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Gromr123

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Gromr123 last won the day on October 28

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About Gromr123

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  1. This one is from earlier on in the year during a trip to France/Luxembourg, one I thought worth posting up here! Chateau Lumiere needs no introduction, a magnificent building with such grandeur its hard to believe its been abandoned. The huge glass skylight allows daylight to illuminate all the floors, making for wonderful lighting. During the last few years Chateau Lumiere become a bit of a tourist destination, with vandals smashing the large mirror in the big foyer. Luckily its fared well over its many years of dereliction and is still one of the most beautiful buildings I have had the pleasure of exploring. History Built in early 1900s, this house was owned by a tobacco tycoon from Switzerland. After the owner moved away in 1950s, the house was used for business purposes, and was sold multiple times before finally being left empty. There isn't a confirmed date it was abandoned, but the general consensus seems to say its in the 1980s. The Explore After finally finding the location of it and seeing it was a reasonable distance from Luxembourg where were staying for 2 weeks, it became a must do. We found a charming cheap hotel in the next town over and booked a night there. Finally the day was upon us and were there, stood outside awestruck by the Neo-Baroque styling of Lumiere. We looked for a way inside and quickly found a well beaten track round the back. As we approached I could hear voices inside. We definitely weren't the only visitors that day, in fact there were loads of people wondering around inside! Most other people were explorers like us, however some weren't there to take photos as it turned out a bit later... We started with the basement and worked upwards. The basement actually had quite a bit of stuff still left there, unlike the rest of the floors that were bare to say the least. In fact the house was almost empty from the ground floor up. All the fittings and fixtures remained, but no personal items were left at all. We photographed it from nearly every angle we could think of. The best thing about Lumiere is just how photogenic it is. Its hard to take a bad picture. It was a fairly relaxed explore, until we witnessed a group of 12 year olds smashing the glass skylight and then coming downstairs smashing bricks onto the marble floor. The red-mist descended as I yelled down at them at them from one of the skylight balcony's while waving my arms around like a loony. I must have looked like a madman. They didn't understand my English, I certainly didn't understand their French. Luckily they didn't stick around much longer to do any more damage. With the drama over we got back to the explore, now alone in the house. We spent about 3 hours inside in total, but you could easily spent much longer there if you wanted to photograph everything. One thing that struck me was the quality of every little detail. Silly things like the latches on the windows still work flawlessly and feels better made and smoother than any modern window latch I've used before. Anyway, on with the photos. Photos Externals Internals In the porch there is this notice, translates roughly too: "Many of us have seen that you like this in all its splendor. Photographers, Models, Fans of Urbex, but some unscrupulous individuals do not respect...Alas! Yet you are known everywhere for your splendor, and the sublime cliches that you have brought us. Today April 19, 2015 we owe you this ... to give you a bit of sparkle ... after the vandalism that you have undergone. Thank you to those who will preserve you forever Respect this place as you would at home PLEASE! Do not break! Do not vandalize it.. Do not leave rubbish, paper etc.. Bring your waste back with you.." The entrance hall and foyer. Sadly this used to be where the the large mirror was, but was broken in 2015. A rather interesting choice of wallpaper... Recent damage to the glass skylight. Saw this in the loft and couldn't help but get a photo too The Details The Basement
  2. A piece of British WW2 History hidden under a hillside. HMS Forward, a maritime intelligence centre, was key to monitoring the English channel and and was heavily involved in D-Day. Although it's fallen into dereliction, attempts to restore and maintain it have been carried out by 'Friends of HMS Forward'. History HMS Forward was the Royal Naval HQ, setup up on the 20th of June 1940 in the Guinness Trust Holiday Home. It had responsibility for units along the south cost, including: HMS Marlborough - Eastbourne HMS Aggressive - Newhaven HMS New - Newaven HMS Vernon - Roedean HMS Lizard - Hove The tunnels of HMS Forward began life in March 1941 after an Admiralty direction that ordered channel ports to setup facilities to maintain naval plots and created the need to securely house equipment for plotting and communications. It was decided to built a network of tunnels into the a hillside of South Heighton for operations to take place from. HMS Forward was designed by Lt. Col. F.H.Foster, Commander of the Royal Engineers, and built by the 1st Tunneling Engineers Group and No 172 Tunneling Company. They were completed on the 14th of November 1941. At the time they were a state of the art facility and were kitted out for every eventuality. This including backup power generator and full air conditioning systems with gas filters. They had chemical toilets, sleeping cabins and a gallery. Although the toilet were for emergencies only and it was noted that he veterans who worked here didn't even have knowledge of these toilets. The labyrinth of tunnels had an East and West entrance. The West entrance by the main road was the main entrance. The East entrance was under the West wing of the Guinness Trust Holiday Home (now demolished). There were two Pill boxes at the top of the hill that were accessible from inside the tunnels, but were demolished long ago. During its operational period between November 1941 and August 1945, the tunnels of HMS Forward carried out many key maritime operations. It monitored the English channel from Dungeness to Selsy Bill using ten radar stations from Fairlight to Bogner Regis. It was heavily involved with D-Day as well as nightly raids on the occupied french coast. The Explore A very nice explore in a very nice set of tunnels. They are quite extensive and is quite the maze, however once you get your head round the layout its impossible to get lost. Its quite a shame that such an important piece of history has been left to rot. This is somewhere that really needs to be preserved for future generation. I'd heard that there was intention to turn it into a museum some time ago, but plans for this got scuppered by the local residents up top. It was clear that there was once some kind of open day as there were still laminated signs and notices left up by the 'Friends of HMS Forward'. Photos The West entrance with signs and notices from a previous open day / tour. Looks like it was a good few years ago though. You can see here what looks like a machine gun nest in the brick wall as you turn the very first corner. The large security gate of the West entrance. The long 100m West adit tunnel looking towards the east end. Looking from the East end of the West Adit. The two tunnels going left and right just before are the stairs up to the South and North Pill boxes. Looking up what remains of the stairs to the Northern Pillboxes. It is possible go up to the top of these, but its been sealed up at the top with rubble. The West Airlock. The Air conditioning plant room and standby generator room. The standby generator was a large diesel JP Lister engine. This provided 400V/230V power at 22Kw. Exhaust was piped through to the annex at the back of the engine room where it was exhausted through the ceiling too the surface through a 4" pipe. The start of the operational rooms of the tunnel. The room on the left side is the TURCO Office, and looking right down the long tunnel is down the length of the main tunnel with sleeping cabins. T.U.R.C.O stands for Turn Round Control Organisation, used to 'Assist naval shore authorities in the quick turn around of ships and craft'. The East gallery was used for sleep accommodation, switchboards and coders. The GPO Voice frequency equipment room. The pits in the floor are to fit the equipment in, as the modems were over 8ft tall. Looking down the East Galley and into the Teleprinters room. Looking down the the far end of the plotting rooms. The sleeping cabins. There were 4 of these for personnel on the night duty and split watches. Looking up towards the mock hen house, sealed at the top of course. The stairs up to the eastern entrance with pit at the bottom to slow down would-be invaders. The gate on the way to the East entrance. The remains of a second gate. Thanks for reading!
  3. This one required an early start, but the morning adventure to The Kings Hall was worth the effort. Visited with Zombizza. History "Located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was built in 1916 and was designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The King’s Hall building has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and it was soon screening religious films. By 1926, it was operating as a regular cinema, still managed by the Methodist church. The King’s Hall Cinema was closed in 1937. It then reverted back to a Methodist Church use as the King’s Hall Methodist Church. They vacated the building in January 2013" The Explore Started nice and early, and managed our entrance fairly incident free...if we don't count the massive tear in my trousers.. It's a pretty spectacular place with a wonderful blend of natural decay and marvelous original features/architecture. With little to no daylight, we decided to wonder round the back rooms while the sun came up before the spending too much time on the main attraction, the large auditorium. The rooms around the back are a weird mix of new and old, some of them being more disgusting than others. One room was so pungent that I took 2 steps in before bailing out. There was also one room that was filled with beds, old food packets and needles. Looked a few years old, but squatters for sure. The larger rooms consisted of meeting rooms, prayer rooms and teaching rooms. All of them had funky wavy flooring where the wooden floor tiles had expanded with moisture. Eventually the sun came up and the auditorium started to flood with the golden morning light. After a few hours we left, although the exit was hilariously unsubtle. Photos The Auditorium
  4. This ones been long in the planning, but eventually at some ungodly hour of the morning me and Brewtal managed to get inside and see the place for ourselves. It was a pretty brief visit by all accounts, but we managed to see most of the lower level. History Built as part of the now demolished Melville Barracks in Chatham. This deep shelter was a refuge for the marines at the barracks. The history is pretty vague, but I believe the tunnels existed before the start of WW2. In the early 1960s when the melville Barracks were demolished to make way for the council offices, and most of the tunnel entrances were sealed up. The Explore After a few weeks of planning me and Brewtal finally got round to visiting here. This one requires a little more caution as the entrance method is somewhat brazen. After a bit of head scratching we devised a plan and went for it. We were in! I'd be forewarned about the stairs, and everything said was absolutely right!. The wooden stairs are very rotten and very dangerous. Even when taking extra care, we had a few brown pants moments. Once at the bottom of the lower level we could relax and start exploring. The lower level is quite extensive and we saw as much as we could. Unfortunately we were fairly time limited, so we didn't mess around too much. I found the stairs going up to the upper levels, but decided against it this time. Re-visit for that one me thinks. It was refreshing to see no graffiti or vandalism. The access situation has protected it pretty well I suspect. Photos The bottom of the stairs. These were supposed to be the 'Ok' stairs. Dread to think what the 'bad' stairs were like. The stairs to the upper levels.
  5. Thanks! Still super stoked about this one, don't find many houses this clean. PM me if you fancy visiting it
  6. I don't post very much here on Oblivion State, So I thought I'd best start posting a bit more. Be warned this is going to be a picture heavy one. History I'm being purposefully vague as this place needs protecting from the cretins that unfortunately will take joy in ruining such a delightful property. 'Punch Lodge' as I'm calling it, was used by a large business as a management training facility. It had accommodation for the people attending the training courses, presumably running for several days or weeks at a time. The Lodge has roughly 20 rooms for accommodation, as well as lounge, bar and dining room areas. It also has a lovely round shed, swimming pool and a tennis court. It was used from at least 1980 and closed down in around 2007. I'm still trying to find more information about it, and I'll add any new information I find as an edit here. The Explore So like many of my finds, this was a Google Maps spot that I decided to go check out on the off chance. Normally with these things its a gamble as it's either been converted, knocked down, sealed up or was never derelict at all. I had a good feeling about this one though. As I approached it I could see a building over the fence, and what looked like a couple broken window panes. Carefully wandering down the overgrown path, I was presented with a big messy courtyard and the front of the lodge. There was a couple fire extinguishers chucked on the ground, the usual sign that kids had been in messing around. Access was simply an open door, so an excellent start already. Exploring from room to room, I was flabbergasted what I was seeing, the house was pristine! It almost was too good, I was expecting for an alarm to go off at any moment and the fuzz to show up. The house has 2 floors plus a 2nd floor loft conversion (with roof access too!). To my surprise the power was still on. Many of the lights still worked. A good amount of the rooms were filled full of crap, almost as if they were using it as storage. I found a few offices with lots of paperwork left. It was mostly tax returns and business related documents. Obviously the house was used to run a business from, but there was quite a few different business names to the address. However now that I know it was used for business and management training it makes a little more sense. I headed outside to explore the surrounding land. After fighting through brambles and trees I found a very full up swimming pool and the tennis court. I did a bit of research once I got home and found that there were numerous businesses that still had this address as its registered office. I don't have a very good knowledge of the inner works of running a business, but to have a registered office as the address of derelict property seems a bit naughty to me. Photos Externals This is the main courtyard area. You can see piles of rubbish and fire extinguishers that have been chucked about. Internals The main lobby area was pristine. This is the main door and porch area. The lounge area. The bar area used as storage for furniture. The dinning room The kitchen with everything left untouched once again. The downstairs office with lots of paperwork still left. Lots of silverware stuffed into a case?! This looks like it was used as a training room Upstairs. The long corridor with lots of bedrooms. A few of the rooms looked like they were being renovated. A few were being used for storage. Most had the same bright orange curtains. Bit of Sangria anyone? Another office type area, except I spotted something interesting in here. A CCTV monitor that was in standby mode. I hit the power button and all 4 cameras had VIDEO LOSS, so either they weren't set up properly or someone has disconnected them. The top floor consisted of a big bedroom with en-suite bathroom. Adding to the fun, there was roof access from one of the windows! Outside area By the corner of the house was a round shed that had a fantastic ceiling. The woodlands behind the house is very overgrown and it was a struggle to fight through the foliage to find anything. Found the swimming pool! Almost stepping right in as rain water had filled it to ground level. The tennis court. Thanks for reading.
  7. There has been a good few reports on Clockhouse Brickworks over the last couple years, however none since they put up the new fence and filled in a lot of the access points. This didn't stop me and Brewtal however, as we ninja'd our way inside. That said, it was by far the hardest access I've ever found, full credit to the people who sealed this place up as they did a top job. We had been planning this explore for a little while now, including drone photography and scouting trips, so it was satisfying to say the least when the plan came together at the end. I visited here back in early 2015, so its was interesting to see what had changed and how much is still intact. It's sad to say that it has been well trashed and vandalised since the last visit. The last 18 months have not been kind to Clockhouse, which might be why they have erected a big fence around it. It certainly seems be a magnet for undesirables who want to steal copper and lead etc. This said, it's still remarkable how much machinery and tooling is still left, despite years of decay. I actually used to know someone who was an ex-employee here who told me a little about it. He said that shortly before it closed they had spent vast amounts of money on a new piece equipment/machinery, all of which went to complete waste. Not sure whether its true or not, but he claimed that due to the requirement to comply with new Health and safety standards, it worked out to be more expensive to bring the site up to scratch, than it was to close it and start from scratch elsewhere. I'd imagine in reality this was one of a few factors that lead to it's closure. It's pretty sad because he said he really enjoyed working there. History 'The Clock House Brick Company Ltd was founded c.1933 to exploit a rich deposit of high-quality Weald Clay to the south of the Surrey village of Capel. The outbreak of war in 1939 was bad news for brickmaking, as housebuilding effectively ceased and the workforce was swallowed up by conscription. Although there was some demand for bricks to be used in military engineering projects, there was little use for the high-grade ceramic blocks made at Clock House. By 1941, the Company was in liquidation and sold the majority of its share capital to the London Brick Company (LBC) to avoid closing the works. In 1945, the Company was wound up for good and the works were acquired by the LBC. Under LBC, production was substantially increased to meet demand from the recovering housing market and in the 1960s the factory was rebuilt to accommodate more efficient production methods. London Brick was acquired by Hanson PLC in 1984 the works was refitted shortly afterwards to produce multi stock bricks under the Butterley and Capel brand names. In 1998, Clockhouse Bricks were used by three major exhibitors in that year's Ideal Home Show and by 2000, Clock House was be Hanson’s main soft mud production site, making around 42 million bricks per year. The global financial crisis of 2008 hit the building materials industry hard, however: a sudden slump in housing prices meant that house-building ground almost to a halt and demand for bricks plummeted. In March 2009, Hanson announced a 'phased closure programme' which began later that month and led to the loss of 61 jobs. Hanson have since indicated that there is no intention to re-activate the brickworks or extract clay from the adjacent pits. Since closure, Clock House Brickworks has been in limbo, slowly being stripped of anything valuable while a lengthy audit determines the planning conditions surrounding re-use of the site. Plans for an incinerator ('energy from waste facility') on the site, bitterly opposed by local residents, were thrown out by a High Court Judgment in 2009 and the future of the site is now uncertain.' (The Derelict Miscellany :: Clock House Brickworks) The Explore As previously mentioned, they have erected a 6ft palisade fence all the way around the site. Getting past this was surprisingly easy, getting inside the building was not. We sneaked round the outside of the building look for ways in. We saw one potential one, but it seemed tricky. After ruling out every other option(not that we had many others) we decided to give it a go. It took a couple of goes but we managed it just about. We were in! It's almost overwhelming to see the vast array of machinery, walkways and control panels. It's hard to know where to even start at photographing it. Getting out proved to both easier but more painful. I managed to slip and ended up with a nice big bruise an inch below the nipple. It certainly got Brewtal worried. Exploring is dangerous kids. Drone Shots Interior Shots The Drying oven The Tool room. There used to be a big pillar drill in here, but that has disappeared. The press for the bricks. The chair shot, of course. The maintenance room has been trashed. Lol. Thanks for reading and happy Christmas!
  8. That's worrying?! Its in the middle of no-where, so I can't imagine who would have done it. Doubt the locals next door would have done something like that!
  9. Tower brick and tile company is a lovely little explore tucked away in the small village of Selborne. It's very isolated, with interruptions only from the occasional passing car and the swarming birds in the field opposite. The History The Brick and Tiles company have been producing hand made bricks at this site since 1872, with production finally ceasing on the 6th of November 2009 when the company went into administration. Since then there have been attempts to breathe life back into the brickworks, however all unsuccessfully. There were plans to turn the factory into a clean eco-friendly factory by using a anaerobic digester in order to generate the gas required to power the site. Unfortunately plans for this were refused in August of 2009. (Waste-to-energy plans at Selborne brickworks refused - BBC News) The Explore After attending a wedding, nothing was better to break up the niceties of suits, dresses and canapes then getting mucky and dusty on an good explore half way into the long drive home (It was pretty much on route anyway!). The weather was cloudy and slightly foggy, but it wasn't raining and it wasn't freezing so we had no complaints. Overall a pretty chilled explore with a surprising amount of equipment and machinery left and intact. As described by Mookster, this is very much a mini Clockhouse Brickworks, although getting in was far far easier. It's a shame we rushed round here a bit, as it's one of those places you could happy spend a few hours exploring. A small factory brimming with character and interesting relics of its former years. Pictures I did laugh at this The Kiln In here is the most impressive porn room I've seen so far. A big poster of how it used to look in its former days I assume? One of a few Drying ovens. Looks like a big chemical drum leaked onto the ground. Not sure exactly what it was, but I didn't really want to find out. I'm not really sure, but this looks like it could be a press used for forming the bricks/tiles.
  10. UK The Shrine - West Sussex - October 2016

    The place is properly sealed up and alarmed. No-one is getting in there anytime soon.
  11. Buried in the countryside of West Sussex is this rather magical place. A totally chilled out explore with some quite interesting and quirky bits of architecture. Location & History The mausoleum is said to have been built for the mother of the family to be buried in. The actually body however is not buried here, but in a local cemetery. The shrine is around the remains of an old castle, the remains of which are still visible. The site is situated on the edge of a lovely pond and has a path going around it with a boat house on the opposite side. The Explore This was a very relaxed explore, the grounds are pretty magical and are very pretty. There isn't a great deal to see other than the mausoleum and the statues, however a nice little wander neither the less. The mausoleum is completed sealed up and is alarmed, so exterior shots only.
  12. History Oxted Quarry is a site owned by Southern Gravel Ltd (SGL). Those who drive the southern part of the M25 often might have seen it as its quite visible about mile west of the Clacket Lane services. The site has been operating from as early as the 1940s and finally came to a close in 2012 when locals complained about the HGV traffic. Pressure from the locals start in around 2007 when the traffic from the site increased due to increasing numbers of operations on the site. SGL in a what was deemed as somewhat of a panic response closed the site with the aim to convert the area into housing. In November 2014 the council refused the application to build housing and the site has been left derelict ever since. Personally, the road going up to the quarry is tiny, winding and very steep and is totally unsuitable to deal with any level of increased residential traffic, let alone HGV traffic. I am hardly surprised at the local residents skepticism to the plans. The Explore Me and a friend went to visit here late in the afternoon a couple hours before sunset. To be honest it was a bit of a rush job and I could have happily spent another hour or so there. First I sent the drone over for a bit of recon and it seemed empty, so in we went. It would be entirely possible to walk in the entrance as it wasn't gated, however to play it safe I found a more desecrate way in. Aside from a bit of barbed wire, no issues here. For a site that has been abandoned for only a few years, its really not in a good state. There was some interesting things going on there as well as some rather odd finds. Unfortunately there was some lights and signs of some kind of activity on the lower portion of the quarry towards the entrance, so I didn't get to see as much of it as I wanted. A re-visit at some point might be in order. Aerial Shots The Quarry Under the Lean-to there were boxes of helicopter rotors as well as what appeared to be gearboxes. If anyone can enlighten me what they are doing here, I'd be curious to know. The building behind seemed pretty sealed up, no idea what was inside it. Thanks for reading!
  13. History During WW2 a British resistance unit was created, named the 'Auxiliary Patrol'. These were a sort of top secret elite Home Guard that were given the most modern weapons and equipment. Each member of the 'Auxiliary Patrol' were taken from the Home Guard, Vetted and made to sign the official secrets act. This highly secret unit had there own underground hideout for in the event that Britain was invaded. Each hideout was fitted with bunk beds and could sleep up to 8 people. The Explore When they built this, they intended for it to be well hidden. I have to commend them, they did a mighty good job. I spent the best part of an hour wandering aimlessly round woods around a vague marker I put on google maps from SUBBRIT. Eventually I found it with bit of luck and some extra location clues I found online. The SUBBRIT location was actually a little off as it turned out. The underground hideout has two entrances. One is down via a square shaft that requires a ladder to get down. The second way in is via the 'Emergency exit tunnel' which is a concrete tunnel that is roughly a meter in diameter and comes out on the banks of an old pond. I actually found the emergency tunnel first, so decided get in touch with my Andy Dufresne side and crawl down it. It was actually no-where near as claustrophobic as it looked as you can sit up and turn around in it quite easily, but it is about 20-30m long. The bunk beds are all still there, but very rotten. The floor is covered in damp mud but everything else is in very good condition considering its age. When I was heading out I went to find the other entrance, which I must have walked right by the first time. It was covered by a couple corrugated steel sheets. Overall, a decent little explore
  14. I visited here with Brewtal from over at DP. Thanks for showing us around this place, it was great! Hope you like the drone video. This former manor house was used for Chemical and Optical work. The History for this place is pretty sketchy and I can't anything on it. Its being redeveloped into housing and part of the structure has been emptied and will be demolished. The main house is remaining to be redeveloped from what I understand. The roof is completely missing and has been covered completely by a scaffold roof. The top floor is very surreal because of this. The drone video! https://youtu.be/kZJJd8V4OD0 Thanks for reading!
  15. Fantastic photos, really great light painting. I'm relatively local to Godstone so this seems to a great spot to visit soon.
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