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Jsp77

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Jsp77 last won the day on March 11

Jsp77 had the most liked content!

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About Jsp77

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    Oblivion State Member

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Hertfordshire

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332 profile views
  1. With a few spare hours to hand i thought i'd pay a visit, it was almost a year since the last time i was here. I had a bit of a game of hide and seak and would have perfered to have stayed a little longer but it never turned out that way, so i left. whilst walking back to the car i noticed a very nice sunset developing so i got in a good position and come away with some stunning photos. History Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory (MRAO) is home to a number of large aperture synthesis radio telescopes, including the One-Mile Telescope, 5-km Ryle Telescope, and the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager. Radio interferometry started in the mid-1940s on the outskirts of Cambridge, but with funding from the Science Research Council and a donation of £100,000 from Mullard Limited, construction of the Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory commenced at Lord's Bridge,[1] a few kilometres to the west of Cambridge. The observatory was founded under Martin Ryle of the Radio-Astronomy Group of the Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge and was opened by Sir Edward Victor Appleton on 25 July 1957. This group is now known as the Cavendish Astrophysics Group. A portion of the track bed of the old line, running nearly East-West for several miles, was used to form the main part of the "5km" radio-telescope and the Cambridge Low Frequency Synthesis Telescope. on with the photos thanks for looking
  2. Last time I was here i never got to climb up the tower, due to some mindless kids smashing things up and the the old Bill turning up. I no theres not much to see in the tower but it was something i wanted to do, just to have a look for myself really and so glad i did as you get some lovely views of just what is left on site. I visited with a non member, who kindly took the last photo St Crispins was a large psychiatric hospital on the outskirts Northampton and established in 1876 as the Berrywood Asylum and closed in 1995. thanks for looking
  3. Hello from Hertfordshire

    thanks for the warm welcome, will get something posted over the next few days.
  4. Stairs Gallery

    Having just joined thought i'd better join in
  5. Just signed up and thought i'd say hi to you all. Been arround for a few years and get out most weekends, like traveling arround the uk looking at anything that takes my fancy. I enjoy a wide variety of places hospitals, manors, industrial, miliarty & drains etc. I don't mind going on my own or with like minded people.
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