Jump to content

RetroGamerVX

Members
  • Content count

    16
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    2

RetroGamerVX last won the day on December 28 2016

RetroGamerVX had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

17

About RetroGamerVX

  • Rank
    Oblivion State Member

Profile Information

  • Location
    Consett
  1. Hi, yup, it's what my subscribers have asked for, as unbroken footage as possible. What some do with shorter time available is watch it in chunks Steve
  2. Thanks very much and sorry about that, didn't realise
  3. Hi all, In our continuing adventures of exploring abandoned mines, we revisit Smallcleugh Lead Mine in Nenthead, Uk, which dates back to the 1700s. In the 3.5 hour adventure, we visit the classic Ballroom, where a huge body of ore was removed, and then onto what we have named the " Second Ballroom ", which is the largest stope I have ever seen. A little history (Thanks mineexplorer.org) Smallcleugh Mine was started in about 1770, looking for the continuation of Hanginshaw's West of Nent Vein, but this was soon abandoned. In 1787 the work was restarted by an agent for the London Lead Company along the Smallcleugh Cross Vein which produced an immense quantity of ore. There where also many other rich veins worked from Smallcleugh - Middlecleugh (and 1st and 2nd Sun Veins), Longcleugh, and Great Cross. The mine over the years was also worked by the Nenthead and Tynedale Lead and Zinc Company and Vieille Montagne Zinc Company. Most of the operations in Smallcleugh had come to an end around the 1900's. In 1963 the mine was briefly reopened in pursuit of new ore reserves, but little large scale mining took place. A famous occurrence at the mine was the dinner party held down it. On September 2nd 1901, 28 members of the local Masonic branch held a dinner down the mine in a large stope know today as the Ballroom Flat.It is often assumed that Smallcleugh Mine extends all the way to Bogg Shaft and beyond, as these are reached via the Smallcleugh portal, however Smallcleugh originally only went as far as the Longcleugh Vein past the Ballroom, and the beginnings of the Middlecleugh Vein and Middlecleugh Second Sun Vein. The area past this which covers Carr's Cross Vein, Cow Hill Cross Vein, Barron's Sump Chamber and beyond are is in fact a separate mine called Longcleugh Mine, which was originally worked by shafts.Smallcleugh Mine is the one that everyone knows and goes down. We have been going down this mine on and off since 1988. It is very impressive and extensive with multiple flats, circular routes and connections to Middlecleugh, Rampgill, Carr's and Caplecleugh Mines. Enjoy, please like if you do and leave any relevant comments
  4. Hi all, My latest lead mine adventure video is up! This time, we have descended the 600 ft, 45 degree, Brandy Bottle Incline in the Old Gang valley
  5. Hi all, Been out exploring again, so a new video up, and in this one, we are exploring 6 x abandoned lead mines in the Teesdale and Weardale Valleys. Some of these places, we can't even find names for, and some, will be revisited Enjoy Steve
  6. Hi all, I've been out and about again and this time, we've taken a continuious (almost) videoed walk down a lead mine level that is considered to be one of the most beautiful in the North Pennines, Hangingshaw, part of the Rampgill mine complex.. I also fixed my sound issue so in this one, there is no music, just the recording of us walking through! Hope you enjoy and please leave any relevant comment A little history of the main mine complex curtsy of mineexplorers.org: Rampgill Horse Level was started by the Greenwich Hospital in 1736 following the Scaleburn Moss Vein until it reached Fairhill Vein, this then followed into Rampgill Vein. Rampgill Vein may have been worked as early as 1690. There are references to other veins being worked from much earlier on which join into Rampgill Mine. In 1745 the lease was sold to the London Lead Company who developed the mine at an impressive rate and found the Rampgill Vein and others to be incredibly rich in ore. Altogether Rampgill with all its veins yielded 140,000 tons of lead ore between 1703 and 1886.By the end of the 19th century most of Rampgill Vein above the water table had been worked out. Between 1899 and 1921 the Vieille Montagne Zinc Company reworked some of the veins in Rampgill Mine and Coalcleugh Mine for zinc ore, with the Rampgill Horse Level being used for access to Coalcleugh Mine. The Rampgill Horse Level was also used as a haulage way via the Hanginshaw Branch Level for the eastern workings of the Middlecleugh and Longcleugh Veins in Smallcleugh Mine.One of major veins in Rampgill Mine, Scaleburn Vein is generally referred to as being part of Rampgill Mine, it is however a sperate mine in its own right and it only used the Rampgill portal as its access point.
  7. UK Video Report : Tyne Bottom Lead Mine , Nenthead , UK

    Thanks Andy
  8. Hi all, New video up, and it's another Ancient Lead Mine Explore! This time, it's the rather fun, smaller mine, called Tyne Bottom, in Nenthead, UK. This is my first experience of deep water in a mine The following history details are curtsy of mineexplorer.org.uk: Tynebottom Mine was first worked by the Earl of Carlisle and Company from 1771 to 1798, and then by the London Lead Company from 1798 to 1873. There are two adits into the mine, and both intersect the North Vein. The two levels are known as Wisen's Level or more commonly as Tynebottom A, which is the level from the footpath and the Sun Vein Level or known more commonly as Tynebottom B that emerges near the river. Only a small part of the mine is accessible now, but it is very extensive and has a number of surface shafts along its principle veins - Windshaw Bridge Vein and the North Vein. The workings on the Windshaw Bridge Vein extend over 1000m and on the North Vein they reach 600m. Towards the forehead on the North Vein there are shaft connections into Whitesike Level via Bunkershill and the Clay Levels. The mine is used by outdoor centres for commercial trips, the trip being in through one of the adits, across the North Vein Flats and then out via the other adit. NOTE: access to the adits is from the Pennine Way footpath, this however crosses private land and there is a little known agreement where explorers should leave a payment of £1.00 / per head in an envelope at Bridgeview cottage (opposite the green) in Garrigill. If approached by the land owner please be respectful and bite your tongue if you feel the need for arguments. The situation is fragile and that last thing needed is a sealed entrance.
  9. UK Video Report - Brownley Hill Lead Mine, Nenthead, UK

    Thanks muchly Lenston, more to come, although in my next one, using my floodlight for a more wide light
  10. We recently did a trip down Brownley Lead mine in Nenthead, Uk. I have the video up on my Youtube channel. Link is below. If you want info before watching, the following is from mineexplorer.org. Brownley Hill mine was first worked for lead with silver being extracted as well, the earliest workings being via surface shafts on the Brownley Hill Vein. Records dated 1735 from the Greenwich Hospital indicate that the mine was of no real economic value at this time. In the middle of the 1700's the London Lead Company took out a lease for just under 20 years. They worked the Brownley Hill Vein in the Little Limestone and in the hazles above it, obtaining a considerable amount of ore, but they were prevented from mining deeper by water. To overcome the problem they drove the Brownley Hill High Level in the sills above the Great Limestone in an attempt to reach the Little Limestone gaining access to the bottom of old workings, however only a fraction of the expected ore was found. The company also tried the Brownley Hill Moss Cross Vein and Jug Vein, but due to poor ventilation they abandoned their undertakings in this area. In all, they gave up their lease before it was expired as the total current outlay on development brought forth very little in results.At the end of 1765 a new lease was taken out by two man team who obtained a very large amount of ore from the cross Veins as well as the Brownley Hill Vein. The ore raised was sold to the London Lead Company. In 1795 the lease passed to the newly formed Brownley Hill Lead Company. This was a particular lucrative time as the price of lead increased dramatically due to the wars with France. When the price declined again the lease was sold on to another group in 1816, which continued to work the mine under the same name of the Brownley Hill Lead Company. The mine now was being worked for zinc as well lead. It is during this period that the mine started to really develop. The Bloomsberry Horse Level was driven and the previously worked veins were now being worked from below. The horse level extended out on Guddamgill Cross Vein, Wellgill Cross Vein, Brownley Hill North Vein, Brownley Hill Vein eventually reaching the Brownley Hill Moss Cross and Brownley Hill High Cross Veins as well as Jug Vein. The lead ore in the lower levels were much poorer than that obtained in the higher horizons, however the grade of zinc ore was very good and this contributed to the operations profitability. Production was maintained until the middle of the 1850's.In 1869 the mine was operating under a different concern again, the Brownley Hill Lead Mining Company during this period the mine was closed for a while and then reopened again with the same workforce. In 1890 the company sold up the complete mining operation to the Nenthead and Tynedale Lead and Zinc Company who held the lease until 1894. At this time high grade lead ore was depleted and the Vieille Montagne Zinc Company took over the lease in 1914 shifting operations to the extraction of zinc ore. The mine operated until 1936. The last working of the mine was between 1964 and 1966; when the trial Slate Sill level was driven in the Slate Sills southeast of the Brownley Hill Moss Cross Vein. Enjoy Steve
  11. Hi from RetroGamerVX

    Just a quick hi to say hello My name is Steve and I run a Youtube channel which I've been using to document mainly lead mines, abandoned railway tunnels, quarries and viaducts in the Durham / Cumbria / Weardale area
×