Jump to content

Our Picks

Top content from across the community, hand-picked by us.

I've visited this former state hospital site a few times and over the last few years they've torn down a few buildings and unfortunately before I was able to make my first visit the morgue and lab were two of those :(. I wished I'd gotten to see them but alas...I did not. Here are a few photos from various trips. I didn't take great photos when I first started exploring and my editing sucked! Most of the buildings are rather boring and not much was left inside.
 
  • 10 replies

Hey everyone!
 
It's been a while since our small Belgium/Luxembuorg/France-Roadtrip in September, but now I finally had the time to recall this one and edit some of the images.
As I'm totally new to photography, I would be very delighted to hear your opinion on the photos and processing! (:
 

1st day:Usine Barbele


2nd day: HFB



3rd day: Diesel Power Plant

 
4th day: Salle des Compresseurs
 
 
5th day: Power Plant X

 
best wishes from Germany,
Nico
  • 7 replies

Haus der Offiezere
 
My first report. I have had this account for about a year but never posted anything from fear of my photos not being good enough to post. Decided to pluck up the courage to start contributing more but I apologise if there are any mistakes. Anyway, on to the history!

History

The Haus der Offiezere was originally established as a shooting range between Kummersdorf and Jüterbog in 1888. It wasn't until 1910, when construction of the Berlin to Dresden railway line took place, it was decided that Wunsdorf held a significant strategic advantage and because of this it became a military headquarters two years following. A telephone and telegraph office was built in 1912. By the start of the first world war, Wunsdorf had already become Europe's largest military base, boasting 60,000 acres of land. A year later, the first mosque was built in Germany on the site. This was to accommodate for the Muslim prisoners of war which were housed there. They were known as the Halbmondlager or Crescent Moon camp.

After the war, the Wunsdorf Headquarters was converted into a military sports school in 1919. It was even used to train athletes for the Olympic games in Berlin in 1936. During the uprising of the Third Reich, a network of highly modernised tunnels and bunkers were built, including a communications centre, known as the Zeppelin. A year Maybach I and II were built which coincided with the Zeppelin bunker. A ring tunnel connected all the bunkers to each other and were disguised as ordinary homes on the ground, to avoid suspicion. The construction of these bunkers wasn't completed until 1940, a year after war was declared. From 1943 the Haus der Offiezere was temporarily converted into a hospital to treat wounded German soldiers.

Two years later, in 1945 the Red Army had invaded East Germany and quickly seized control of Wunsdorf. This was when it was renamed the Haus der Offiezere which translates to House of the Officer. During Soviet occupation of Wunsdorf in the GDR, the Haus der Offiezere became a place of art and culture. The former sports halls and gymnasiums were torn down and replaced with elaborate theatres and concert halls. Daily deliveries of supplies came all the way from Moscow on a direct train line and the locals nicknamed it 'little Moscow' due to the number of roughly 60,000 Russian inhabitants.

This continued for almost 50 years, until the reunification of Germany when it was handed back. The last remaining Russians eventually left in 1994 and it has remained unoccupied since.

 
 
 
 
  • 8 replies

Hi, this is my first report, I don't really know what to write but here goes.......
 
Unless you have been on Mars or in a coma for the past couple of weeks you would most probably have heard about this Manor House. Some pictures were posted & the guys who posted them had pretty much made it crystal that they were not going to be sharing its location. The post stated that they hoped that people would forget about it & that it would be saved. Or to put it another way - they threw the gauntlet down big time and by doing that it had made it the UK’s most hunted derp within the UE community, and surprise surprise within a day it had been found by more than one person. The actual post & chats that I had with them gave me a couple of very good clues & to be fair to the guys when I told them that I had it they did clue me up with everything I needed to know.  
Anyway, It just so happened that I was in the area with some free time on the Wednesday so I popped along. I got there before sun up & had the house to myself for a couple of hours, it was a pretty much ad hoc visit & quickly realised that I needed a wider lens, I knew some guys were planning to hit it on the Saturday & decided a revisit was in order. 
Messages were sent & arrangements were made for the pre-Sun up meet, I’d gotten wind that there may be a few people there so I was not surprised to see a few other faces when I opened the door at around 7am. The pre-dawn light, or rather lack of it meant that we all sat around having a chat & a schmoke as more & more people turned up out of the darkness. I didn’t count but I’m told that at 08:30 there were 21 of us in the house and that the snack bar had ran out of breakfast rolls & that pin badges & t shirt sales were through the roof. 
  • 8 replies

Baikonur cosmodrome.
 
 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
  • 11 replies

This place was part of a giant complex where they used to build trains for the national railroad company.
Most of the site was already demolished by the time we got here, but the lab itself was still worth the visit.
 
It's been abandoned since 2010, which is sort of surprising, if you look at the amount of decay, but well, I'm not complaining about that at all...
 
Actually took 2 visits to get in. First attempt was on a thursday afternoon. Entered the site, walked to the particular building and said to my girl: "what's that noise?!"
Peeked inside the building and got instantly spotted by demolition workers... Took a run and returned a few days later in the weekend.
More luck that time.
 
Have to say, definitely worth it...

 
 
Thanks for looking!!
  • 19 replies

Leopold Fortress, France - October 2017
This fortress was constructed by the Germans from 1907-1914. It served German soldiers during the First World War but saw little action. Then it was occupied by the French between 1919 & 1940, where it was incorporated into the maginot line for WWII. After the departure of French troops in June 1940, the German army took back the fort. On September 2, 1944, it was declared a fortress of the Reich by Hitler. The stronghold must therefore be defended until the last extremity by German troops, whose chiefs all took an oath to the Führer. In October 1944, the fort was captured by the American 3rd Army in the Battle of Metz
http://www.oblivionstate.com/forum/topic/12165-leopold-fortress-france-october-2017/
#oblivionstate #urbanexploration
  • 11 replies

The terrain of this psychiatric hospital is huge (1.000.000 square metre). So it took me 2 days to explore and I didn't have a chance to visit all buildings or the whole surrounding. UNfortunately most of the buildings were cleared but it was still beautiful there.
Between 1908 and 1933  40 buildings evolved so the hospital had a capacity of 2.000 patients. Situated on a small hill above the sea the hospital is abandoned since 1998.


 
Behind the scene - my way of exploring
 
  • 8 replies

Built in 1896 and in continuous use until 1995, this pinwheel style quaker prison was a reflection of a similar one located nearby. You can tour that one for a few dollars and take as many pictures as you like. This one was not so easy....
 
  • 12 replies

Having seen some older reports on this place and being a sucker for old theatres, it’s one that has always been on my list.
 
Taking the long drive back from work (Bangor to Stockport) I get an email with info that this place is open and doable. I decided to pick @eastyham up and take the 1.5hr trip over to Donny. Ideally I’d of gone during daylight but I didn’t want to miss out on it. So complete darkness it is. Had a bit of bother of some goons who work in the shopping centre but still managed to sneak in another way.
 
  • 11 replies

Solo jaunt, part 2/3 of my (temporary) swansong.

Well, this was epic. The best asylum I've had the pleasure of exploring, and possibly the best asylum of the "post-classic" era when most closed. And definitely one of the most memorable explores I have ever done. If it was any one site that inspired me to finally visit the Emerald Isle, it was this. As always, I turned up at the site completely unprepared and without any idea of what to expect. As I walked round the building, I see the grounds are well maintained, and someone is there walking their dog. Is it security? What are those cars doing at the top of the site? I didn't have a clue.

  • 12 replies

This was the admin block for an adjacent steelworks. It was built in 1704, and despite being pretty battered nowadays, it still retains some of its former grandeur. The mixture of decay and natural light makes it quite photogenic. Plenty of reports from here before so this is just an update on its current state. Visited with @Maniac, @Andyand @extreme_ironing. 
  • 6 replies

One of only a few of my discoveries which I have exclusive (at least I didn't find any pictures on the www).  I spotted this small farmhouse a few years ago on one of my rides but unfortunately there was no way inside. But happily I decided to keep in mind. This year I detected an open window.  Have been in there twice since. 
  • 7 replies

So I've been to this location, which was a dancing/disco/club whatever you prefer. But not your usual one, this one exist out of tents!
Seen it passing by  a few times.. Started searching for it and found it. Now we only had to pick a date and go out on explore!
Last weekend was the time! We already left on Friday, and wanted to do this location Friday also. But thanks to our amazing road network in Belgium and their works, we'd end up there after sunset.
So we ended up here Sunday , on our way back home!  Heard it was actually an easy entrance somewhere upfront the fences where laying down..
  • 8 replies

A piece of British WW2 History hidden under a hillside. HMS Forward, a maritime intelligence centre, was key to monitoring the English channel and and was heavily involved in D-Day. Although it's fallen into dereliction, attempts to restore and maintain it have been carried out by 'Friends of HMS Forward'.
  • 5 replies

The chateau is one of the many large abandoned houses that can be found around France. Built in the 1700s by the lord of the village it is within, the house has been modified and expanded over the years.
  • 3 replies

This one required an early start, but the morning adventure to The Kings Hall was worth the effort. Visited with Zombizza. 

History
"Located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was built in 1916 and was designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The King’s Hall building has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and it was soon screening religious films.
By 1926, it was operating as a regular cinema, still managed by the Methodist church.
The King’s Hall Cinema was closed in 1937. It then reverted back to a Methodist Church use as the King’s Hall Methodist Church. They vacated the building in January 2013"
  • 6 replies

The last piece of Pye.
 
I’m sure everyone who visited Pyestock before it was demolished will remember the Anechoic Facility, that one last bit of the puzzle that couldn’t be visited. The blue-tailed building was still in use long after the demolition of the rest of the site, and is the only surviving part of Pyestock’s original host of facilities. This last part of the site has now also closed.
 
  • 6 replies

I can't find much history about this place except it was built in the 1950s and abandoned in the 90s due to a more modern replacement being built nearby. Sadly the turbine hall has been completely gutted but the control room was absolutely pukka. A nice chilled explore with @Miss.Anthrope
  • 7 replies

A Little History -

The NSRIs roots go back to a dispensary which opened in 1804, the first public hospital in North Staffordshire. The dispensary allowed sick patients to get diagnosis and treatment, and provided vaccination for smallpox, eventually the hospital grew to facilitate fever patients and new facilities were put in place to treat general and accident patients.

The hospital expanded further, due to an increase in sick patients and accidents in the local pottery and mining industries. The hospital then relocated to another site and employed a small team of staff, this site was surrounded by factories and other industry and became unsuitable due to new ideas about infection control at the time, so the site was relocated again.
The hospital was then moved to its current location in Hartshill, as the North Staffordshire Royal Infirmary (fast forward) then later merged with the City General Hospital to form the Royal Stoke University Hospital.
Our Visit -

Our first visit here was very much a sort of a 'I'm bored, wanna see if that hospital is any good?' kind of trip. We found it fairly easy to get around and navigate around the maze of padlocked doors that fills this place, visiting the operating theatres and anything else we could snap before it got dark. Once outside we fancied our chances at some other buildings (i.e. mortuary), but security night shift had just rocked up and got us out of there.

Fast forward a week and we're ready to try again with a few different tactics in mind. This time around everything went fairly smooth, minus a few cuts and bruises. We did however find that security had been heightened a bit, there's now three guards on at a time and the main building is a fair bit more secure than before. However, well worth it for dem slabz..

Visited with @AndyK!
Main Building, Corridors, Stuff -  
  • 7 replies

Peppermint Powerplant - 

The plant was purpose built to aid a neighboring paper mill, which closed at the same time as the power plant.
It contains a single Siemens set, which looks great in peppermint green. This was a fairly quick walk around because the place is so small, I didn't even take many photos, although it's a really nice little power station. 

Visited with @AndyK! and @Kriegaffe9

  • 7 replies



×