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little_boy_explores

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  1. you have some very nice and interesting pictures there! nice report
  2. Well you are right there isn't much information on this place... but I did some quick research and according to westerntelegraph.co.uk the place closed at the end of 2011. That said nice report and some good pics there!
  3. Nice thread idea... heres some of mine
  4. Black and white or B&W shots The best of your black and white shots Here's a couple to start off with
  5. Bretton Hall Gymnasium The history A teacher training college founded by Alec Clegg. The collage boasted in the design and the architecture of the veroius 'new' buildings scattered around the collage campus including the Gymnasium and the student centre. The collage merged with the University of Leeds in August 2001. Most of the music, fine art and teacher training courses were moved to the Leeds campus, but visual and performing arts education and creative writing remained at the Bretton site, which became home to the University's School of Performance and Cultural Industries. The Gymnasium also stayed but later became disused. The building now is a showdow of its former glory. The explore Ive always fancied to have a look around this building and never got the chance too... until recently. Its quite an unusual looking building but that said it would make a very nice modern Gym. Entry was fairly easy if you have common sense, and its nice to get out with a new member. Theres not much really else to say about this building... just watch out for the tourist who don't share the same interest as you when it comes to abandonment. The pictures @SILVERSKULL2004 if your still on the forum nice meeting you and a good mooch that... Cheers for reading I know it's a bit of a small one but o'well LBE
  6. Woolley Hall The history Woolley Hall is a landscape park largely unchanged since 1800. The park is associated with a Jacobean Hall (dated to around 1635 with later alterations). Features include wooded pleasure grounds, a ha-ha, kitchen garden and ponds. The main house is Grade II listed and the courtyard is Grade II listed as being of Special Architectural and Historic Interest. Michael Wentworth began rebuilding Woolley Hall in 1635. The new Woolley Hall consisted of an 'H'-shaped building of moderate size. An east wing was added to the south front around 1680. The western wing was added during the mid eighteenth century. The eastern wings which form the rest of the present building were added in the early nineteenth century. The house is constructed of hammer-dressed sandstone, with a slate roof. There are four storeys including the attic and basement. Recently Woolley Hall went up for sale (2014) with a guide price of £3m from its owners, Wakefield Council. It was purchased in 2015 by new owners Commercial Development Projects (CDP). Plans were submitted (2016) for a hotel conversion for the Grade II listed building. (CDP) had put forward a proposal to create a 88-bedroom hotel, with function facilities to cater for 300 guests, spa treatment rooms and a gastro restaurant. But (CDP), sent an email to the council (2017) to say they have withdrawn the plans, but gave no explanation. In reaction to the withdrawal, assistant chief executive for resources and governance at Wakefield Council, Michael Clements said: “Wakefield Council agreed to sell Woolley Hall to a local developer last year. “The sale was conditional upon them developing the site into a boutique hotel. “Disappointingly, this deal has now fallen through. It is thought the proceeds would be used to re-invest council capital with a spoke person stating “The proceeds from the sale will be used to support the council’s capital investment plans across the district whilst it will also provide an annual budget saving to help us deal with the funding cuts imposed on us by the Government.” The explore The hall sits in pleasant surroundings and considering its recent endeavour has a boutique hotel it looks like efforts are been made to keep the hall well maintained. so... during a very windy February morning we moved in for a closer look. It was a little difficult to know where to start with this one as there were quite a few different access routes to the hall... Not knowing if we would be met by a security team we started documenting the building from a far whilst slowly moving in. The hall is quite something and reminded us of one of those old hammer house movies... albeit without Dracula. Moving slowly to the east side of the hall we came across what looked like an old boiler house... although four boilers remained only one was operational... perhaps part of the councils money saving scheme. Making our way though we entered the main hall.. Surprisingly most of the rooms original architecture is preserved with some rather exquisite flooring and panelling. although some of the rooms were accessible most of the doors were bolted and without wrecking what looked like a very well preserved old door we decided to document what we could and move on. Although the main hall was the main attraction we decided to explore some of the stable blocks to the north of the hall... It looks like this was used by council departments including Wakefield social services among others. Largely empty with left overs from its office days with little else on offer. There was some very unusual looking housing quarters although we could not find any entry to these building. On leaving the stable blocks we were met by a very pleasant care taker who gave us a little history whilst politely telling us to f*uck off... The pics The main hall The stable block The boiler house oh well time for a game of golf... LBE
  7. Dobroyd mill The history Dobroyd Mills was built in 1829. A fine cloth manufacturer Dobroyd Ltd was founded at the mill in 1919. The mill closed in 1974, but was re-opened in 1976 under John Woodhead Ltd spinners. It currently houses several businesses including a classic car restoration firm and tea rooms. The future of Dobroyd Mills became a subject of debate when the current owners Z Hinchliffe began reducing the height of the chimney last year (2011). Concerned neighbours referred Dobroyd Mill to the English Heritage when the works began. But an inspector from English Heritage decided the Mill was not suitable for the list of buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest. Planning permission to knock down two sections on the northern end of the complex was granted by Kirklees Council last month (2012). The stone structures were deemed unsuitable for modern use. The explore The Mill resides in pleasant surroundings with parts rented to a few small businesses including a quaint tea room... doing some rather unorthodox rambling to the bemusement of nearby dog walkers we eventually arrived at the Mill. The Mill sits on top of a stream and in it's surrounding offers some peace from modern living. The exterior is generally in good condition with little sign of vandalism... The Mill stretches over some 4.04 hectares and took just over an hour to explore. Theres a few original features scattered around including some pretty heavy duty scales ... eleswhere empty rooms which bizarrely looked like they had just received their annual spring clean. looks like 'Love 37' and 'CarrotBoy' have done a few jobs here too. The pics
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