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  1. 4 points
    History Due to the aircraft stationed at RAF Coningsby there was an external bomb dump, in order to Reduce the quantities of explosives stored and the number of personnel exposed to risk, along with separating explosive processing from storage were the major lessons adopted in what I believe was the reason for a bomb dump further away than normal. Historically I couldn't find much on this place. I did find out about an accident that occurred there in 1971 though. An accident which killed 2 armourers while they were preparing 68mm SNEB Rockets. Without warning, one initiated in the process building they were working in. There was an unexplained electrostatic discharge causing the rocket motor to fire. The Explore Well this is pretty close for me, literally just down the road. I have been here before. Obviously having a connection to the RAF held some interest here. I explored with @hamtagger as per We had a relatively leisurely stroll around. As far as bomb dumps go it was 'normal' in layout and relatively huge. Admin buildings scattered the front section of the site past the picket post and the remainder were process buildings or prep buildings. We ventured in to one and noticed that we hadn't seen it before, on any reports or throughout social media but it was what was inside that caught my attention. Guns & not the handheld sort. I have had to do a bit of research on this because I wasn't aware that firstly they were Royal Navy guns & secondly what type of gun they were. It turns out that there was 2 types, the first was a GCM-A03 twin barrelled Oerlikon. This had a firing seat where someone could sit, almost like a little cabin. It was a bloody tight squeeze as well and I am tiny! Apparently capable of firing 650 rounds a minute. The second which there were 2 of didn't have a firing seat so it was fired by someone either standing up and shooting it or controlled electronically. The first fired 30mm rounds while the second fired 35mm rounds. Both would have been mounted on a ship & both had the barrels removed. Next to this we also found what we believe to be a small communication suite. I have never seen one before and may never do again but it was cosy and compact! We had more or less finished when we spotted 2 blokes part literally right outside & jump over the front gate, they seemed to follow us to the rear side of the site. No camera's or owt then just disappeared. Anyway, enough of my waffle & on to the pics This is where they would have serviced Skyflash & Sidewinder missiles 1 2 This is the communication suite 3 4 The GCM-A03 twin cannon Oerlikon 5 6 7 8 This is it in action (Not my photo, obviously) 9 This was the other gun, a GCM-A01 (I believe, could be wrong) 10 The rest of the site 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 A little mention of tornado here, which became stationed at Coningsby during the Gulf War 18 Mercury Thallium is found in AIM-9 sidewinder missiles 19 20 21 thanks for looking!
  2. 3 points
    This one required an early start, but the morning adventure to The Kings Hall was worth the effort. Visited with Zombizza. History "Located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was built in 1916 and was designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The King’s Hall building has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and it was soon screening religious films. By 1926, it was operating as a regular cinema, still managed by the Methodist church. The King’s Hall Cinema was closed in 1937. It then reverted back to a Methodist Church use as the King’s Hall Methodist Church. They vacated the building in January 2013" The Explore Started nice and early, and managed our entrance fairly incident free...if we don't count the massive tear in my trousers.. It's a pretty spectacular place with a wonderful blend of natural decay and marvelous original features/architecture. With little to no daylight, we decided to wonder round the back rooms while the sun came up before the spending too much time on the main attraction, the large auditorium. The rooms around the back are a weird mix of new and old, some of them being more disgusting than others. One room was so pungent that I took 2 steps in before bailing out. There was also one room that was filled with beds, old food packets and needles. Looked a few years old, but squatters for sure. The larger rooms consisted of meeting rooms, prayer rooms and teaching rooms. All of them had funky wavy flooring where the wooden floor tiles had expanded with moisture. Eventually the sun came up and the auditorium started to flood with the golden morning light. After a few hours we left, although the exit was hilariously unsubtle. Photos The Auditorium
  3. 3 points
  4. 3 points
    Hi new to the site from northampton i am part time photographer and do a lot of work in derelict places am looking to do more urban ex stuff
  5. 3 points
    Villa Sbertoli was built in the early 1800s by wealthy merchant Agostino Sbertoli. According to some sources he decided to turn the villa into a psychiatric hospital because he had a disabled son, whom he tried to cure all his life. On his death bed he decided to devote all his possessions to a charity for the mentally ill, even their, so that his son could feel at home. It was inaugurated as a psychiatric hospital in 1868. During World War II it was used by the Nazis to hold prisoners but afterwards was sold to the province and used as a psychiatric hospital again. In 1978 "Law Basaglia" (a reform of the Italian psychiatric system) was passed and the hospital was forced to close. By 1990 it was abandoned completely. Really liked it in here, the main hall is stunning and there are a few medical rooms upstairs. Perhaps a bit staged in one or two of them but interesting all the same. The building next door had some nice bits as well. Unfortunately we got off to a bad start by bumping into Jonny the security guard. He seemed like a really nice guy but it was difficult to communicate with him. Luckily @Miss.Anthropewas on hand with her mystical ability to understand everything a foreigner says in a language she doesn't speak. He wanted 20 Euros off each of us to let us inside, and that's why he was being so nice. Now I'm not really into paying for explores so we told him we had no money on us. He didn't like this predicament much so we eventually reached a settlement of 5 Euros for the both of us. A sum we could happily live with! Nice one bruvva
  6. 3 points
    This extravagant castle was originally built in 1605 to a more simple design. During the 19th century it underwent an Arabian style makeover which took 40 years to reach completion. No attention was spared to detail, with each and every one of the 365 rooms given its own identity. During the second world war it was looted by the Germans. After that it became a luxury hotel until it closed it's doors in 1990. Since then various plans have fallen through and a very recent sale attempt was upheld by Italian courts so its future remains unknown. I visited here with @Miss.Anthrope, a place we'd both had firmly at the top of our wish lists for some time. We could've spent hours in here but decided to air on the side of caution and keep our visit relatively short as we'd been asked to leave the area by security the day before. I guess it was pretty obvious what we were up to with camera bags and tripods peeking over the fence and we'd been spotted on cctv. On our return we made sure not to make the same mistake as they are definitely keeping an eye on the place. Derelict buildings don't come much more stunning than this. Ciao bella
  7. 3 points
    previously known as Frontier City, a former American Wild West theme park in Cornwall. Closed in 2009
  8. 2 points
    The sanatorium Ernst T. was built in 1915. Later it was in use as a military hospital and FDGB holiday home. In 1995 it was abandoned. 1. 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
  9. 2 points
    The little house in the middle of a small town was found by chance by a colleague. She told me about it and a few days later we went there together. It's near to a pilgrimage route, therefore the name. Judging by the year on a newspaper, it may have been inhabited until the beginning / middle of the 2000s. The door was open and so access was very easy. Inside, unfortunately, there were hardly any furnishings. But at least an old sewing machine, a cross, a blue staircase and a peacock butterfly still offered a few photogenic subjects. The floors were completely removed. Possibly it was originally intended to renovate the house and this plan wasn't completed; Or the wooden boards were used elsewhere after leaving. I don't know... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
  10. 2 points
    A look around the abandoned Beijing film academy which includes a large amount of Terracotta Army soldiers, a castle and a large Shanghai style town movie set!
  11. 2 points
    Just found myself drooling over that turbine picture and now I'm sad Another cracking report. The control room makes it very worthwhile.
  12. 1 point
    A piece of British WW2 History hidden under a hillside. HMS Forward, a maritime intelligence centre, was key to monitoring the English channel and and was heavily involved in D-Day. Although it's fallen into dereliction, attempts to restore and maintain it have been carried out by 'Friends of HMS Forward'. History HMS Forward was the Royal Naval HQ, setup up on the 20th of June 1940 in the Guinness Trust Holiday Home. It had responsibility for units along the south cost, including: HMS Marlborough - Eastbourne HMS Aggressive - Newhaven HMS New - Newaven HMS Vernon - Roedean HMS Lizard - Hove The tunnels of HMS Forward began life in March 1941 after an Admiralty direction that ordered channel ports to setup facilities to maintain naval plots and created the need to securely house equipment for plotting and communications. It was decided to built a network of tunnels into the a hillside of South Heighton for operations to take place from. HMS Forward was designed by Lt. Col. F.H.Foster, Commander of the Royal Engineers, and built by the 1st Tunneling Engineers Group and No 172 Tunneling Company. They were completed on the 14th of November 1941. At the time they were a state of the art facility and were kitted out for every eventuality. This including backup power generator and full air conditioning systems with gas filters. They had chemical toilets, sleeping cabins and a gallery. Although the toilet were for emergencies only and it was noted that he veterans who worked here didn't even have knowledge of these toilets. The labyrinth of tunnels had an East and West entrance. The West entrance by the main road was the main entrance. The East entrance was under the West wing of the Guinness Trust Holiday Home (now demolished). There were two Pill boxes at the top of the hill that were accessible from inside the tunnels, but were demolished long ago. During its operational period between November 1941 and August 1945, the tunnels of HMS Forward carried out many key maritime operations. It monitored the English channel from Dungeness to Selsy Bill using ten radar stations from Fairlight to Bogner Regis. It was heavily involved with D-Day as well as nightly raids on the occupied french coast. The Explore A very nice explore in a very nice set of tunnels. They are quite extensive and is quite the maze, however once you get your head round the layout its impossible to get lost. Its quite a shame that such an important piece of history has been left to rot. This is somewhere that really needs to be preserved for future generation. I'd heard that there was intention to turn it into a museum some time ago, but plans for this got scuppered by the local residents up top. It was clear that there was once some kind of open day as there were still laminated signs and notices left up by the 'Friends of HMS Forward'. Photos The West entrance with signs and notices from a previous open day / tour. Looks like it was a good few years ago though. You can see here what looks like a machine gun nest in the brick wall as you turn the very first corner. The large security gate of the West entrance. The long 100m West adit tunnel looking towards the east end. Looking from the East end of the West Adit. The two tunnels going left and right just before are the stairs up to the South and North Pill boxes. Looking up what remains of the stairs to the Northern Pillboxes. It is possible go up to the top of these, but its been sealed up at the top with rubble. The West Airlock. The Air conditioning plant room and standby generator room. The standby generator was a large diesel JP Lister engine. This provided 400V/230V power at 22Kw. Exhaust was piped through to the annex at the back of the engine room where it was exhausted through the ceiling too the surface through a 4" pipe. The start of the operational rooms of the tunnel. The room on the left side is the TURCO Office, and looking right down the long tunnel is down the length of the main tunnel with sleeping cabins. T.U.R.C.O stands for Turn Round Control Organisation, used to 'Assist naval shore authorities in the quick turn around of ships and craft'. The East gallery was used for sleep accommodation, switchboards and coders. The GPO Voice frequency equipment room. The pits in the floor are to fit the equipment in, as the modems were over 8ft tall. Looking down the East Galley and into the Teleprinters room. Looking down the the far end of the plotting rooms. The sleeping cabins. There were 4 of these for personnel on the night duty and split watches. Looking up towards the mock hen house, sealed at the top of course. The stairs up to the eastern entrance with pit at the bottom to slow down would-be invaders. The gate on the way to the East entrance. The remains of a second gate. Thanks for reading!
  13. 1 point
    A while back I posted a report from a creme de la menthe location called Chateau a la Mange Tout. This sanatorium sits on the same site, not bad having two half decent explores right next to each other, joie de vivre! I meant to post a report at the time but never got round to it. It wasn't massively photogenic so I only took a load of hand held shots but there was a fair bit of stuff inside. Bon appetit, as the French would say Last but not least we had a quick peek inside the morgue, no slab but some body fridges left behind. Tres bien ensemble
  14. 1 point
    History- The building is from the 'railway era'. The hotel was a hub of the community, it had a fantastic ballroom and restaurant. Many people came by rail to stay at Sutton Bridge. The hotel from around 2000 was used by an employment agency called StaffSmart to house workers they had lured over to the UK from South Africa to work in the local canning factory. People came from SA on the promise of hotel accommodation and didn't know until they got here that it meant inside the shell of the Bridge Hotel on damp mattresses lined up in each room, including the Ballroom. After StaffSmart vacated the hotel, it stood empty with broken windows until it was bought and restored to a high standard with plush furnishings and chandeliers. However, the hotel rooms were pricey and without the rail trade of people heading to the village, people would be passing through and tended to stay in cheaper accommodation in the area. The hotel wasn't open for long before closing down and ownership passed through several hands whilst falling further into disrepair. In 2015, workmen were spotted on the site removing roof tiles and floorboards to salvage as many building materials before it was demolished but its still standing now, so I don't know what stopped the demolition. Since then the building has unfortunately been vandalised and several fires have been set destroying about 70% of it. The Bridge Hotel in the 50's Explore- The hotel is close to me, so even though I knew the damage of the place it was still worth checking out. Access to the building was easy, a window round back was broken and a board to climb up to it was balanced kind of safely. The cellar floor, ground floor and a few rooms on the first floor were safe enough to walk around but past that there is a lot of fire damage. Pictures-
  15. 1 point
    Lluesty Hospital, Holywell, North Wales – May 2017 So in true recent Landie style; I have a huge backlog of sites to get up! So far 2017 has been a very slow year on the exploring front, but Mookster and I had a rather successful road trip back in May of North Wales. The first site we did was the rather derpy Lluesty Hospital which would be Mooksters 500th explore! I haven’t been counting personally, but estimate it to be around 300 and something. Anyway, though this place is rather ruined, it does have some photogenic bits and bobs remaining. The hospital is located in Holywell, Wales, and was originally built as a workhouse in the later part of the 1830s. It has been disused since the new Holywell Community Hospital opened in 2008, a mile or so down the road. According to auctioneer, there was “intense interest” in the site, potentially selling well in excess of its £150,000 guide price at £275,000. The original workhouse complex; inclusive of its chapel was Grade II listed 20 years ago. The early Victorian building was designed by St Asaph architect John Welch and used as a workhouse for 14 parishes. The hospitals construction was carried by Thomas Hughes of Liverpool and the contractor was Samuel Parry. Several alterations were believed to be carried out in 1869 and the hospital was enlarged to the right in 1902. The buildings are on grounds of around 7.4 acres which have been allocated for housing development. It is thought up to 70 houses could be built on the site. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157681845073713/
  16. 1 point
    So this is my first post on this forum, I found out about these houses on a Abandoned Lincolnshire group on Facebook and thought they were definitely worth a trip, but... the first trip wasn't very successful, the address for these houses took us to two houses on the other side of Withcall that were at one point abandoned but have since been knocked down, so after about half an hour of looking around it became very clear the houses weren't there. After talking to the person who posted them originally and finding out the real location we headed back up to find them. We had to make sure we kept quiet as there is a neighbor attached to the 2nd station house and we weren't sure they'd have appreciated a night time visit from 3 explorers haha. Access to the house is easy, the doors being left open is always convenient. Walking around the houses only took 30 minutes or so , but was still a nice little explore. It's one of them places that besides a few repairs and some serious wallpapering, it looks like the family could just walk back through the front door and pick up their lives where they left off which gave the houses a real creepy vibe. I guess that's all that really needs to be said about these houses. Here's a few pictures: Thanks for reading:)
  17. 1 point
    The oldest parts of the church dates back to the 12th century, the octagonal tower was added in the 13th century. The windows were renewed in the 15th century and the roof in 1633. Further renovations took place in 1867 and 1874. The church was closed in 1987, but it's maintained until today. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
  18. 1 point
    Sorry mate I missed this!!! It's the remains of a Land Rover Series II 109"
  19. 1 point
    Maenofferen Slate Quarry, Blaenau Ffestiniog, North Wales – May 2017 Still on Day Two of our North Wales Tour back in May; Mookster and myself arrived to the site of an enormous walk up to the remaining buildings at Maenofferen Slate Quarry. Oh my was it a walk… We followed the well trodden footpath up to the buildings; attempting to dodge the tour bus which goes around other parts of the quarry as part of a local museum. It just kept going on and getting steeper and steeper, but we persisted and made it to the top. Which was a relief! Lots of lovely decay; totally open to the elements here with a lot of cool stuff remaining inside the sheds and workhouses on site. We spent a good couple of hours here before heading down (which was a hard as going up!) as we had a lot more in Wales to see before a big drive home. The quarry was first staffed by men from the nearby Diphwys quarry shortly after 1800. Come 1848 the slate was being shipped via the Ffestiniog Railway. This was short lived, and this service ceased in 1850. Traffic resumed in 1857 and apart from a gap in 1865; there remained a steady flow of slate dispatched via the railway. In 1861 the Maenofferen Slate Quarry Co. Ltd. became incorporated, producing approximately 400 tons of slate in that year. During the 1800s; the quarry flourished and expanded, extending its workings underground and further downhill towards Blaenau Ffestiniog. By the year 1897 it employed 429 people with almost half of those men working underground.. Eventually, slate was sent via the Rhiwbach Tramway which ran through the quarry. This incurred extra shipping costs that rival quarries did not have to bear. Llechwedd Quarry purchased Maenofferen in 1975 together with Bowydd. Underground production of slate ceased during November 1999 and signalled the end of large-scale underground working for slate in North Wales. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 Thanks for Looking guys :-) More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157684249889963/ Oh and one more thing! One Heartbreaking find for Landie_Man :-( :
  20. 1 point
  21. 1 point
    Welcome to the forum, not a bad first post that, quality carpet there as well
  22. 1 point
    Normally, the abandoned Belgian Wolvenhof castle (BE, Province of West Flanders) can't be visited. But due to many requests, the city of Izegem decided to open it for photographers for one day, on 09. September 2017. For this, a written application must be submitted in advance: https://www.west-vlaanderen.be/genieten/domeinen/WallemoteWolvenhof/Paginas/default.aspx
  23. 1 point
    Heading north from my usual area of abode to pick up myself a new 4 wheeled toy (none from this report of course) and seeing this place was nearby, what better opportunity for a mooch. Being a bit of a car nut myself, I have been on a bit of a mission to see some abandoned vehicles so this was a perfect quick little explore to satisfy that mission. For now anyway. Certainly some interesting vehicles on the site, one of which in my opinion is well worthy of a restoration! Unfortunately I didn’t manage to get inside the station building itself and didn’t fancy crossing the live tracks to see the platform side of the building.
  24. 1 point
    Knowing this place from years ago in the days it was active, and heading back from a days exploring in Norfolk, this was last on the list for myself and RelictaSpiritus. I had memories many moons ago meeting a girl who worked at Bambers Green, but unfortunately after speaking for many weeks I found her somewhat rude upon arrival. I couldn’t resist including that in the report… But anyway, the site was slowly but surely being reclaimed by nature but still had plenty to see so cracking on myself and Relicta made our way through the site. The highlight for myself was one of the two houses, simply a stunning property which leaves me surprised that such a place has been left to waste away. Even the houses past was clearly shown with equestrian type decoration in various places. Looking for the history on the location, the houses are actually up for sale which again leaves me somewhat perplexed as to how or why they haven’t yet sold. Unfortunately (my favourite report word), much of the remains worth seeing that I have seen on other reports appears to have now long gone. Onto the history and pictures now, along with a huge thanks to RelictaSpiritus for the day out! Fantastic day, even smashing my previous exploring record with 8 locations in one day.
  25. 1 point
    Visited this place about 2 years ago with Katia and James. The shop was left as it was when it closed over 50 years ago, full of old bottles with stuff still in them. Probably one of the best sites I've done over the years considering how much is in there. But recently a few cabinets have been taken which is a shame. But thats why I cant share it, which also means I cant give out any history either. Ill shut up now and let the photos do the talking. More photos here https://www.flickr.com/photos/scrappynw/sets/72157680831523783/with/34395914850/
  26. 1 point
  27. 1 point
    Missed this one, nice photos Andy. Maybe the floorboards were removed by metal thieves stealing copper pipes underneath?
  28. 1 point
    i am loving the wallpaper here, really like your detailed shots too Andy
  29. 1 point
    That's cool mate, really nicely photographed
  30. 1 point
    What an insane building inside, great for some photos and exploring tho, nice one
  31. 1 point
    I can't find much history about this place except it was built in the 1950s and abandoned in the 90s due to a more modern replacement being built nearby. Sadly the turbine hall has been completely gutted but the control room was absolutely pukka. A nice chilled explore with @Miss.Anthrope 1. 2. This is what used to be inside here..... (archive photo) 3. What it looks like now. Sometimes life isn't fair. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Amazing that this is in such a good state compared to the rest of the building. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. The trip wouldn't have been complete without a quick peek inside the cooling tower. 20. The smallest cooling tower I've seen I think! Grazie mille
  32. 1 point
    Oh man, those turbines were sexy. Loving the rooftop shot of the fans. Great stuff.
  33. 1 point
    Dope, always wanted that door in the last shot. Didn't want to risk it as I heard they will take ya camera and format your card. Great selection, I am just exporting my 69 pics from here now.
  34. 1 point
    sadly yeah wanted to believe it would be a little bit like it was but everything is pretty much trashed
  35. 1 point
  36. 1 point
    Nice parts in this video, but I would prefer a bit shorter version of it.
  37. 1 point
  38. 1 point
    Glad that you finally could visit it. It's simply a stunning place.
  39. 1 point
    Still a very nice place. Just sad that the piano has gone.
  40. 1 point
  41. 1 point
    Fair play this place looks so good, nice report
  42. 1 point
    What a fantastic place! Great staircase and beautiful ceilings. I especially like the pics 4 & 8.
  43. 1 point
    Liking that mate, tiled entrance for the win! Where is @coolboyslimthese days?
  44. 1 point
  45. 1 point
    The last piece of Pye. I’m sure everyone who visited Pyestock before it was demolished will remember the Anechoic Facility, that one last bit of the puzzle that couldn’t be visited. The blue-tailed building was still in use long after the demolition of the rest of the site, and is the only surviving part of Pyestock’s original host of facilities. This last part of the site has now also closed. Visited with @SpiderMonkey and @darbians. The National Gas Turbine Establishment. For those who don’t know, NGTE Pyestock - The National Gas Turbine Establishment - was a huge industrial site in Fleet, Hampshire. The site was used to test jet engines during their development and could simulate the conditions of flight in huge wind tunnels. Large scale expansion took place throughout the 50s and 60s to facilitate the much larger jet engines being developed such as those used on Concorde. The site finally closed in 2000 due to a decline in jet engine development and the advent of computer aided simulations. The Noise Test Facility A lot of research into noise took place at NGTE over the years, and the first anechoic chamber was built in the early 1960s. The increasing demand for quieter aircraft stimulated the more research work, and as a result a larger test facility capable of undertaking large scale noise tests on a variety of gas turbine components opened in the 1970s. The new facility consisted of two main laboratories, fully independent of each other. These were the Absorber Rig Facility and the Anechoic Chamber facility. The Absorber Rig Facility was the first to be completed and it came into service in the summer of 1972. The Anechoic Chamber Facility was commissioned just over one year later in early 1974. The noise test facility in the 1970s before the blue inlets were installed The blue air intakes and associated fans were installed during a refit in the 1990s The plans below show the general layout of the building. The anechoic chamber is central with silenced air intakes to the left and the silenced exhaust duct and extraction fans to the right. The induced airflow passes through the anechoic chamber where the noise tests were conducted. The Anechoic Facility has a 10,000 cubic metre chamber for noise testing in which the enclosed working volume has nearly zero noise reflection, thereby reproducing environmental conditions which can be compared to those in flight, and permits work to separately identify the source and direction of noise wave phenomena. The building is principally intended for the noise testing of jets, turbines and certain configurations of acoustically lined ducts. Broadly, the facility consists of an acoustically lined main test chamber 85ft wide and 46ft high with an overall length of 88ft, but which is reduced to 52ft at the working section. The jet flow from the main noise source is projected towards an acoustically lined, flared duct 28ft diameter at inlet with a 20ft diameter throat, which acts as an exhaust inducer. General view of the anechoic chamber with the exhaust duct to the left and working section to the right View towards the exhaust duct showing fixed microphone towers View from a hatch at the top of the working section, showing ceiling mounted crane Three observation galleries were positioned around the chamber. Each could be retracted to preserve the room's anechoic properties: The most striking feature of the anechoic chamber itself is the sound reflecting wedges of which there are nearly 7,000 units covering the walls, ceiling and floor. Three individual wedges are mounted together on a base-frame to form each single unit 610mm square; these units are then arranged over the chamber surfaces so that each successive unit has its wedge peak edges at right angles to the neighbouring unit. The working section was modified during refurbishment in the 1990s. A permanent nozzle was fitted through which high pressure air could be blown in using the blue external assembly shown in earlier pictures. Inside the working section the area where jet engines would be positioned was replaced with a network of pipelines feeding the new nozzle. Large air inlet pipe behind the nozzle The rig room before the refit The exhaust collector was responsible for transferring the jet engine exhaust gasses and induced air from the chamber to the exhaust silencing structure behind it. It is acoustically treated around its periphery, this lagging consists of heavy density rockwool 8in thick, faced with cotton sheeting and perforated galvanised mild steel sheet. The duct itself is prefabricated from 0.25in thick steel plate and has a total length of 35ft. The exhaust collector Selfie shows the scale of this huge hole in the wall Behind the exhaust collector Air and exhaust gasses then pass into the exhaust silencing structure. The main features of the structure, other than the exhaust collector are the acoustically slabbed walls of the concrete ducts which reverse the flowpath, two sets of silencing exit splitters, high and low frequency, and the ten exhaust extraction fans. Low frequency splitters on the left, and one of the two sets of high frequency splitters on the right. The pole is a fixed microphone boom. Another selfie showing scale The fan units themselves are double axial units having two counter-rotating six bladed fans in each pod, both with its own electric motor. One of the two sets of five extract fans, plus one redundant space for an additional fan. The new arrangement after the refit was particularly suited to testing ducts and propellers. One such item was found boxed up below the working section. This was possibly the last item to be tested at the site. A separate building, houses the control and engineering service equipment. This building has three floors and the heavy service plant was originally installed on the lower floor with the service supplies fed to the rig room via an underground communication duct; the main control room is on the middle floor, while the upper floor houses the ancillary electronic equipment. The control room and Fourier Analyser as originally fitted The control room was refitted with computerised equipment during the refurbishment in the 1990s. All that remains from the original control room is a single panel, the Plant Controller board.
  46. 1 point
  47. 1 point
    What a cracker. I'd give it a "thumb" but i can't
  48. 1 point
    That's some nice photography right there, love the upward stair shot
  49. 1 point
    stunning control room to say the least, it's got me drooling alright
  50. 1 point
    History Holcim, originally named Aargauische Portlandcementfabrik Holderbank-Wildegg, is a Swiss-based building materials and aggregates company that was founded in 1912. The company expanded across Europe in the 1920s, then the Middle East and Americas between the 1930s and 50s. By the 1970s, the company had begun to expand into the Latin Americas and Asian countries. Today, the company employs over seventy-one thousand people and it holds interests in over seventy countries. Following a series of significant mergers with other companies, Holcim has become one of the largest cement manufacturers in the world. The company’s name was changed to Holcim in 2001 – it is short for Holderbank and cement. Holcim’s Cape Foulwind cement works opened in 1958. However, as it has reportedly become cheaper to import cement from Japan, the plant was closed in 2016. The power was turned off on the 29th June, after the remaining eighty workers went home at midday, and the Holcim Cement Carrier left Westport harbour for the last time carrying the remaining 2,500 tonnes of cement from the wharf silos. To help support its staff, Holcim started a Tools for the Future programme to equip workers for after the plant closed. The scheme offered courses that would give their staff skills in other forms of employment, such as barista and chainsaw training, and guaranteed each worker a toolbox. All workers received tools for their toolboxes when they met targets, up to the final closure date of the plant. As a result of the closure, one hundred and five staff and contractors lost their jobs. Their final gift from Holcim was an umbrella and a ratchet set, to add to their toolboxes. Immediately after the plans to close the site were made public, The Buller District Council began looking for new businesses to occupy the land to ensure the survival of Westport and nearby villages; the town’s port grew because of the cement works and it was the area's main source of income. However, a year on and still no redevelopment work has taken place. Although there are plans to turn the site into an eco-park that could make energy from rubbish incineration or turn waste timber into bio-diesel, farms or an industrial park, the council have been unable to find new companies or buyers willing to establish a base in such a rural area of New Zealand. Today, only seven security guards, who were all members of staff at the plant, remain to protect the site until it is sold. As for the town of Westport, a number of houses are now up for sale as many local residents have been unable to find work in the area. Unfortunately, it seems likely that Westport will suffer heavily in the long term as a result of Holcim’s closure. Our Version of Events Holcim’s old cement works has been on the radar for a little while now. However, because it’s located on the desolate West Coast, we’d never had much reason to head in that general direction. Fortunately, though (for us), a major storm hit New Zealand the week we decided to go off and do some exploring, so, to flee the bad weather, we ended up in Westport. As we arrived, the rain had eased into a light drizzle for the first time in days. Yet, despite the change in weather, we still weren’t very optimistic that we’d get onto the site since there were several security cars parked outside of the buildings at the front of the site. Since we’d driven all the way, though, effectively into the middle of nowhere, we decided to have a crack anyway. In the end, access was a lot easier than we imagined, although it did entail a fair bit of walking. And once we were in, we managed, somehow, to completely avoid secca. There was the feeling that one of them could suddenly appear the entire time, since the site had many nooks, crannies and entranceways; however, we got lucky and didn’t encounter anyone until we were on our way back to the cars, back on the right side of the fence. As for the site itself, it was absolutely massive. Most of the interior was quite cramped and full of strange looking machinery, and some areas were flooded. The exterior was perhaps the best part of the explore as it had a very imposing feel to it. It kind of felt like we were extras on a Star Wars set at times. There were some sections to the front of the site that were difficult to access due to secca, and because the entire plant was coated in a thick slimy layer of cement we were unable to climb up some of the high-rise sections. There’s definitely scope to revisit the site then, to have a look at the couple of parts we didn’t manage to visit. Explored with Nillskill. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27: [/url] 28: 29: 30: 31: 32: 33: 34: 35: 36:

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