Jump to content

mookster

Members
  • Content count

    1,159
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    18

Everything posted by mookster

  1. Ever since I started becoming interested in derelict buildings, Houghton Grange was always somewhere I had wanted to visit but for one reason or another I never found myself in the right place, or with the right people, or whatever. However with plans for this weekend changed I was left with a free day so I hastily got on the phone to an old exploring friend and asked if he was about - after a discussion with his wife he told me he was able to come out and play so off we went Cambridgeshire-bound. First stop was for me to show him the Old Rectory Care Home, which I found a whole load more depressing than when I first saw it in the summer - the floors have turned from 'minor deathtrap' to 'outright lethal' in a few short months and the water pouring through from the rain lashing down gave the whole place a real dark, dank feeling that I don't think either of us really enjoyed. So it was onwards to the main target of Houghton Grange and after a trek across the fields we made our way in. The site has clusters of buildings spread over a large area centred around the old manor house which is flanked by two sets of modern buildings. We explored for a while, it's a shame the place is so samey for the most part but then we got to the part of the site which has been dubbed 'Lab X' by other explorers. This building is almost completely dark inside and has an atmosphere to match, I always thought the old BIBRA labs in Carshalton that served a similar purpose which I explored a good few years ago would have been the only one to give me the jitters like that. The building is different to all others on site, the laboratory doors are thick reinforced jobbies doubled up with airlocks and there are extremely creepy concave plexiglass windows looking into each room. After that my friend had had enough - he was with me on the BIBRA explore too - and as time was chopping on anyway we made our exit. The place has been done a million times before so I won't bother with the history, it was an animal research lab, lots of nasty stuff happened there, thats all you really need and probably want to know. Thanks for looking
  2. First I must apologise for not being around too much lately, other things have been going on and I've barely found the time or energy or want to explore stuff here. However I have just got back from a three week trip to the States where I saw many wonderful things and places. As many of you know I love my industrial explores, they are my favourite kind of abandonment. However, incredibly, this was the only industrial location I managed to explore on my latest trip! Still, it was one I had wanted to see for absolutely years and my main reason for heading to Detroit in the first place, everything else I managed to explore there was a bonus. The Detroit Harbor Terminal was built in 1925 by The Detroit Railway and Harbor Terminals Company. The ten-storey warehouse was intended to relieve a shortage of available storage space elsewhere. Cargo ships would unload materials at the dock, which were then stored or loaded onto train cars. To support the tremendous weight of so many tonnes of freight, the floors and columns were made out of reinforced concrete, which spread the load across the length of the building. On the north side of the plant was a single-story building that provided heating and cooling, as well as massive engines to power the air compressors. The building is sometimes referred to as the Boblo Island Warehouse because of a huge advertisement for the old Boblo Island Ferry painted on one side. In 2003 the port closed down and the warehouse was abandoned, but the port was reopened in 2005 handling mostly steel products and the occasional Navy ship docking there, whilst the warehouse building remains vacant to this day. It used to be an absolute breeze to get into here, with an old fence full of holes and an open loading bay door all that separated people from the inside. However recently a new fence has appeared along the entire length of the road and all but one access point into the building has been sealed. We found our way through the fence after a fashion, and following a very speedy run around the side of the building away from the highly visible road we were in and straight to the roof just in time to catch the sun rise over two countries. The river next to it is the river which separates the USA from Canada and as such there are border patrol boats who like to hang around, so it was very important to not get too close to the edge as they aren't best pleased when people trespass as you can imagine. After we'd had our fill of the beautiful sunrise we headed down and explored the rest of the huge building. It's pretty samey as nine out of the ten floors are exactly the same in construction, but the ground floor power plant compressor room is extremely cool. Thanks for looking
  3. Miranda/Noisy

    Just in case you've been inhabiting a cave for the last week, in a couple of weeks time the most over-rated over-explored European derpy mcderp of them all, Chateau Miranda/Noisy will be nothing but a flat expanse of rubble. As if you all didn't already know...
  4. It's funny seeing this again, as I know exactly what you mean about the floors. It's the building that tried ending both me and one of my fellow explorers at the same time, as he put his leg through a floor directly above where I was stood resulting in a cascade of wood and metal pipe parts landing on the floor right in front of me...
  5. I do believe this is the very first post about this place. Which is surprising! The Defence Medical Equipment Depot (DMED) in Ludgershall, Wiltshire was a part of the Defence Logistics Organisation (DLO) and provided medical equipment and supplies to the armed forces both here and abroad. It closed in 2005 and has sat empty since, I can't find any current planning applications or developers sites with it on so for the near future at least it looks like nothing will be done with it. It comprises a very large factory-type area and a few more regular military buildings including a mess hall built in 1939, whether it used to be part of a larger base I am unsure of. Anyway me and Landie Man were bored this afternoon so drove the hour trip from my house on the chance it wouldn't be demolished and it paid off. Thanks for looking, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157646766360121/
  6. A place that I had wanted to see on my last Welsh excursion but the unfortunate ankle injury obtained whiolst exploring another site put paid to it was this beautiful chapel deep in south Wales. Well I say beautiful - it is - but it is absolutely saturated in pigeon poop and stinks to high heaven. I think I shortened my lifespan by a good decade being in here. It was a great feeling to tick it off though and get another Welsh chapel under my belt. Thanks for looking
  7. The Royalty had been a bugbear of mine ever since I failed it a couple of years back, I'd wanted to give it another shot but never been in the right place at the right time. With the news that the annoying car wash people had vacated their plot for good though I thought it was high time I swung by again. So heading home me and my mate made a very worthwhile detour. I had heard it was sealed again not long after someone else had been recently so really I wasn't holding out much hope but it turned out to be way easier than I expected - although depending how often the building is checked I don't expect it to stay that way for long! The outside of the building away from the street is extremely weird, all assymetrical angles and curves and odd pointy-out bits that look like they've been tacked on with no thought to the look apart from the beautiful frontage. I don't explore many cinemas or theatres as they aren't really my main area of interest but it was a great feeling to cross this one off the list at last. Thanks for looking, more on my Flickr....
  8. Oh boy did it feel to get my exploring shoes on again. I've been suffering some health issues at present which has made me feel very disinclined to explore anything but lately I've been feeling a little better so thought what better use of my time during a miserable January than to go on a little day trip. It was most successful with three explores done and I had a jolly good time, albeit still feeling quite rubbish. This is a place I'm surprised hasn't been featured more often on forums such as this, and it was that which worried me as to whether it was even still there. A planning application was approved in June last year for demolition of the factory buildings and construction of new houses as well as conversion of Packington Hall, an 18th century manor house which forms the frontage. It looks like workers had got as far as taking up most of the upstairs floors of the house before downing tools and leaving, and so it sits to this day. Little bitta history.... Having been sat for almost a decade now it's in a bit of a mess but most of it looks like natural decay, granted there are the usual broken windows and metal fairy stripping but other than that it's pretty solid for the most part, although parts of the upstairs floors (or whats left of them!) are slanted worryingly to one side. This is one of those strange residential/industrial mixed sites like the now demolished Frith Park, better know as The Acid House, down in Surrey. Peculiar but rather cool as well. Thanks for looking, as ever more on my Flickr...
  9. This place takes me right back to the time I was just beginning to be interested in exploring, looking at forums etc etc so we're talking near on a decade now. Hafod-Morfa Copperworks once dominated a large area of land in the middle of Swansea, but by the end of the 1970s it was all but derelict. Large swathes of the former Copperworks have been cleared but there are a few buildings left, ostensibly as some kind of derelict 'heritage' trail thing. Most of what is left is empty and ruined but the former rolling mill building is definitely worth it, the size of the enormous cable wheel is unbelievable when you're stood next to it. I think it's even bigger than the one from the steelworks I explored in the USA earlier this year. After leaving here we had big plans for the rest of the day, but walking towards the next explore through a muddy and wet forest I lost my footing coming off a steep bank and badly twisted my ankle digging into the soft ground. After copious swearing and finding said explore sealed up we headed off to another place, only for me to realise by the time we got there I was in quite a large amount of pain, could barely walk and my ankle had swollen up good and proper. So unfortunately the day was cut short there and then as we headed back to the hotel to get my foot on ice, painkillers down my throat and a tubular compression bandage sorted. All whilst worrying that the next day would be a write off as well... Anyway here are some photos from before I broke myself. Thanks for looking, more on my Flickr.....
  10. Stairs Gallery

    Come on if anyone was going to be starting a thread dedicated to stairs and staircases it'd have to be me right, self-confessed staircase fetishist and all. I like them in all shapes and sizes, styles or condition you name it. Here are a few I have seen this year. I think I have issues...
  11. France Some Old Cars in the woods, France - September 2015

    Citroen H Van and an Opel Rekord are two of the others there. Not much into the 'vintage' pre-war cars myself but that is a great collection.
  12. Battle Hospital in Reading closed it's doors in 2005 and was subsequently demolished, sitting on the land now is a large Tesco supermarket and new housing estate. However not included in the sale or development plans were the service areas such as the industrial laundry, incinerator, ambulance service building and a few others. These have sat derelict ever since with only part of that area being used to store ambulances and one smaller building is an operational NHS laboratory. Me and my friend decided to give it a look on a day of trying out new places and all seemed well, for about ten minutes. As soon as we got into the incinerator building I noticed the obvious signs of a squatter in residence (including very fresh human excrement on the floor... ) so we were already on our guard. Soon after that we heard somebody else enter the building whilst we were out of sight at the other end and, after hearing them walk around making noise decided the best course of action was to avoid any possible confrontation entirely and leave via a small hole in the side of the building. We then poked around the empty laundry building and on the way out noticed a door that had been closed a few minutes earlier was now open. After that we cut our losses and left, which is a shame as the incinerator building is very cool and I would have loved to have spent more time there were it not for our interruption. Thanks for looking
  13. Is it fully closed now then? I remember seeing old reports from this place of it still being half active and people literally walking through the main entrance to get in...
  14. UK Hafod-Morfa Copperworks, Swansea Nov 2016

    Didn't even know there was one. Those kinda things aren't really my cup of tea anyway so no great loss for me
  15. Recently myself and Landie Man embarked upon a little South Wales roadtrip, as he was given a couple of nights stay free in a city centre hotel down there due to a screw up on their part last year. I have wanted to explore a Welsh chapel for ages, and I had a few on my list but sadly due to a few reasons which I'll go into a little later this was the only successful one, but it is a real good one. We rocked up early on a dull rainy morning, and after a less-than-subtle, very tight and quite noisy entry because of me dropping Landie's bag into the remains of a broken toilet we were in. It took maybe fifteen minutes for it to get light enough to start taking photos, it was a shame it wasn't sunny as it would have been so beautiful to watch the sun come up through the windows. This particular chapel closed it's doors around the end of 2007. Wales is littered with abandoned chapels, it's amazing how many you can accidentally stumble across whilst looking for something else entirely, but sadly a lot of the time they have a very limited scope for available access points. I was more than satisfied with this example though, it's a bit bashed around but that's to be expected for something abandoned the best part of a decade. Thanks for looking, more on my Flickr as always
  16. I'll be brutally honest here and say Tower Colliery is (well, was) one of the only places in this country that I had been desperate to explore. It's come to be known as the forgotten colliery, with other much higher profile closures of bigger sites like Kellingley and Thoresby dominating the news over the last few years. Tower Colliery was the oldest continuously working deep-coal mine in the UK and possibly even the world, and was the last mine of it's kind to exist in the valleys of South Wales. Tower, named after the nearby Crawshay's Tower folly began operations in 1864 and worked until British Coal closed the site in 1994 on the grounds it would be uneconomic to continue production. After closure, 239 former workers pledged money from their redundancy packages to buy back Tower Colliery and continue production in a community buy-out. After fourteen years further production, the seams had been exhausted and Tower Colliery closed for the second time, for good, in January 2008. In 2010, an open-cast mine was opened part of the former coal washery site located a short distance away, although this too is scheduled to close fairly soon. A future development of both sites would see part housing, part industrial estate and part heritage museum to provide employment in the area and keep some legacy of the coal mine alive. This place was every bit as great as I had expected, the decay in some areas is awesome, and the winding house is epic. After about two and a half hours on site we were alerted to the noise of a vehicle arriving on site, and after the coast seemed clear we ventured out of our little hiding spot to see what was going on. Soon after up pulled security, who turned out to be an ex-miner from the colliery who had spent forty years down the mine and now worked as security for the site. He pointed out the CCTV cameras and said that they were all active and get monitored at the other site. He was absolutely sound, a really nice guy to talk to about the place, he was only slightly annoyed that we had made him get out of bed on a Sunday morning! I hope you enjoyed my take on what was one of my favourite home-grown explores this year... More on my Flickr as per normal...
  17. I got back from the States at the beginning of this month and I've been itching to get out exploring again but, truth be told, I'm finding it very difficult at the moment to find places over here which grab me by the balls enough to make me want to explore them. After various weekend plans fell through over the last couple of weekends I settled on a day of checking out some fairly local sites with an old exploring friend, some I knew well, others were complete shots in the dark as to whether they'd still be there or not. We were both pleasantly surprised by this place, which was nice. I really wasn't expecting much, and after seeing how ruined the first few rooms were my expectations were low. But further into the building it looks as if some rooms have barely been touched since the home closed in 2008, and certain rooms have some amazing natural decay seeping through. It's the same story with this location as with many of this kind of 1970s care home buildings. This one specialised in housing elderly people with dementia within it's 25 bedrooms, and was forced to close in 2008 after new legislation was brought in requiring all care homes to have an en suite bathroom in every bedroom. Many of the care homes weren't able to provide these facilities so had to shut down. I've explored quite a number of these now and this was one of my favourites because of the gorgeous decay in some of the areas. Thanks for looking, more on my Flickr as per normal
  18. For once the name of the location was apt as it was absolutely pissing it down when me and Landie Man rolled up here having been tipped off to it by another member. Access was fairly straightforward but a bit of a squeeze and we spent about an hour or so here in the peace and quiet with only the rain for company (if you ignore the businesses operating out of the converted weaving sheds on the roadside that is). I went around it once with my usual 10-20mm wide angle and then again with my 30mm prime so there will be some of those shots on the end of the post. There isn't much information forthcoming about this old three-storey mill but it once wove and produced rugs and carpets and is a very pleasant wander if you're in the area. Thanks for looking, more on my Flickr
  19. I'm back from another one of my jaunts across the Atlantic, in fact I'm so soon back I still haven't recovered from the epic that was the last day coupled with jumping straight onto a six and a half hour flight smelling like something dragged out of hell itself, with no sleep in the last 30 hour period. The first location I happened to find myself in was a fairly small one but it was very close to where I was staying with my explorer friend and he'd never explored it - in fact none of my friends up where this is had. So it was a bit of a journey into the unknown for both of us. Once in it was clear there was more to the site than my friend had first thought so we set about exploring the rusting hulks of two coal conveyor buildings and the old conveyor line. Sadly the main draw for this location, the crane that would have taken the coal from barges and lifted it onto the conveyor system has had a large fence put around it with pressure pad/movement alarm sensors rigged up, probably to stop people climbing up and jumping into the river, and also probably to help protect the very active building situated right next to it. So that was a shame in a way but still it made for a nice shot or two behind the fence. Anyway enough jabbering from me, here are some photos. Thanks for looking, more photos on my Flickr as per normal.
  20. Anyone who has known me knows I have a love of abandoned schools, and especially big American ones which are completely different to the ones found over here. I was given the opportunity to visit one recently and jumped at the chance although having not heard of the place before or seen any photos I didn't know what to expect. This was typical of a small town high school, not massive by any means but certainly a grand place in it's day. It closed some time in the 1980s and has been sat slowly decaying ever since. The outside is home to many stray cats, which the local residents look after. They have provided the cats with a few carriers as shelter and put out food for them outside the exterior fence which is really nice of them. But the inside is where it gets funky...the sports hall has become a home to hundreds of pigeons, who all run around in the void between the suspended ceiling tiles and original ceiling. I've never seen or heard anything like it in my life! Thanks for looking
  21. Prison 15H being knocked down

    Are they going to demolish the encampment of pikeys as well?
  22. UK Longbridge underground tunnels

    If you live five minutes from there you could, I dunno, wander down there and check it out in person? Just a thought.
  23. Derp Cars

    Some American, and a few Canadian, car spots....
  24. You know when you get that urge to do something impulsive and outlandish? Yeah that happened to me during my time in America. I'm not usually one for solo jaunts, least of all in a city I am still largely a stranger to, least of all when it also involves going some way into a pretty rough neighbourhood also. But needs must, and all that. To give a brief history, it was originally a row of three large townhouses, before being purchased by a secret society who constructed a large auditorium and ballroom on the rear of the property, before it passed into the hands of a boxing promotion who used the auditorium for many years as their arena. I'd seen a few photos of this place come up from a friend just before I left on my trip so he gave me all the details I'd need, and stepping foot inside it was one of those rare 'jaw on floor' moments that I was finally seeing it for myself, stood in one of the most iconic places in American sporting history. It's utterly unique, incredibly beautiful, and a massive shame that it has been left abandoned, taken charge of by a development company with a string of failures to their name. Sadly the most likely outcome of this place will be demolition of all but the historic frontage and construction of a hotel on the land. I didn't have long in here as it was getting dark and didn't want to outstay my welcome, but it's a massive tick in the accomplishments box for me. Thanks for looking

Disclaimer

Oblivion State exists as an online forum to allow like minded individuals to share their experiences of Urban Exploration. We do not condone breaking and entering or other criminal activity and advise all members to read the FAQ articles about the forum and urban exploring in general. All posts are the responsibility of the original poster and all images remain copyright to the original photographer.

We would just like to thank

Forum user AndyK! from Behind Closed Doors for our rather excellent new logo.

All of our fantastic team of Moderators who volunteer their time to keep this place running smoothly.

All of our members for continuing to support Oblivion State by posting up the most awesome content. Thank you everyone!
×