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Showing content with the highest reputation since 02/17/2018 in Posts

  1. 7 points
    Stoke Hospital Morgue. Been closed a fair while now, been here 3 times and never been able to gain access to this part of it due to it being locked off and being caught by secca once!
  2. 7 points
    Did you ever went to an Island full of creepy dolls??? NO??? Let me take you with you! On my holiday in December 2017 to Mexico I heard about this place so I had to go. There is no holiday without finding some decayed stuff! The story goes as followed: The guy who lives on this Island found a girl who was drowned around the island. He also found a doll floating nearby and, assuming it belonged to the deceased girl so he hung it on a tree as a sign of respect. After he did that he heard whispers and foodsteps around his hut where he lived. He started to collect and hang more and more old dolls to calm down the spirit of the drowned girl. In 2001 the owner of the Island died and was found on the same spot where the girl was found. When I wanted to go to this place I had to find someone who wanted to bring me there because it was hard to reach according to people around there because of latest hurricanes and earthquakes . After a lot of negotiations I found someone with a little boat to go there and to be honest it was worth the whole trip!! I hope you liked it! Let me know what you think! Marco Bontenbal https://pixanpictures.com
  3. 6 points
    I've visited this former state hospital site a few times and over the last few years they've torn down a few buildings and unfortunately before I was able to make my first visit the morgue and lab were two of those :(. I wished I'd gotten to see them but alas...I did not. Here are a few photos from various trips. I didn't take great photos when I first started exploring and my editing sucked! Most of the buildings are rather boring and not much was left inside. One of the areas of this complex was/is a bowling alley which for years was flooded and no one was able to photograph it. However when they were preparing a building beside it to be demoed the water was removed from it. It's completely dark there so no available light except by light painting which I detest This building above they removed the cupolas for what reason I don't know and they are sitting behind fence at the building in the background This building was demoed 2016.
  4. 4 points
    In the middle of the city ... the entire ground floor is flooded ... mold ... demolition .... Sports and medical clinic connected to the hotel. Another building written down for losses. Probably soon will be razed to the ground ... especially that in its vicinity grow new residential buildings. One can only imagine what sport stars were in this object. Have a look at the photos that remained inside ... (TRANSLATOR...sorry)
  5. 4 points
    One of the more fun powerplant explores i ever did. This location was pretty active and there was still a lot of electronics and lights turned on. I've been here twice, and still didn't have the chance to see the whole location. The highlights of these place (for me) are the modern controlroom with all the screens, photographing the lights outside on the roof, climbing the 143m/469feet chimneys (twice) and watching the security car doing its rounds on the terrain from the chimney. Combine this with great weather and great friends, and this makes it one of my favorite locations. Oh, and i also shot some photos: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  6. 4 points
    Hey everyone! It's been a while since our small Belgium/Luxembuorg/France-Roadtrip in September, but now I finally had the time to recall this one and edit some of the images. As I'm totally new to photography, I would be very delighted to hear your opinion on the photos and processing! (: 1st day:Usine Barbele The entrance was quite easy. The place where the hole in the fence should be seemed to have been closed a few times already; but everytime a new hole was opened just a few steps further. Arriving at the heart of the plant, we quickly made our way up to the rows of coking furnaces. It was a rather dark day, clouds hanging heavily in the sky, and we stopped many times when some loose parts made loud crashing noises, moved by the wind. We did not feel comfortable here, it seemed like we were not welcome. After taking some portraits at the big fans, my girlfriend told me she was hearing engine sounds, and we decided to rush into a small cabin at the side of the road and hide. And really, she was right: A black Dacia made its way slowly around the plant, passing the shed where we were hiding. We heard it stopping somewhere, opening and closing it's doors again, and we were in complete agreement we should leave this place as fast as posible. Hiding behind everything we found, we fled along the side of the way, stopping and quietly peeking back every now and then. 2nd day: HFB We decided to be quick with this one when thinking back to the day before. We made our way to the blast furnace, took some photos and left again. We'll have a look at the rest of the site on our tour in march. ET Phone Home I found this one online just the day before, and after a short research, I had the coordinates. After having a stop at a small park to have a look at a sculpture we wanted to see, we quickly headed over the fields toward this one. We arrived at sunset, and after strolling through high grass and climbing the small fence, we stood in the middle of those antennas. I really liked the view, but I'm not at all pleased with the pictures I made. Maybe we'll repeat that one someday. 3rd day: Diesel Power Plant Not much to say. The door that was said to be open was closed again, so we moved on to the sea and did not any exploration that day. 4th day: Salle des Compresseurs We made our way in from the west. According to the parts we found in this wasteland, it used to be some kind of power station. There are also some basement structures where you can still find some electrical gear. The compressor house was a nice little place - nice machines looking like ducks, rust, peeling paint, plants. Beautiful. 5th day: Power Plant X The access to this one was said to be "a bit dirty", but i really enjoyed it. We took some shots in the boiler room and moved on to the pumping room in the next building. Sadly we didn't get to see the big hall with the gas motors as renovation work was going on - the space was lit up like a soccer field and plastic sheets were covering windows and machines. Let's hope it gets well preserved for the posterity so they can enjoy that view too! Terres Rouges This one was easy. We heard stories of police driving around and were careful, but luckily nothing happened. The place isn't as impressive as HFB or Usine Barbele and in a quite bad shape, but there were some nice perspectives. It was raining cats and dogs, so we didn't have much time to shoot the nice reflections. That's it for now. There aren't so much images as we also did a bit of sightseeing and I sorted out a bunch that I didn't like or weren't able to process to the point where I could post them with a good feeling Hope you still like them! If you like to see some (but that's not THAT much) more images, you can hit up my flickr page: https://www.flickr.com/photos/152392524@N08/albums We'll do another tour in March (Be, Lux, Fr, Es, It, Ch) and hopefully we'll come back with more pictures. Maybe I'll also add some of my older images. And of course, thanks a lot to the people that helped me with the locations and confirmed my researched coordinates - it's really nice to know how to get in and somebody has been there recently. I won't publish the names here so that you don't get flooded with requests, I hope that's ok. You rock! best wishes from Germany, Nico
  7. 4 points
    Was reminded that I didn't posted anything yet so, here's a post of a recent visit to this mine. This one is not the safest one :-) . Some parts are already collapsed. There are several levels but the lower did we skip. Heard that the air quality is not the best there and we didn't bring the rope ladder . Was nice to explore. Hope you enjoy looking at this.
  8. 3 points
    The Station Hotel is a grand Victorian building situated in the heart of Ayr town centre. The hotel consists of 71 bedrooms, complete with en-suite bathrooms, plus a host of suits for functions and a cocktail lounge. The hotel, which is attached to Ayr railway station, was originally opened by the Glasgow and South Western Railway in June 1866 and become part of the British Transport Hotels (BTH) at Nationalisation. It was sold by BTH in October 1951 and has changed ownership a number of times, having been owned by Stakis Hotels, Quality, and Swallow Hotels. The Station Hotel is currently the oldest and most famous hotel in Ayr. The hotel has retained almost all of its original features inside and out. The hotel started to turn away customers in 2014 and closed around 2015. After suffering neglect for some time beforehand, the building is now deteriorating; the railway station have had to take action to safeguard their customers from falling debris. Visited with @SpiderMonkey The car park is fenced off due to parts of the exterior falling off Entrance and staircase Reception Lift and staircase on the first floor Into the cocktail lounge.... The corridor leading to the next parts was suffering decay due to leaks in the roof The Arran Suite... Restaurant... The restaurant's kitchen Other public spaces around the hotel... The Kyle Suite bar area The Carrick Room The Kintyre Suite And finally, the hotel rooms... View of the decaying rear facade overlooking the railway station
  9. 3 points
    Colonia IL / Mono Orphanage History The orphanage was built on the border of Switzerland and Italy. Sadly there doesn't seem to be a lot of information out there regarding this location. From what I've gathered it originally served as an orphanage and at some point in time, it was also used as a summer camp. Despite being closed during the 1970's, it has remained in pretty good condition with minimal graffiti and vandalism. Visit Visited again with @darbians and @vampiricsquid. Unfortunately when we visited the beds had been removed but lucky there was still a lot left to photograph. The chapel was absolutely stunning and it was nice to see that some furniture, including the desks from the classrooms were still there. All in all an excellent location to finish off our Italian adventure.
  10. 3 points
    The hospital was closed less than three years ago. The facility has functioned, among others orthopedics and traumatology, rheumatology, pulmonology and surgery. The total area of the facility is about 2.38 ha. As of today, little souvenirs remain in the middle. The only thing left was the lamps in the operating rooms and some glass equipment somewhere in the attic. Despite everything, the hospital has an amazing atmosphere ... until you want to walk the long corridors. The hospital is not haunted, it has no ghosts ... it is guarded ... motion detectors, cameras and a dog make the entrance into the wild border with a miracle. Thanks to this the building is in very good condition .... (Sorry, translator)
  11. 3 points
    Here's a few of my doors and doorways. I'll start with asylums, you're guaranteed to see lots and lots of photogenic doors... Nuclear bunker blast door Vagrants ward (remnant of an old workhouse) Prison H15 Sheffield courthouse cell Pritzer Fac Cambridge Military Hospital Childrens ward And of course possibly the most iconic doors ever....
  12. 3 points
    Glen Parva was constructed on the site of the former Glen Parva Barracks in the early 1970s as a borstal and has always held young offenders. Since its opening in 1974 the establishment has seen considerable expansion and change and now serves a catchment area of over 100 courts, holding a mixture of sentenced, unsentenced, and remand prisoners. In 1997, Her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Prisons walked out of an inspection at Glen Parva because conditions were so bad. After a subsequent inspection a year later, the report stated that there was "hope for the future" for the prison but added that a lot of work still needed to be done, and recommended that some staff should be moved because of their attitude towards inmates. Our Explore: Late night mission to this place made the entry a slight more easy then in the daylight, secca made this explore a lot more challenging haha! but a shame it had to be in the dark and access to most of the rooms made me see only a slight percentage of this place. but i seen what i wanted to thankfully! And cheers to the lot that helped! Enjoy the pics the few of them the rest are for the archives
  13. 3 points
    Thanks for your kind words! I'm happy you like it! @jones-y-gog: There'll definitely be more stuff! I'm back in april, hopefully with lots of new pictures If you got some nice tips in Soutwest-Europe, please let me know! I've also found some older pictures of Kraftwerk V/Lightworks (quite crappy), a nearly empty children's sanatorium/home and the remains of Hitler's oxygen plant (not really worth seeing), maybe I'll can get a bit out of them.
  14. 2 points
    Spiral Staircases We've all encountered old spiral staircases on our travels, some more grand than others, and some in the most unlikely of places. Here's a couple of mine below. Now show us yours... Sleaford Bass Maltings - 2014 St. Joseph's Seminary - 2015 Hardys and Hansons Brewery - 2016 Malsis School - 2017 Barbour Threads Mill - 2018 I know there's loads out there, post yours below
  15. 2 points
    Endless Corridors.. I've had a love of photographing corridors and other vanishing-point perspective shots for a long time now, long before I took a greater interest into the UE world, and old hospitals/asylums tend to present the best ones. Here are a few from different places over the years, feel free to post yours below too! RAF Nocton Hospital - Nov 2013 RAF Nocton Hospital - Apr 2014 Outer Walkways Severalls Hospital - March 2014 Frank Whittles Factory - May 2014 Derby Royal Infirmary - May 2014 Severalls Hospital - Dec 2014 CWM Cokeworks - Mar 2015 North Wales Hospital Denbigh - Mar 2015 Selly Oak Hospital - May 2015 Benenden Hospital - Sep 2015 St. Joseph's Seminary - Oct 2015 St. John's Hospital - Oct 2015 RAE Bedford 3x3 - Nov 2015 RAF Upwood - Jan 2016 W Hospital - Apr 2016 Welsh Hospital - June 2016 RAF West Raynham - July 2016 Bletchley Park - May 2017 T.G. Greens Pottery - Jul 2017 Malsis School - Aug 2017 Let's see yours...
  16. 2 points
    I have long dreamed of visiting an abandoned school. From what I was able to read on the internet, the school was closed in 2003. After a few years, the facility was reactivated, an environmental center was created. Unfortunately, the plan did not work out. So the little kids marched to another school. The old facility stands and waits ... thousands of people take a course on it like believers on Jasna Góra. It is probably the most recognizable school in Poland, of course those abandoned. My only regret is that only now I managed to come here. You can see traces of demolition ... in the sleeping area where the youngest ones were napping, you can see traces of alcoholic libations. Crosses turned upside down, I personally am not a believer, but I put most of the crosses as it should be. Very childish play, although even the children probably would not do it, because for what. If any of you have plans to visit a school ... do not postpone it for later ... because there is no reason to go. The school has an amazing atmosphere. (Translator....sorry )
  17. 2 points
    This is the old Fiat Trattori (tractor) factory, this factory was build in the 1960s and was abandoned in 1993 after Fiat bought the American company New Holland. Today the plant is in quite bad shape. There are no plans of reconverting the place. [/url] This was the Design centre and the administration building. [/url] [/url] [/url] [/url] [/url] [/url] [/url] [/url] [/url] [/url] [/url] [/url] [/url] Thanks for looking!
  18. 2 points
    Explored here a couple of weeks ago seems a bit destroyed now which is a shame bet it was a decent explore at one point. A bit of history, Royal Army Ordnance Corp (RAOC) Marchington, was built around 1957 and dealt with the supply and maintenance of weaponry and munitions and various other military equipment until 1993 when the Corp amalgamated with the Royal Logistics Corp. The site is now an industrial estate. It was also a Central Vehicle Depot during this time until the barracks closed in 1970, and the Territorial Army took over. Until it finally closed the site in the early 1980s. Marchington also housed the Armys fleet of Green Goddesses which came under the jurisdiction of the Office Of The Deputy Prime Minister (ODPM).The site is now an industrial estate. The Barracks lie bare and derelict and the married quaters have are all now private housing.
  19. 2 points
    Also a nice theme. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27
  20. 2 points
    I took a lot photos of doors and doorways in recent years. Really many ... Maybe you think now, I've finally gone crazy. But I just couldn't decide which pictures still to leave out. So, it has become, ahm, "a few" more photos now ... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101
  21. 2 points
    Haus der Offiezere My first report. I have had this account for about a year but never posted anything from fear of my photos not being good enough to post. Decided to pluck up the courage to start contributing more but I apologise if there are any mistakes. Anyway, on to the history! History The Haus der Offiezere was originally established as a shooting range between Kummersdorf and Jüterbog in 1888. It wasn't until 1910, when construction of the Berlin to Dresden railway line took place, it was decided that Wunsdorf held a significant strategic advantage and because of this it became a military headquarters two years following. A telephone and telegraph office was built in 1912. By the start of the first world war, Wunsdorf had already become Europe's largest military base, boasting 60,000 acres of land. A year later, the first mosque was built in Germany on the site. This was to accommodate for the Muslim prisoners of war which were housed there. They were known as the Halbmondlager or Crescent Moon camp. After the war, the Wunsdorf Headquarters was converted into a military sports school in 1919. It was even used to train athletes for the Olympic games in Berlin in 1936. During the uprising of the Third Reich, a network of highly modernised tunnels and bunkers were built, including a communications centre, known as the Zeppelin. A year Maybach I and II were built which coincided with the Zeppelin bunker. A ring tunnel connected all the bunkers to each other and were disguised as ordinary homes on the ground, to avoid suspicion. The construction of these bunkers wasn't completed until 1940, a year after war was declared. From 1943 the Haus der Offiezere was temporarily converted into a hospital to treat wounded German soldiers. Two years later, in 1945 the Red Army had invaded East Germany and quickly seized control of Wunsdorf. This was when it was renamed the Haus der Offiezere which translates to House of the Officer. During Soviet occupation of Wunsdorf in the GDR, the Haus der Offiezere became a place of art and culture. The former sports halls and gymnasiums were torn down and replaced with elaborate theatres and concert halls. Daily deliveries of supplies came all the way from Moscow on a direct train line and the locals nicknamed it 'little Moscow' due to the number of roughly 60,000 Russian inhabitants. This continued for almost 50 years, until the reunification of Germany when it was handed back. The last remaining Russians eventually left in 1994 and it has remained unoccupied since. Visit The photos I have compiled for this post were taken on two separate occasions. Wanted to give a good representation of the location, as there is a lot to see. Unfortunately some of my photographs were taken when I first started getting into the hobby, so I hope they do enough justice and excuse the quality of said images. Second visit was on a solo trip to Germany, giving me plenty of time to mooch. Would consider the Haus der Offiezere one of my favourite locations and I hope you enjoy my report. Externals Internals Thank you for reading.
  22. 2 points
    Great theme and nice shots. Later I will have a look for some of my door-pics.
  23. 2 points
    I've checked my photos and put together a collection of (more or less) endless corridors. Some pics are already very old and my editing from that time is ... hmm ... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33
  24. 2 points
    One from back In Jan As the weekend approached, as did another explore for myself @eoa and @monk. Seems we are a good trio of bell ends and something usually goes wrong somewhere down the line and Moel Fferna wasn’t going to let us (or shall I say me) down. Anyway, Myself and @EOA started the day with our customary maccies breakfast (minus the spiced cookie latte this time) we then met @Monk nearer to the mine. We’d heard the walk was a bit of a pig upto the mine so we opted to utilise the jeep which took us as close as we could manage, but still a bit of a walk away. Ah well it saved our legs A LOT. The weather was, well, yeah…. you can see from the pictures! So after a bit of a trek through the snow we found the air shaft and @EOA worked his ropey magic and rigged up 2 lines for us noobz (me and @Monk) to covert absolute pro umbex urbseil down the shaft to have amooch around the mine! Top day, the mine is bloody huge, unfortunately we didn’t find the bridge of death as we only had wellies and it was a tad too deep for us to carry on that way. So a return trip isin order. As I said earlier, Moel Fferna wasn’t to let me down. As I was trying to ascend out of the chamber I put all of my weight on my right leg pushed up and POP my knee let go. I managed to get myself out and hobble back to the car. Turns out I have partially tore a ligament off my bone and damaged my meniscus. YAY. All in all another fucking epic mooch with two top blokes in some mint weather conditions playing with ropes, beers, mines and cameras. AWESOME Update. So I have been to the fracture clinic I'm awaiting a scan but the consultant is very confident i have torn my cartilage and will need keyhole surgery. Great History Early workings tended to be in surface pits, but as the work progressed downwards, it became necessary to work underground. This was often accompanied by the driving of one or more adits to gain direct access to a Level. In some rare instances, such as here (Moel Fferna), there is no trace of surface workings and the workings were entiely underground. Moel Frerna has chambers which follow the slate vein, connected via a series of horizontal Floors (or 'Levels'). The chambers vary in size and are divided by 'pillars' or walls which support the roof. The floors are connected by 'Inclines' which used wedge-shaped trolleys to move trucks between levels. At Moel Fferna a team could produce up to 35 tons of finished slate a week. In 1877 they received about 7 shillings a ton for this. After paying wages for the manager, clerks and 'trammers' the company could make a clear profit of twice this amount. This system was not finally abolished until after the Second World War. Pics Here we are at the top of the airshaft whilst @EOA rigs it up. (don’t we look like pros?) @monk abseiling in. we did have an electron ladder there too but its bloody awkward so it was easier to just abseil in past it. @EOA urbseiling in The first few sections of the mine are very damp and a pain to photograph due to the amount f moisture in the air. This was the flooded section. It was just above wellies but we couldn’t be arsed getting wet feet. @EOA did though because he is a balloon. @Monk snapping away It’s hard to gauge the size of these chambers even with myself in the shot you don’t get a true feel for the sheer scale of them Pikied carriages RIP ladder Some of the Graff 33ri3 wheelbarrow pushed around by the headless mine man. On the 12th hour of everyday you can hear the squeak of the pikied wheel. There was plenty of cool little walkways between the chambers. A winch still in situ up at the top too. The most photogenic rusty old pump in existence. Last but not least another groupshot underneath the cog support. Oh and if anyone is interested a quick video chucked together. <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/dc_8V5x3KDo" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>
  25. 2 points
    The Jordanhill Campus is an historic estate within the boundaries of Jordanhill in Glasgow, Scotland. The buildings have stood empty since 2012, until which time it served as the Faculty of Education of the University of Strathclyde. Sometimes you just can't understand why no one else has posted a report. This is one of those places! Initially @The Amateur Wanderer and I had a look around the place during our Christmas trip to Scotland, and then I returned a short while later with @SpiderMonkey. We only looked around one building, the David Stow Building which is the main attraction, the original and oldest part of the site. There is also a huge 1960s concrete extension behind, but the sooner that gets pulled down the better - we didn't bother with it! History The buildings date back to 1837 when former merchant and educational pioneer David Stow opened the Dundas Vale Normal Seminary, Europe’s first purpose-built training institution for teachers. Some remnants of the old seminary still remain today – rooms with rows of sinks which were more recently used as storage, and wooden lockers can still be found. In 1913 the Glasgow Corporation agreed a deal to buy the estate, and build both a teacher training college and the associated Jordanhill School on the site. A new building was planned to provide teacher training. With the new school completed in 1920 and the college in 1921, the now Grade B listed David Stow Building facilitated all teacher training provided under the unified University of Glasgow. Centrally funded and with no ties with churches, the college was largely non-residential and its range of work was wider. A shortage of teachers throughout Britain in the late 1950s lead to large scale expansion at Jordanhill. Construction of a new purpose-built facility commenced in 1961, replacing a much older manor house on the site. In 1993, the college was required to merge with a higher education facility. The University of Strathclyde approached the college, and an agreement between both institutions was reached. In 1993 Jordanhill College became the Faculty of Education of the University of Strathclyde. With better use of facilities, and an ageing campus at Jordanhill which was highly protected by preservation orders, in 2010 the decision was made to close Jordanhill campus and move the Faculty all courses to its John Anderson Campus. 2011-12 was the last academic year held at the Jordanhill Campus before the move took place. David Stow Building - Entrance Hall Francis Tombs Hall Staircases and Corridors Teaching rooms and facilities Other areas Hidden Relics There were a few areas around the building that hadn’t been refurbished and contained relics from older uses...
  26. 2 points
    Closed German thermal gym.
  27. 2 points
    Closed glassworks. The office building looks like they closed it yesterday. There is not even a trace of dust. The room in which there are samples of what they made there - amazing. Rows of glass lamps ... until you do not want to leave. I'm sorry that it's all waiting ... just for what. Fortunately, the object is well guarded ... probably because it looks like it looks.
  28. 2 points
    This is my first Urbex adventure. I recently moved to West Sussex and though I'd have a look around at some popular and easily accessible sites to explore. I stumbled upon Bedham Chapel and after some quick research, I found the location and travelled there. We drove down a single track road until spotted it in the woodland below us. We parked a few hundred metres further down the road and set out on foot to get there. This is my video report that I captured and I apologise for the clickbaity title of the video and the fact that it's so weird it looks staged. But it really isn't! My girlfriends reaction to this is real and we were definitely creeped out by our find. If anyone has any idea of what this ceremony was about, please let me know! Video Link
  29. 2 points
    Hiya! So... this is me! My name's Faith, I'm always looking for adventuring buddies and travel pretty much constantly as I write about my travels on my website www.lifeoutthere.co.uk This year I'm hoping to explore more of the UK- there are a lot of abandoned islands! Also, ghost towns in the US on my way to Wasteland Weekend (Mad Max tribute festival). I live on a boat and love rock/metal music. F p.s. My IG is full of locations and postapocalyptic stuff too- it's "lifeoutthereblog"
  30. 2 points
    My first post to this forum. Today we visited a factory somewhere in Belgium. It used to be a plant where soda but mostly water was bottled and then prepared for distribution to grocery stores in Belgium and surrounding countries. The factory stopped being productive because of a severe collapse of the roof. We didn't have any hightech-equipment so I used my iPhone to make some pics. enjoy!
  31. 1 point
    Welcome back . It's a nice little place this and i'm glad to see it's still on the map. Seems like more and more gauges and dials are disappearing every time I see it!
  32. 1 point
    That's an explosion just waiting to happen! Great photographs of an awesome location once again @GREGUL1979
  33. 1 point
    Awesome set there @jones-y-gog
  34. 1 point
  35. 1 point
    A small chapel built in a small park. Just behind it is a steel gate and stairs leading to the crypt. In the middle, cool, quiet ... dark. A lit torch reveals the secret of the crypt. Stacked coffins, side by side. Judging by the size, adults buried there ... and between them ... between them two small coffins, probably they were babies. Seven family members buried in a common crypt ... (Translated in a translator)
  36. 1 point
    Villa Scorpio History Unfortunately I couldn't find a great deal of history surrounding this location but from what I have gathered it was built at some point during the late 19th century. The former occupier owned a large cement factory in the same town. I would imagine the family were quite well off, as it was very grand and exquisite building. The design of the villa shared various similarities with the Art Nouveau style of architecture. Featuring a stunning staircase, a beautiful skylight and an decorative greenhouse. Our visit Visited with @darbians and @vampiricsquid on our tour of Italy last summer. As soon as we arrived outside, we knew it was going to be a good explore. Hope you enjoy my photos! Externals Internals
  37. 1 point
    Having seen some older reports on this place and being a sucker for old theatres, it’s one that has always been on my list. Taking the long drive back from work (Bangor to Stockport) I get an email with info that this place is open and doable. I decided to pick @eastyham up and take the 1.5hr trip over to Donny. Ideally I’d of gone during daylight but I didn’t want to miss out on it. So complete darkness it is. Had a bit of bother of some goons who work in the shopping centre but still managed to sneak in another way. Really enjoyed it in here. The floors are mega dodgy towards the front of the building but it is rather lovely along that side where the old dressing rooms are. I particularly loved the fly loft level with the old painted signs and poster remains. History The Doncaster Grand was constructed in 1899 and originally stood on a prominent site in a shopping street facing the main railway station. However, town centre improvements robbed it of any sensible context and it is no longer in a street, but attached rather indirectly to the Frenchgate shopping centre. It still faces the station, however is separated from it by a busy inner ring road which comes so close that it has actually snipped off a lower corner of the stage house. It was threatened with demolition until an energetic local campaign and Friends group secured statutory designation in 1994. The frontage, which, with an improved setting, could again become a local landmark, is three-storeyed. Baroque in treatment, with a complex rhythm of bays articulated by coupled and single pilasters and groupings of arched windows and doorways all rendered. There is a large broken segmental pediment over the three central bays with date 1899. It retains an intimate auditorium. Two well curved balconies with good plasterwork on fronts, the upper gallery is benched. Single pedimented and delicately decorated plasterwork boxes in otherwise plain side walls, flanking a decorative plasterwork rectangular-framed 7.9m (26ft) proscenium. More decorative drops to the ante-proscenium walls, bolection mouldings and plasterwork panels to the stalls and ceiling. Deep central oval ceiling dome. The Grand could quite readily be restored and reopened. It could offer amateur and community drama and musical productions, small scale touring and other activities to complement Doncaster's new venue, Cast. Pics It’s so weird seeing a building as grand as this just surrounded by utter tripe. The old dressing rooms. There was some pipework from the old gas lamps remaining in here. And then the newer porcelain roses with brass? Conduit. This whole side of the building was rotten. It looks like the flat roof bit behind the grand façade is holding water and pissing in when its bad. one of too proper cool dated bar areas. My idea of heaven. A theatre brewdog. For the la la la la LADZ Not sure if this was a ticket or a newspaper clipping? This tiling reminds of any sort of leisure site back when I was a kid. The other bar on the top level. This was suoer cool for me. Not looking good for itself here. Some great art deco styling on the seats. Im guessing this upstairs part was shut off for years whilst it was a bingo hall. LBL? and some old pictures I found on google from when it was a bingo hall.
  38. 1 point
    Incredible climate. Several work halls, in one stand drills, lathes, milling machines ... right next to carriages and goods wagons. Everything is gently sunk in the green eaves ... Some 150 skilled workers used to work in these halls. Today there is silence. (translated in a translator)
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    HI all Im Urban Cleetus new to this site and photography. I have been Watching the group and waiting to find somewhere which hasn't been done, before i post So here we go, My first post! History: The factory in Harrow first opened in 1891 and was also Eastman Kodak’s first manufacturing base outside America.The factory in Harrow was the largest photographic manufacturing plant in the British Commonwealth and at the height of its output in the 1950s it employed more than 6,000 people. The site provided printing paper for professional use of mural images and also personal use by amateur photographers.Kodak has been present in Harrow for more than 120 years, the factory’s history charting much of the history of popular photography itself. Due to the ever-growing popularity of digital photography, in 2005 track four at the factory was shut and ended the site’s production of film, leading to the loss of 250 jobs.Now due to increasing financial pressures in recent years, Kodak has sold off the Harrow site for development. The last shift was carried out Friday 2nd December 2016 I visited this site three time in the 8 days since its closure with the company of 2 explorers i know. Beware dogs and heavy security on site
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    Tnx chaps. .its all lit with a few flashlights. One for the foreground. And another for the far end. For soe reason no bats found here.
  41. 1 point
    Yeah I will do m8 I did Daresbury hall tonight and although its completely inaccessible I did get a few half decent snaps. Its pretty, much a no-go these days m8!
  42. 1 point
    That's pretty impressive... you can't beat sneaking into a prison!
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    As the title says Thought of it when I found a load today of explores I did years ago.A quick commentry as to why would be good too. I think this was my first trip to West Park. It had been started the night before in the neigthbouring park, progressed to dodging the PIRs and then the infamous MC hammer. Good times.
  44. 1 point
    Thanks! I'm new to the urbex-scene. I'm mostly interested by the history of the buildings, what the the reason was to abandon the place and to see how the places are taken back by nature. I'm interested to find more Urbex locations to do some research of and just peacefully walk trough it and make some nice pictures. Kind regards
  45. 1 point
    That’s an awesome first report, thanks for taking the time to put it together
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    Hi @Dubbed Navigator thanks for the welcome, been here a few weeks now. We started urbex about a year ago and have covered some amazing ground since then. There are two of us for the big explores and a couple others that come along on local ones. I’m a software and web developer during the week I also do social media marketing and seo. Urbex is a hobby for us both and we’re slowlt gaining a following 🤪
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    couple more of my favourite thing to get amongst #puddlesgetmewet
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