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  1. 7 points
    1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Little house somewhere in Belgium. Seems there lived an 103 year old lady and after a fire on the upper floor she left the house. Her son still comes there every week to feed the cat.
  2. 7 points
    First things first - this place is a death-trap. Simple as that. And it's quite likely to be worse now than it was when I went. But as I have a bit of an obsession about redundant old cinemas and theatres I left all common sense at the entrance. The building still shows signs of its grand past but sadly any possibility of saving it looks pretty slim, although a Trust has been set up to try to preserve it and bring it back into use. The four-storey building, designed by G. B. Rawcliffe, opened in 1894 as a music hall, before being converted to a cinema in 1938. It was last used as a bingo hall in 1995. ^^^ Not sure about that!
  3. 5 points
    I visited the chocolate factory already more than four years ago. Inside it was partly very dark - much darker than it looks in the photos. The plaster had fallen from the ceiling; a gray damp mud lay on the floor and stuck stubbornly to the shoes. After the owner died, the factory was closed over 20 years ago. The widow of the manufacturer still lives in a dilapidated house next to the factory. In the past years, the condition has worsened a lot. Meanwhile, the roof of the former factory has almost completely collapsed. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
  4. 5 points
    1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. A former ballhaus somewhere in the eastern of Germany. At the moment they are renovating the building and for a small amount of money you can get acces for taking photographs.
  5. 5 points
    1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: A legal visit during a photo base on 21-10-2017. Felt like a last chance because renovation is being prepared. We could notice the painting done during the filming of 'a cure for wellness' very well since we did the bathhouse an men's complex illegal in 2016. Still an impressive location of course and the photo's won't be much of a surprise i guess. I already had a fascination for abandoned buildings, but my first visit at Beelitz Heilstatten in 2014 really kicked of my passion for photography of the abandoned world. Hope you enjoyed viewing this thread! grts, Peter
  6. 4 points
    Visited recently on my first foray over to the European side of life (can't believe it has taken so long). It was excellent / cold in the snow! History: On May 9, 1899, Kaiser Wilhelm II laid the first stone of Fort St. Blaise. Group Fortification Verdun group is built on top of two hills, it consists of two forts, the fort Sommy 30 ha in the south, and Fort Saint-Blaise 45 ha on the north. Group Fortification Verdun has four 150mm howitzers and six short 100mm guns. Fort St. Blaise was planned for 500 men and fort Sommy for 200 men. It could then receive two infantry companies, in addition to the gunners. St. Blaise, whose fortified barracks could receive 500 people, has 10 observation domes and 12 lookout posts.[4] The water tank's capacity was 1,300 m. 4 diesel engines of 25HP each, providing the energy necessary for Fort St. Blaise. The fort Sommy, including the fortified barracks, could accommodate 200 people, and has 6 observation domes and 8 lookouts. Its water tank could hold 600 m and it had 3 diesel engines of 20HP each, to provide the energy needed for its operation.[4] The coat of arms of Count of Haeseler is carved on the pediment of the door of the fort. It caused the Americans a huge headache in WW2 and proved its worth as a fortified location. Patton underestimated their strength immensely. Fort St. Blaise: The first of the two forts, complete with short 100mm funs in place showing battle damage. Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Collapsed structure / battle damage Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr The thing you don't realise until you get there is that the French Army have not removed any of the barbed wire entanglements, complete with foot spikes and in some places, unexploded ordnance Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Fort Sommy: The smaller outer fort, with a machine gun cupola and two turrets with guns and a tonne more battle damage, with craters and wall collapses all over the shop! Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr
  7. 4 points
    This abandoned porcellain manufactur was founded at the end of the 19th century. It produced until 1974 when it went bankrupt and finally folded. #1 DSC05275 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC05230 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC05220 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC05221 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC05237 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC05231 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #7 DSC05232 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #8 DSC05247 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #9 DSC05262 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #10 DSC06557 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #11 DSC06558 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #12 DSC05253 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #13 DSC05264 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #14 DSC06578 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #15 DSC06559 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #16 DSC06574 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #17 DSC05266 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #18 DSC06564 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #19 DSC05271 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #20 DSC06562 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #21 DSC06565 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #22 DSC06566 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #23 DSC05251 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #24 DSC06571 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #25 DSC06573 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #26 DSC06575 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #27 DSC06576 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #28 DSC06577 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #29 DSC05261 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
  8. 4 points
    The colliery Saint Fontaine was opened in 1908. For the extraction of hard coal, they dug to a depth of 1037 meters. In the 1960s, up to two million tons of hard coal were mined. In 1972 the colliery was closed for the first time, but in 1976 the operation was resumed. In 1986, the final closure, whereupon a large part of the buildings were demolished. Today, apart from the listed tower, only the administrative building including the locker room / pithead baths exists. In recent years, unfortunately, there was a lot of vandalism; last the ceiling lamps were destroyed by some idiots. In Saint Fontaine, there were repeated fatal accidents. On 3 January 1933, 36 miners were killed in a gas explosion. On May 29, 1959, another 26 workers were killed in another explosion. On September 23, 1968, three miners smothered. Visited with @The_Raw. 1. 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
  9. 3 points
    Welcome to the Grand Hotel S. which was built from 1840 to 1842. It closed its doors in 1999 and is abandoned since. #1 DSC05761 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC05762 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC05763 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC05787 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC05744 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC05745 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #7 DSC05746 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #8 DSC05747 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #9 DSC05748 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #10 DSC05751 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #11 DSC05752 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #12 DSC05753 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #13 DSC05755 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #14 DSC05756 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #15 DSC05766 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #16 DSC05773 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #17 DSC05776 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #18 DSC05777-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #19 DSC05779 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #20 DSC05771-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #21 DSC05769-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #22 DSC05783-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
  10. 3 points
    Built in 1884 Villa S. ist regarded as the first casino at this coast. After decades of desertion and decay it burned down in 2006. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13
  11. 2 points
    So this is my first post on this forum, I found out about these houses on a Abandoned Lincolnshire group on Facebook and thought they were definitely worth a trip, but... the first trip wasn't very successful, the address for these houses took us to two houses on the other side of Withcall that were at one point abandoned but have since been knocked down, so after about half an hour of looking around it became very clear the houses weren't there. After talking to the person who posted them originally and finding out the real location we headed back up to find them. We had to make sure we kept quiet as there is a neighbor attached to the 2nd station house and we weren't sure they'd have appreciated a night time visit from 3 explorers haha. Access to the house is easy, the doors being left open is always convenient. Walking around the houses only took 30 minutes or so , but was still a nice little explore. It's one of them places that besides a few repairs and some serious wallpapering, it looks like the family could just walk back through the front door and pick up their lives where they left off which gave the houses a real creepy vibe. I guess that's all that really needs to be said about these houses. Here's a few pictures: Thanks for reading:)
  12. 2 points
    This fortress was constructed by the Germans from 1907-1914. It served German soldiers during the First World War but saw little action. Then it was occupied by the French between 1919 & 1940, where it was incorporated into the maginot line for WWII. After the departure of French troops in June 1940, the German army took back the fort. On September 2, 1944, it was declared a fortress of the Reich by Hitler. The stronghold must therefore be defended until the last extremity by German troops, whose chiefs all took an oath to the Führer. In October 1944, the fort was captured by the American 3rd Army in the Battle of Metz. Definitely one of the best military sites I've visited yet. Amazing to think it served both WWI & WWII yet remains in such good condition today. There are dozens of murals dating back over a century, and 1,700m of tunnels connecting various sections. I had to be dragged away as I could have spent a week in here. Visited with @Maniac @extreme_ironing and @Andy. "Flourish German fatherland" "Cameroon child in Munich" / "Man does not agree" "Booze kills, so do not drink so much!" (or something to that effect....) "Beautiful is the recruit life" "Whoever quarrels or rushes gets the hell out of it" "May God punish England" Thanks for looking y'all
  13. 2 points
    First report from the latest trip abroad! This old mansion sits in a small village, the gates are wide open and the locals don't seem to even care about it. The highlight here was definitely the grand entrance hall, surrounded by pillars, red carpet, grand staircase, and a lumiere-esque balcony above it. There were also some pretty nice side rooms too. From what I can gather the last use this building had was as a hotel, judging by the slight modernization of some areas. A nice relaxed explore with @AndyK! and Kriegaffe9. Featuring: My tripod because I'm too lazy to shop it out. Cheers
  14. 2 points
    Thank you! That' s a pitty. But I guess you are welcome another time? The place is not big, 2 hours is enough being there. Yep the stairs is very nice indeed! Thanks!
  15. 2 points
    That corridor in number 4 . It has a similar ceiling to that irish asylum, nice report
  16. 1 point
    Wow what a beautiful mansion with a long complicated story. Unfortunately the weddingdress is gone once again, but that doesn't make this location less amazing. Thanks for watching! -Rody 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16.
  17. 1 point
    The story behind Palácio da Fonte da Pipa begins in 1875, when Marçal Paheco (deputy mayor of Loulé) decided to purchase a plot of land just outside the village with the intention of building a house for himself, similar to the ones he had seen on his travels throughout Europe. Unfortunately he died in 1896 before it was completed. In 1920 the property was sold to Manuel Dias Sancho, a wealthy bank owner who completed the construction work with some adjustments to the original plan, such as the addition of electricity. Then with the financial crisis of 1929 and the ongoing political turmoil of the time, the owner was left penniless and his home was reposessed by the Banco Du Algarve (Algarve Bank). 1935 came along and the latest wealthy owner was a gentleman named Francisco Guerreiro Pereira. An action from him that lasts to this day was the addition of the exotic plants in the grounds. In 1948 he died and it was passed on to his eldest son, who then sold the property in 1981 to “Quinta da Fonte da Pipa, Urbanizações, Lda”. It is not clear what this company used the property for, or if they simply wanted to demolish the building and develop the land, but from artefacts left in the building it seems it was used as either an office or for paperwork storage for tour companies and resort owners for a few years before being abandoned.
  18. 1 point
    History: Not much to go by for the history as its really hard to find anything out but what I have found out is that it was built by Sheffield Corporation Water Board at the time they were constructing the nearby Underbank Reservoir which started in June 1890 and was completed in June 1903. Holme Cottage is located at the rear of the land with another building at the front which was probably a Forge or Metal Workshop. From what we gathered while in the place it was last occupied by an old man whose wife had died many years before upon his death there was no living relatives to claim the house or the belongings so it has just been left frozen in time. Pics:
  19. 1 point
    Kings Hall Cinema, Southall, London - September 2017 Interesting one this one! I'd wanted to do this for a while and had been planning to in the coming weeks but had been put off with the idea of its "unique access" which requires some planning in terms of times of entry! Situated on a very busy road with lots of passersby and businesses open till the very wee hours, there is a very small window to get inside as the Night Shift commute changes to the Early and Day Shift Commute. When we arrived it was around midnight and the streets were busy. We were in London so went for a little drive for an hour or so before returning. Visited with a non-member back in September;when inside we had a little lie down in a dark corner for an hour or so to allow the sun to rise just a little bit, and spent about 2 hours light painting the rooms which were boarded and anything which the abundance of daylight wouldn't help. It's a very interesting building with lots to shoot photos of and with my "loaded" parking meter fast running out, we didn't have as much time inside as we would have liked. The air inside is terrible (understandably) and the damp has caused the parquet floors inside much of the building to bow upwards, making an interesting effect! We started shooting inside the main hall at around 6am and spent some time chilling here and getting photos as the sun came up, but we only had till 8am on the car park. The street was already very busy down below by 6am and the main hall had a hue of red from some of the shops signage. When it did become time to leave, we had to jump into a street full of commuters. We were not getting out without being seen. It was 7:45am and the bus stops had queues of people at them. As I was leaving I did attempt to not be seen, but a middle aged chap turned round and looked right at me. I wished him a good morning, jumped down and walked off to get my externals. He certainly looked slightly bewildered. The cinema come Methodists Church is located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was constructed in 1916; designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The site has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was originally operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and was soon playing religious films. By 1926, Kings Hall was operating as a regular cinema; but was however still managed by the Methodist church. The Cinema was closed in 1937. It then converted back to its original Methodist Church use, and today is the King’s Hall Methodist Church. Some interesting and otherwise controversial quotes taken from comments when closure was announced. The church vacated the site in 2012. More Info at: http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/31352 #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157688232708403
  20. 1 point
    First I must apologise for not being around too much lately, other things have been going on and I've barely found the time or energy or want to explore stuff here. However I have just got back from a three week trip to the States where I saw many wonderful things and places. As many of you know I love my industrial explores, they are my favourite kind of abandonment. However, incredibly, this was the only industrial location I managed to explore on my latest trip! Still, it was one I had wanted to see for absolutely years and my main reason for heading to Detroit in the first place, everything else I managed to explore there was a bonus. The Detroit Harbor Terminal was built in 1925 by The Detroit Railway and Harbor Terminals Company. The ten-storey warehouse was intended to relieve a shortage of available storage space elsewhere. Cargo ships would unload materials at the dock, which were then stored or loaded onto train cars. To support the tremendous weight of so many tonnes of freight, the floors and columns were made out of reinforced concrete, which spread the load across the length of the building. On the north side of the plant was a single-story building that provided heating and cooling, as well as massive engines to power the air compressors. The building is sometimes referred to as the Boblo Island Warehouse because of a huge advertisement for the old Boblo Island Ferry painted on one side. In 2003 the port closed down and the warehouse was abandoned, but the port was reopened in 2005 handling mostly steel products and the occasional Navy ship docking there, whilst the warehouse building remains vacant to this day. It used to be an absolute breeze to get into here, with an old fence full of holes and an open loading bay door all that separated people from the inside. However recently a new fence has appeared along the entire length of the road and all but one access point into the building has been sealed. We found our way through the fence after a fashion, and following a very speedy run around the side of the building away from the highly visible road we were in and straight to the roof just in time to catch the sun rise over two countries. The river next to it is the river which separates the USA from Canada and as such there are border patrol boats who like to hang around, so it was very important to not get too close to the edge as they aren't best pleased when people trespass as you can imagine. After we'd had our fill of the beautiful sunrise we headed down and explored the rest of the huge building. It's pretty samey as nine out of the ten floors are exactly the same in construction, but the ground floor power plant compressor room is extremely cool. Thanks for looking
  21. 1 point
    To get to Preventorio R which has been a childrens sanatorium deep in the mountains of Italy was a real torture. Riding on my Vespa through Italy I'm used to navigate by listening to Google Maps on my earphones. After hours of riding Google suddenly instructed me to turn left on a really steep and curvy gravel path that didn't allow more than the first gear for about 10km. Finally arriving at the Preventorio i realised that it is situated next to a well developed main street. F*** Google Maps Navigation! But it turned out to be worth the effort. #1 DSC05555-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC05550 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC05551 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC05548 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC05546 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC05542 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #7 DSC05541 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #8 DSC05554 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #9 DSC05547-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #10 DSC05545 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #11 DSC05553 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #12 DSC05552 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #13 DSC05549 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #14 DSC05544 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
  22. 1 point
    I originally found this while I was exploring on Google Earth, someone had taken a picture in 2013, then I found out about the wireworks site close by so thought I'd take a look. The house was originally built by the Hurt family in 1846 or 1848? for the daughters of Francis Hurt although they never got to live there. The Johnson family bought it and enlarged the property(this may have been in 1894 as there is a date stone) It changed purpose a number of times, it was also a retreat for the local diocese and finally became flats during the 1970's, and was unused from the 80's Only had a quick look about as was already out of time. It is pretty much a ruin. From the outside it looks in good condition, but most of the internal walls and floors have collapsed. There are some features that remain and the whole house is easily accessible, but dangerous! An attempt at some humour! Inside it reminds me of Overstone Manor in Northampton. Another beautiful old building that has just been left to decay!
  23. 1 point
    Visited with Bigjobs and AndyJ I'd never heard of this place but on a recent trip to Belgium for non-explory stuff, AndyJUK happened to mention a coal factory just near to where we were going and showed me some pics, ohhhh it was so pretty and yes, of course, I wanted to go and play out there! We got the satnav details up and off we went, only to be ambushed by a diversion that didn't make sense and so with a road block in front of us we pulled up looking for somewhere to park. Spotting a Belgian about to leave we turned round ready to poach the space, laughing the Belgian approached the limo and shook his head as if to say no way would be fit in there, anyway opening the door to talk to the man he asked us where we were going, Jobs, getting out his best french, explained where we were going and the man pointed to a road across some rail lines and explained we needed to go that way. Thanking him but still thinking we were having that spot we watched him get in his car only for us to be thwarted (or so we thought) by the Belgian waiting whilst a dinky red car parked there! Yes, we cursed, until we realised that rather than allowing his "mate" to park he was actually waiting for us to follow him, so we did! Whizzing across the rail tracks and driving the wrong way down one-way streets off we went, following the little old Belgian man. Just a few turns later he pulled over, came over and pointed at what we wanted to see and after many Merci Buckets he went on his way and we dumped the limo and set off to explore. Unfortunately, demolition has already started on this and the workers were in full flow with the diggers, so going in the front was definite a no go. Nipping round the back of some houses we found our way to the side of the building and decided to have a mooch over the fence and up the back, but not before the boys got distracted by a random pair of handcuffs fastened to the fence! (Yep ten minutes later they were off the fence and a souvenir gifted to AndyJUK!). After a quick climb up we were in! We spent a good while mooching about and although a lot of the stuff that can be seen in other reports has gone it was still pretty cool to look around. So a couple of hours and a lot of photos later we headed out with the hope of a photo of the front of the site entrance......yeah, maybe not! Heading towards the entrance we spotted an angry looking dude in high vis watching us like a hawk so made a quick U-turn and headed back to the limo. Ten seconds later an executive decision was made to drive past the dude and grab a shot anyway! Jobs drove up and I legged it out the car and into the entrance of the site and took probably the crappest shot ever but it was worth it just to spite the Hi Vis dude. Here's a bit of history from substreet.org Near Visé, Belgium lies the mining village of Cheratte, where coal was unearthed between 1847 and 1977. After finding a generous seam of coal in 1851, the company began serious development of the site. They sank new shafts, developed the aboveground structures, and hired hundreds of miners. As workers chased the seam underground, they passed the water table of the nearby river, dooming the mineshaft, which flooded persistently thereafter. Pumps attached to steam engines were installed to keep the lower sections productive, but less than a year later, in 1877, the flooding caused a major tunnel collapse, trapping and drowning the workers in that section. The mine closed for the first time. In 1907, investors who wanted to again tap the coal under Cheratte paid for the construction of the first mine headframe in Belgium. A headframe is the part of a mine where the shaft meets the surface, and it is typically a simple tower with a hoist in the centre. Cheratte is different, though. For reasons I cannot explain, but choose simply to appreciate, they built the tower and support structures in a medieval influenced neo-gothic style. At its peak, 1,500 men worked here, and about half that number still took the ride underground when the operation closed in 1977. (subtreet.org) And of course, some pics of varying quality Hope you enjoy!
  24. 1 point
    Really nice looking power plant. Its next to a live steel works and it is currently undergoing restoration. There is a science museum next door. I loved the vintage industrial feel of the place. Thanks for looking!
  25. 1 point
    Really like this @Andy, love the sci-fi feel to shot 17
  26. 1 point
    With a slightly later Easter weekend start to the day than usual, making my way over to a certain church in Essex to meet with onethirtytwo_ to kick off the days splore. Now before I continue with this, despite our best attempts and even flagging down a local, we did not manage to venture inside the church itself, so in effect was a failed explore. However in true UD fashion a report is a report so I will share the few external shots I did get. There’s very little history on this place so won’t be posting any history with this report unfortunately.
  27. 1 point
    This was my first ever trip down a mine. So a massive thanks to @EOA for making it happen and another massive thanks to @monk and his daughter for being excellent guides. It was bloody awesome, I could've spent all day poking around the sheds at the top tbh. Underground however was just amazing. It's bloody big this place so a return visit over a couple of days with many more mine beers is a must. History copied from the ever faithful Wikipedia. Obviously. Maenofferen was first worked for slate by men from the nearby Diphwys quarry shortly after 1800. By 1848 slate was being shipped via the Ffestiniog Railway, but traffic on the railway ceased in 1850. In 1857 traffic resumed briefly and apart from a gap in 1865, a steady flow of slate was dispatched via the railway. The initial quarry on the site was known as the David Jones quarry which was the highest and most easterly of what became the extensive Maenofferen complex. In 1861 the Maenofferen Slate Quarry Co. Ltd. was incorporated, producing around 400 tons of slate that year. The company leased a wharf at Porthmadog in 1862 and shipped 181 tons of finished slate over the Ffestiniog Railway the following year. During the nineteenth century the quarry flourished and expanded, extending its workings underground and further downhill towards Blaenau Ffestiniog. By 1897 it employed 429 people with almost half of those working underground. The Ffestiniog Railway remained the quarry's major transport outlet for its products, but there was no direct connection from it to the Ffestiniog's terminus at Duffws. Instead slate was sent via the Rhiwbach Tramway which ran through the quarry. This incurred extra shipping costs that rival quarries did not have to bear. In 1908 the company leased wharf space at Minffordd, installing turntables and siding to allow finished slates to be transshipped to the standard gauge railway there. In 1920 the company solved its high shipping costs by building a new incline connecting its mill to the Votty & Bowydd quarry and reaching agreement to ship its products via that company's incline connection to the Ffestiniog Railway at Duffws. Modern untopping operations at Maenofferen. The uncovered chambers of the Bowydd workings are clearly visible In 1928 Maenofferen purchased the Rhiwbach quarry, continuing to work it and use its associated Tramway until 1953. When the Ffestiniog Railway ceased operation in 1946, Maenofferen leased a short length of the railway's tracks between Duffws station and the interchange with the LMS railway, west of Blaenau Ffestiniog. Slate trains continued to run over this section until 1962, Maenofferen then becoming the last slate quarry to use any part of the Ffestiniog Railway's route. From 1962 slate was shipped from the quarry by road, although the internal quarry tramways including stretches of the Rhiwbach tramway continued in use until at least the 1980s. The quarry was purchased by the nearby Llechwedd quarry in 1975 together with Bowydd, which also incorporated the old Votty workings: these are owned by the Maenofferen Company. Underground production at Maenofferen ceased during November 1999 and with it the end of large-scale underground working for slate in north Wales. Production of slate recommenced on the combined Maenofferen site, consisting of "untopping" underground workings to recover slate from the supporting pillars of the chambers. Material recovered from the quarry tips will also be recovered for crushing and subsequent use. Anyway onto my poto’s My first ever photo down a mine.
  28. 1 point
    Nice report mate, I've visited a few bits over there this year but not this one. Have to admit, I hadn't thought about unexploded ordnance. I was surrounded by spikes and barbed wire looking for a couple of maginot bunkers, it felt like I was crossing enemy lines
  29. 1 point
  30. 1 point
    Another visit from October with @Andy, @Maniacand@extreme_ironing. From seeing Andy's report I missed quite a few bits but you can't see everything unless you spend the whole day down there. Another epic bit of WW2 history and there's lots more out there. Ouvrage Mont des Welches, a gros ouvrage of the Maginot Line fortifications, is part of the Fortified Sector of Boulay. It comprises two entrance blocks, one infantry block, one artillery block, one observation block and two combination blocks. The underground gallery system is compact, about 200 metres (660 ft) from end to end, and unlike larger ouvrages where the gallery system is linear in concept, the central portion of Mont des Welches is a dense network of tunnels crossing one another, housing the barracks and utility areas. The galleries are excavated at an average depth of up to 30 metres (98 ft). Unlike most gros ouvrages, its 60 cm internal rail network was not electrified, relying on human power to move the rail cars. Relatively small for a gros ouvrage, Mont des Welches saw a brief period of sharp action in June 1940, when German forces moving along the rear of the Maginot Line engaged the position without success. The manning of the ouvrage in June 1940 comprised 490 men and 17 officers of the 167th Fortress Infantry Regiment and the 151st Position Artillery Regiment. After modest renovations in the 1950s, it was abandoned in the 1970s. Bon journée
  31. 1 point
    The fortress with a lot of murals in its bunkers is part of the second fortified belt of forts of Metz and had its baptism of fire in late 1944, when the Battle of Metz occurred. The Fortification was part of a wider program of fortifications called "Moselstellung", encompassing fortresses scattered between Thionville and Metz in the valley Moselle. The aim of Germany was to protect against a French attack to take back Alsace-Lorraine and Moselle from the German Empire. The fortification system was designed to accommodate the growing advances in artillery since the end of XIXth century. Based on new defensive concepts, such as dispersal and concealment, the fortified group was to be, in case of attack, an impassable barrier for French forces. Covering an area of 83 ha, the Fortress is constructed from 1907 to 1914. The group fortification has 2 fortified barracks and can accommodate a total of 560 men. It has 8 pieces of artillery, 6 of them 100mm and 2 of them 77mm. It has eight domes and twenty observation points and lookouts. The various items are connected by 1,700m of underground galleries. In its water tanks, it has 2,640 m3 of water. The energy required for its operation is ensured by seven diesel engines of 27 hp each. During The Annexation of Alsace-Lorraine, the fort receives a garrison of gunners belonging to the XVIth Army Corps. From 1914-1918, it served as a relay for the German soldiers at the front post. Its equipment and weapons are then at the forefront of military technology. In 1919, the fort was occupied by the French army. After the departure of French troops in June 1940, the German army reinvests the fort. In early September 1944, at the beginning of the Battle of Metz, the German command integrates the fort into the defensive system set up around Metz. In Second World War, on September 2, 1944, Metz is declared fortress Reich by Hitler. The fortress must be defended to the last by German troops. Visited with The_Raw, extreme_ironing and Maniac. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37
  32. 1 point
    Although some of the graves go back to the 17th century part of this hige cemetery are left to decay and neglect. The area is blocked so descendants have to overcome construction fences in order to commemorate the deceased. For some reason I didn't feel comfortable exploring this site but nevertheless I took some pictures to share with you. #1 DSC07246 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC07247 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC07248 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC07251 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC07256 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC07258 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #7 DSC07268 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #8 DSC07269 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #9 DSC07271 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #10 DSC07272 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #11 DSC07296 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #12 DSC07348 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #13 DSC07312 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #14 DSC07343 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #15 DSC07342 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #16 DSC07317 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #17 DSC07332 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #18 DSC07340 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #19 DSC07352 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #20 DSC07355 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
  33. 1 point
    Nice report and beautiful pictures! Much better than my snaps oft that place... I was there in September, and I think Centrale Thermique was already completely gone if I'm not mistaken
  34. 1 point
    Great pics of a great place. I visited Beelitz already 10 years ago and spent almost a whole day there, to explore as many of the buildings as possible. It is still a special place and you captured it very well.
  35. 1 point
    This location is the one where you quickly hear the stories about: impossible, the mount everest of the urbex, don't even try ... But sometmes this steel giant likes some company over too and there were rumours of a slight chance to get in. The date was set already and actually something else was on the program but when one fellow exploer had heard that there were loopholes in the net of the impenetrable hell gate (read: fences, 3 rows of nato wire and another 200V power wire as icing on the cake) we wanted to attempt. The hell gate was only a smaller obstacle, because once you pass you are on the playground of little demons in white vans that approach almost without any sound, or with a shepherd dog at their side. With all of the above in mind, I had a very turbulent night's sleep 3 nights in advance. In the end, the steel gods favoured us that day, which enabled me to enjoy this beautiful exploration. Very briefly it became exciting when there were 5 people in the building with helmets and hi-visability jackets. After some back-and-forth texting with my mates, and some cat and mouse tricks to avoid thm, I first hid in a closet and then rushed me to the top where the rest of our team was. Once there, I crossed the 5 fluos ... 5 eyes on me, 2 of them with open mouth. A French voice 'mais, elle est ici tout seule?' 'vous n'avez pas peur'? It turned out to be just the most flashy explorers you can imagine, not to mention the decibels they produced. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
  36. 1 point
    I really love the look of this place, so much going for it. You've really done it justice with your pics too, awesome job particularly like 2, 4 & 9
  37. 1 point
    Thank you, good to be here.
  38. 1 point
    I see the mobile operators are taking full advatage of that place! Dont think the photos are crap at all, nice job.
  39. 1 point
    Ive done this one before... but my photos were w*nk and from my phone so heres another report The location; Opal Tower, officially known as Opal 3, Leeds is a 25 storey building in Leeds, West Yorkshire, England. It serves as student accommodation for 542 students and is close to the Civic Quarter campus of Leeds Metropolitan University and the University of Leeds. The initial planning application for this site (previously occupied by the Londoner pub) on Jacob St, Leeds city centre, was submitted in July 2005, for a 23 storey student apartment block. This design was later altered after initial approval and permission was granted in December 2006 to build the current 25 storey tower. Construction work began in early 2007 with an expected completion date of September 2008. The building was designed by Morrison Design and was developed by Opal Property Group, with the site contractor being Ocon Construction. Construction was completed on time, with the development opening to its student tenants between the 15th and 20th. The development is the third tallest building in Leeds, after Bridgewater Place and The Plaza Tower which took Opal 3's title approximately a year after its completion. Infiltration; After not doing this for quite some time, i was well up for getting back up there. Seeing some friends head up there the night before i wasted no time and me and @butters headed up while it was still light. We stood shadily outside, trying to blend in as a student waiting for someone to let us in. Once in we took the lift to the 23rd floor and from there hit the stairs. I think this is my fave rooftop in the North, and it give spectacular views over leeds and the surrounding areas. Photos; Thanks for looking
  40. 1 point
    Dirty and dangerous business coal, deaths were rather common. Nice collection that.
  41. 1 point
    Bit of a grim history with all those miners losing their lives . Great images @Andy
  42. 1 point
    Crikey that balcony . Cool set of shots though, the place must be in a bad state nowadays
  43. 1 point
    Nice shots, see what you mean about it being a death trap, I wouldn't want to find myself stood on the balcony in that first shot.
  44. 1 point
    Nothing wrong with dials and switches! The older ones look far nicer than today’s. Cool looking place.
  45. 1 point
    The P7.2 improves on its predecessor in a few ways (4 x AAA) and you can pick one up for under 40 sheets. Well worth it IMO!
  46. 1 point
    In May I went to Lake Constance for a Vespa Corso. As the wheather forecast was promising I decided to take the chance for a ride through Baden-Württemberg. Feeling hungry once I realised to be close to the French border. Et voila.. Château Lumière. No more words neccessary about Château Lumière I suppose. #1 DSC06840 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC06904 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC06883-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC06891_neu by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC06895-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC06897-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #7 DSC06896-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #8 DSC06898-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #9 DSC06900-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #10 DSC06892-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #11 DSC06894-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #12 DSC06841-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #13 DSC06876 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #14 DSC06868-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #15 DSC06843-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #16 DSC06844-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #17 DSC06877-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #18 DSC06846-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #19 DSC06847-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #20 DSC06848-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #21 DSC06855-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #22 DSC06857 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #23 DSC06858-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #24 DSC06859-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #25 DSC06881-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #26 DSC06863-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #27 DSC06866-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #28 DSC06869-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #29 DSC06871-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #30 DSC06872-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr Behind the scene: Lake Constance Break French way
  47. 1 point
    This place really looks intersting. Great set!
  48. 1 point
    Very nicely shot, and captured very well. I didn't see the chair when I was there... PS The town has so many abandoned buildings we felt we could have stayed for a week!!
  49. 1 point
    Wow, now thats some nice industrial goodness there! Really enjoyed these pics
  50. 1 point
    Got that one on my list for some time, can't wait to get there... I'm glad the metal gods gave you that oppurtunity! Amazing pics, especially 15! (: That's quite some HDR work, isn't it?
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