictures
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