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  1. 12 points
    First report from the latest trip abroad! This old mansion sits in a small village, the gates are wide open and the locals don't seem to even care about it. The highlight here was definitely the grand entrance hall, surrounded by pillars, red carpet, grand staircase, and a lumiere-esque balcony above it. There were also some pretty nice side rooms too. From what I can gather the last use this building had was as a hotel, judging by the slight modernization of some areas. A nice relaxed explore with @AndyK! and Kriegaffe9. Featuring: My tripod because I'm too lazy to shop it out. Cheers
  2. 12 points
    Great Tew Manor was originally built around 1730, with extensions added in 1834 and 1856. Shortly after the First World War the owner died and the house was left empty until the 1960s. A further period of neglect in the 80s left most of the house uninhabitable. One end of the house has now been renovated and is occupied but the majority of the building is still in poor condition, clad in scaffolding and plastic sheeting. Several sections of floor and ceiling have now collapsed, the 'ongoing restoration project' doesn't appear to have got very far sadly. Shame as it's a spectacular building. I'd never heard of this place before, it just popped up while I was doing some research. I soon discovered a flurry of reports from 2010 to 2013, but nothing ever since. A few comments on the old reports suggested the whole place had been fully refurbished but I couldn't find anything online to verify this so we decided to go take a look for ourselves. Glad we did as it's not changed much at all and it's an absolute belter. Shame we only had 45 mins of daylight left though as I easily could have spent hours in there. There were lots of things I didn't capture with my camera, old documents dating back over 100 years and tunnels running underneath the whole of the house. A good end to a quality weekend with my bitches @Miss.Anthrope and Cankles, perhaps we will return here some time for afternoon tea. 1. 2. 3. This was inside the dome shaped roof section, you can just make out the decorative patterns on the walls 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. Roof collapse in the attic 17. and on the floor below.... 18. However this was the best part, the Gothic revival library. An absolute stunner and somehow still in pristine condition. 19. 20. 21. Thanks for looking
  3. 11 points
    History: Sunnyside Royal Hospital, originally called the Montrose Asylum, was a psychiatric hospital located north of Montrose in Scotland. Sunnyside was the second site for the local psychiatric hospital in Angus. The original Montrose Asylum, which was the first asylum in Scotland, was funded by public subscription established by local woman Susan Carnegie and opened in 1781. Expanding patient numbers led to the purchase of a new site in Hillside and the current hospital buildings opened in 1857. The site was further developed with the construction of a new facility for private patients called Carnegie House in 1899. Despite this addition, overcrowding was a problem, as the asylum’s patient numbers had grown to 670 by 1900. Two new buildings – Howden Villa (1901) and Northesk Villa (1904) – were added. Additional staff were recruited and the Westmount Cottages were built in 1905 to house them. In 1911 the lease of Sunnyside Farm expired and over 52 acres were purchased for £4500. A further development was the addition of Angus House, which was built in 1939 to accommodate elderly patients suffering from dementia. From the 1970s, advances in psychiatric care and greater community resources, including supported accommodation and the set up of three community mental health teams in the 1990s, led to reduced patient numbers and the closure of some of the buildings on the Sunnyside site. The whole site was officially closed in late 2011 and most patients were sent to a new £20 million build at Stracathro Hospital (also in Angus) - the Susan Carnegie Centre. Others were placed in the community. Sunnyside was open for 230 years before its closure, and was the oldest psychiatric hospital in Scotland. Visit: Covering the whole place Vastly in around 8 hours and probably missing some parts out was definitely worth the 12 hour-round trip. Hearing people mentioning silent alarms, secca & police in other reports had me a little skeptical about how short our explore would be, But with a week of planning and very early darting the explore was a success!! Another one ticked off my list! Visisted with a non member. also a thanks to @AndyK! for some info. top man. 1) The front of the hospital 2) Glass corridor 3) One of the main corridors in the main building 4) The main hall 5) Curtains left hanging in a ward 6) Corridors of the many isolation cell wards 7) 8) 9) 10) A different ward from the Infirmary 11) Violent patients would have their teeth removed to minimize "biting" 12) Body Fridge 13) Body fridge with a body lift 14) The chapel of rest 15) Main chapel with pews removed 16) Zodiac roof from the doctors Billiards room 17) More isolation cells in the basement 18) Marble floors are Popular in the outer buildings Thanks for looking GK WAX
  4. 11 points
    This building used to be a monastery but in the first World War it was turned into an emergency hospital for soldiers who fought in the trenches. Many Belgian soldiers were brought into care here, which explains why the ' don't spit on the floor" sign is both in French and English. We came here on a chilly winters day in December. I loved how the warm sunlight supported the nice colours in the building. It's also the first location in which i stripped down to take a selfie, to find out later on, loads of other explorers had been there on the same day. this could had turned out very awkward 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Thanks for watching.
  5. 10 points
    Having seen some older reports on this place and being a sucker for old theatres, it’s one that has always been on my list. Taking the long drive back from work (Bangor to Stockport) I get an email with info that this place is open and doable. I decided to pick @eastyham up and take the 1.5hr trip over to Donny. Ideally I’d of gone during daylight but I didn’t want to miss out on it. So complete darkness it is. Had a bit of bother of some goons who work in the shopping centre but still managed to sneak in another way. Really enjoyed it in here. The floors are mega dodgy towards the front of the building but it is rather lovely along that side where the old dressing rooms are. I particularly loved the fly loft level with the old painted signs and poster remains. History The Doncaster Grand was constructed in 1899 and originally stood on a prominent site in a shopping street facing the main railway station. However, town centre improvements robbed it of any sensible context and it is no longer in a street, but attached rather indirectly to the Frenchgate shopping centre. It still faces the station, however is separated from it by a busy inner ring road which comes so close that it has actually snipped off a lower corner of the stage house. It was threatened with demolition until an energetic local campaign and Friends group secured statutory designation in 1994. The frontage, which, with an improved setting, could again become a local landmark, is three-storeyed. Baroque in treatment, with a complex rhythm of bays articulated by coupled and single pilasters and groupings of arched windows and doorways all rendered. There is a large broken segmental pediment over the three central bays with date 1899. It retains an intimate auditorium. Two well curved balconies with good plasterwork on fronts, the upper gallery is benched. Single pedimented and delicately decorated plasterwork boxes in otherwise plain side walls, flanking a decorative plasterwork rectangular-framed 7.9m (26ft) proscenium. More decorative drops to the ante-proscenium walls, bolection mouldings and plasterwork panels to the stalls and ceiling. Deep central oval ceiling dome. The Grand could quite readily be restored and reopened. It could offer amateur and community drama and musical productions, small scale touring and other activities to complement Doncaster's new venue, Cast. Pics It’s so weird seeing a building as grand as this just surrounded by utter tripe. The old dressing rooms. There was some pipework from the old gas lamps remaining in here. And then the newer porcelain roses with brass? Conduit. This whole side of the building was rotten. It looks like the flat roof bit behind the grand façade is holding water and pissing in when its bad. one of too proper cool dated bar areas. My idea of heaven. A theatre brewdog. For the la la la la LADZ Not sure if this was a ticket or a newspaper clipping? This tiling reminds of any sort of leisure site back when I was a kid. The other bar on the top level. This was suoer cool for me. Not looking good for itself here. Some great art deco styling on the seats. Im guessing this upstairs part was shut off for years whilst it was a bingo hall. LBL? and some old pictures I found on google from when it was a bingo hall.
  6. 10 points
    So I've been to this location, which was a dancing/disco/club whatever you prefer. But not your usual one, this one exist out of tents! Seen it passing by a few times.. Started searching for it and found it. Now we only had to pick a date and go out on explore! Last weekend was the time! We already left on Friday, and wanted to do this location Friday also. But thanks to our amazing road network in Belgium and their works, we'd end up there after sunset. So we ended up here Sunday , on our way back home! Heard it was actually an easy entrance somewhere upfront the fences where laying down.. They said.. Well looks like they've put them back up! Some of these beta fences you find on every location, decorated with lovely (fresh?) razor-wire! Looked a bit around and seemed like they made work of it closing all the openings. So went around the other side only to find this small piece not having any razor-wire, perfect! Once on terrain it already looked pretty trashed outside, and of course as was inside. Seemed like people needed some club lights for their homes, and alot of other stuff that went missing.. Sadly there was a fire not so long ago, and i believe wind have destroyed on of the main tents ( or could be partial due to fire ). This club was actually already existing for a long time, i believe nearly 20 years. It had to shut down it's door, as less people started to visit the place. It got blown in a second life, but that didn't last long. Naamloos_HDR22 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR18 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR8 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR4 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR6 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR11 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR10 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR2 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR14 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR13 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR12 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr _DSC9607 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr _DSC9613 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr _DSC9599 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR15 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR16 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Naamloos_HDR16 by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Hope it's a bit readable !
  7. 10 points
    History T.G.Green & Co Ltd originally operated from the village of Church Gresley, South Derbyshire between 1864 and 2007. More famous for their blue and white striped 'Cornish Kitchen Ware' produced from the early 1920's (then known as 'E-Blue') the pottery produced many hundreds of patterns from Yellow wares, Victorian transfer prints, colourful hand painted Art Nouveau & vibrant enamelled Art Deco patterns, Wartime utility pottery, avant garde Retro designs and many well known Brewery wares, employing up to 1,000 local staff at the height of production. Now, sadly, the old pottery site lays in ruins, the land under private ownership, never likely to ever see production again, the last of the South Derbyshire potteries has gone, although as it nears its 100th anniversary the traditional Cornishware is still manufactured and sold through a new T.G.Green & Co Ltd. Explore This is somewhere I have wanted to visit for some time so pretty pleased we eventually got around to doing it. Visited with @hamtagger. We got here and spent a little while just venturing round the site, there was a bit of activity from the far side but from what I could see there are various parts of the site being used. Not a hugely massive site but we spent quite a number of hours here. I really loved this place. Although a bit late on getting here and missing out on a few bits I have seen in various other reports there was still enough here to see and the decay is so much more established which made everything much more photogenic. Well worth a trip if you havent already. It was quite nice to see some finished products So, on with the pics. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 One of the companies they supplied to 15 16 17 18 19 Thanks for looking!
  8. 10 points
    This was a fun explore. Presumably there must have been a threat from animal rights protestors when it was active here so the site is well secured. High fences equipped with beam sensors and shake sensors stretch the entire perimeter, with remote controlled infra red cameras pointed at all the weak points. The site is also partly still active as the relocation process hasn't quite reached completion yet. The main building (The Francis Crick Institute) was our main target although we passed many outbuildings along the way; houses, stables, a sub-station and many more. It took us a while to figure out a way into the main building but once inside it was a pretty chilled affair. Unfortunately the labs had already been cleared out so there were no pickled animals in jars lying around, which was a shame, coz you know, that's the kinda grim stuff we were hoping for! However, all was not lost as the building itself had some nice art deco features which sort of made up for it. Visited with @extreme_ironing, and again with @AndyK! and @Miss.Anthrope. History The National Institute for Medical Research (commonly abbreviated to NIMR), is a medical research institute based in Mill Hill, on the outskirts of London, England. It is principally funded by the Medical Research Council(MRC), and is its largest establishment and one of only three designated as an 'Institute'. The Medical Research Council, founded in 1913, was immediately charged with establishing a central research institute in London. Later that year, premises at Hampstead were acquired and the National Institute for Medical Research was founded. In the 1930s, the decision was made to move the Institute to new premises. An imposing copper-roofed building at Mill Hill was designed by Maxwell Ayrton, the architect of the original Wembley Stadium, and construction began in 1937. Occupation was delayed when war broke out in 1939 and the building was given to the Women's Royal Naval Service. The building was returned to the MRC in autumn 1949 and the official opening ceremony took place on 5 May 1950, with King George VI and Queen Elizabeth present. In 1962, Nobel Prize winner Sir Peter Medawar became director and, consistent with his research interests, established NIMR as a major centre for immunological research. Following an illness, Medawar retired as director in 1971 to be replaced by Sir Arnold Burgen. Burgan had an interest in nuclear magnetic resonance techniques and formed the MRC Biomedical NMR Centre at the Institute in 1980. Sir Dai Rees became director in 1982 to be replaced by Sir John Skehel in 1987. Since then NIMR has continued to excel scientifically, reporting perhaps most famously the discovery of the sex determining gene SRY, in 1991. In 2003, as part of their Forward Investment Strategy, the MRC announced plans to consider moving NIMR from its current location to a university/medical school site, to enhance its ability "to translate its biomedical research into practical health outcomes." University College London was selected as a preferred partner institution, and in 2016 the NIMR began its migration to the new Francis Crick Institute, constructed next to St Pancras railway station in central London. The rooms and other locations in the building were used in the film Batman Begins, for the Arkham Asylum scenes. 1. The Francis Crick Institute, Mill Hill Laboratory. 2. Nice art deco entrance hall 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Map of the building layout 10. Some funny scribblings on the wall 11. A few photos from the various laboratories which made up about 90% of the building. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. & 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. A nice safe vault in the basement 22. 23. The Directors 24. 25. Looking down from the roof. The building with a green roof was a nice looking hall but unfortunately locked. 26. 27. Games Room (locked) 28. Refectory 29. 30. 31. Christmas decorations still hang from the ceiling 32. Art deco library, a nice surprise located on the 5th and 6th floors. 33. 34. 35. That's all folks, thanks for looking
  9. 10 points
    Worthen Farmhouse The Explore This was from last April. I can't remember a huge amount about this location as myself and @Urbexbandoned had spent the weekend further south in Wales and we were working our way back up to this area before heading back home. There was a farmer bumming about in a tractor right across the road spreading his animal shite around the place, but from memory it was a nice easy and relaxed mooch. Out in the back garden area there was various abandoned cars and and a couple of old tractors, which were nice to look at, especially the old 3.3 litre Vauxhall Cresta. The History History on this place is pretty vague unfortunately and all that i could find through extensive research (copied from Tracey's report @Urbexbandoned) is that "the former resident passed away some time ago and apparently her son couldn't bring himself to sell the house or sort it out so it has been left to decay naturally." The Pictures 1. 2. 3. 4/5. 6. 7. Bedpans are useful eh? 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. The Vauxhall Cresta 3.3 Litre Straight Six (Thanks to Hamtagger Senior for the vehicle ID ) 20. That's it, thanks for taking the time to have a look and feedback always appreciated
  10. 10 points
    These two old power stations sit on the edge of a live steelworks site. There is some really impressive old industry to see here, including a massive old gas engine hall which still contains one huge engine, which was actually the biggest of its kind in the world. All that's left of the other smaller power station are the boilers and a couple of small control rooms, no turbines But it's still impressive to see some dated industry. Visited with @AndyK! and Kriegaffe9. The first building we entered was the smaller station: After a while walking around on giant suspended pipes and through asbestos we find this compressor room: Gas engine hall: One of two more modern turbines inside the hall: Cheers
  11. 9 points
    At first glance, the huge psychiatry campus with its historical buildings reminds you of certain pieces of literature or films. The early morning haze lies over the hospital grounds and really adds to that somewhat uncanny atmosphere. It´s still pretty early in the morning. Thus, we almost don´t meet any people. A situation, that changed completely on our way back, when we had to keep as insconspicious as possible among patients, nursing stuff and "normal" visitors. Yet, everything´s still pretty calm and we can enjoy the morning silence as we walk across the park-like grounds of the hospital, walking on paths which are bordered by beautiful flowers. Here and there, beautiful buildings appear. Everything occurs to be peaceful and neat. Almost a place for your well-being, at least form the perspective of a non-patient. Not before we pass by a building, fenced up by thick bars, reality sets in. As if by command, we can suddenly hear screams coming out of the building. The hospital is largely still active. Only a small part has been disused out of unknown reasons. It seems like time´s been standing still here for a pretty long time. Old benches would´ve been disappeared in a jungle-like thicket entirely, if it wasn´t for their bright red colours. Across an architectural more than beautiful patio we enter the building in front of us. Inside, particularly striking are the numerous toys scattred around the building. What exact purpose the old building served remains a mystery.
  12. 9 points
    Visited this old house a few months back.from the outside it just looks like a very small run down derelict cottage.but once inside its like a little time warp.nothing had been touched for a very long time.the pictures still hung on the wall.cobwebs everywhere.the place was a nightmare to shoot and very dark and dingy in most rooms
  13. 9 points
    History (taken from The_Raw) Great Tew Manor was originally built around 1730, with extensions added in 1834 and 1856. Shortly after the First World War the owner died and the house was left empty until the 1960s. A further period of neglect in the 80s left most of the house uninhabitable. Visited after a meal in a nice pub with @The_Raw and @Maniac. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
  14. 8 points
    This location is the one where you quickly hear the stories about: impossible, the mount everest of the urbex, don't even try ... But sometmes this steel giant likes some company over too and there were rumours of a slight chance to get in. The date was set already and actually something else was on the program but when one fellow exploer had heard that there were loopholes in the net of the impenetrable hell gate (read: fences, 3 rows of nato wire and another 200V power wire as icing on the cake) we wanted to attempt. The hell gate was only a smaller obstacle, because once you pass you are on the playground of little demons in white vans that approach almost without any sound, or with a shepherd dog at their side. With all of the above in mind, I had a very turbulent night's sleep 3 nights in advance. In the end, the steel gods favoured us that day, which enabled me to enjoy this beautiful exploration. Very briefly it became exciting when there were 5 people in the building with helmets and hi-visability jackets. After some back-and-forth texting with my mates, and some cat and mouse tricks to avoid thm, I first hid in a closet and then rushed me to the top where the rest of our team was. Once there, I crossed the 5 fluos ... 5 eyes on me, 2 of them with open mouth. A French voice 'mais, elle est ici tout seule?' 'vous n'avez pas peur'? It turned out to be just the most flashy explorers you can imagine, not to mention the decibels they produced. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
  15. 8 points
    lil place in my backyard... i've been coming to this spot for over a decade. tragically i've only picked up a camera a few years back. it's nice to be able to visit a location many times in the continuation of self improvement and documenting the destruction of a location. heres a few shots from over the past year: pano from last summer. i ran here one day as the sun set. i wanted to catch the lighting. belly of the boiler. behind the controls. another scrapper hard at work i see. test shop. looking down the next year would be sad times as kids from all over began to populate this place. i used to be able to walk around for weeks without running into a soul, and now there could be 30 kids here. in a short period of time shity taggers would desicrate the temple. angering the gods. even the snow doesnt cover that grime. she sure is a beauty tho. i've been to quite a few generating stations and none compare it felt like a train station grande hall. standing in the freezing cold taking a pic of snow falling (or ceiling) so ladylike everyones favorite hallway which was in a movie for 3 seconds. (relax-its photoshopped.....or is it???) until next time . . .
  16. 8 points
    This one required an early start, but the morning adventure to The Kings Hall was worth the effort. Visited with Zombizza. History "Located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was built in 1916 and was designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The King’s Hall building has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and it was soon screening religious films. By 1926, it was operating as a regular cinema, still managed by the Methodist church. The King’s Hall Cinema was closed in 1937. It then reverted back to a Methodist Church use as the King’s Hall Methodist Church. They vacated the building in January 2013" The Explore Started nice and early, and managed our entrance fairly incident free...if we don't count the massive tear in my trousers.. It's a pretty spectacular place with a wonderful blend of natural decay and marvelous original features/architecture. With little to no daylight, we decided to wonder round the back rooms while the sun came up before the spending too much time on the main attraction, the large auditorium. The rooms around the back are a weird mix of new and old, some of them being more disgusting than others. One room was so pungent that I took 2 steps in before bailing out. There was also one room that was filled with beds, old food packets and needles. Looked a few years old, but squatters for sure. The larger rooms consisted of meeting rooms, prayer rooms and teaching rooms. All of them had funky wavy flooring where the wooden floor tiles had expanded with moisture. Eventually the sun came up and the auditorium started to flood with the golden morning light. After a few hours we left, although the exit was hilariously unsubtle. Photos The Auditorium
  17. 8 points
    The last piece of Pye. I’m sure everyone who visited Pyestock before it was demolished will remember the Anechoic Facility, that one last bit of the puzzle that couldn’t be visited. The blue-tailed building was still in use long after the demolition of the rest of the site, and is the only surviving part of Pyestock’s original host of facilities. This last part of the site has now also closed. Visited with @SpiderMonkey and @darbians. The National Gas Turbine Establishment. For those who don’t know, NGTE Pyestock - The National Gas Turbine Establishment - was a huge industrial site in Fleet, Hampshire. The site was used to test jet engines during their development and could simulate the conditions of flight in huge wind tunnels. Large scale expansion took place throughout the 50s and 60s to facilitate the much larger jet engines being developed such as those used on Concorde. The site finally closed in 2000 due to a decline in jet engine development and the advent of computer aided simulations. The Noise Test Facility A lot of research into noise took place at NGTE over the years, and the first anechoic chamber was built in the early 1960s. The increasing demand for quieter aircraft stimulated the more research work, and as a result a larger test facility capable of undertaking large scale noise tests on a variety of gas turbine components opened in the 1970s. The new facility consisted of two main laboratories, fully independent of each other. These were the Absorber Rig Facility and the Anechoic Chamber facility. The Absorber Rig Facility was the first to be completed and it came into service in the summer of 1972. The Anechoic Chamber Facility was commissioned just over one year later in early 1974. The noise test facility in the 1970s before the blue inlets were installed The blue air intakes and associated fans were installed during a refit in the 1990s The plans below show the general layout of the building. The anechoic chamber is central with silenced air intakes to the left and the silenced exhaust duct and extraction fans to the right. The induced airflow passes through the anechoic chamber where the noise tests were conducted. The Anechoic Facility has a 10,000 cubic metre chamber for noise testing in which the enclosed working volume has nearly zero noise reflection, thereby reproducing environmental conditions which can be compared to those in flight, and permits work to separately identify the source and direction of noise wave phenomena. The building is principally intended for the noise testing of jets, turbines and certain configurations of acoustically lined ducts. Broadly, the facility consists of an acoustically lined main test chamber 85ft wide and 46ft high with an overall length of 88ft, but which is reduced to 52ft at the working section. The jet flow from the main noise source is projected towards an acoustically lined, flared duct 28ft diameter at inlet with a 20ft diameter throat, which acts as an exhaust inducer. General view of the anechoic chamber with the exhaust duct to the left and working section to the right View towards the exhaust duct showing fixed microphone towers View from a hatch at the top of the working section, showing ceiling mounted crane Three observation galleries were positioned around the chamber. Each could be retracted to preserve the room's anechoic properties: The most striking feature of the anechoic chamber itself is the sound reflecting wedges of which there are nearly 7,000 units covering the walls, ceiling and floor. Three individual wedges are mounted together on a base-frame to form each single unit 610mm square; these units are then arranged over the chamber surfaces so that each successive unit has its wedge peak edges at right angles to the neighbouring unit. The working section was modified during refurbishment in the 1990s. A permanent nozzle was fitted through which high pressure air could be blown in using the blue external assembly shown in earlier pictures. Inside the working section the area where jet engines would be positioned was replaced with a network of pipelines feeding the new nozzle. Large air inlet pipe behind the nozzle The rig room before the refit The exhaust collector was responsible for transferring the jet engine exhaust gasses and induced air from the chamber to the exhaust silencing structure behind it. It is acoustically treated around its periphery, this lagging consists of heavy density rockwool 8in thick, faced with cotton sheeting and perforated galvanised mild steel sheet. The duct itself is prefabricated from 0.25in thick steel plate and has a total length of 35ft. The exhaust collector Selfie shows the scale of this huge hole in the wall Behind the exhaust collector Air and exhaust gasses then pass into the exhaust silencing structure. The main features of the structure, other than the exhaust collector are the acoustically slabbed walls of the concrete ducts which reverse the flowpath, two sets of silencing exit splitters, high and low frequency, and the ten exhaust extraction fans. Low frequency splitters on the left, and one of the two sets of high frequency splitters on the right. The pole is a fixed microphone boom. Another selfie showing scale The fan units themselves are double axial units having two counter-rotating six bladed fans in each pod, both with its own electric motor. One of the two sets of five extract fans, plus one redundant space for an additional fan. The new arrangement after the refit was particularly suited to testing ducts and propellers. One such item was found boxed up below the working section. This was possibly the last item to be tested at the site. A separate building, houses the control and engineering service equipment. This building has three floors and the heavy service plant was originally installed on the lower floor with the service supplies fed to the rig room via an underground communication duct; the main control room is on the middle floor, while the upper floor houses the ancillary electronic equipment. The control room and Fourier Analyser as originally fitted The control room was refitted with computerised equipment during the refurbishment in the 1990s. All that remains from the original control room is a single panel, the Plant Controller board.
  18. 8 points
    Krampnitz Kaserne was a military training complex built by the Germans in 1937. It was used for the training of Nazi troops until the end of the Second World War. The Germans evacuated the barracks on April 26, 1945. A day later it was taken over by Soviet troops who had immediately taken control of the area. The 35th Guards Motor Rifle Division was then stationed here until its abandonment in 1992, after the Dissolution of the Soviet Union. The whole complex consists of more than 50 buildings, mostly accommodation and storage, though it also includes an officers' club, a basketball court, a theatre and much more. Movies such as Enemy at the Gates, Inglourious Basterds, The Monuments Men, and Valkyrie shot scenes here. I came here on my own as I couldn't get any of the other lazy fuckers out of bed. I was pretty glad as it happens as I quite enjoy exploring on my own. You get round places far quicker and your senses are heightened so it can be a bit more intense. They weren't bothered anyway, they got to lie in and have kebabs for breakfast. Anyway, this was my third trip to Berlin, and although my previous two trips were fun, they were pretty boozy affairs so I didn't get much done. This time I was on a proper mission. For me these old German military sites are fascinating. To think that this place was full of Nazi troops during WWII is pretty mind blowing in itself, but even more so when you see the size of it in person. Some of the buildings are easily accessible but don't have much to offer. The more interesting buildings have been sealed pretty well but there are still ways inside for the most part. Here's some photos. 1. 2. I think this was the officers' club. Lots of grand grand rooms inside but looking a bit worse for wear now. 3. 4. 5. 6. This staircase sits underneath the famous Nazi eagle mosaic. I didn't have long here as I heard voices and people entering the building through a locked door. 7. Unfortunately however the eagle mosaic has been completely covered up with plaster. I was pretty disappointed by this but I needn't have worried as Krampnitz has tons more interesting stuff if you keep looking. You can see the eagle mural here on an old report > 8. Back outside I spotted this building through the trees 9. A basketball court / gym hall 10. I wonder if this was part of a school for children, as families spent years living here. 11. 12. 13. This small theatre was quite interesting. Only a couple of rows of seating remain. 14. 15. 16. I spotted some old German writing (siegen oder siberia) under the peely paint which translates into English as 'Victory or Siberia' 17. 18. 19. 20. There's a lot of crap graff all over the place unfortunately, I chose to avoid photographing it for the most part. These are some of the better examples I found. 21. 22. 23. Just when I thought I was done I stumbled across this grand old theatre. 24. On hearing voices approaching I made my way out and narrowly avoided bumping into a couple of men with the keys to the building. They weren't dressed like security but I didn't fancy hanging around after that. 25. Finally, some old Soviet signs and murals I found on the outside of the buildings. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. I'd like to go back and find the rest of these as I missed a large chunk of the site so there must be tons more. Thanks for looking.
  19. 8 points
    I don't have any history on this little place except for the fact that it was a farm in a remote village in Norfolk. As you can probably tell I have a little backlog. With various personal events over the last year allthough I have been out a bit I havent had much time to post so catching up on it now Thanks to @Mikeymutt for some details on this place! Helpfl as always mate Visited here with @hamtagger, we had a really relaxed explore with this one. Probably one of the fullest interior wise of the residential places we have visited but stacked with personal memoroes just such a shame to have been left behind. I remember thinking I wouldnt like to rifle through someones personal posessions but it is really nice to build upa picture of the people that once lived here. Can't remember much else except this was another place welcomed for @hamtagger having an urbex shit. I swear there is not one place we have been to where he hasn't christened the almighty ceramic throne! Anyway, on to the pics 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Thanks for looking!
  20. 8 points
    A state-of-the-art manufacturer of pipes and fittings, once fully owned by the state, went bankrupt under suspicious circumstances, just before it’s 50th birthday. Only a year before the 50th anniversary, the state sold 85% of the shares in the company to a private investment firm for roughly 300K (GBP). (the remaining 15% remained with the state.) Shortly after that, the employees (while enjoying their christmas holiday), received a letter stating the company filled for bankruptcy. Almost 400 workers lost their job and numerous attempts were made to reboot or sell the company. Unfortunately none of them successful. A few years later, questions were raised about the initial transaction, from state to private investor, as the remaining assets of the company were estimated at a total value of 5M (GBP). (Roughly 17x the original investment of the investment firm.) A short while ago, the site has been sold to a new owner and is currently being repurposed/renovated in order to house a production facility for a local company, potentially creating 200 new jobs. Anyhow, enough history for today, so on with the shots; 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Thanks for looking!
  21. 8 points
    Bletchley Park was the central site for British codebreakers during World War II. It housed the Government Code and Cypher School (GC&CS), it regularly penetrated the secret communications of the Axis Powers – most importantly the German Enigma and Lorenz ciphers. The official historian of World War II British Intelligence has written that the "Ultra" intelligence produced at Bletchley shortened the war by two to four years, and that without it the outcome of the war would have been uncertain. Peely paint, cobwebs, code breaking machines, organs, film memorabilia, and an immeasurable amount of WWII history; this place has it all. Tons of stuff left behind here in D Block, most of it just slung in corners left to rot. Shame really as I expect most of it is well worth preserving and there's a massive fuck off museum next door! HELLO..... Anyway, onto the pictures.... I didn't stage any of these scenes myself, they were like this upon arrival. Made for some nice piccies though so I don't mind really. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Sign from the Enigma cinema which closed in 2015. Enigma was the name given to the machine the Germans used to encrypt their messages. An electronic current passing through the machine's rotors would change alphabets in the message to other letter. 10. Some equipment neatly set up. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. Someone let the staging get a bit out of control here but it looked kind of cool to be fair.... 20. 21. 22. 23. A replica of the 'Bombe' code breaking machine designed by Alan Turing to crack the German Enigma code 24. The Bombe machines in use back in the day. Women code breakers apparently used to hang their underwear up to dry on top of the machines. *This is where the phrase 'knickers in a twist' comes from. *Possibly not true. 25. @Lenston hiding from the sun And that is all. Check out 'The Imitation Game' movie if you've not seen it before, a pretty good dramatisation of what went down at Bletchley Park. Thanks for looking
  22. 8 points
    Its been a long time since I posted a report, so here is my first of 2017. I hope you're all doing well. History (wiki) It was a residence of members of the princely dynasty of the Welsh kingdom of Powys and one of the taî'r uchelwyr (houses of the gentry) in late medieval Wales. It subsequently came into the possession of the Ormsby-Gore family (Lord Harlech). Its English correspondent is sometimes given as Porkington. A manuscript known to have been in the possession of Brogyntyn in 1574 was a copy of the Hanes Gruf(f)udd ab Cynan. The house itself is of brick dating from circa 1730 refaced and much added to between 1813–20 by the architect Benjamin Gummow.[3] It is noted for a portico of four giant unfluted Ionic columns with scrolls and pediment. Outside can be seen an arch with 2 pairs of unfluted Ionic columns. In the entrance hall survives an elaborately carved fireplace dated 1617. Brogyntyn Hall and its 1,445-acre estate, was sold by the 6th and present Baron Harlech in 2001 for less than £5m to a local developer, who divided up the estate, and investigated the potential for a retirement community development in and around the Hall.[4][5] However, the Hall and 234 acres went up for sale for £5m in December 2013.[6]
  23. 7 points
    Quite a big place this one with some great decay throughout. Spent a good few hours round here enjoying a relaxed explore. Some parts of the building are worse than others .There has also been some vandalism and shit graff left behind. Not enough to spoil the over all feel of the place though. And like I said, the decay is awesome. Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY Our Lady’s Hospital first opened its doors in 1868 and was then known as Ennis District Lunatic Asylum. For 134 years it continued to operate on the same site as a mental hospital and indeed until the 1950s very little changed in the manner in which it was run. The hospital was one of the largest public buildings in County Clare and was both a large employer and purchaser of goods from local suppliers.It played an important role in the economic life of Ennis, especially in earlier years when jobs were scarce and pensionable positions were highly prized. Wards were very overcrowded with up to 70 beds per room, with only inches between. It closed in 2002 and there are currently no plans for its development. . . . . . Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/135648593@N02/albums/72157662358523548/with/37531708144/
  24. 7 points
    I was not aware of this place until I seen a report on it last summer and as with Octel Bromine it was the medical room that caught my eye. And a little beauty it was too. Great decay with some nice features left. This place is rather big. The sort of place that seems to keep going and going with shit loads to have a look at. The old kilns where very nice, especially a big walk in one down in the lower levels. Some cool decay and nature egress in here also plus some collapsed floors and roofs in parts. A cracking mooch this one which I thoroughly enjoyed. Visited with non member Paul. History T.G.Green & Co Ltd originally operated from the village of Church Gresley, South Derbyshire between 1864 and 2007. More famous for their blue and white striped 'Cornish Kitchen Ware' produced from the early 1920's (then known as 'E-Blue') the pottery produced many hundreds of patterns from Yellow wares, Victorian transfer prints, colourful hand painted Art Nouveau & vibrant enamelled Art Deco patterns, Wartime utility pottery, avant garde Retro designs and many well known Brewery wares, employing up to 1,000 local staff at the height of production. Now, the old pottery site lays in ruins, the land under private ownership, never likely to ever see production again, the last of the South Derbyshire potteries has gone, although as it nears its 100th anniversary the traditional Cornishware is still manufactured and sold through a new T.G.Green & Co Ltd. . . Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/135648593@N02/albums/72157682973777741/with/34569316764/
  25. 7 points
    History Chamberlin & Hill Castings Ltd have been manufacturing in Leicester since 1864 and are part of the successful Chamberlin & Hill plc group. They produce castings from 0.1 kgs to 6000 kgs supplying product for turbines, transmissions, oil and gas compressors, earth moving equipment, vacuum pumps and more. Metal types include Ductile Iron (SG Iron), Grey Iron and Alloyed Iron. The company is also a world leader using Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI). Medium castings were done at the Leicester site. Chamberlin & Hill Castings Ltd is the result of two successful foundries joining together. The existing company scattered around various sites company currently has 200 employees and a turnover of over £19 million. With demand for products produced here repidly decreasing the company decided to close at the end of 2016. Explore After seeing this pop up from AndyK! me and @hamtagger decided to venture over to Leicester, picking up @Session9 on the way! After finding our way in relatively quickly, we made our way through the place. The place is a nice size, dotted with various rooms used for offices and laboratories and obviously the workshops and main There is such a vast amount of stuff still here but with only having closed at the end of last year explains why. So much to see and we spent quite a few hours just wandering. Doing what I normally do and venturing off on my own from the others I was happily just looking around the place. I walked up some stairs and needed the loo. I decided to just take some pics of the few rooms upstairs before going so off I went. On the way back I walked down a little alley bit to go to the toilet. On the way I heard someone coughing. I stopped and suddenly realised that they didnt sound at all like anyone I was with so made my way back downstairs. I found a little dark corner and texted hamtagger to ask if he or session9 had just been to the toilet. He replied "No!". Oh great. So I went to find them who were on the other side of the building and get that section done. Convinced that either there was someone else in there or they were playing a joke on me we actually got round alot of the place. It was only when we went back upstairs to do the offices that upon glancing outside we saw secca walking about glancing up at the windows. The offices were only right above his office. Well, we stayed put and went right to the top. We heard him come up stairs, have another pee quite loudly and when he walked up nearly had a heart attack when he walked in to the room and saw us all stood there. Pretty friendly bloke though and kindly allowed us to walk out the front gate All in all a great explore, definitely one I would return to. Anyway, enough of my rambling and on to the pics. 1 2 3 4 I didnt take a crooked pic, I just liked how the labels were wonky 5 6 7 8 9 10 A lot of machines here bearing the same logo for Wadkin, the same company I believe which closed some years ago too also from Leicester. 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Thanks for looking!
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