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Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/16/2018 in all areas

  1. 5 points
    This old chapel in the middle of the forest was the first stop during my last trip to France on the penultimate weekend. Only a small and overgrown path leads to it. If you don't know the location, you'll hardly find it; even from the winding country road below the chapel, it's barely visible. Inside were still several beautiful things - dusty plastic flowers, small Madonna statuettes and images of saints, as well as two rosary necklaces with crosses. In a broken stone the date 13th of April 1870 was engraved. However, I don't know when the secluded chapel was actually built. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
  2. 4 points
    For those who is planning to go to Antwerp metro! Beware that it's Belgium, and the actual presence of trams in the tunnels might not be consistent with their schedule! Being already inside one of the tunnels of the active line, we suddenly heard noise behind. I checked the schedule in advance, the next tram was supposed to be only in 8 min, but it was behind us now! There is nothing in the tunnel where one could hide in, so we had to run to the next station. We managed to hide there right before the tram arrived (thanks to the guy I was with, because he found a good place while I didn't know what to do ). I don't know if the driver saw us or not, but no one came to search for us.
  3. 2 points
    it was actually a last minute decision to visit this explore. en route home from doing the manton colliery explore i passed the fomer pumping station at bracebridge with a shall i or sha,nt i so a quick turn round of the car i squeezed in behind some twat in a skoda who thought it a very good idea to park across the entrance who then decided to move and the explore was on. Built in 1881 Bracebridge Pumping Station was part of Worksop's new sewage system. It used two steam-driven beam engines (together with a travelling crane) to pump the sewage to the effluent processing facility. The engine was coal-fired, with the coal being brought in from nearby Shireoaks Colliery by boat via the Chesterfield Canal. Like many Victorian pumping stations it was built with no little style, designed in an Italian Romanesque style including ornate cast-iron columns and a spiral staircase. Apparently these remain inside (the columns are most definitely visible on external view). Now Grade II Listed, the building along with 1.33 acres of land is currently bricked yp to prevent access so sorry no interior shots the old pumping station has been like this since it was refurbished many years ago there was talk of turning it into an attraction but nothing has happened yet and possibly wont do for the forseeable future the old pumping station viewed from high hoe road the old beds still filled with water one of the victorian columns can still be seen through the windowless building rising upwards towards the ornate chimney a closer view of the ornate victorian columns the base of the chimney from the back of the pumping house the rear of the pumphouse the rear of the pumphouse and chimney the middle of the chimney with the lightning conductor on the right the top of the chimney and the lightning conductor someone had gained access inside by a rope tied to one of the windows but feeling a bit cream crackered i didnt fancy the tarzan routine so i didnt bother
  4. 2 points
    Thank you @hamtagger Yeah it's pretty gaffed-up & the tanks have gone but I'll revisit once it gets warmer, it was bloody freezing that day! Hopefully I won't see Mr Angry next time
  5. 1 point
    Any shots of vintage industrial locations - the older the better!
  6. 1 point
    It was a very long trip on this day - 23.5 hours on the road, 1480 km driven... But it was worth it. In the afternoon we reached our third place, this old house on the outskirts of a small village. From the outside it was already pretty overgrown. Nevertheless, access wasn't difficult. Inside were old furniture, various dolls, a piano, and everything surrounded by beautiful decay. Only the smell of a decaying fox in the entrance area wasn't really pleasant... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
  7. 1 point
    this second part nearly didnt happen as when i arrived i found the yard had changed hands and was all set to write it off as a waste of time and head home untill i spotted something in the far corner of the yard and sought permission to take some photographs which was given by way of intercom so off i trotted across the yard camera in hand to find my subject. mass transit was founded in May 1998 by Michael Strafford an engineering business, performing contract maintenance for other operators. It also specialised in the conversion of buses for non-passenger use. It then diversified into the operation of school bus services At the time operations ceased it operated 86 routes serving 32 schools and at its peak carried some 15,000 children a day to and from schools across south yorkshire and lincolnshire Between 2001 and 2005, Brightbus, then known as Mass Transit, had a substantial presence in lincolnshire following the acquisition of the bus operations of Applebys Coaches, Reliance Travel of great gonnerby and the grantham depot of lincolnshire roadcar. The Grantham operation failed under Mass ownership and was sold to centrebus and the Lincoln area operations to dunn line in 2005 In 2004, BrightBus purchased the long established Leon Motors of finningley that was formed in 1922 and operated buses in doncaster by 2008 the company's stage-carriage work had passed to first south yorkshire and concentrated on school contracts which were based at the main BrightBus depot at north anston mass/transit now brightbus disposed of the elderly leon and northern bus fleets which had kept the stage carriage and school services going and ran a fleet of 73 buses, including many English built three-axle dennis dragons and leyland olympians the dragons repatriated from Hong Kong. painted in what i thought was a very sickly green michael strafford retired at 55 stating ill health but didnt want to sell the business although he has disposed of the vast majority of the bright bus fleet possibly to other school or service bus operators . today the yard is in the hands of hallam express a logistics company full of lorries and fork lift trucks but a few of michaels buses are stored in the far corner of the yard all be it in a scrap state i think he is trying to sell these vehicles on for preservation rather than send them to booth roe or carlton PSV at barnsley he also still owns the former depot at leon wether these are to pass on to his family or he his hanging on for a better price i wouldnt know what i do know is like leon this marks the passing of another operator from the bus world. i acknowlage the author of the brightbus photos a rather scruffy mass transit bus possibly filling in between school runs heads for hexthorpe near doncaster a mixed group of bright buses mostly repatriated hong kong tri axles wait for the school run a wider view of the hong kong tri axles sandwich in a leyland olympian a hong kong tri axle MIL 55774 stands under the bus wash hong kong BIG 9823 which moved to leon finningley for a short time and C887 RFE parked at the rear of the yard near the inspection ramps viewed through the fence american schoolbus GHL 212 V in the yard as stated bright buses yard is now home to hallam express logistics lorries now park where buses once used to the former bus repair sheds now used for storage this is all that remains of brightbus a hong kong tri axle and a few scrap buses stored in one corner of the yard a side view of tri axle E537AKU and olympian W141 EON which spells leon the company brightbus aquired in 2004 the hong kong still retains its brightbus fittings and that of its previous company an interior view of the downstairs of hong kong looking down the bus it smelt like one of the museum type buses a unused shut in smell not unpleasant looking up the bus to be honest its in good condition and would make a runner again where as leon was in a deploreable state had to squeeze past rammels corner to get the interior shot SN53 KKH stands in pieces far from its london home although inside it could have just finished the days service came across this dennis dominator a long way from home formally with greys from ely complete with its cambridgeshire county council notice with junk dumped in its interior but wait all is not what it seems ...its colour and the sticker insider gives it away it was formally a magic bus based near piccadilly manchester the american schoolbus GHL 212 V is still parked up in the yard the interior and drivers seat tastefully redone ..... in moquet...yuck!! and as i take my leave the bus wash still exists but out of use mass brightbus still need fitters and the spirit of mass /brightbus continues to haunt the north anston industrial estate
  8. 1 point
    A early morning meet in Liverpool with @GK-WAX to try a few locations around the city that resulted in a few fails but can wait for another day. Then we decided on littlewoods.this one I have tried before with @telf and @whoopashooppa but didn't manage to get far so roll on a few years and I'm back again. Last time it was a bit of a fort knox so wasn't expecting to find a way in. Now yes it's stripped out but I enjoyed it especially up on centre tower roof on a sunny morning. So here's some history and photos. History... Architectural charity SAVE Britain’s Heritage welcomes new plans to save Liverpool’s most prominent Art Deco landmark, the huge white Littlewoods building that dominates the city’s eastern approach. Built in 1938 for Littlewoods’ famous football pools, the tall central clock tower and streamlined concrete profile are visib le far across Liverpool. The building housed the giant printing presses that sent millions of pools coupons across the country every week, to player s dreaming of winning a golden ticket. photos from SAVE Britain’s Heritage The National Lottery superseded the football pools, and the building has lain derelict for over a decade. English Heritage refused an application to list the structure and two redevelopment schemes have fallen victim to the recession. Earlier this year, local press reports warned that demolition was becoming increasingly likely as the structure fell into decline . SAVE responded by drawing national media and ministerial attention to the building’s importance , owned by the Homes and Communities Agency. SAVE P resident Marcus Binney accu sed N ational Regeneration A gencies of indifference to the building’s demonstrable architectural and historic significance. T he building was seen by sev eral million viewers when SAVE Deputy D irector Rhiannon Wicks appeared on the Alan Titchmarsh show in S eptember with Dan Snow, to highlight its plight . Now Manchester based developers Capital & Centric Plc have announced their intention s to buy the building . They are submit ting a planning application to Liverpool City Council to convert it into a hotel wi th commercial space. The new proposal, drawn up by Shedkm Architects , would see £16 million of private sector money invested in the refurbishment project , which could start on site summer 2013 . The project is thought to have won financial support from the mayoral City Deal fund. SAVE salutes the Mayor’s positive achievement in working with national government and the private sector in response to public opinion to secure the future of this important building. DSC_3040 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3066 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3065 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3064 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3063 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr url=https://flic.kr/p/JRoMB5][/url]DSC_3062 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3061 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3059 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3057 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3054 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3053 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3052 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3051 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3050 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3048 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3047 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3045 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3043 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3039 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3038 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3067 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  9. 1 point
    Not the greatest photos ever, but yeah... mine are the after shots (shown first) and the before shots (shown after) are 25 years old and not mine. I hope that all makes sense
  10. 1 point
    an early finish today prompted a visit to the former colliery site at manton and the sidings at manton wood after parking the car in manton pit wood park trying to look like an afternoon stroller and not an urban explorer a circuitous walk through manton pit wood was required to reach my goal and avoid the security cameras in the car park. after much huffing and puffing uphill through the trees i gained the main path about half wayup the pit tip another path led me around the side and down to the old trackbed when i discovered a flatter way and the tree cover was enough to hide what i was up to. climbing down the bank with a few choice oaths i gained the old trackbed of the former manton colliery. opened in 1898 manton was a 3 shaft colliery fully operational in 1907 in 1947 it was part of south yorkshire area not nottinghamshire closing in febuary 1994 manton was the 29th pit to close and the 8th pit in bassetlaw . the majority of mantons coal went to the CEGB power station at cottham but after the privatisation of of the electricity industry in 1990 and the dash for gas led to the pits demise. today the site is now owned by diy giant B&Q some bits of track still exsist as far as the other side of the retford road bridge the bridge itself is now fenced off as a dangerous structure and will possibly be removed at some point for scrap severing forever the former track into manton colliery i dont think that B&Q are really intrested in products being shipped in or out by train as the bridge over retford road would possibly have to be replaced ruling out trains ever running again at this location on cost grounds. the sidings at manton wood are still extant but see little use apart from the monday to saturday 17.35 east midlands trains service from nottingham which stables then runs round here to allow the northern rail sheffield to lincoln and lincoln to sheffield services to pass and use the platforms at worksop. 58029 prepares to leave manton colliery with a coal train to cottham power station the cripple wagon on the left awaits attention the same scene today looking towards manton colliery sees only bright orange B&Q trailers parked up awaiting loading for another journey sleepers and ballast litter the former trackbed near manton colliery two views of the former railway bridge that used to connect manton colliery to the main line along with its bridge board i doubt the safety of trains would be affected seeing as a train hasnt crossed this bridge for 24 years a security fence and padlocked gate declare retford road bridge an unsafe structure the rails end at a mound of ballast behind the camera the single to double track points still in place having done the batman routine (above) and ducked around the security fencing a small section being available here is the bridge decking with the track still in place not having seen a train for 24 years the bridge from the other side batman time again !!! the bridge from the main line end shows the track still connected but covered by a mound of ballast a rusty rail in the undergrowth beyond the trees a rusty rail in the grass continues towards the main line with another ballast pile just short of the main line continuing beyond the ballast the rail has either sank or collapsed at this point dolly signal wp270 protects the main line from phantom coal trains A 2 ..2car set passes manton wood signal box heading for sheffield possibly from cleethorpes via gainsborough the colliery access tracks in the foreground of the hut and the rear of the DMU. now overgrown and unused looking towards retford apart from the monday to saturday east midland trains 17.35 from nottingham which stables here then runs round to allow 2 northern services to pass...looking towards worksop and the occasional network rail train the signal box was where the boxes are now on the bankside the former manton colliery line turns right here the sheffield to lincoln main line is on the left and finally the network rail access board
  11. 1 point
    I found this tank at a former military trainig area around Munich. The associated casern was closed in 2001. The tank was used as military target once. It is the only one left of originally 5 tanks. #1 DSC01446-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC01447-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC01449-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC01452-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC01460-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC01483-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr Rosinante and tank
  12. 1 point
    I also like the second shot. Luckily you reached the station in time and didn't get caught.
  13. 1 point
    This was the first stop in Italy with Elliot5200 & @shaddam last month. I don't know any history unfortunately but it's a stunning building and I wouldn't mind living in it! I normally write a lot more than this but I'm not sure what else to say. Oh, we went for a pizza afterwards. Pics: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. & 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. Thanks for looking
  14. 1 point
  15. 1 point
    Here are some of my photos. Perhaps not always "vintage", but at least older industry. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
  16. 1 point
    Haven't seen anything from here for a while, wonder has it gone now?
  17. 1 point
    Just added this here as it's not really worth a separate thread. Cheers Oblivinators!
  18. 1 point
    Thanks mate. Was a press slash cutter I think.
  19. 1 point
    Myself and @Session9 decided to have a go at Kinmel Hall in North Wales around mid 2014 I think. There were a few silly code names around at the time like "Cuckoo Hall and Lotus Hall" and crap like that. Although looking back at older reports from then nowadays it had some nice features and indeed was a nice looking explore, there's been better appear on the forums before and since BUT, at the time it was a place I really wanted to see but it did have a bit of a reputation for being a difficult one. I was working over in the Shropshire area for a month or so and myself and @Session9 decided to do a bit of a welsh tour from north to south. I remember picking him up from Wolves train station about 7pm or so one Friday and we headed straight across through North Wales and arrived in the dark around 11pm. We navigated along the loooonnnngg path up to the Hall and literally spent the next 12 hours until the late morning trying to gain access. I got into the building at three separate points but it was annoyingly sealed internally at every point, preventing us getting into the main building, staircase, nice bits. Sensor alarms around the back made us jump the first time but after about the 6th time they got a good ignoring. A loudspeaker was rigged up playing Radio 4 or some crap from the front too, but after a couple of laps we realised it was in a loop. Anyway, this is the place that springs to mind when i think of the one that got away, but there has been MANY!. It was difficult walking away defeated and tired and pissed off , but the rest of the weekend working our way down through Wales was a success. Good times that didn't begin as planned but ended up great. Nowadays, the last I heard from the place it was trashed and easy as hell and was definitely a missed opportunity back then.
  20. 1 point
    There was an intoxicating smell of chemicals in the air and a smell of ubiquitous mold. Ampoules and glass beakers, volumetric flasks ... broken ... crashed throughout the room. It is best not to touch anything. Just being in this room led the airways to rage
  21. 1 point
    Also a nice theme. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27
  22. 1 point
    A sunny winters day on the Jurassic Coast - drinking coffee, murdering bacon sandwiches and hunting for concrete - top day! One of our targets was Studland bay, where once upon a time the likes of King George VI, Churchill, Eisenhower along with General Bernard Montgomery and Acting Admiral Louis Mountbatten congregated to witness the largest live ammunition practice of the entire war - a full-scale rehearsal for the invasion of Europe and thousands took part - they watched from Fort Henry a demonstration of carpet bombing, followed by an assault landing by troops, a truly momentous occasion. Alas, history over, here are some pictures: Fort Henry - a lookout for the likes of King George VI, Churchill, Eisenhower, General Bernard Montgomery and Acting Admiral Louis Mountbatten. Inside Dragons teeth - anti-tank defences The area of Studland bay was also heavily fortified - here is one of the gun emplacements. The bolts that mounted the gun, set within the concrete. Inside it's magazine. ... and finally, a pillbox (i won't bore you with the others) - i do wonder if this one will last another 70 years though!
  23. 1 point
    The history of Coalbrookdale foundry dates back all the way to 1572 when the land was passed to John Brooke who developed coal mining there on a substantial scale. A blast furnace was built at the site to produce iron, which blew up in 1703. It remained derelict until the arrival of Abraham Darby I in 1709. Abraham Darby I set about rebuilding the Coalbrookdale Furnace, using coke as the fuel. His business was that of an iron founder, making cast iron pots and other goods, an activity in which he was particularly successful because of his patented foundry method, which enabled him to produce cheaper pots than his rivals. The furnace was the first coke-fired blast furnace to operate successfully for a prolonged period of time. The Coalbrookdale Foundry – this area has since been converted into a museum Following the death of Abraham Darby II, Abraham Darby II was brought into the business as an assistant manager when old enough. The Company also became early suppliers of steam engine cylinders in this period. Experiments took place with the application of coke pig iron to the production of bar iron in charcoal finery forges. This proved to be a success, and led to the beginning of a great expansion in coke iron making. In 1768, the company began to produce the first cast iron rails for railways. In 1778, Abraham Darby III undertook the building of the world’s first cast iron bridge, the iconic Iron Bridge, opened in 1780. The fame of this bridge leads many people today to associate the Industrial Revolution with the neighbouring village of Ironbridge, but in fact most of the work was done at Coalbrookdale, as there was no settlement at Ironbridge in the eighteenth century. Workers boots hung on the front gate The blast furnaces were closed down, perhaps as early as the 1820s, but the foundries remained in use. The Coalbrookdale Company became part of an alliance of iron founding companies who were absorbed by Allied Iron founders Limited in 1929. This was in turn taken over by Glynwed which has since become Aga Foodservice. Castings for Aga Rayburn cookers were produced at Coalbrookdale until its closure in November 2017. Delivery yard, where the raw materials and scrap iron arrive One of the two cupolas, seen from the melt shop delivery yard Archive image of molten iron being taken from the cupola Number 1 cupola. This mini blast furnace melted the iron ready to be cast. Number 2 furnace Above the furnaces Compressors which blew air into the cupolas Rear of the furnaces Ladles hanging from an overhead rail system for transporting molten iron One of the ladles Moving into the casting area where we find racks of moulds Patterns laid out on the floor Patterns laid out on the floor The main casting shop contains a fair bit of automated casting equipment Beside the production line with wagons on rails for transporting castings Casting production line Casting production line End of the casting line Casting machine, where the molten iron is pored into Archive image of molten iron being poured into cast Automated production lines Automated production lines Tanks and conveyors Towards the end of the factory we find more machinery Forklift trucks Cherry picker Extraction hoods in an old part of the site The workshops shop contained a handful of machines Dress in the machine shop A pair of drills More drill-presses Finally, some of their finished products – an Aga in the canteen along with a Rangemaster fridge
  24. 1 point
    This small hydroelectric power station originally powered the neighboring Crespi textiles factory that closed some time ago. Before we came here we were aware that the building was possibly alarmed, but determined to see the industrial deliciousness inside, we carried on. On our approach we were hiding in the woods, dodging dog walkers and cyclists, but it was SO worth it.. Even if I did only manage about 3 photos after setting of the alarm Visited with @PROJ3CTM4YH3M, Kriegaffe9 and @AndyK! Not a lot of information here I know.. But hopefully these will make up for it -
  25. 1 point
    Thanks to sime for the tip off on this place.visited this with a few friends.we hit it early on a wet and grey morning.it was a bit of a trek up a very muddy path.i slipped over twice.and was filthy.but it was worth it.you could only get in one train there.but it was lovely and reminded me off the derelict orient express in Belgium.it was nice to wander around the outside too with all the bits and bobs laying about.
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