The_Raw

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The_Raw last won the day on May 17

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About The_Raw

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  • Birthday 12/21/1978

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  1. UK

    Some interesting stuff in there, like that window shot with the bottle
  2. UK

    I'd put the bride in a gas mask, play In for the Kill by La Roux as she walks down the aisle, get @TrollJay to conduct the ceremony, and ask the photographer to HDR the fuck out of it all
  3. Great set @Andy. We covered a lot of ground that Day!
  4. Haha sorry Andy, how could I forget you!
  5. The Maginot Line, named after the French Minister of War André Maginot, was a line of concrete fortifications, obstacles, and weapon installations built by France in the 1930s to deter invasion by Germany. It was constructed along the borders with Switzerland, Germany, and Luxembourg. Ouvrage translates as "works" in English: published documents in both English and French refer to these fortifications in this manner, rather than as "forts". An ouvrage typically consists of a series of concrete-encased strongpoints on the surface, linked by underground tunnels with common underground works (shops, barracks, and factories etc.). Constructions started in the early 1930s. They served during the Second World War, and were often reused during the Cold War before being gradually abandoned by the French army. Ouvrage Rochonvillers Ouvrage Rochonvillers is one of the largest of the Maginot Line fortifications. Located above the town of Rochonvillers in the French region of Lorraine, the gros ouvrage or large work was fully equipped and occupied in 1935 as part of the Fortified Sector of Thionville in the Moselle. It is located between the petit ouvrage d'Aumetz and the gros ouvrage Molvange, facing the border between Luxembourg and France with nine combat blocks. Rochonvillers saw little action during World War II, but due to its size it was repaired and retained in service after the war. During the Cold War it found a new use as a hardened military command center, first for NATO and then for the French Army until 1998. The ouvrage remains under the control of the French Army. Sadly the bunker has suffered badly from fire damage throughout and has been ransacked. Only a few areas remain intact. Visited with @Maniac, @Andy,@extreme_ironing and Elliot5200. 1. Camouflaged entrance 2. No stairs in here, just a long ramp taking you underground 3. Fire damage is immediately evident 4. 5. Burnt bed frames 6. 7. A large section has been rebuilt with mundane breeze blocks for the Cold war era, this was updated in the 80s 8. Lecture theatre with torn projection screen 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. An entire block of bedrooms remains in good condition with all the beds still in place 15. 16. 17. These engines also still in reasonable condition considering. 18. 19. Control room, sadly ripped to pieces now. 20. How it looked in the 90s, a glimpse of how nice this place might have been when it was immaculate. Shame it's so trashed now. Camp d'Angevillers The camp of Angevillers is part of a barracks located near ouvrages Molvange and Rochonvillers. It was built at the same time as the Maginot line, construction was completed in April 1933. It is now used occasionally for military exercises. All the buildings were pretty much empty but still made for a nice wander. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. Inside the water tower Thanks for looking.
  6. Belgium

    That's pretty awesome, that staircase is epic
  7. UK

    Looks in pretty decent nick, I've still not seen one of these myself. Cheers for sharing
  8. That's wicked mate, dem stairs tho ....
  9. UK

    Love the look of this one, might have to take a peek this summer. Cool pics
  10. The Maginot Line, named after the French Minister of War André Maginot, was a line of concrete fortifications, obstacles, and weapon installations built by France in the 1930s to deter invasion by Germany. It was constructed along the borders with Switzerland, Germany, and Luxembourg. Ouvrage translates as "works" in English: published documents in both English and French refer to these fortifications in this manner, rather than as "forts". An ouvrage typically consists of a series of concrete-encased strongpoints on the surface, linked by underground tunnels with common underground works (shops, barracks, and factories etc.). Constructions started in the early 1930s. They served during the Second World War, and were often reused during the Cold War before being gradually abandoned by the French army. Ouvrage Latiremont is a gros (large) ouvrage of the Maginot Line, located in the Fortified Sector of the Crusnes, sub-sector of Arrancy. It lies between the gros ouvrage Fermont and the petit ouvrage Mauvais Bois, facing Belgium. More than 1,200 metres (3,900 ft) of underground galleries connect the entries to the farthest block, at an average depth of 30 metres (98 ft). The gallery system was served by a narrow-gauge (60 cm) railway that continued out of the ammunition entrance and connected to a regional military railway system for the movement of material along the front a few kilometres to the rear. Several "stations" along the gallery system, located in wider sections of gallery, permitted trains to pass or be stored. The 1940 manning of the ouvrage under the command of Commandant Pophillat comprised 21 officers and 580 men of the 149th Fortress Infantry Regiment. Latiremont was active in 1939-1940, coming under direct attack in late June 1940. From September 1939 to June 1940, Latiremont fired 14,452 75mm rounds and 4,234 81mm rounds at German forces and in support of neighbouring units. It was not until June 1940 that Latiremont and Fermont were directly attacked by the German 161st Division, which brought 21 cm howitzers and 30.5 cm mortars on 21 June. By this time, German units were moving in the rear of the Line, cutting power and communications. Heavy fire repelled attacks but Latiremont's garrison surrendered to the Germans on 27 June 1940. After renovations during the Cold War, it was abandoned. This was the first of 3 gros ouvrages I visited with Elliot5200, @Maniac, and @extreme_ironing. Also good to hook up with @Gromr123 who happened to be nearby on this occasion. Photos can't quite convey how large it is in here, 1.5km from one end to the other. We only saw a portion of it due to time constrictions, but you could easily spend a whole day in here. 1. 2. 3. 4. Some amazing blast doors down here 5. 6. 7. Workshop with a lathe inside 8. Remains of a kitchen 9. Shower block 10. 11. 12. Blast door inside one of the attack blocks on the surface 13.Some rusty gun machinery still in situ 14. 15. 16. 17. Another epic blast door 18. 19. 20. Engine Room 21. 22. 23. 24. Train station for bringing in materials, the platform on the left 25. 26. <3 this door 27. 28. Cheers for looking
  11. Thanks @Lenston lots more to come from this trip
  12. The Maginot Line, named after the French Minister of War André Maginot, was a line of concrete fortifications, obstacles, and weapon installations built by France in the 1930s to deter invasion by Germany. It was constructed along the borders with Switzerland, Germany, and Luxembourg. Ouvrage translates as "works" in English: published documents in both English and French refer to these fortifications in this manner, rather than as "forts". An ouvrage typically consists of a series of concrete-encased strongpoints on the surface, linked by underground tunnels with common underground works (shops, barracks, and factories etc.). Constructions started in the early 1930s. They served during the Second World War, and were often reused during the Cold War before being gradually abandoned by the French army. This particular ouvrage consists of two combat blocks connected by an underground gallery and was manned by 100 men before surrendering to the Germans in 1940. I put this on the list of things to check despite information suggesting it was secured. Glad I did as it turned out to be pretty nice inside. All items have been removed but it's pretty clean with some nice signage and murals on the walls throughout. Just a small part of a very fruitful trip with @Maniac @extreme_ironingand Elliot5200. 1. Starting from ground level 2. 3. 4. Coat of arms painted on the wall 5. 6. Sealed entrance in one of the combat blocks. 7. Hand painted signage could be found everywhere: 'Victory' 8. 'One for all, and all for one', the motto of the Three Musketeers 9. 'Be a man' 10. & 11. 12. & 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 'Honor work solidarity' 24. 25. 26. 27. 'Secrecy is a matter of honor for communications personnel' 28. Notice the dirty footprints up the wall, not sure how those got there. 29. This mural was definitely the coolest find. 30. Just to finish off, a couple of pics from another petit ouvrage that was also meant to be sealed. It was flooded in here, the water reached waist deep in this brickwork tunnel so we had to give up. 31. Calcite coated the floor throughout. 32. Gun machinery would have been positioned here. Cheers for looking
  13. Luxembourg

    Yes mate, wicked shots. We had to scarper from here after just a few pics unfortunately as they had motion sensors near the giant gas engine

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