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Buffalo

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Everything posted by Buffalo

  1. Went out for a day trip of exploring in Leeds with @plod. We had Opal 3 on our list but once we arrived in Leeds we already noticed there were people on the roof so we were unsure of whether we'd get a chance to get up there. We did some explores in the area to pass the time then eventually made our way to Opal 3. We headed to the roof anyway despite seeing what we first thought were builders, but it turned out there was actually an abseiling event going on so I thought why not. I'm so pleased I had the opportunity to have this experience, and I'd say it was pretty decent timing Opal 3 is a 25 storey building which serves as student accommodation for 542 students. It is the 3rd tallest building in Leeds after Bridgewater place and the Plaza Tower.
  2. The former British Gas building was built in the 1960's and at 147ft is the 21st tallest building in Leeds. Originally to be demolished, this building currently has plans of being converted into a hotel designed by Simpson Haugh and partners. The podium building will also be extended and raised to four storeys along its full length, and work is now progressing on the demolition phase. I was with @plod and another user from 28DL when I explored this in June but I have since come back a few times and built up a series of photos taken from late afternoon through to the night. Pretty cool place this, the views are amazing. It's definitely worth the huge trek up those stairs As I still currently use a bridge camera, not all of my pictures turned out all that good due to photographing in unfavorable conditions for the most part but I wanted to show them anyway.
  3. Gledhow Grove, built in the 1820's was designed by architect John Clark in Greek Revival style. Chapel Allerton Hospital was opened in may 1927 by HRH Princess Mary, It was run by the Ministry of Pensions and cost £130,000. It replaced the old military hospital at Becketts Park in Leeds, catering for patients who had been injured in the Great War, specializing in the fitting of appliances and false limbs to war veterans. The hospital closed in 1994, the old hospital buildings were demolished and the Grade II listed mansion has been left derelict with new housing built in the grounds. In early 2008, filing cabinets containing patients' details were found inside the basement of the hospital after it had already been sold on. As most of this place has already been converted I only got to explore the mansion part of it. What's unique about this building is how different the layout is to your average hospital, and it still had lots of character despite being so wrecked. Some of the floors that we saw above had completely fallen through with the entire carpet hanging down, probably one of the most far-gone places I've seen.
  4. Pineheath house is a 40-room mansion that has been abandoned for 30 years. It was owned by Sir Dhunjibhoy and Lady Bomanji who were considered friends of the royal family. From what I could see online it used to have tonnes of interesting old-fasioned items in there but those have since been auctioned off and the place has been almost completely stripped bare. A few of the rooms are still decorated in a 1920's style and the house contains some pretty neat features. Explored with @plod and a non-member.
  5. Explored with @plod and a 28DL member. There wasn't much to the first few rooms we explored apart from tonnes of christmas trees & graffiti so I wasn't too sure about the place upon first impressions, but the main factory bit was quite interesting and very colourful. Some of the machinery and tiles were still there which I was surprised about given how far gone the place is now. Some of the smaller buildings had also been badly burned, I fell halfway through one of the floors but managed to save myself on a plank of wood I couldn't actually find any history of this place sadly, apart from the obvious stuff. 1
  6. The History Typhoo Tea Factory, founded by John Summer in 1903, was known as one of Birmingham's most prominent landmarks. The factory was used for tea production from the 1930's, surviving bombing by the Luftwaffe in WW2. Typhoo merged with Schweppes in 1968 and the following year merged with Cadbury to form Cadbury Scweppes. The factory eventually closed in 1978. The site, which is currently being used as a 148-space pay and display car park, has been granted planning permission as part of a £14 million project to be turned into a university campus for Birmingham City University. The Explore So after months and months of constantly checking this place, access finally popped up during a Birmingham trip with @plod and some other users from 28. We started the day off with the usual quote of "lets check typhoo again even though we won't get in", followed by our customary perimeter check for access and another visit to the boiler room, and surprisingly we managed to find an access point which had evidently come up fairly recently so our timing was spot on there. We spent a good 3 or 4 hours exploring the tea factory as well as S Rose & Co; there was a lot to look around (and we did get lost a few times, we had more trouble finding our way out than trying to find a way in!) although sadly nothing much was left there which was a bit disappointing as nobody would have guessed what it was by looking at the place, but it was still definitely worth the trip. Despite the failures it was a pretty successful day.
  7. Coleg Harlech was a residential adult education college for mature students, established in 1927 by Thomas Jones. Starting from just 6 students; numbers increased to 30 in the 1930's, then 70 in the 1960's. Coleg Harlech began offering a two-year diploma course validated by the University of Wales, which became a preparation for university education for those who had missed out on earlier education to give them a second chance. I had spent the day on Harlech beach with @plod and after our original plan became unsuccessful we headed to the train station. On our way there we came across this place which I was surprised we hadn't noticed sooner as it really stands out like a sore thumb, so we went ahead and had a look inside as we had an hour to kill anyway. There wasn't much to see inside but I'm doing this report because I've noticed nobody else has actually gone here. We did get a really good view of the beach from the roof though
  8. History High Royds Hospital (formerly known as the West Riding Pauper Lunatic Asylum) first opened on the 8th October 1888. The main purpose of the asylum was to contain and restrain mentally ill patients. People often spent decades imprisoned in the asylum, which was recognized in the High Royds Cemetery which stands as a testament to those who spent their last days there. People lived very repetitive and lonely lives in the asylum due to poor care and understanding of mental illness in the 19th century, and it was common for people to be admitted for minor mental illnesses, such as phobias, anxiety and learning disabilities. The asylum was given the name Menston Mental Hospital in the 1920's, (and eventually became High Royds Asylum in 1963), and cures for mental illness were considered as an alternative to simply storing patients. The use of shock therapy was introduced with the intention of putting patients into a relaxed mental state, however this resulted in many patients screaming in pain, and sometimes caused them to become unconscious. Lobotomy was also a popular treatment at High Royds around this time. The hospital was closed in 2003 because it had become outdated and unsuited to modern psychiatric practice. The site is now being redeveloped into a new village, and all that remains is the admin block, which is grade II listed. Some features of the hospital will remain, such as the clock tower and ballroom. I've been here a few times so the photos are from various trips. I only ever got to see the Admin block but it was worth it for the clock tower and ballroom which I'm glad they're keeping. Explored with @plod and a few others. Sadly this place is now a no-go, I think its safe to assume somebody had been caught by the residents which brought attention to the access point, as they always seem to have their eyes out. I'm glad I at least got to see the last little bit that was left while it still stands though.
  9. Nice shots and interesting building!
  10. Salem Methodist Chapel was built in 1833 in Arthog, near Barmouth in North Wales. In 1868 it was rebuilt in the Gothic style of the gable-entry type, by architect Thomas of Landore, and eventually closed in 1973. Apparently the owner of the building moved abroad to avoid paying a bill for a quarter of a million pounds, which means as a result the walls and other works of the structure are unsafe to passing motorists and local residents due to lack of maintenance. It has been assessed and surveyed and is deemed likely to collapse on itself if it does go. Me and @plod were on holiday in the area so I did a bit of research to see what was about that we could explore. We hadn't yet done a chapel so I was pretty eager to look at this one, so we took a long walk up to check it out. It seems the chapel roof has already started collapsing in on itself which is a huge risk with it being situated on a hill right next to the road, although we got some great views of the inside of the chapel from the path that goes up along by the roof. I really liked the little piano in the corner too, and the building itself was in a very nice state of decay. We actually ended up sleeping in here one of the nights since we walked here at about 3am and were too far away from where we were staying
  11. Crossroads Farm comprises a Georgian farmhouse with a range of derelict cottages, traditional and modern farm buildings and 120 acres of land. The main farmhouse was constructed in the 18th century and was used as a coaching inn prior to its conversion to a farmhouse. I spotted this place while in the car with @plod and a member from 28 on the way to a few sites in Tadcaster, so we stopped off to have a brief look around. We only managed to get into a few sections of this and there wasn't much left to see but it was an interesting place to visit. I'm not too sure when this place went abandoned but the interior was very old-fashioned so I'd assume it was quite a while back.
  12. UK British Gas Building, Leeds - June 2016

    @Andy Too bad they didn't stop anyone
  13. Dudley rail tunnel was opened in 1850 to allow the Oxford-Worcester-Wolverhampton Line between Stourbridge and Wolverhampton to pass for several hundred yards beneath Dudley. The tunnel was regularly used by passenger trains until 1964, when the town's station closed along with the remaining passenger stations on the line, although goods trains were still allowed to use the line. It finally closed to all trains on 19 March 1993, when the section of railway between Walsall and Brierley Hill was closed after 143 years in use. A cable laying train passed through the tunnel on 2 July 1993 - nearly four months after the line was officially closed. Explored with @plod and a 28DL member. Plod
  14. UK Dudley Railway Tunnel - February 2016

    That's fine! I understood everything you said in all your comments on my posts
  15. UK Dudley Railway Tunnel - February 2016

    @Andy Thanks!
  16. The History The railway tunnel, opened in 1848 by George Stephenson and the York & North Midland railway company, ran 400 yards directly below Langcliffe Avenue from the A61 Leeds roundabout to the opposite side of Tewit Well Road. Initially, the locals opposed the railway being built, so the tunnel was built around the railway to keep it out of sight. The branch from Brunswick tunnel and the station was then abandoned after 14 years in operation. The abandoned tunnel was later converted into an air-raid shelter during WW2, with steps leading down to it from the Leeds road roundabout area. A concrete floor had been laid with a 6ft high brick wall lining the tunnel, and the remains of makeshift toilet cubicles in the four corners of the shelter were present. The air-raid shelter finally became abandoned in 1943 due to the bombing of The Majestic Hotel in 1941. The tunnel is mostly free from vandalism, apart from some minor graffiti which dates as far back as the 1970's. The indents on the ground from the sleepers are still evident, and the portal has 2 fixed metal grills to allow bats to use the tunnel. The Explore I explored this one with @plod, and another time with some non-members. after spending hours on research and putting together a detailed map it actually turned out much easier to find than we had anticipated. Getting to the entrance was pretty tricky though (as well as actually accessing the tunnel) and when we arrived it soon became clear that our £8 wilko torch was not going to cut it, so with this place being pretty local we decided to do a more detailed explore in a return visit Even with the return trip & better torches my camera really struggled with the poor lighting so picture quality isn't its best. We knew that the tunnel was basically a straight line so we headed right towards the end where we came across a wall with a doorway. Through here was an empty brick room with toilet cubicles in the corners, and past that room through the opposite doorway was a staircase leading to a pile of rubble underneath the Leeds Road roundabout, which had been dug into by the workmen in the 1960's who didn't know it was there, so sadly that's as far as we could go. This is a neat little place in Harrogate that not many people actually know of.
  17. @Andy I found this one difficult because of the low light
  18. @jones-y-gog the place is still for sale currently, and @AndyK! we did bramham orphanage and looked at the little chef restaurant down the road but that's about it for that area
  19. @The_Raw Were you the guy with the blue blanket that kept waking up and looking at us then going back to sleep?
  20. UK Dudley Railway Tunnel - February 2016

    @The_Raw I wish I'd have gotten more but I use a bridge camera and didn't understand it much back then so couldn't really take many low-light shots
  21. UK Salem Methodist Chapel, Arthog - July 2016

    @AndyK! It was so rough
  22. UK British Gas, Leeds. July 2016

    Great pics!
  23. The History Clayton Hospital was opened in 1854; after Thomas Clayton, a former city mayor donated buildings to the Wakefield general dispensary, an organisation set up to provide healthcare for the poor. It provided much needed healthcare long before the NHS was formed. The hospital was later abandoned in 2012. Specialist eye services have moved from Clayton to the more modern Pinderfields Hospital and its sexual health services will be based at King Street Walk-in Centre. The Explore Explored with @plod and a member from 28. (shot out to the 3 kids we also met there ) It's a shame to see that the place is in such a state, I tried to make the best of it despite not having much battery power left in my camera from the previous explores of the day. The main building was pretty disorientating so I'm sure I missed some of it but I'm quite satisfied with what I did get to see, given how trashed the place is anyway. We were interested in finding the morgue and we managed to locate it but it was very well boarded up, and there is anti-climb paint covering the fences that surround it as our friend managed to find As we were searching for a way in to another building in the center of the site, the security guard showed up while @plod was down the tunnels looking for a way in from there. Security gave us 2 minutes to get him out before the police are called but plod had wandered so far in that he couldn't hear us calling him Luckily he showed up in time after no luck finding anything; the security guard wasn't happy but he gave us no trouble as he didn't really seem to know what he was doing.
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