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The_Raw

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Everything posted by The_Raw

  1. Belgium Diesel Farm Power Plant - Belgium - July 2017

    Some cool pics there Trev
  2. Brilliant! I love that you've been doing this so long that you still have amazing places like this from 7 years ago to share!
  3. UK Oakwood Farm, Norfolk - June 2016

    Nice shooting mate. Enjoyed the write up as well, felt like I was sitting in the bathroom watching you do a
  4. UK Fat willys house 2015/16

    Loving that mate, very nice find indeed
  5. Nice one, saw this on facey a while ago
  6. The Maginot Line, named after the French Minister of War André Maginot, was a line of concrete fortifications, obstacles, and weapon installations built by France in the 1930s to deter invasion by Germany. It was constructed along the borders with Switzerland, Germany, and Luxembourg. Ouvrage translates as "works" in English: published documents in both English and French refer to these fortifications in this manner, rather than as "forts". An ouvrage typically consists of a series of concrete-encased strongpoints on the surface, linked by underground tunnels with common underground works (shops, barracks, and factories etc.). Constructions started in the early 1930s. They served during the Second World War, and were often reused during the Cold War before being gradually abandoned by the French army. This particular ouvrage consists of two combat blocks connected by an underground gallery and was manned by 100 men before surrendering to the Germans in 1940. I put this on the list of things to check despite information suggesting it was secured. Glad I did as it turned out to be pretty nice inside. All items have been removed but it's pretty clean with some nice signage and murals on the walls throughout. Just a small part of a very fruitful trip with @Maniac @extreme_ironingand Elliot5200. 1. Starting from ground level 2. 3. 4. Coat of arms painted on the wall 5. 6. Sealed entrance in one of the combat blocks. 7. Hand painted signage could be found everywhere: 'Victory' 8. 'One for all, and all for one', the motto of the Three Musketeers 9. 'Be a man' 10. & 11. 12. & 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 'Honor work solidarity' 24. 25. 26. 27. 'Secrecy is a matter of honor for communications personnel' 28. Notice the dirty footprints up the wall, not sure how those got there. 29. This mural was definitely the coolest find. 30. Just to finish off, a couple of pics from another petit ouvrage that was also meant to be sealed. It was flooded in here, the water reached waist deep in this brickwork tunnel so we had to give up. 31. Calcite coated the floor throughout. 32. Gun machinery would have been positioned here. Cheers for looking
  7. Krampnitz Kaserne was a military training complex built by the Germans in 1937. It was used for the training of Nazi troops until the end of the Second World War. The Germans evacuated the barracks on April 26, 1945. A day later it was taken over by Soviet troops who had immediately taken control of the area. The 35th Guards Motor Rifle Division was then stationed here until its abandonment in 1992, after the Dissolution of the Soviet Union. The whole complex consists of more than 50 buildings, mostly accommodation and storage, though it also includes an officers' club, a basketball court, a theatre and much more. Movies such as Enemy at the Gates, Inglourious Basterds, The Monuments Men, and Valkyrie shot scenes here. I came here on my own as I couldn't get any of the other lazy fuckers out of bed. I was pretty glad as it happens as I quite enjoy exploring on my own. You get round places far quicker and your senses are heightened so it can be a bit more intense. They weren't bothered anyway, they got to lie in and have kebabs for breakfast. Anyway, this was my third trip to Berlin, and although my previous two trips were fun, they were pretty boozy affairs so I didn't get much done. This time I was on a proper mission. For me these old German military sites are fascinating. To think that this place was full of Nazi troops during WWII is pretty mind blowing in itself, but even more so when you see the size of it in person. Some of the buildings are easily accessible but don't have much to offer. The more interesting buildings have been sealed pretty well but there are still ways inside for the most part. Here's some photos. 1. 2. I think this was the officers' club. Lots of grand grand rooms inside but looking a bit worse for wear now. 3. 4. 5. 6. This staircase sits underneath the famous Nazi eagle mosaic. I didn't have long here as I heard voices and people entering the building through a locked door. 7. Unfortunately however the eagle mosaic has been completely covered up with plaster. I was pretty disappointed by this but I needn't have worried as Krampnitz has tons more interesting stuff if you keep looking. You can see the eagle mural here on an old report > 8. Back outside I spotted this building through the trees 9. A basketball court / gym hall 10. I wonder if this was part of a school for children, as families spent years living here. 11. 12. 13. This small theatre was quite interesting. Only a couple of rows of seating remain. 14. 15. 16. I spotted some old German writing (siegen oder siberia) under the peely paint which translates into English as 'Victory or Siberia' 17. 18. 19. 20. There's a lot of crap graff all over the place unfortunately, I chose to avoid photographing it for the most part. These are some of the better examples I found. 21. 22. 23. Just when I thought I was done I stumbled across this grand old theatre. 24. On hearing voices approaching I made my way out and narrowly avoided bumping into a couple of men with the keys to the building. They weren't dressed like security but I didn't fancy hanging around after that. 25. Finally, some old Soviet signs and murals I found on the outside of the buildings. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. I'd like to go back and find the rest of these as I missed a large chunk of the site so there must be tons more. Thanks for looking.
  8. In 1910 a garrison of the Imperial German Army was established at the Waldstadt section of the Wünsdorf community. By the First World War in 1914 it had become Europe’s largest military base. During World War I it was the site of several prisoner-of-war camps, including the "crescent camp" (Halbmondlager) for Muslim fighters of the Triple Entente, where the first wooden mosque in Germany was erected. From 1939 to 1945, Wünsdorf hosted the underground headquarters of the German Wehrmacht (OKW) and Army's High Command (OKH). After World War II the area became a Soviet military camp, the largest outside Russia, until 1990. Since then it has been returned to civilian use. You can actually pay the security guards 15 Euros to take a wander around here but we chose to sneak in instead and try our luck. It just so happened it was our lucky day as there was a nude photo shoot taking place, so all the doors were wide open! Result! Anyway, on with the photos. Wünsdorf HQ 1. Haus der Offiziere (Officers’ House). Unfortunately we didn't see inside here as security was onto us before we had a chance (cue much hiding....) 2. Statue of Lenin 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. This is where the naked girl appeared from randomly! 11. Plant room valves labelled in Russian 12. Theatre Entrance 13. 14. 15. Still kept in stunning condition 16. Hospital 17. Some nice natural decay inside here 18. 19. 20. Russian newspapers were pasted onto the walls underneath the paintwork throughout 21. 22. 23. The doors were padded both inside and out along this corridor. Perhaps a secure ward. 24. Maybach & Zeppelin Bunkers 25. Maybach I was built in 1937 and became operational in 1939 as the threat of war loomed. The complex consisted of twelve three-storey buildings above ground designed to look from the air like local housing, and two floors of interlinked bunkers with two-foot thick walls below. Deeper in the subterranean levels of Maybach I, there were wells for drinking water and plumbing, air-filter systems for protection against gas attacks, and diesel engines to keep the system operational. Later in the Second World War, the site was further camouflaged by the use of netting. During 1945 the site was heavily bombed by both the British and Americans. 26. The entrances were all partially destroyed by the Russians in 1946 to make the bunkers ineffective for military use so we had to scramble underneath this mess of twisted steel and collapsed rocks to gain access. 27. Inside the walls were filthy from fire and smoke damage. 28. The ring tunnel connecting all the Maybach bunkers was backfilled so we were only able to walk a few hundred metres in any direction before we reached a dead end. 29. Russian scribbles cover the walls and ceiling throughout 30. Handy that someone has placed these beer crates as stepping stones over an oil spillage 31. 32. 32. Another small bunker a couple of hundred metres away. 33. This small entrance leads to a much larger interior 34. 35. One of the entrances to the Zeppelin bunker, a highly modern underground communications centre which had walls up to 3.2 meters thick and a 1 metre shell around it. The Nazis’ entire second world war campaign was guided from the Zeppelin bunker, providing direct contact through telex to the fronts at Stalingrad, France, Holland and even Africa. Constructed in 1937 it was one of the largest newsgathering hubs in operation during the Second World War. The Zeppelin bunker later formed part of the Soviet Cold war era installations in Wünsdorf under the name Ranet. Further bunker installations were subsequently added to house the central command and communications functions of the Soviet army in the GDR. The bunker grounds were demilitarised following the closing of the army base in 1994, when the last Russian troops left Germany 36. Unfortunately the bunker was sealed beyond this blast door and we ran out of time. We will be back! Thanks for looking
  9. Yes mate, and got eaten alive by bugs!
  10. Other Nearly Abandoned :)

    Hahaha love it! There's the makings of a love story in this
  11. Another eventful evening with @Miss.Anthrope. Things didn't end well here, we were caught by an extremely angry security guard with a baseball bat (inscribed 'Mr Happy'....) and the police got called out. To be honest it really wasn't worth the hassle, renovation is well under way now and they've thoroughly stripped the place of all it's glory. It's been derelict for a number of years but has always been well sealed. This partly explains why there are no interior photos anywhere online, which is a shame because it was clearly an amazing building until recently. The 'no photo policy' (whatever one of those is....) which security highlighted to us numerous times may also be partly to blame. This was what he was super pissed about, the possibility that someone might post photos online and break the 'no photo policy' that he's protected for so many years without fail. We bullshitted that we hadn't even taken any photos yet so were eventually allowed on our way. Sadly the only decent feature left was the gothic staircase with stained glass windows but even that was covered up. I've cobbled together a few other pics to make a report but I definitely wouldn't bother coming here. About 90% of the building is stripped back to the bricks, there was barely anything to photograph. I will add some more history and stuff at a later date once renovations have been completed. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. Thanks for looking
  12. UK Kaserne Krampnitz, Germany - June 2017

    Thanks boys and girls x
  13. Germany funeral carriage (visited 06/2017)

    Nice. Is this your new bed Andy?
  14. This was a fun explore. Presumably there must have been a threat from animal rights protestors when it was active here so the site is well secured. High fences equipped with beam sensors and shake sensors stretch the entire perimeter, with remote controlled infra red cameras pointed at all the weak points. The site is also partly still active as the relocation process hasn't quite reached completion yet. The main building (The Francis Crick Institute) was our main target although we passed many outbuildings along the way; houses, stables, a sub-station and many more. It took us a while to figure out a way into the main building but once inside it was a pretty chilled affair. Unfortunately the labs had already been cleared out so there were no pickled animals in jars lying around, which was a shame, coz you know, that's the kinda grim stuff we were hoping for! However, all was not lost as the building itself had some nice art deco features which sort of made up for it. Visited with @extreme_ironing, and again with @AndyK! and @Miss.Anthrope. History The National Institute for Medical Research (commonly abbreviated to NIMR), is a medical research institute based in Mill Hill, on the outskirts of London, England. It is principally funded by the Medical Research Council(MRC), and is its largest establishment and one of only three designated as an 'Institute'. The Medical Research Council, founded in 1913, was immediately charged with establishing a central research institute in London. Later that year, premises at Hampstead were acquired and the National Institute for Medical Research was founded. In the 1930s, the decision was made to move the Institute to new premises. An imposing copper-roofed building at Mill Hill was designed by Maxwell Ayrton, the architect of the original Wembley Stadium, and construction began in 1937. Occupation was delayed when war broke out in 1939 and the building was given to the Women's Royal Naval Service. The building was returned to the MRC in autumn 1949 and the official opening ceremony took place on 5 May 1950, with King George VI and Queen Elizabeth present. In 1962, Nobel Prize winner Sir Peter Medawar became director and, consistent with his research interests, established NIMR as a major centre for immunological research. Following an illness, Medawar retired as director in 1971 to be replaced by Sir Arnold Burgen. Burgan had an interest in nuclear magnetic resonance techniques and formed the MRC Biomedical NMR Centre at the Institute in 1980. Sir Dai Rees became director in 1982 to be replaced by Sir John Skehel in 1987. Since then NIMR has continued to excel scientifically, reporting perhaps most famously the discovery of the sex determining gene SRY, in 1991. In 2003, as part of their Forward Investment Strategy, the MRC announced plans to consider moving NIMR from its current location to a university/medical school site, to enhance its ability "to translate its biomedical research into practical health outcomes." University College London was selected as a preferred partner institution, and in 2016 the NIMR began its migration to the new Francis Crick Institute, constructed next to St Pancras railway station in central London. The rooms and other locations in the building were used in the film Batman Begins, for the Arkham Asylum scenes. 1. The Francis Crick Institute, Mill Hill Laboratory. 2. Nice art deco entrance hall 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Map of the building layout 10. Some funny scribblings on the wall 11. A few photos from the various laboratories which made up about 90% of the building. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. & 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. A nice safe vault in the basement 22. 23. The Directors 24. 25. Looking down from the roof. The building with a green roof was a nice looking hall but unfortunately locked. 26. 27. Games Room (locked) 28. Refectory 29. 30. 31. Christmas decorations still hang from the ceiling 32. Art deco library, a nice surprise located on the 5th and 6th floors. 33. 34. 35. That's all folks, thanks for looking
  15. This place really should have been looked at a long time ago, the history behind the place is literally insane. Thanks to zombizza for putting the lead up, it was still just about worth a look inside although practically everything has been stripped already. I went inside with workers present which made it a fairly tense explore, lots of patiently hiding around corners and sneaking around expecting to get seen at any moment, eventually that moment came and I had to scarper quick sharp. I decided to go back at night and finish off seeing the place assuming there would be nobody present. Surprisingly this turned out to be an impossible mission due to previously unlocked doors being locked and an annoyingly active pair of torch waving security guards with way too much energy. During the day was better. Onto the lengthy history, take a deep breath, there's a lot to read if you can be arsed. Originally known as the Middlesex County Asylum, this was the first pauper lunatic asylum built in England following the Madhouse Act of 1828, which allowed the building of purpose-built asylums. It went on to become the largest asylum in the world at it's peak. When it opened in 1831 the Asylum accommodated up to only 300 patients. The building was enlarged in November of the same year and by 1841 90 staff were looking after 1302 patients. Extensions were added in 1879 and by 1888 there were 1891 patients and the Asylum had become the largest in Europe. Patients were looked after by members of their own sex and there were two gatehouses at the entrance - one for males and one for females. It achieved great prominence in the field of psychiatric care because of two people, Dr William Ellis and Dr John Connolly. Dr (later Sir) William Ellis encouraged patients to use their skills and trades in the Asylum. This 'therapy of employment' benefitted both the Asylum and the patients themselves and was a precursor to occupational therapy. Dr John Conolly became Medical Superintendent in 1839. He abolished mechanical restraints to control patients. This was a great success and encouraged other asylums also to do so. Padded cells, solitary confinement and sedatives were used instead. The extensive grounds were cultivated for produce. The Asylum became self-sufficient, with a farm, a laundry, a bakery and a brewery. Local artisans - tailors, shoemakers - worked at the asylum. There was a gasworks and a fire brigade and even a burial ground for those patients whose relatives had not claimed their bodies. Water was taken from the nearby Grand Union Canal and the Asylum had its own dock for barges delivering coal and for taking away produce for sale. Several name changes took place over the years. In 1889 the Asylum was renamed the London County Asylum, Hanwell. In 1918 it became known as the London County Mental Hospital. In 1929 it was renamed Hanwell Mental Hospital. In 1937 its name changed again, to St Bernard's Hospital, Southall. During WW2 the Emergency Medical Services commandeered one ward for war casualties. The Hospital and grounds received some bomb damage and later the laundry was destroyed by a V1 flying bomb, which caused many casualties. A gatehouse was also damaged. It joined the NHS in 1948 as part of the North West Metropolitan Region, with its own Hospital Management Committee. By the 1960s the Hospital in its 74 acre site held 2200 patients. St Bernard's Hospital was merged with the adjacent Ealing Hospital in 1980 and became the Psychiatric Unit. It was then known as the St Bernard's Wing of the Ealing Hospital. By this time it had 950 beds for psychiatric and psychogeriatric patients. In 1992 the Ealing Hospital General Unit and Maternity Unit split off to form a new Trust and the St Bernard's Wing regained its previous name of St Bernard's Hospital. The Hospital underwent a major refurbishment in 1998. The exterior of the buildings still in use were cleaned, revealing the yellow colouring of the bricks. Scenes from Porridge were filmed in the courtyard here and also scenes from the 1989 Batman movie with Jack Nicholson. Much of the site has been demolished already, and other parts converted into flats. The current hospital has decided that the asylum buildings can no longer be refurbished in such a way as to support a modern hospital so the remainder of the asylum buildings are being refurbished for private housing. The extensive modern buildings at the back (canal-side) of the hospital will remain in use and will be supplemented by further new buildings away from the historical asylum. I didn't know it at the time but the screws on my wide angle were completely loose so the majority of my shots were out of focus unfortunately. These are the shots that came out good enough. 1. How the exterior of all the buildings looked.... 2. 3. I spotted this stuck onto the skirting board in a corridor, I assume this was the adolescents ward... 4. Most rooms had cartoon characters painted on the walls in here 5. 6. 7. Not sure what this old hall might have been used for 8. 9. At this point the place became a little more interesting, this was the busiest area of work so I didn't hang about long 10. 11. 12. 13. The last few shots were all taken on the top floor 14. The ceiling in here was one of the only remaining features left 15. 16. 17. 18. EDIT: July 2017 revisit .... 19. Chapel and Hall, the only two buildings that haven't been converted yet. The chapel was locked and appears to be in use as a site office. 20. Large backstage area behind the hall, difficult to capture the size of it due to the scaffolding and temporary flooring above. 21. Some glimpses of former grandeur with these columns. 22. 23. Temporary flooring below the ceiling 24. 25. 26. The Hall, amazingly still untouched despite the remainder of the buildings being completely stripped or converted. 27. 28. 29. 30. Thanks for looking
  16. Some stonking pics you got there mate
  17. Looks pretty immaculate considering it shut in 2009, nice one
  18. UK HM Prison Blunderston - July 2017

    Looks like there is demo work going on inside anyway in one of your pics
  19. Exactly what my thoughts were, especially seeing as they removed practically all the existing features. But there are no photos anywhere online of what existed previously.
  20. Cheers @hamtagger, it took a while to find the decent bits but worth it in the end
  21. Updated July 2017. Went back, found a nice hall.
  22. Really nicely captured @Andy, you always find the spiders don't you
  23. UK Chaos Manor - April 2017

    Yes mate, that's my mate Rory on the decks
  24. UK Chaos Manor - April 2017

    I went to a rave in here
  25. There was none here
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