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The Elusive

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About The Elusive

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  • Birthday 10/28/1983
  1. Whoever put the downstairs lights on would have set the alarm off; Pir was wired to the electric box!. There were already so many lights on in there that the workmen had left on still cant quite fathom why you would mess with it, I mean you already had enough light in there to photograph, Spoilt compared to other cinemas which are pitch black barely any chance to focus!
  2. UK Sheffield crown court

    I went here god, ages ago and was faced with the roller, I just forgot about it since ive been to bloody sheffield twice now! if pocket-size peeps can get in now i may have to get back up those parts! Great captures!
  3. UK Pram Cottage

    Cheers for the Nice comments ! Lucan and i have been putting the miles in lately
  4. UK RAF Church Fenton. Jan 2016 (Somewhat pic heavy)

    Lovely shots, very much liking the amount of decay makes for great photos!
  5. UK Pram Cottage

    Thanks hamtagger
  6. UK Pram Cottage

    Some of the most enjoyable places to visit for me are the old cottages that are always in the middle of nowhere, This one is no exception.. Its pretty decayed which lately Ive really enjoyed capturing! I think i did get a bit carried away with the pram and very distracted when i heard a few fast jets whizzing over!
  7. UK Air Raid shelter

    Hey *waves I did wonder where you went! thanks! maybe we will bump into each other on location sometime lol stranger things have happened!
  8. UK Air Raid shelter

    It has been a while since i posted on here! Ill make more of an effort dude
  9. UK Longbridge Bunker

    Certain parts of longbridge that were left look amazing from previous reports, before my time unfortunaltely but i was still determined to check out every nook and cranny around the area just in case we had missed something! Ive been up the area a handful of times over the last year and despite the ever evolving building site and quite a few failed attempts eventually Lucan and I were able to have a look at the last few bits. Not much information about this place, This used to be part of the body shop areas for a Factory. The shelter is unique about 400ft long, it was constructed out of brick and reinforced concrete; using a cut and cover method with a possibility of mining. It has possibly been used for storage since the war. Sadly the Body shop itself has been demolish over a decade ago… this is all that left. I thought the way it was built is really curious, looking at aerial photos from the time the rest of the shadow factory was constructed it appears to have been built after westworks factory was already there. Hopefully ill turn up some more info. thanks for looking
  10. UK Abandoned Chapel, January 2016

    Great start! Thats a lovely location I love the close up object shots they are really good, my first reports on here are absolutely shocking photograph wise if this is the level your starting in then your laughing! The only CC i would say is with hdr sometimes it can make external shots and light appear the wrong texture but its a personal preference and also a phase some photographers go through. I use black and white, tone mapping and hdr as well as the occasional SOOC and pano, makes for a interesting creative journey and can produce some very different results! Nice to have met you on out and about the other day!
  11. UK Air Raid shelter

    Lovely trip to see this place; I think its been a while since it was photographed. Sometimes you often find yourselves questioning why we do the things we do… today was no exception. Migraines, hidden holes, rubble every where and bad air! not to mention the occasional squeeze Still had to be done and feel very fortunate to have seen this place, Despite the state of me and the location! Bit O history.. There was a prevailing mood in the Government against deep shelters being built for the protection of large numbers of civilians. Their effectiveness from high explosive bombs was questioned, based on reports of their performance in the Spanish Civil War, and there were also concerns about costs. The Government’s preference for almost two decades had been for smaller, dispersed shelters, and so the large deep shelters that went ahead all had very specific causes, such as their being in areas with previously excavated mines and tunnels, or eminently suitable geological conditions, or even very determined local authorities who were willing to risk losing government grants to build the shelters they wanted. However when the Blitz started in the autumn of 1940 policy changed and permission was granted for the two large civilian shelters Grant funding was generous given the need to protect the skilled workers. The shelter was in the side of the hill allowing access at grade into two main entrances, while at the uphill end a 25m ventilation shaft was sunk, doubling up as an emergency escape via a series of steep metal ladders. The tunnels in between these ends were cut out in a familiar gridiron layout, with four long perpendicular tunnels fed at both ends from the two main entrances, and eleven cross tunnels. Toilets, a canteen, and a first aid post were provided either in the cross tunnels or at tunnel intersection nodes. Within this 1596 bunks and 793 seats were provided for those lucky enough to have the requisite shelter permit. Construction began in December 1941 and was largely completed within a year, having suffered from escalating costs, geological problems, an unskilled labour force, and also paradoxically trespassers and vandalism. The original intention was that the tunnels would be 2.1m wide and 2.0m high with an arched roof, but the surviving tunnels are considerably larger than this. Records indicate that the considerable height came about following roof trimming required in the latter stages of the project due to the softness of the rock and problems with instability after exposure to the air. The shelter, like many of the deep shelters reluctantly approved by the Government, came too late to provide mass protection during the periods of heaviest bombing. After the war it was used for customs and excise storage, fire brigade training, and was even considered for Cold War use but rejected due to extensive dry rot. The Local Borough Council visited in the 1950’s to see if they could find a use for it, but disapprovingly recorded it to be “damp, dark and featureless” and it has been sealed in recent times. Local groups in the last decade have looked at ways of reopening it as a tourist attraction, and hopefully one day will be successful. Thanks for looking More pics http://www.the-elusive.uk/
  12. UK Tuxedo Royale, Middlesbrough - June 2015

    oh wow thats so awesome, great find
  13. UK a hoarders farmhouse 2015

    Awesome place! took ages to get into every room mind! Great choice of pics for this report dude! I darent think about all the stuff we never got a chance to see smouldering away ..
  14. Bloody hell thats stunning! good effort!
  15. Germany World of lava (visited 04/2015)

    Thats stunning! awesome looking place and some very good photographs indeed

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