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Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/15/2018 in all areas

  1. 5 points
    Woolley Hall The history Woolley Hall is a landscape park largely unchanged since 1800. The park is associated with a Jacobean Hall (dated to around 1635 with later alterations). Features include wooded pleasure grounds, a ha-ha, kitchen garden and ponds. The main house is Grade II listed and the courtyard is Grade II listed as being of Special Architectural and Historic Interest. Michael Wentworth began rebuilding Woolley Hall in 1635. The new Woolley Hall consisted of an 'H'-shaped building of moderate size. An east wing was added to the south front around 1680. The western wing was added during the mid eighteenth century. The eastern wings which form the rest of the present building were added in the early nineteenth century. The house is constructed of hammer-dressed sandstone, with a slate roof. There are four storeys including the attic and basement. Recently Woolley Hall went up for sale (2014) with a guide price of £3m from its owners, Wakefield Council. It was purchased in 2015 by new owners Commercial Development Projects (CDP). Plans were submitted (2016) for a hotel conversion for the Grade II listed building. (CDP) had put forward a proposal to create a 88-bedroom hotel, with function facilities to cater for 300 guests, spa treatment rooms and a gastro restaurant. But (CDP), sent an email to the council (2017) to say they have withdrawn the plans, but gave no explanation. In reaction to the withdrawal, assistant chief executive for resources and governance at Wakefield Council, Michael Clements said: “Wakefield Council agreed to sell Woolley Hall to a local developer last year. “The sale was conditional upon them developing the site into a boutique hotel. “Disappointingly, this deal has now fallen through. It is thought the proceeds would be used to re-invest council capital with a spoke person stating “The proceeds from the sale will be used to support the council’s capital investment plans across the district whilst it will also provide an annual budget saving to help us deal with the funding cuts imposed on us by the Government.” The explore The hall sits in pleasant surroundings and considering its recent endeavour has a boutique hotel it looks like efforts are been made to keep the hall well maintained. so... during a very windy February morning we moved in for a closer look. It was a little difficult to know where to start with this one as there were quite a few different access routes to the hall... Not knowing if we would be met by a security team we started documenting the building from a far whilst slowly moving in. The hall is quite something and reminded us of one of those old hammer house movies... albeit without Dracula. Moving slowly to the east side of the hall we came across what looked like an old boiler house... although four boilers remained only one was operational... perhaps part of the councils money saving scheme. Making our way though we entered the main hall.. Surprisingly most of the rooms original architecture is preserved with some rather exquisite flooring and panelling. although some of the rooms were accessible most of the doors were bolted and without wrecking what looked like a very well preserved old door we decided to document what we could and move on. Although the main hall was the main attraction we decided to explore some of the stable blocks to the north of the hall... It looks like this was used by council departments including Wakefield social services among others. Largely empty with left overs from its office days with little else on offer. There was some very unusual looking housing quarters although we could not find any entry to these building. On leaving the stable blocks we were met by a very pleasant care taker who gave us a little history whilst politely telling us to f*uck off... The pics The main hall The stable block The boiler house oh well time for a game of golf... LBE
  2. 5 points
    An oil refinery being decommissioned... I went there with my bicycle, managed to get it past the first fence which was nice xD I hope i didn't put too many photos... D90 with sigma 17-70 cheers
  3. 4 points
    This was the first stop in Italy with Elliot5200 & @shaddam last month. I don't know any history unfortunately but it's a stunning building and I wouldn't mind living in it! I normally write a lot more than this but I'm not sure what else to say. Oh, we went for a pizza afterwards. Pics: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. & 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. Thanks for looking
  4. 4 points
    Bowling World – Belgium Closed in late 2015. It closed due to a decline in custom and proposed development on the site of this bowling alley and dance hall next door.
  5. 4 points
    Visited with The Kwan on a rainy Saturday, some lovely bits left in the area and we missed quite a bit so theres always an excuse for a return visit. Some History The name Ratgoed derives from “Yr Allt Goed”, which means the steep, wooded hillside. Ratgoed mine was also sometimes known as “Alltgoed”. The Ratgoed slate workings lie at the head of what was originally called Cwm Ceiswyr but became known as Cwm Ratgoed because of the quarry. It lies north of Aberllefenni and northwest of Corris in, what is now, the Dyfi Forest. The slate that was quarried at Ratgoed was the Narrow Vein. This runs from south of Tywyn, on the coast, to Dinas Mawddwy about 18 miles inland and follows the line of the Bala Fault. The Narrow Vein was worked along its length at places such as Bryneglwys near Abergynolwyn; Gaewern & Braich Goch at Corris, Foel Grochan at Aberllefenni and Minllyn at Dinas Mawddwy. The slate at Ratgoed dips at 70° to the southeast, the same as Foel Grochan. Ratgoed was a relatively small working, it was worked from around 1840 until its closure in 1946. Pics [ [ Le Kwan Thanks for looking
  6. 4 points
    Mineral Springs Bath House History The construction of the Mineral Springs Bath House began in 1907. This was in order to bring in more tourism and wealth into the area. The town it was built in was an excellent location to host a bath house, as it was well known for it's rich mineral water sources which was believed to have medicinal properties. During the start of the 20th century mineral baths were a very fashionable and popular leisure activity. It took 3 years to build, with the help of local residents and neighbouring villages. It was finally unveiled with a ceremony in 1911. The materials which were used for the interior were designed in Vienna, France and Belgium and it was the most expensive healing bath in Bulgaria at that current time. Typical to most bath houses, it was separated into two sections, one for the men and another for the women. Both areas accommodated for it's visitors with a large circular pool, changing rooms and 10 bathtubs. The baths also provided central heating facilities, the main parts of the building were kept consistently at 15°C, the changing rooms at 28°C and the baths themselves were 32°C. The bath house was also equip with a clinic, admin offices and a large laundry room. Sadly the Mineral Springs Baths eventually closed in 2001, due to the decline in interest and popularity along with the lack of investment by the local government. Visit As always, visited with @darbians on a long weekend trip to Bulgaria. We were both feeling pretty optimistic once we'd seen the grand looking exterior on arrival and fortunately the interior certainly lived up to our expectations. Externals Internals If you've got this far, thanks for reading
  7. 3 points
    Everything left as if the hotel's owners left it with the thought that they will come back in a moment. Or maybe the contrary, with the thought that they can not go back there anymore. We know that they did not come back. We do not know why. At the bottom, aprons, cups, the inscription "Welcome wedding guests". Upstairs furniture, appliances, personal items, books. Everything is abandoned, not packed, segregated, as in the planned move. No. Abandoned and destroyed. Scattered. Maybe by a vandal who accidentally got there and could not respect the place and things that belonged to someone. Or maybe by someone who did it with the deliberation that was looking for something.
  8. 3 points
    This is my first video of this 60s hotel located somewhere in Italy. I hope you liked the video!
  9. 3 points
    When I die, honey when I part with the sun and I will be a long rather sad thing will you take care of me then? you will embrace your arms and you'll fix what broke cruel fate ...
  10. 2 points
    History Once the magnificent property in East Germany housed a spa building. Around 1950, the building was converted into a hotel, which was given the name of a Duchess. In the 90s, it was closed for cost reasons, since it decays visibly. The Explore Access was easy; the front door was locked, but some open windows and a open door at the back. My first visit was in 2011. Now I returned to see how the building has changed over the past seven years. Many ceilings and floors had collapsed meanwhile, and some areas I could't enter therefore. Unfortunately, some things were destroyed by vandalism or were stolen. For example, all banisters and the ornamented window arches. But on the other hand, the natural decay of the past few years has been very interesting. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Here are also a few comparison pictures and some photos from 2011 of rooms that couldn't be entered anymore today. 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 - Also this rose has been gone due to the collapse of the ceiling.
  11. 2 points
    Taxal Lodge - Photographic Report - 2018 #TaxelLodge Photographic Report - 11th March 2018 Built-in 1904 Taxal Lodge was once the home of Lt. Col. H. Ramsden Jodrell, Who passed away in 1950. The home became a Special School, for disruptive and emotionally disturbed kids that lived on site 5 days a week. It replaced an older Taxal Lodge that originally stood further up the valley. Over the years there have been various reports of abuse within the school and a lot of visitors and students claim that the lodge is haunted. Once the plug was pulled by the authorities the school was closed in 2005. Since its closure, the lodge fell victim to vandals & arson. Now other nature has now begun to stake her claim... The Urban Collective We Film It...
  12. 2 points
    History Costing £350,000 and ten years to build, the Cardiff City Asylum opened on 15 April 1908. The main hospital building covered 5 acres (2.0 ha), designed to accommodate 750 patients across 10 wards, 5 each for men and women. Like many Victorian institutes, it was designed as a self-contained institute, with its own 150 feet (46 m) water tower atop a power house containing two Belliss and Morcom steam engine powered electric generator sets, which were only removed from standby in the mid-1980s. The site also contained a farm, which provided both food supplies and therapeutic work for the patients. The first medical superintendent was Dr Edwin Goodhall, whose then advanced approaches and therapies resulted in the hospital acquiring a reputation at the forefront of mental health care. Patients were also encouraged to take work and supervised tours outside the institute. During World War I, the facility was called the Welsh Metropolitan War Hospital. During World War II, part of the hospital was turned over to the military, becoming the largest emergency service hospital in South Wales, treating British, US Army and German personnel. 200 beds were retained for civilian use, which enabled early treatment of post traumatic stress disorder of military patients. On 5 July 1948, the hospital was taken over by the Ministry of Health as the National Health Service came into existence. It continued to be used through to the mid-1980s, when care in the community began to reduce the number of resident patients. The decision was made to close the hospital as it was no longer deemed suitable for patients. Closure of the hospital is today, 29th April 2016. The Explore As always, explored with my better half @hamtagger . This place had become a little bit of a fixation to us. Knowing as most of you probably did that closure was imminent we decided to pay it a visit. The hospital recently had an exhibition showing the history of Whitchurch and it had finished a week before our visit, only downfall is we would have got to see the hall but where is the fun in being allowed in somwhere! This place had 10 wards, they are huge wards, built on 2 floors. When we visited only 2 of those wards were in use on the East side and they were the secure unit which were moved to the new Llandough Hospital earlier this week. 90% of the site is disused. On site there is a funeral home and a hospice both of which are still and will still remain active now that the hospital has closed. The whole site is pretty vast, the corridors are long and echoey, we never saw a single person while walking around the main sections. The wards were all closed and padlocked off inside but this didn't really bother us too much. We just enjoyed sneaking round capturing it like it is now. HT said to me wouldnt it be nice to look back on these pics in years to come and see what it did look like. A severalls in the making if nothing happens with it. As you can see not a lot was accessible but it wil give you an idea of what it is like. Parts of it reminded me of Goodmayes Asylum in Essex, it had that feel to it. Especially with working lights and the colour of red on the windows and doors. The place hadn't been looked after which was a shame really. Decay had allready started. Some corridors were closed off due to colapsing ceilings. The water tower was locked off because of Aspestos. Reading a story online, millions had been spent renovating one of the concrete rings on one side of the tower only a few years ago. The building is beautiful. Red brick with a single line of yellow brick right through the middle. The grounds are just as nice, old flowerbeds now overgrown but still spring flowers coming through. On our way out we were met by Security at the main desk, we explained to him that we were just looking at the buildings. Luckily we were on our way out and he told us that he didn't mind us taking externals so there was our chance to walk around the whole site externally. I got chatting to him and asked him about his job. He explained that he had started working for the gardens when he was 17 as a stopgap before he found something else to do, 44 years later he is still there. I could see the bond he had with this building with the closure ahead. He was emotionally attached to it, you could see the sadness in his eyes when he talked about it. He talked to us about the cannabis factory that was found a few years back in one of the derelict wards. He laughed when he said that staff thought he was behind it. All in all really nice to speak to him, someone with knowledge. So really a maze of corridors to see and a lot locked down, this place has a mortuary but I am led to believe that it's 50/50 as to wether there is a slab inside it still. I am told that it is stored for gas bottles. The main hall is amazing but I only got to see it through cracks in the doors. Currently being used for storage of medical records and equiptment it was heavily locked. Whitchurch has a lot more to offer but for us its a waiting game until it becomes more accessible inside. In particular I loved the Matron's door. This place had a lot of original features left and this was one of them. Anyway enough of my waffle, I am sure that many of you will vsit this place in time. On with the pics Externals An aerial view of the whole site, arrow plan. 1 : The Main entrance 2 : The Pavillions had seen better days 3 : Westside, Innit bruv! 4 : One of the smaller villa's on site, more recently being used for admin 5 : One of the secure Units for the higher risk patients 6 : 7 : East Side 8 : Some more of the East side 9 : The external of the curved corridor 10 : 11 : The Internals 12 : 13 : 14 : 15 : 16 : 17 : The corridor Kink 18 : A bit of artwork from a former patient 19 : 20 : The corridor which led you to the Mortuary & Tower, sadly closed off 21 : Sad times for Whitchurch 22 : The main entrance 23 : A little history from when it was a military hospital Thanks for looking!
  13. 2 points
    One of a Kind Acoustic Places ! Never seen anything like this Fuel Storage of the NVA Troops in Germany
  14. 2 points
  15. 2 points
    Really nice shots there Lee, must be a nice way to spend a few hours
  16. 1 point
    If you have recently joined the forum.... Welcome! It's always nice for new member to say hello. We don't need an autobiography, just a hi and where you're from will be enough. Please take a look at the guides in out technical help section before posting your first report http://www.oblivionstate.com/forum/information/technical-help/ You can upload your images directly to the forum too! Just drag your files in, or click the "choose files" link below the edit box. Thanks for joining!
  17. 1 point
    That's pretty cool, lovely looking building
  18. 1 point
    Nice one. I like the columns with the dried plants in the second picture.
  19. 1 point
    Quite enjoyed the video of the place, but I think your choice of parking location right outside the gate might've drawn attention to yourselves
  20. 1 point
    Really like these 'before and after' reports of yours. Great to see the difference but sad at the same time
  21. 1 point
  22. 1 point
    Fantastic find! Some good stuff coming from you guys recently
  23. 1 point
    some nice spots around there. enjoy!
  24. 1 point
    Nice video, I like the view from the roof with the sign. Good that the guard wasn't aggressive.
  25. 1 point
    Very nice. Was there two years ago and liked it a lot. It's a pitty that you didn't find the corridor with the stairs down to the church.
  26. 1 point
    This was a fun one. A small part of the hospital is still in use so there were lots of vehicles coming and going. Security kept driving up and down the main road as well like it was groundhog day so we had to stay on our toes. The hospital was built in 1930 for the treatment of people suffering from mental illness. Towards the end of WWII, in 1945, a famous massacre took place here. Seventy five Italian Social Republic soldiers were brought here as prisoners and around 50 of them were brutally executed. Some of them being tied up with wire and crushed under the wheels of two trucks. Anyway, as I was saying, a fun place to hang out, with something to see in most of the buildings. I'd say we got around 75% of the abandoned stuff. Here's some pics: 1. Chapel 2. Not too impressive inside 3. 4. & 5. 6. Beds bolted to the floor 7. 8. 9. Not entirely sure what this was, some kind of meals on wheels type body trolley? 10. 11. Several buildings full of old documents 12. 13. 14. X-ray scans 15. Theatre/Cinema 16. Amazingly the projector has survived Thanks for looking
  27. 1 point
    Bastard with matches certainly took a liking to that theatre Nice looking place mate.
  28. 1 point
    The blue meth church, visit on the last Trip 2k17 in east germany. All doors are closed, so we have to climb in... for me the hell on earth 1. Blue meth church 01 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 2. Blue meth church 02 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 3. Blue meth church 03 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 4. Blue meth church 04 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 5. Blue meth church 05 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 6. Blue meth church 06 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 7. Blue meth church 07 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 8. Blue meth church 08 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr
  29. 1 point
    Hi! Thank you for acceptation and your message on my Facebook Page! I've some times so i'll post some pictures of my exploration of "Slides of the Past" aka "Maison Alexa", located in Belgium. I don't post every pictures because i've done 51 photos... If you want to see the others, you can go on FB / Flickr and search "PixRoads"! Thanks! ^^ Let's go, have a nice visit and day #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17
  30. 1 point
  31. 1 point
    thanks for the comments guys!
  32. 1 point
    This website has many sections off the main exploration forums, all of which can help you with taking advantage of the many features it has. Some of these are cosmetic, some of them directly impact posting. These guides are located at http://www.oblivionstate.com/forum/information/technical-help/ These will be updated over the coming weeks, however it would be useful for people to pipe up and ask any "how to" so we can kill two birds with one stone
  33. 1 point
    To be honest, I partially fast forwarded the video. Not because it's quite long but a lot of shots are pretty shaky. Therefore, it's a little uncomfortable to watch it for a longer time.
  34. 1 point
    Photo reports will always get a better reception on both sites to be honest, if you do both, you wont go wrong.
  35. 1 point
  36. 1 point
    Looks like an interesting place! Lots of stuff to rummage around in
  37. 1 point
    low key as in .. i'm not into posting myself all over you tube etc lol
  38. 1 point
    hey i think i saw you can host images, so i'll post reports directly here, not link the website. cheers
  39. 1 point
    Cheers, it’s a nice wander for sure.
  40. 1 point
    What an absolute quality place that is Id love see this m8 nice shots too thanks for sharing I can almost smell the flora and fauna!
  41. 1 point
    Ive never considered it since mate, warm hotels on trips the only option!
  42. 1 point
    Yeah it is pal however sleeping is something Ive never considered lol probs a laff tho campfire kicking n shit!
  43. 1 point
    I know m8 is sad because it truly is a stunning place in a stunning location!
  44. 1 point
    What a shame Taxal is close to ruin, seems some of the ceilings have collapsed in the last few years. A friend was quoted a million by the owner 3 years ago to buy it to renovate it, imagine a fiver may get it now! 😮
  45. 1 point
    Yea that's stunning all round!
  46. 1 point
  47. 1 point
    Wow what a beautiful place! Loving the colours and that staircase. Great report!
  48. 1 point
    I will sort it tonight, I can re post from Flickr. Cheers
  49. 1 point
    All good here mate. Looking forward to a catch up end of the month man. Hope all is good your end too
  50. 1 point