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Merryprankster

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Everything posted by Merryprankster

  1. first report in a while, been busy in france + havent seen anything from this place so thought id share it. It was one of those lucky stumble upon by accident explores, which are always nice, certainly not epic to look at but its nice knowing every corner you walk round is going to be something new that you wont have seen it on someone elses report already. I was actually in the area looking for waterfalls to go and have a jungle shower as we'd been camping up the road, zigged when i should have zagged and came across this. couldnt find much history apart from the local rag circa feb 09 and little from historic england historic england- HISTORY: Tansley Wood Mill is a substantially complete example of a late C18, first generation water- powered textile factory, whose form is strongly influenced by, and is a near-contemporary of Sir Richard Arkwright's pioneering cotton spinning factory at nearby Cromford. The site retains clear evidence of phased development, and of the enhancement of its water power-producing capacity, https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1389284 local rag Plans to convert a former Tansley textile mill into flats and offices have been given the go-ahead. Council chiefs gave the green light to a major redevelopment of Tansley Wood Mills, in Lower Lumsdale, on Tuesday. The historic woodland building is to be restored and redeveloped after officers said the scheme would regenerate what was formerly an important employment site. Plans, submitted by applicant Paddock Motors, include converting the Grade II-listed mill into flats, turning the old forge building into a restaurant, four craft studios, office space and commercial units. Planning co-ordinator for the scheme, Bill Clay, said: "It is an exceptional attractive and special location in this historical wooded valley. "It is a wonderful environment to be working in, particually as we are local people. What we are doing is finding a new use for an important historical building and ensuring it has a future. "It is also a very important employment site, historically, and we want to take it into the future in terms of returning it to an employment site." District council planning officers said the site would benefit nature conservation, landscape restoration and secure the future of a listed building. A previous bid to develop the building was rejected by the Secretary of State in 2005, saying it could be detrimental to the character and appearance of the area. Read more: http://www.matlockmercury.co.uk/news/local/tansley-mill-s-conversion-plan-is-approved-1-871469#ixzz4BCYQORUw picturegraphs IF anyone knows what the flying fuck this is can you let me know and lets not forget the real reason i was in thee valley thanks for looking kids, happy explorin
  2. Evening Scabies and jelly spoons, hope everyones settling back into work alright. This place is on my doorstep but was never really fussed with it, as we all know its been major 2015 tour bus destination so you know what you're in for. Was kinda always saving this place for a rainy day when i fancied some exploring but couldn't be arsed to drive to far, so yeah that day came and i popped up selly oak hospital with a couple of young bloods who are new to the forum, they had been firing reports up on 28 from all sorts of old brum derps and clearly putting the effort in and getting out exploring stuff so i teamed up with them for selly oak, originally i wanted to do the river rea but needless to say what with all the rain it was a bit of a raging torrent so that's been back burnered, that word looks like bummered from where i'm sat, it shouldnt say bummered. the explore- the explore was pretty straight forward, no craziness, no swat teams, no russian mountain dog chases, not even a sniff of secca. Thank you to the lovely lady (you know who you are) who hooked me up some details on what's what access wise at the minute, pretty straight forward mooch, still plenty of nice bits left to see, a lot more than i was expecting to be honest, couldn't believe there's more to this place than a morgue!! morgue pics seems to be the only thing i've seen from the place, don't get me wrong there is a whole load of bugger all here as well but there's a few interesting bits dotted about, my fave was the bed with the leather worn off in the shape of a person and then mould has started growing through the worn material, who doesn't want to see some fungus feeding of the moisture of years of embedded human perspiration and growing in the shape of a person! fookin gross right generic wiki history The first buildings on the site of Selly Oak Hospital were those of the King’s Norton Union Workhouse. It was a place for the care of the poor and was one of many workhouses constructed throughout the country following the introduction of the Poor Law Amendment Act of 1834. This act replaced the earlier system of poor relief, dating from 1601.[1] The rising costs of poor relief had become a national problem and the new act sought to address this. Throughout the country, parishes were formed into larger unions with the power to raise money from rates on property to pay for the poor. King’s Norton Poor Law Union was formed from the parishes of Harborne, Edgbaston, King’s Norton, Northfield and Beoley. Each of these five parishes had individual workhouses. These were replaced in 1872 by the new, much larger one at Selly Oak. It was built to accommodate 200 pauper inmates. Central supervision by the Poor Law Commissioners in London ensured that all workhouses were administered similarly by a set of rules and regulations. How humanely these were interpreted depended entirely upon each local board of Poor Law Guardians, who were local worthies. They were elected annually and gave their services voluntarily. The aim of the Poor Law Amendment Act was to deny any form of relief except through admission to the workhouse. Generally it was assumed that the able-bodied poor could find work and if they did not then they should be forced to work within the confines of the workhouse. It was thought that if conditions in the workhouse were really bad then the poor would be deterred from seeking relief. However, by the late 18th century it became apparent that the majority of workhouse inmates were the most vulnerable people in society; the young, the old, the chronic sick and the mentally ill. Various Acts of Parliament ruled that separate provision should be made for children and the mentally ill. The sick poor were to be accommodated in separate infirmary blocks. These were often built adjacent to the workhouses and were the forerunners of many great hospitals of today. Commemorative plaque recording the opening of the King's Norton Union's Infirmary at Selly Oak, on the "3rd Day of September 1897" At Selly Oak, a separate infirmary was built in 1897 at a cost of £52,000. It was the subject of much heated debate as the original estimate had been £18,000. It was a light, clean and practical building, and generally a source of much pride. The Guardians took great care and gathered information from other infirmaries to ensure that the final design, put out to a competition and won by Mr. Daniel Arkell, was up-to-date and modern. The Infirmary accommodated about 250 patients in eight Nightingale wards and smaller side wards and rooms. There was also provision for maternity cases. Between the two main pavilions were a central administration block, kitchens, a laundry, a water tower, doctors’ rooms and a telephone exchange. There was no operating theatre or mortuary and, in the workhouse tradition, the internal walls were not plastered, painted brick being considered good enough for the sick paupers. The workhouse and infirmary were separated by a high dividing wall and were run as separate establishments. The population of the King’s Norton Union increased dramatically, and in 1907 extensions to the infirmary and the workhouse made provision for the growing numbers of poor people. This doubled the size of the main hospital building. The Woodlands Nurses’ Home was built at the same time to accommodate forty nurses. A small operating room was added to the infirmary. There was a resident nursing staff of eight trained nurses and nineteen probationers who were supervised by the Matron. She also had responsibility for the resident female servants. The Steward managed the infirmary, governed the male servants, kept the accounts, ordered provisions, and recorded births and deaths. There was a Senior Medical Officer who attended three times a week between 11:00 and 13:00. A Resident Medical Officer attended at both the infirmary and the workhouse. In 1911, King’s Norton – no longer a rural area – left Worcestershire and became part of the City of Birmingham. The Birmingham Union was formed from the unions of King’s Norton, Aston and Birmingham. The King’s Norton Workhouse Infirmary was renamed Selly Oak Hospital. Over the next two decades facilities improved with the addition of an operating theatre, plastering of internal walls, and the introduction of physiotherapy, pathological and X-ray services. By 1929 there were seven full-time members of the medical staff, and the medical residence was built at this time. The Good Samaritan (1961), by Uli Nimptsch, in front of the Out-patients Unit at Selly Oak Hospital Attitudes to the poor changed gradually and measures to relieve poverty, such as old age pensions and National Insurance, were introduced before the First World War. By 1930, the administrative structure of the Poor Law was finally dismantled. Selly Oak Hospital and the Workhouse, renamed Selly Oak House, came under the administration of Birmingham City Council. Selly Oak House was administered separately and used for the care of the elderly chronic sick. Selly Oak Hospital continued to grow, new operating theatres were added in 1931, and the biochemistry and pathology laboratories opened in 1934. Nurses had been trained at Selly Oak since 1897, but it was not until 1942 that the School of Nursing was opened. In 1948, when the National Health Service was introduced, Selly Oak Hospital and Selly Oak House were amalgamated. Since then many changes to the site have resulted in the institution we see today. Recent developments[edit] The hospital closed in 2012 upon completion of the new Queen Elizabeth Hospital. Relocation of the first services from Selly Oak began during the summer of 2010 when its A&E department moved to the new Q.E.Hospital on 16 June and over the next 7 days Critical Care and other departments moved step-by-step the 1.5 miles to the new hospital. On average one inpatient was moved every 5 minutes between 7 am and early evening [2] On the morning of 23 May 2010 a 'Service of Thanks' was held at Selly Oak Hospital to celebrate a century of caring and this was followed by a fun fair at which staff and patients were invited to "Take a Trip Down Memory Lane", sign a memory wall [3] and contribute to an on-line memories website. The reorganisation was first planned in 1998 though it was not until October 2004 that planning approval was given by Birmingham City Council, with construction beginning during 2006. Selly Oak Hospital was well renowned for the trauma care it provided and had one of the best[citation needed] burns units in the country. It was also home to theRoyal Centre for Defence Medicine, which cared for injured service men and women from conflict zones, as well as training service medical staff in preparation for working in such areas. In March 2007, the Hospital was alleged to be not properly treating Iraq war veterans.[4] The hospital has also appeared in national newspapers with stories of servicemen being verbally abused in the hospital by members of the public opposed to the war.[5] There were also difficulties[clarification needed] when Jeremy Clarkson went to the hospital to give gifts to the wounded serviceman.[6] A report published by the House of CommonsDefence Select Committee blamed the allegations against the hospital on a smear campaign[7] and praised the clinical care provided to military patients.[8] Picturegraphs MOULD MAN!!! [ thanks for looking guys, always remember to stop look and listen, always wait for the green man and always be aware of stranger danger, take it sleazy kids.
  3. UK The Tone Mills, Somerset - July 2016

    Nice that lad
  4. UK Winnington Soda Ash Works, Cheshire - April 2016

    beauuuutiful bit of industry right thur! aweseome as alwys dude
  5. UK Sea Containers House, London - April 2016

    Looks like a bloody coo roof does thus dude
  6. UK The Nuba Survival, Checkendon April 2016

    I stopped by this last year, it was massively overgrown with nettles around the barn so couldn't get in to have a look around, tis a cool sculpture though
  7. UK Bron y Garth Hospital, Penrhyndeudraeth, April 2016

    looks like an interesting little mooch this, dont see many timber cell doors about
  8. Belgium Ferme Leonie... March '16

    lovely stuff dude, loving the timber frame joists
  9. way over due writing an actual report, got a back log of about 20 reports at the minute but just cant find the time or the internet speed for uploading to flickr, spend most the week working away on the most basic hotel wifi youve ever seen then when the weekend comes around im always off exploring, anwyays heres a little start with some good old south wales indursty took my mate lara whos wanted to come exploring for a while, was a good day but i reckon we only saw about 2/3rds as we had other stuff on the list to tick off, definitely want to come back here in the summer when the foliage is in full bloom bit of coffee and paste histoire Cwm coke works is a large site just north of Beddau in Rhondda Cynon Taf. Up until the mid 1800′s Beddau was a small collection of farmsteads at the conjunction of four crossroads. (Incidentally, Beddau, which means ‘graves’, may be a shortening of Croesheol y Beddau, ‘crossroads of the graves’, as it is marked on an ordnance survey map circa. 1833. Criminals were often hanged as crossroads as an example to others…). In the 1860′s coal pits were sunk around Beddau, and the town grew at a steady rate until 1909, which saw the opening of Cwm colliery. As the industry moved in, Beddau grew quickly, and in 1958 Cwm coke works opened, furthering the expansion. At its peak, Cwm colliery was producing hundreds of thousand of tons of high quality, low sulphur coal per year. Much of this was processed at Cwm coke works, into high-grade coke suitable for foundry use. The National Coal Board closed the colliery in 1986, and Cwm Coke works in 2002, leaving yet another small Welsh town deprived and forgotten. It would seem now, work has begun to reclaim the land, so perhaps this magnificent example of commanding industry and stark, utilitarian achitecture won’t be around for much longer. thanks kids ttake it sleazy!!
  10. UK X in the City, Liverpool - April 2016

    i hope you popped thos bottles of champagne!!
  11. UK Horror Underground Manchester - March 2016

    nice work CBS, looks like a cool littl explore, was good to meet you last weekend, hope you got yourself warmed off when you got home and off that bridge
  12. UK Rhiwbach Slate Mine - North Wales - March -2016

    looks lovely does that, good work lads
  13. Belgium Diesel Power Plant, Belgium - February 2016

    lol that videos ace, some wicked shots there mate, i uploaded mine to flickr sat to sort a report and then ate too much dominos and fell asleep! cool shots of that super nice control room, liking the cupboard doors in the lab aswell
  14. France Pottery S - Jan 16

    lovely little place, those little tracks are awesome, great work dude
  15. UK Horror Underground Manchester - March 2016

    loving this mate, great work thanks for sharing
  16. Urbflections - Stick your camera in a puddle

    thanks trace, only photo trickery was flipping it 90 degrees clockwise, bit of real world trickery in that i i'm lying on a chair, you can see it if you look for it but its hidden quite nicely by my coat
  17. how could anyone not go on the slides!!
  18. UK Dannah House Nursing Home Swindon February 2016

    liking the look of this, niceley decayed in there for sure, that plant growing up the wall is ace, thanks for sharing dude
  19. Howdy! I'm Sinister Suspect!

    nice intro dude welcome to the forum
  20. Faster flickring

    right dunno if anyone else does this but thought i'd share it as it halved my deleting stupid bbcodes times when linking from flickr, let's face it no one enjoys it it's just one of those mundane things we have to do, so as long as i have been writing reports i have always copied the whole bbcode text for one image, deleted the first half and then deleted the second half, two actions for one photo, this was how i was told to do it when i first started so this is how i have always done it. for some reason tonight i decided to just go through all the pics leaving all the codes in and delete them one by one afterwards once i had a list of 12 images with all the urls and stuff ready for deleting, doing that you can then obviously highlight the last bit of bbcode from one image and also the first bit of bbcode in the second image, two copy paste delete actions per photo has now been reduced to one, fair enough you need to to run through them after with a return tp give you the spacing but it is definitely quicker, im kicking myself for not realising it sooner, hope this makes someone's life easier
  21. Evening kids, first report of the new year and as its my home town i kinda feel like i should make a bit of effort with this one. My long standing curiosity of what was on the other side of a certain wall in worcester was satisfied last night when i finally got around to hopping it and having a nosey, this in turn sparked a morning's research into what the tunnel was used for, which then lead to me reading a whole bunch of other stuff about the rest of the shrub hill and lowesmore industrial sites. As i said this is home turf for me and some of the derp warehouses that were standing around this part of town some 15 years ago when i was a young punk skiving off school were some of my first explorations, long before the cameras, the forums and the term uRb3X it was just me and my mates being little shits and going where we wanted. After a few years of raving it up reaching for the lazers and going out on the smash every weekend here i am full circle hanging out in derps again, only difference is this time i got a camera and a car Anyway enough of the life story, on with the explore, the shrub hill tunnel is a tunnel which runs down from the main lines of shrub hill, it was a siding used to service various companies. HHere's a lovely little hand drawn map of what we are looking at, pic courtesy of miac.org.co.uk, the tunnel is the dotted line running diagonally across/underneath the heenan froude ltd company Little bit of history about 3 of the companies the tunnel and siding serviced - In 1857 Thomas Clunes established the Vulcan Iron Works, Cromwell Street, Worcester as iron and brass founders. clunes later went into business with a couple railway fellas by the name of McKenzie and Holland and branched into the railway signal manufacturing business. Mckenzie & Holland manufactured signalling equipment which was used in many British and overseas signal boxes. The company expanded to become the foremost manufacturer of signalling equipment in the UK. Walter Holland became a J.P. for the City and County and was Mayor of Worcester from 1878 until 1881 and again in 1887. Mckenzie & Holland merged with other signal manufacturers in 1901 and became a limited company at the same time, wholly owned by the Consolidated Signal Company Limited. The Worcester operation was closed in 1921. The Mckenzie & Holland locomotive was then purchased by Heenan & Froude Ltd who took over responsibility for rail traffic. As you can see from the map above and the pic below here the tracks from the tunnel led right down to the worcester birmingham canal to accommodate goods coming in or going out via canal barge and locomotive, given the vulcan iron works were in the iron business i'm imagining a lot of coal was more than likely being brought down the shrub hill tunnel. The shrub hill tunnel ran underneath another company by the east side entrance to the tunnel, the Heenan and froude ltd company. Heenan & Froude was famous for building the 518ft high Blackpool Tower. It was once one of the largest employers of skilled workers in the area. The Company, who also had a factory in Manchester, opened its operation in Worcester in 1903, having moved from the Aston Iron Works in Birmingham to a part of the former worcester engine works co site at Shrub Hill. Heenan & Froude was a general purpose engineering company who made amongst other things exhaust and mine ventilating fans, colliery and mining plant, belts, conveyors, elevators, sawing machines, bench chains, water dynamo meters, spherical, horizontal and vertical engines, patent water boilers, bridge and roof iron work, and refuse destructors. Heenan & Froude also used the sidings that had been laid in 1865 and that were connected the 'vinegar works branch line. Shunting of rail traffic on the site was originally the responsibility of mckenzie & holland. When Mckenzie & Holland ceased in 1921 its locomotive was sold to Heenan & Froude who took over the shunting of the railway traffic. A new locomotive was purchased in 1928. The location of the engine shed is not known. This is the heenan and Froude building, the tunnel on the left in the first two images with the clock tower is the same as the small dark tunnel on the right in the third pic, im just stood right up the other end. i actually rooftopped this building when i was a kid, camera wasnt great on my 3310 though This is a quick couple of pics of how everything lays out on top, mainly because there's scaff and i could get a nice shot over the area On with the tunnel pics then This is the west side tunnel entrance leading into what was the vulcan ironworks/mckenzie holland and onto the canal. The tunnel on the right in this pic is the east side of the tunnel, 2 that's about it i reckon, thanks for looking kids happy new year to y'all
  22. Belgium Villa Heil, 2015

    lovely set, loving that wallpaper! thanks for sharing dude
  23. nice work dude, proper little time capsule, do need to get around to doing a derp house again they are interesting places + definitely have a very specific vibe to them, coool set and thanks for sharing

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