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Urban Diaries

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About Urban Diaries

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  • Birthday 07/19/1993

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  1. UK Doughty House - Richmond - March 2016

    Thanks guys
  2. History: Doughty House is a large house on Richmond Hill in Surrey, England, built in the 18th century, with later additions. It has fine views down over the Thames, and both the house and gallery are Grade II listed buildings. The house was named after Elizabeth Doughty, who lived there from about 1786, and built St Elizabeth of Portugal Church in The Vineyard, Richmond. It was the residence of the Cook baronets from when it was bought in 1849 by the first baronet until after World War II. A 125-foot-long-gallery (38 m) was added in 1885 for the very important family art collection. The house was damaged by bombing in the Second World War and the 4th baronet moved to Jersey with 30 paintings from the collection. In 2012 the house was on the market with an asking price of £15,000,000. Future: C18 house with C19 alterations made by the Cook family. Planning Permission and Listed Building Consent have been granted to retain the main property as a single dwelling and to convert the gallery to ancillary accommodation, along with re-instating Doughty Cottage as the link between the house and gallery. The explore: So we spent basically all day in traffic jams to get there and back... The explore itself was surprisingly easy too; I must admit, that from what I have seen of it, I was expecting the place to be a little bigger than it was, but I guess thats the art of the wide angle lens! Anyway, great explore, would definitely revisit providing there are no traffic issues!
  3. They are indeed. Thanks 👌🏼
  4. Last I heard, they had started taking the scaff down. It's probably still doable somehow if you get there soon!
  5. UK Motspur Park Gas Holders (July 2015)

    History ​ Motspur Park, also known locally as West Barnes is a suburb in south-west London in the boroughs of Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames and London Borough of Merton. It owes its identity to the railway station of the same name, which has six trains an hour to London’s Waterloo, and to the adjacent parade of small shops. Two prominent gas holders, which are used to store the consumer gas supply for south west London stand just south of the shopping parade and can be seen from a wide area. The Explore ​ So the largest gas holder has caved in and made a kind of lake, it smells a bit gassy but its cool none-the-less. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Thanks for reading!
  6. History: The Grand Hotel is a Grade II* listed Victorian hotel in the city centre of Birmingham, England. The hotel occupies the greater part of a block bounded by Colmore Row, Church Street, Barwick Street and Livery Street and overlooks St Philip’s Cathedral and churchyard. Designed by architect Thomson Plevins, construction began in 1875 and the hotel opened in 1879. Extensions and extensive interior renovations were undertaken by prominent Birmingham architecture firm Martin & Chamberlain from 1890 to 1895. Interior renovations included the building of the Grosvenor Room which boasts rich and impressive Louis XIV style decoration. The hotel closed in 2002 and due to the risk of crumbling stonework it has been under scaffolding and protective covers since. In 2012 planning permission was granted for plans to restore the building into a luxury 152-bedroom hotel. Works to the exterior began in October 2012. Before the 1870s, St Philip’s churchyard was surrounded with Georgian terraces. However, as a result of the Second Birmingham Improvement Act of 1861, the buildings were to be cleared for the redevelopment of Colmore Row. As the leases on the buildings on Colmore Row began to end in the late 1860s, demolition began. Barwick Street was constructed in 1870 and several plots of land bounded by Colmore Row, Church Street, Barwick Street and Livery Street were acquired to create the site of the hotel. Isaac Horton, a major Birmingham land and property owner and his architect and builder, Thomson Plevins, were very active in the acquisition of the land and developing it in line with the 1861 Act. Plevins issued three separate contracts for the Colmore Row range of the hotel and construction work started in 1875 on the corner of Church Street. The hotel opened on 1 February 1879, with 100 rooms and a further 60 unfinished at the time of opening. Other facilities included a restaurant with an entrance fronting Church Street, two coffee rooms and stock rooms. The stock rooms were an exhibition space where businessmen could demonstrate their new products and were built as the hotel aimed to attract most of its clients from commercial visitors from out of town. The hotel was let to Arthur Field, a hotel operator from Newcastle upon Tyne. In 1880 the hotel was extended, when the corner of Church Street and Barwick Street was built. The Explore: So we took a spontaneous trip up to Birmingham to check out a few rooftops and we then remembered that the grand hotel was in fact, 2 roads away from where we were planning on going. So we decided to pull an all nighter and find this room; anyway we got in at around 4am and spent a good hour looking for the ballroom (actually it was a nightmare to find); anyway, once we had found it a few of us fell asleep leaving just 2 of us to enjoy its architecture! I find it shocking that this kind of building hasn’t been restored, my photos do it no justice. Anyway we spent about 3 hours taking our photos before stumbling to McDonalds for a well earned bagel and coffee. 100% would revisit. Being tired and hungry we didn't bother checking out the whole site and instead just went straight to the ballroom! 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Thanks for looking!
  7. History: ​ The Queen Elizabeth II hospital – or the QEII as it is known locally, is located in Welwyn Garden City and run by East and North Hertfordshire NHS Trust. The first full hospital to be built by the NHS, the QEII had some 100 beds. All inpatient and emergency services were transferred by October 2014 to the Lister Hospital (Stevenage), which has had £150 million invested in major new facilities. Since October 2014, the QEII has continued to offer a range of general hospital services for people living and working in many parts of east and south Hertfordshire. These include GP services, outpatient clinics, diagnostic (radiology, pathology and endoscopy), a breast unit and antenatal and postnatal care, as well as a 24/7 urgent care centre for adults and children of all ages with minor injuries and illnesses. £30 million has been invested in new facilities. The old hospital site is now closed and the land will be used for housing and a care home. The Explore: ​ So having only recently discovered this hospital (thanks to a friends lead) we managed to get down there fairly promptly, and what a great surprise this place turned into! 1. The Morgue 2. The Morgue 3. The morgue 4. Some Corridors 5. Medication Chutes 6. Medication Storage for use with the chutes pictured above. 7. Confidential Documentation Room 8. Another Corridor 9. On the wards. 10. The staircase 11. The staircase 12. The staircase 13. The staircase 14. Some manky blood samples 15. 16. Theatre Lights 17. Theatre Lights Thanks for reading!

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