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Landie_Man

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Everything posted by Landie_Man

  1. Powergen Tower, Shirley, Solihull, West Mids, England - Jan 2017 So after exploring Longlands, myself and two mates headed East toward Birmingham to my "fall back" site for the day, we had failed two and succeeded one at this point; as we know, this is how it goes sometimes. We arrived in Shirley as it was getting dark, parked up and headed for the old Powergen Tower on the A34. Inside the fence a patrolling Security Guard clocked us, we weren't on site so as we walked off, he watched us for a bit and then wandered off. Must have seen the camera bags? After this, we decided we would take a slightly longer route onto the site which had us a little less exposed in the large swathes of open space on the Ten Acre Site, which includes its own Multi Storey Car Park. By now, it was pretty dark, so once on site we headed straight for the buildings. In all honesty; I thought that this site was one "just for the roof", but I found a few redeeming features inside; such as a rather large canteen with quite an ornate wooden roof and disco ball! The main tower is the usual two box design, with the offices going around the outside, and all the gubbings such as toilets, lifts and stairs in a square in the middle, but with various "wings" connected by suspended walkways. This canteen was one of those wings. Powergen Tower; designed by Architect John Madin in the early 60s for The Central Electricity Generation Board (Later known as Powergen) wasn’t used for all that many years and closed in 1995 when Powergen vacated the site. The rather large expanse of land was purchased by ASDA Supermarkets in 1996, and several plans were turned down by the Local Authorities for a supermarket here; though recent Planning Permission has given the go ahead for the demolition of the tower. Madin is well known in this area and has designed and built many buildings around Birmingham and Solihull, but they are not usually well received by those locally due to their Brutalist Nature and many have been demolished. The site is shrouded with mystery and farfetched tales in the local area; allegedly the third floor was occupied by Mi5 and Mi6 and used for interrogation and torture, which I find incredibly unlikely as I can't think why such a secret operation would share with a Power firm. Alongside these strange allegations; there is apparently a Nuclear Bunker on site, and an Underground Substation, which I suppose is more believable? There are also stories of a homeless person dying here in the 2000s and a horrific rape taking place. There is no solid evidence of any of these things happening here and I won't delve anymore on these stories, but you are welcome to have a Google. Either way, Powergen Tower, which is incredibly good condition for 22 years of closure, is a bit of a "Marmite Site" in this area of the country, people plead for its demolition, but when a Supermarket comes to occupy the site, they campaign against it and some want Madin's work protected and listed. When Powergen Tower closed in 1995; the area suffered massively as its 1,000 employees used to use the shops in and around the Shirley Area. In 2015, a film crew used the Powergen site to shoot a Horror Movie, "She Who Brings Gifts". Quite a bit of history there for a derp office block if you ask me, but its quite an interesting tale. After a quick sweep of some of the lower floors (and a few of the upper, its much more "plush" in the higher offices?!) and some incredibly long exposures (no light painting due to the windows!), we headed straight for the roof. The weather was damp and horrible, but a photogenic mist was setting in up on the roof. Slippery was an understatement! Still, It was great to be out in 2017 and I really enjoyed this one, despite it being very empty. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 More Phonecalls to your Power Provider At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157679306882246
  2. Arla Milk Processing Plant, Hatfield Perverel, Essex – Feb 2017 Well, this one was some time back! Coupling a backlog with the decision of keeping this one till it was gone, simply because there were bits and pieces going on here such as the sale of the equipment; I decided to mothball it. Myself and two Non-Explorer friends decided one evening back in the winter, that while one of their partners was on a night out in London we would make use of the time and do a few Essex/London night explores. Our first couple of sites did not turn out quite the way we wanted so we decided to follow this lead. We weren’t disappointed! History Arla Foods, formerly Dairy Crest; situated in Hatfield Peverel in Essex was a dairy production factory in Hatfield Peverel in Essex and processed milk for large firms such as Cravendale and supermarkets across the UK; with organic milk production taking place on site as well. The Hatfield site had the capacity to process 356,000 litres of milk per day! By March 2016; the company announced its plans to close the factory and spend £150 million on upgrading the companies shiny new mega dairy in Aston Clinton near Aylesbury which has the facilities to produce 1 billion litres of milk per year. The Aylesbury site is now the worlds largest dairy operation plant. Only 32 of 200 employees would retain their jobs after the July 2016 closure of the Essex site which has been demolished to make way for a shiny new much needed Housing Development in Hatfield Peverel. The Explore This explore came as a much needed and Crave(ndale)’d (see what I did there….) large factory explore back in the winter. After failing many Essex sites we rocked up here and spent several hours on site; my non-explorer friend delaying the collection of his partner from her night on the town in London several times and by several hour (she was safely at her friends!). The site is huge and we were uncertain if security were on site at all so remained vigilant as always. Plenty had already been removed from the site and it was obvious that demolition was well underway inside the buildings. It became apparent by things left behind on site; that the closure was sudden and came as a bit of a shock. It seemed that there was a bit of a family vibe amongst the workers here. A mural written in glue on the door of a locker can be found amongst these photos. Unsurprisingly; many parts of the building smelt of gone off milk; though other bits were squeaky clean and sterile, ready for the machines to be sold to other dairies. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 As always guys; thanks for your time. Sorry it’s been a slow couple of years! More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157682698884470
  3. Kings Hall Cinema, Southall, London - September 2017 Interesting one this one! I'd wanted to do this for a while and had been planning to in the coming weeks but had been put off with the idea of its "unique access" which requires some planning in terms of times of entry! Situated on a very busy road with lots of passersby and businesses open till the very wee hours, there is a very small window to get inside as the Night Shift commute changes to the Early and Day Shift Commute. When we arrived it was around midnight and the streets were busy. We were in London so went for a little drive for an hour or so before returning. Visited with a non-member back in September;when inside we had a little lie down in a dark corner for an hour or so to allow the sun to rise just a little bit, and spent about 2 hours light painting the rooms which were boarded and anything which the abundance of daylight wouldn't help. It's a very interesting building with lots to shoot photos of and with my "loaded" parking meter fast running out, we didn't have as much time inside as we would have liked. The air inside is terrible (understandably) and the damp has caused the parquet floors inside much of the building to bow upwards, making an interesting effect! We started shooting inside the main hall at around 6am and spent some time chilling here and getting photos as the sun came up, but we only had till 8am on the car park. The street was already very busy down below by 6am and the main hall had a hue of red from some of the shops signage. When it did become time to leave, we had to jump into a street full of commuters. We were not getting out without being seen. It was 7:45am and the bus stops had queues of people at them. As I was leaving I did attempt to not be seen, but a middle aged chap turned round and looked right at me. I wished him a good morning, jumped down and walked off to get my externals. He certainly looked slightly bewildered. The cinema come Methodists Church is located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was constructed in 1916; designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The site has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was originally operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and was soon playing religious films. By 1926, Kings Hall was operating as a regular cinema; but was however still managed by the Methodist church. The Cinema was closed in 1937. It then converted back to its original Methodist Church use, and today is the King’s Hall Methodist Church. Some interesting and otherwise controversial quotes taken from comments when closure was announced. The church vacated the site in 2012. More Info at: http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/31352 #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157688232708403
  4. P.D. Bricks L.T.D., Llandulas, North Wales – May 2017 As Always! I have a huge backlog of sites to get up! It’s been a slow old year, but myself and Mookster had a pretty successful North Wales trip back in May! P.D. Bricks operated this North Welsh Brick Production Facility until 2008; when it closed along with many others due to the massive economic trouble which began that year. The buildings on site are located at the base of a quarry, and are sadly largely stripped out of everything. There was however, a large network of tunnels into the quarry which led in all directions, something to be considered by The Underground enthusiasts among us. The gloom soon burnt off, and a lovely, hot, sunny day it became! #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157684731310936/
  5. Ferodo Brake Components, Caernarfon, North Wales – May 2017 The Ferodo factory in Caernarfon; Friction Dynamex; was opened by Princess Margaret in 1962. By the late 1960s it employed up to 1,100 making braking components and friction pads. The site was bought by American; Craig Smith in 1997 and renamed “Friction Dynamics”, operating with a workforce of 220 in that year. By April 2001, Union members staged industrial action against bosses in a dispute over their terms and conditions. They picketed the factory gates after they were locked out. Eight weeks later, bosses sacked the members, which sparked a three-year dispute; the longest of its kind in North Wales. After losing a legal battle in 2002, Friction Dynamics called in the receivers in August 2003 and all workers were sacked. Three weeks later; Dynamex Friction was set up. The site continued to operate until 2008 when it finally closed its doors. Mookster and I parked up, just as the weather was beginning to turn once again. This would be the last site of the first exploring day of our road trip. We knew it would be a stripped and ruined site, it was, but an absolutely vast cavern of little photogenic pieces. We both really enjoyed it here, it was relaxed and we just went about and captured what we could of whatever was left. After this, we retired to our hotel and ate at a well acclaimed local curry house. It was acclaimed for good reason as well! #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 Thank You All! More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157681885580152/
  6. Tin Chapel, North Wales – May 2017 Still way behind on the reports lol! The final leg of mine and Mooksters tour of North Wales back in May; took us to this rather nice abandoned chapel made from Tin, a right trek into the woods. It’s incredibly small here and explored in about 10 minutes, but I really rather liked it. It had canvas chairs instead of pews, and has obviously been abandoned for a very, very long time. It was in amazing condition really! The last site of the May Welsh tour, and the last explore of my old cheap run around, before upgrading to a not so cheap runaround! Onto the photos: #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157684346925431
  7. Holdings Country Pottery, Oswaldtwistle, Lancashire – July 2017 Another backlog lol! Back in July, Mookster and myself headed up north for a 650 mile round trip Road Trip with about two A4 pages of sites to do! Very good news; however we only managed four out of about twenty due to loud alarms going off, places being sealed up tight, horrible undergrowth and pretty much every explore failing thing you can think of, such is life. One thing is for certain, “you cant do em all!” Holding's Country Pottery was originally founded in 1842 by James Holding. The original pottery was built a short distance away in Gaulkthorn, another outlying area of Oswaldtwistle. James Holding moved his business to Broadfield in 1860, and in 1900 his son Grimshaw Holding; set up the pottery on the present site where the derelict remains sit. From then till it’s closure; the pottery stayed here and the business was passed down from father to son until it's decline. Holdings was originally powered by a steam engine; sadly no longer in situ, but the line shafting is still present. There were magazines and brochures pointing to a late 1990s closure. I am thinking around 1999-2000 at a guess. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157688819915965
  8. You know when you've been tangoed!
  9. E.P. Bray, Chisworth Dye Works, Glossop – July 2017 So during a fairly unsuccessful road trip of a 20:4 fail ration on a huge 650 mile round trip, Northern Road Trip, Mookster and I arrived here. Nestled next to a public footpath; access was pretty easy, and although stripped, I rather enjoyed this one. Some lovely colours and decay going on inside. What I will say is; there are signs everywhere warning of Lead Chromate contamination inside from the production of coloured dyes. It is absolutely everywhere! Lovely…..! Built at the end of the 18th or in the early 19th centuries; Chisworth Works was as a cotton band manufactory. During these times, the site was called “Higher Mill”. It appears that the original building was extended twice to the rear in its past, as there are noticable lines in the mortarwork and mismatches in the courses along the south-west elevation. It is thought that these extensions took place before 1857 because the building line remains the same on the maps until 1973. The site was used as a dyeing works by 1973; and there was a large T-shaped extension at the rear which looks to have been added in two stages. The only change a decade later, was the construction of a square loading ramp at the front. The outline of the site today is the same as it was in 1984. E.P. Bray began "winding-up" by 2006 and was dissolved/liquidised and the site shut down in September that year. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157685024774162
  10. You reckon? Some of the stuff I read was not nice!
  11. Maenofferen Slate Quarry, Blaenau Ffestiniog, North Wales – May 2017 Still on Day Two of our North Wales Tour back in May; Mookster and myself arrived to the site of an enormous walk up to the remaining buildings at Maenofferen Slate Quarry. Oh my was it a walk… We followed the well trodden footpath up to the buildings; attempting to dodge the tour bus which goes around other parts of the quarry as part of a local museum. It just kept going on and getting steeper and steeper, but we persisted and made it to the top. Which was a relief! Lots of lovely decay; totally open to the elements here with a lot of cool stuff remaining inside the sheds and workhouses on site. We spent a good couple of hours here before heading down (which was a hard as going up!) as we had a lot more in Wales to see before a big drive home. The quarry was first staffed by men from the nearby Diphwys quarry shortly after 1800. Come 1848 the slate was being shipped via the Ffestiniog Railway. This was short lived, and this service ceased in 1850. Traffic resumed in 1857 and apart from a gap in 1865; there remained a steady flow of slate dispatched via the railway. In 1861 the Maenofferen Slate Quarry Co. Ltd. became incorporated, producing approximately 400 tons of slate in that year. During the 1800s; the quarry flourished and expanded, extending its workings underground and further downhill towards Blaenau Ffestiniog. By the year 1897 it employed 429 people with almost half of those men working underground.. Eventually, slate was sent via the Rhiwbach Tramway which ran through the quarry. This incurred extra shipping costs that rival quarries did not have to bear. Llechwedd Quarry purchased Maenofferen in 1975 together with Bowydd. Underground production of slate ceased during November 1999 and signalled the end of large-scale underground working for slate in North Wales. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 Thanks for Looking guys :-) More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157684249889963/ Oh and one more thing! One Heartbreaking find for Landie_Man :-( :
  12. Some sort of milling machine I beleive mate
  13. Cáfe Pripyat (The Dish),(Chernobyl Exclusion Zone) - October 2016 Again, I visited here in 2013 so took very few photos as there is just so much to see in "The Zone". These were shot on my second time to The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. I visited in October 2016 for a four day tour which took us to many places which one might not see on a normal tourist trail to the zone. It was an amazing experience to see The Zone again and each day was packed, getting up at 06:30 to catch the 07:40 train from Slavutych to The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Station, and back to our rented house in Slavutych (the town built to house those who lost their homes in Pripyat) at around 20:00/21:00. - Cáfe Pripyat was once a bustling harbour side spot where the young locals (Average age of Pripyat was 26) would drink and enjoy sun-drenched BBQs by the water and ice skating and fishing in the winter months. It was known locally as "The Dish" and was surrounded by Rose Bushes before The Accident; the Pripyat river where it sat would be adorned with boats. It now sits crumbling away after thirty years of abandonment with varying patches of radiation in the vegetation which surrounds. It makes you feel quite cold inside that many of these "kids", just young men, either received a fatal or life changing dose of radiation on the evening of the 26th April 1986; or during the clean up operation in the following months. It seems there was a bit of a disco vibe in Pripyat; photos of parties can be found online. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 Thanks for reading :-) More Deserted Hangouts at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157675336359955
  14. Salem Chapel, Arthog, North Wales – May 2017 Nearing the end of our North Wales Tour in May, Mookster and myself headed for Arthog for this little gem tucked away in the woods! We had to loiter next to my car on the road outside while a VERY Hawk Eyed elderly couple swept leaves from their road and had their eyes on us for a considerable amount of time. We thought this one wouldn’t be do able as they simply would not leave! Finally, we seized our chance and headed in after they went back into their house. It’s a wonderful little 20 minute explore, but it is rotten to hell and doesn’t have long left! The most comical thing was seeing people and cars pass on the high road behind the chapel, through its failing roof! Salem Methodist Chapel was completed in 1833. Not long after; in 1868 it was rebuilt in the Gothic style of the gable-entry type, by architect Thomas of Landore. It’s in a pretty rural part of wales and eventually closed in 1973. Legend has it, that the owner of the building moved abroad so that he didn’t have to pay a bill for a quarter of a million pounds. As a result of this; the walls and other works of the structure are unsafe to passing motorists and local residents due to lack of maintenance. It has been said by surveyors that it will eventually collapse in on itself. It was a really enjoyable Spring time explore. So relaxed once inside with no trouble at all. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 Thanks all! More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157686823521306/
  15. Thank you mate. She’s a beaut isn’t she? Well worth the silly morning access and the very busy exit!
  16. Langwith Mill, Nether Langwith, Nottinghamshire – July 2017 The 4th and final stop on Mookster and my July Northern Road Trip. Nestled almost in a sort of Farm Yard in Nottinghamshire; next to a disused Restaurant (Goff's Restaurant); a rather odd place for an eatery in a very rural location. Access did involve a bit of grazing field to get up to the mill. The disused mill is a four storey Cotton Mill which was constructed in 1786. The mill was originally sixteen windows wide, which would have made Langwith one of the largest mills in the district. Cotton spinning at Langwith Mill ceased around 1848 and the place was converted into a Corn Mill in 1886. Langwith was still operating after WWII. The Mill was built in limestone with a slate roof which is now holed and in poor condition. Langwith was powered by a large water wheel fed from a dam nearby which is now a meadow. The site is a curtilage building to the Grade II listed Langwith Mill House and a building of Local Interest in its own right. The listing was applied in 1985 as the mill is a site of Local Historical Interest. It’s in pretty poor condition in places! #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157688860638275
  17. Bradfield Water Treatment Works, Lower Bradfield, South Yorkshire – July 2017 Day two of Mookster and I’s Not particularly successful Northern Road Trip. We rose stupidly early as usual and missed breakfast; it’s always way too late in the morning!!! We parked my classic Volvo in the middle of the village and proceeded down to the Water Works, which looks rather prominent in the tiny, tiny rural village which feels incredibly secluded. By now it was around 6:30am and there were dog walkers around all of whom were friendly and gave us an obligatory “Good Morning”. One particular chap who was very polite and wished us well wondered off, when he came back passed and we were scoping the joint, his body language changed instantly and he continued walking away. They must get this a lot! Pretty trashed in here, but it had a few nice shots inside! Bradfield Water Works was built in 1913 for the filtering and treatment of water taken from the Dale Dike (the cause of the 1864 great flood of Sheffield); as well as the Agden reservoirs in the neighbouring Loxley Valley. The site was cutting edge technology back in its day and it even included the first telephone to be installed in Bradfield back in 1930 allegedly! By 1974, the Yorkshire Water Authority took over the Water Works, and then during the Thatcher Government a number of years later; the entire UK water industry was privatised with the Water Act of 1989. Eventually, the pumping house at Lower Bradfield was closed down in 1994 when a new pump house and Water Processing Plant was built elsewhere in the Loxley valley. It has been said that the locals believe the building attracts unwanted visitors and is a “constant eyesore” and a “morbid reminder of Lower Bradfields grim past.” Which explains the looks we got! #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157686442257184
  18. got that right! The best bit of this site lol
  19. Moreton in the Marsh District Hospital - September 2017 Visited a few weeks ago with Mookster and two other non-members for one of their bithdays. It was a very relaxed explore as you'd expect; pretty trashed and stripped of most things, but still retained some photographic merit. We were caught on the way out by a friendly and incredibly confused security guard who didn't really have an awful lot to say and just smiled a lot! Moreton-in-Marsh Cottage Hospital was a small Victorian hospital built in the Cotswolds. It's closure in 2012 came about after a new much larger facility opened just outside the village. Moreton Cottage Hospital was built in 1873 by private subscription. Lord Redesdale gave the land at the north end of the town in Back Ends. The first small stone building had seven beds, but this was extended in 1879 following a £3,000 request by Dr. William Sands Cox, the founder of Queen's College, Birmingham. In 1886 The Joseph Phipps Charity donated a further £1,000 stock to the hospital in and an operating theatre was built in 1900. By 1919 the hospital was extended further, when £2,000 was given to the hospital, and again in 1935. Moreton in the Marsh Cottage Hospital; which had been managed by trustees, eventually came under the authority of the Banbury and District Hospital Management Committee after 1946. There are a several buildings within the site, the main hospital and a much more modernised outpatients clinic. After the hospitals closure, bits of the hospital have been used by a prop hire company as storage but now the whole site remains disused. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 Thanks for Looking, more at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157686204703971
  20. I've got a few reports to get up and a little more spare time, so that's good!
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