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Norfolk Explorer

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About Norfolk Explorer

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  • Birthday 10/26/1980
  1. now that is just epic
  2. UK Whats left of St Andrews. Norwich. Norfolk. January 2016

    It will be mate, that part of the building is listed from what I can remeber
  3. I decided to have a swing by here as it had been a while... In fact a long long time as I hate the place as it was photos I took here that when I plugged the camera into the computer it killed the computer along with a few years of family, holiday and exploring pictures and it was long before I knew how important it was to back up your files etc etc etc. I had been past it a good few times while working and knew exactly what was going on with the demo of the site. I also failed another time to get in but was not fussed as I knew I had seen the good bits and they were slowly vanishing. But I went out with the camera with clareexplores to have a little look at what was left now that the builders have gone...... Well there is not much too see now.. A long corridor with a few rooms and now way to access the other floors and the morgue is all that remains. History The Norfolk Lunatic Asylum was situated in Yarmouth Road, Thorpe St Andrew near Norwich. Opened in April 1814 and closed in 1998 and slowly bit by bit the site has been turned into completely over priced houses on one side of the road and over the other the old tower now just sits all on its own 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
  4. UK WESTLETON. Suffolk. January 2016

    Visited with clarexplres and cheers for the heads up from Black Shuck a few months ago.... But as usual I only just got round to this nice post now. An hours drive and walking up the wrong side of the field to try and find the ROC post to start off with and eventually we were on our way in This was the 1st time I had been in a ROC Post and actually felt how cramped it must have been down there. With stuff strewn everywhere you could hardly more. This site is listed as locked on the Outdated Subrit site and you can see from the images it has not just been opened up recently either.... So get out there checking other ones folks. This particular post opened March 1958 and closed September 1991 What are they Royal Observer Corps Monitoring Posts are underground structures all over the United Kingdom, constructed as a result of the Corps' nuclear reporting role and operated by volunteers during the Cold War between 1955 and 1991. In all but a very few instances the posts were built to a standard design consisting of a 14-foot-deep access shaft, a toilet/store and a monitoring room. The most unusual post was the non-standard one constructed in a cellar within Windsor Castle. Almost half of the total number of posts were closed in 1968 during a reorganisation and major contraction of the ROC. Several others closed over the next 40 years as a result of structural difficulties i.e. persistent flooding, or regular vandalism. The remainder of the posts were closed in 1991 when the majority of the ROC was stood down following the break-up of the Communist Bloc. Many have been demolished or adapted to other uses but the majority still exist, although in a derelict condition. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 We could have had some serious fun if this was still there 12 13 14 15
  5. The Xmas holidays made for some free time and the opportunity for me to explore. So I arranged a whole day out with my buddys and Storm LSF who was coming out with us for the 1st time.. So the Alarm goes of at 2:30am and I check the phone and 2 of the party have become lightweights We arrive at the south coast at 7am and its not good from the start. Fail, fail, and busted by a rather nice security guard. So it is onto our last stop of the day as it is now the afternoon and decided we would try this... With it being busy near the front doors we decided to head round the back and tackle the muddy and waterlogged fields and get in that way..... Once we had squeezed in (due to too much xmas choc I guess) it was time to grab a load of photos and then make a quick exit and get home for more xmas Choccys. And then as we are walking away we hear some shouting from the other side of the water from some folk, could not work out if it was get out of there or how did you get in lol, but we just stomped of into the sunset and headed home History Pinched from kkj The Clock House Brick Company Ltd was founded c.1933 to exploit a rich deposit of high-quality Weald Clay to the south of the Surrey village of Capel. Although the outbreak of war in 1939 brought some demand for bricks to help with the war effort, there was apparently little need for the high-grade hollow ceramic blocks which were Clockhouse's main product and conscription meant that there was also a severe shortage of labour. By 1941, the Company was in liquidation and sold the majority of its share capital to the London Brick Company (LBC) to avoid closing the works. In 1945, the Company was wound up for good and the works were acquired by the LBC. Under LBC, production was substantially increased, aided by the 1950s housing boom and in the 1960s the works was rebuilt to cope with ever increasing demand. The global financial crisis of 2008 hit the building materials industry hard: a sudden slump in housing prices meant that house-building ground almost to a halt and demand for bricks plummeted. In March 2009, a 'phased closure programme' which began later that month and led to the loss of 61 jobs with indication that there was no intention to re-activate the brickworks or extract clay from the adjacent pits. Since closure, Clockhouse Brickworks has been in limbo, slowly being stripped of anything valuable while a lengthy audit determines the planning conditions surrounding re-use of the site. Plans for an incinerator ('energy from waste facility') on the site, bitterly opposed by local residents, were thrown out by a High Court Judgment in 2009 and the future of the site is now uncertain. 1 2 3 4 5 6 :pThis is what I wanted to see here 7 35mm 8 85mm 9 17mm 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 And a few random pics from some place we got busted at during the day. Apparently we set of a PIR/alarm as we walked in 1 2
  6. UK Orford Ness and Bawsey. Suffolk. Sept 2015

    Such a shame for sure
  7. This was a day a out that I had been looking forward to since we planned it all. Nice day out with mates visiting a nature reserve and getting a bit of fresh air too.. The plan was to see all the site and sneak into the pergolas as they said we could get in close to them but we were just not meant to go in....Well que 3 hours later when we are stood over 700mt away from them and now have a angry trust volunteer and a land rover patrolling the site making sure we go nowhere near them we knew it was just going to end up with some very pissed off people. All the way back to the Ferry we got followed... Something tells me they did not trust us at all I get home later than night to find out my mate has already emailed the national trust to have a moan about how annoying the staff are and that by charging and extra £70 p/p that they do for the photography tours it will not make the pergolas suddenly become 'safe' so you can take people into see them. History Atomic Weapons Research Establishment The 1950s saw the construction of specialised facilities to exploit new post-war technologies such as nuclear power. AWRE Orfordness was one of only a few sites in the UK, and indeed the world, where purpose-built facilities were created for testing the components of nuclear weapons. At the height of the Cold War AWRE and the Royal Aircraft Establishment used Orford Ness for developmental work on the atomic bomb. Initial work on the atomic bomb concentrated on recording the flight of the weapon and monitoring the electronics within it during flight, but much of the work involved environmental testing, which in itself was being developed and advanced. Although built and developed specifically for the testing of nuclear weapons, by the 1960s efforts were being made to find commercial markets for the site's capabilities. Between 1953 and 1966 the six large test cells and most of the other buildings on the shingle around them were built to carry out environmental tests on the atomic bomb. These tests were designed to mimic the rigours to which a weapon might be subjected before detonation, and included vibration, extremes of temperature, shocks and G forces. Although no nuclear material was said to be involved, the high explosive initiator was present and a test failure might have resulted in a catastrophic explosion. For this reason the tests were controlled remotely and the huge labs were designed to absorb and dissipate an explosion in the event of an accident. Pagodas Perhaps the most impressive buildings from this period are two of the test labs - the so-called 'Pagodas' - which have become such well-known landmarks on this part of the coast. The work was secret although details of Orford Ness' involvement with the research and development of the British atomic bomb may become more available over the next decades and may illustrate the priority and significance this project had to the government in the post-war years. Amongst the atomic experimental sites Orford Ness is perhaps the most architecturally dramatic and remains the only one allowing general public access at the present time. The AWRE ceased work on the site in 1971. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 So after we had finished being stalked around the island and ticked that one of the list we decided to head back to Bawdsey as 2 folks we were with had not been before for some odd reason, and it was also cool to have a look and see how trashed it was now.... And it is sad to say that it is now that trashed in the Bunker I did not even bother to get the camera out, in fact I do not think that anybody did... The best shots for me were to be had above ground.. I was gutted to see that somebody had been into the police dog room and nicked, and by nicked I mean nicked the whole wall that had the snoopy art work on it History In 1935 Bawdsey Manor Estate in Suffolk was selected as the site for a new research station for the development of radio direction finding and the Manor House, close to Bawdsey Quay was taken over for this purpose. Following this research, the first Chain Home radar station was developed on the site being handed over to the RAF in May 1937, two years later 15 Chain Home stations were available for use around the coast. Bawdsey continued in the forefront of the expansion of the radar network with an AMES Type 2 Chain Home Low on a 200 foot platform on the southern (No 4 of 4) transmitter mast. (each mast was 350' high). Towards the end of 1941 Coastal Defence Radar was established making Bawdsey the only site in the UK with three types of radar (CH, CHL and CD) in operation. By August 1943 Coastal Defence was changed to an AMES Type 55 Chain Home Extra Low (CHEL), again this was mounted on a 200 foot platform on the northern (No 1) transmitter mast. Bawdsey is listed as being operational with both CH and CHEL in 1948. In 1950, the station was chosen to participate in the ROTOR programme which should have been operational by January 1952. Work on the R3 two level underground control centre at the northern end of the site began late in 1950. Bawdsey was designated a GCI/E site utilising 1 Type 7 Mk3 on an R7 building remotely sited on Alderton Marshes, 2km north east of the site. The following radars were planned for the 'A' site: 1 Remote Type 7 Mk 3 with T79 IFF 3 Type 13 mounted on 9' high concrete plinths 2 Type 13 mounted on 12' high concrete plinths 1 Type 13 on a 25' mounted on a 25' gantry (4 of the above are Mk 6 with IFF the other 2 are Mk 7 without IFF) 1 Type 14 Mk 8 mounted on a 9' high concrete plinth 1 Type 14 Mk 9 mounted on a 25' gantry 1 Type 54 Mk 3 mounted on a 200' tower There was a transmitter and receiver site at Shottisham and married quarters in Alderton village. In February 1953 an American (Bendix enginers supervised these UK installations) AN/FPS-3 'search' radar was installed using an air ministry wooden hut as the R3 bunker was not yet complete. The new control centre wasn't ready until 1954 although the station was already operational. In July of that year links were established between the UK and French reporting systems allowing two way extension of radar cover over Europe. Bawdsey was manned by 144 Signals Unit from 11 Group and together with 6 other station in the Easter Sector it offered cover from 30 minutes before dawn to 30 minutes after sunset; there was no night cover. Type 80 radar at Bawdsey In 1958 an AMES Type 80 Mk 3 (Green Garlic) was installed together with 2 AN/FPS-6 US made 'Height Finding' radars. The AN/FPS-3 was retained as a standby as was the Remote Type 7 on Alderton Marshes. In October 1962 the 1st AMES Type 84 L Band radar came on line. In January 1963 Bloodhound SAGW (Surface to air guided weapons) were regrouped under Master Radar Station status at Bawdsey and Patrington but in June 1964 Bawdsey lost its Master Radar station Status and became a satellite to Neatishead. This status was regained in February 1966 following the disastrous fire in the R3 control centre at Neatishead. By 1972 the Type 54 had been removed and a reflector for a microwave link was attached to the tower. The microwave link brought live radar feed from the Type 84 and Type 85 radar's at RAF Neatishead. In 1974 Neatishead resumed Master Radar Station status from Bawdsey on the completion of the installation of the Standby Early Warning & Control System (SLEWC). The following March Bawdsey closed and was placed on care and maintenance. In 1977 theROTOR period plinths, Type 80 modulator building and 200' Type 54 tower were demolished. In August 1979 Bawdsey reopened as a Bloodhound Mk2 surface to air missile (SAM) site operated by C flight of No 85 Squadron. It was divided into 2 missile sections, each equipped with 6 launchers and a Type 87 fire control radar. The Type 84 modulator building (R17) was retained as a crew room and store for Bloodhound armament handling flight. A new control room was established in the R3 bunker to administer the missile control site. The new storage sheds and storage bays and protective wall are all of Bloodhound origin. From 1984 - 85 Strike Command's (UKAIR) Interim Alternative War HQ was established in the R3 operations block while a new Strike Command Bunker was being built at High Wycombe, during the construction period the bunker at Bawdsey was given a short new lease of life. The R3 was given a refit and much new (temporary) equipment was installed. At this time the central operations room was altered and a new control cabin installed above. When the new bunker at High Wycombe was ready the team pulled out of Bawdsey, their equipment was stripped and the bunker was abandoned. In 1988 two Type 87 radar heads were removed and replaced by 2 Type 86 Radar Caravans mounted on platforms on top of the Type 87 plinths. On 31st May 1990 the Bloodhound force ceased operations and in June all the missiles were withdrawn to RAF West Raynham. The RAF Ensign was lowered for the last time on the 25th March 1991 and the station closed on the 31st March. 14 15 16 17
  8. UK hillbilly farm, Norfolk, August 2015

    Cheers folks.. Yep number 1 is the shot for me too
  9. This was another of those fab days out, Just driving around and checking out stuff I had been wanting to see for a while that had popped up online. So myself Zyge, littlebear and Spark headed out for the day to avoid massive nettles and horsefly bites..... Something that I did not manage all to well 1st stop was a area called Hillbilly farm, this was linked to RAF Fersfield and the land incorporates some of the old nissen huts and a few other out buildings as well. Inside some of these buildings you will see there are all sorts of vehicles and other bits of junk, most of what nature has now reclaimed. There is not a lot of history on the farm itself other than the farmer did not want to sell it off as he was worried about being ripped of, how true this is I am not sure, but the airfield history I feel is important as most of what there is to see incorporates the building that are there. The runway is now gone as are all airfield building that we looked for, but you can still drive around the taxi way if you wish Built in 1943/1944, the airfield was originally a satellite of RAF Knettishall. It was constructed to Class A bomber specifications, with a main 6,000 ft (1,800 m) runway (08/26), and two secondary runways (02/20, 14/32) of 4,200 ft (1,300 m). Accommodation for about 2,000 personnel were in Nissen huts along with an operations block and two T-2 hangars. The facility was originally named Winfarthing when it was allocated to the United States Army Air Forces in 1942. Assigned to the VIII Bomber Command, it was renamed Fersfield when used by the Americans. Winfarthing was assigned USAAF station number 140; Fersfield was reassigned 554. Not used by the USAAF, it was transferred to the United States Navy for operational use. The airfield is most notable as the operational airfield for Operation Aphrodite, a secret plan for remote controlled Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress bombers (redesignated as BQ-7s) to be used against German V-1 flying bomb sites, submarine pens, or deep fortifications that had resisted conventional bombing 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  10. UK The Guest Hospital... July '15

    Very nice indeed
  11. Hi from Norfolk

    Welcome along buddy
  12. RAF Neatishead. Norfolk. June 2015

    Cheers guys, actually planning on popping down you way soon Mrs abandoned if you fancy hooking up
  13. RAF Neatishead. Norfolk. June 2015

    Cheers bud.. Really wanted to capture it well, and we just found out the site has a potential buyer, so could have been the last tour
  14. RAF Neatishead. Norfolk. June 2015

    Back in 1994 I visited this site when I was helping out with a open day when I was in the cadets. Many years later I was shocked when I found out that you could now get tours around the site and the bunker, so for the last 4 years I have been waiting to get onto one, but each time I have either been working or on holiday, but this time I got lucky and away we went to have some fun and games. The day was perfect as we met up with people who I had only ever chatted online with , so It was fab to finally put a face to the person. The only gripe of the day was the typical british weather, when we popped back out on ground level it was raining sideways, so that ruined our chances of a great group photo under the Radar. A little bit about the site and what it was used for. World War II In 1941, the Air Ministry surveyed a piece of land not far from the Broads at Horning in Norfolk with a view to establishing a site to host a brand new Air Defence station, a Ground Control Intercept station to be exact, from where Fighter Controllers, backed up by a wide range of support staff, could direct RAF fighters, day or night, to attack enemy aircraft from Germany as they launched raids against Military and Industrial targets in Norfolk as well as against the City of Norwich itself. In September 1941, two years into the Second World War, the first Secret radar system was installed at the new Radar Station of RAF Neatishead. Initially, the complement of forty airmen and airwomen was billeted at a local village and training began in this radical early warning system. At first, the station was home to temporary mobile Radars but it was soon to boast new, improved fixed Radar systems such as the Type 7 Search Radar and Type 13 Height-finding Radars. The hardened Control Room, the “Happidrome†was built and it is this very building which, today, forms part of the Museum. The Cold War At the end of World War II in 1945 the world entered seamlessly into a new conflict that was to last 45 years – the Cold War. As the defences for the United Kingdom were reorganised with fewer but more advanced Radar Stations to meet the new threat, RAF Neatishead continued to play an increasingly important role in the Air Defence of Great Britain. The station was established as a Sector Operations Centre (SOC) and continued to be used as such until 2004, by which time the only other SOC was in Buchan, Scotland. In 1954, the main Operations Centre was re- established deep underground in a vast two- storey hardened Bunker designed to withstand attack by Nuclear bombs. Between them, the Centres were responsible to NATO for the Air Defence of the UK, the Western North Sea (including the vital oil production platforms), and the Eastern North Atlantic well out past Ireland. To provide cover over such a vast area, a number of remote Radar sites were set up to feed information into the Sector Operations Centres, with Trimingham on the North Norfolk Coast being the Radar site still associated with RAF Neatishead today. By 2004, technology had improved to such an extent that all controlling functions could be undertaken from one Control Centre at RAF Boulmer in Northumberland. Neatishead Today Today, the aim of the base at Neatishead is to “to provide radar, ground-to-air radio and data links coverage as part of the UK Air Surveillance And Control System (ASACS), in support of national and NATO air defence; a task that has become increasingly important after the tragic events of 9/11.†Now called a Remote Radar Head, staff based here are responsible for both the Radar at Trimingham as well as equipment at a number of other sites in North Norfolk and at Neatishead itself. Information is sent by secure datalinks from the various systems to RAF Boulmer where the Controllers monitor UK airspace. The above information has been taken from the museum's website, and plenty more information can be found on that right here My photos from the 3 hours spent inside and down below 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
  15. UK Raf upwood, old house, grocery shop. Fenlands. April 2015

    Cheers guys, again the power of the Sigma 35mm was let loose.. Wish I had spent longer at the places now
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