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Involuntary Abstinence

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About Involuntary Abstinence

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    Oblivion State Member
  • Birthday 06/05/1980

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  1. UK Severalls (Colchester - April 2014)

    Thank you Lara!!!!
  2. UK Severalls (Colchester - April 2014)

    Always appreciate you stopping by SK! Thank you!
  3. UK Severalls (Colchester - April 2014)

    Thanks a lot G!
  4. UK Severalls (Colchester - April 2014)

    sorry for the late reply D! haven't been on the forum for a while glad it worked out fine for a while for you, shame about Michael but he is not a pain once he catches you from what I hear
  5. UK Severalls (Colchester - April 2014)

    Thanks man!
  6. UK Severalls (Colchester - April 2014)

    Thank you !!
  7. UK Severalls (Colchester - April 2014)

    Thank you!
  8. Killing the game - Thoughts on UE

    My thoughts exactly!
  9. UK Severalls (Colchester - April 2014)

    cheers buddy! it was a great day!!!!
  10. UK Severalls (Colchester - April 2014)

    Not much to say about Sevs that hasn't been said before in terms of history. The Web is full of backstories and info on the 300-acre asylum and it is worth the effort to spend some time checking various links because the history is immsense and few places have been so well recorded like Sevs. As part of my London trip in April, the visit to Sevs was carried out with The_Raw. We managed to record 7 hours approximately going from one building to the next, eluding security in a couple of occasions. Have to say that being just 2 people probably saved our butts as we were able to hear any footsteps and such in order to quickly move to a different part and out of sight. Was also the first time I got over a palisade fence and must say it's all about turning on your survival mode. Once you have those spikes on your scrotum you are so alert and pumped up that it's quite easy to get over and safely down. Have to admit Sevs surprised me in the most wonderful of ways. Not only was it not as trashed as I thought it would be, but it was quite unique from an architectural point of view. The theme of interconnecting corridors is just a pure mindfrak. You keep turning into another corridor, and another, and another...same with doors, you open one and there is another huge corridor. We didn't get to see most of the "famous" bits like the red chair, the mars vending machine or the bed, but I left with a bigger feeling of completeness than I did leaving Denbigh which was a huge disappointment. At the end of the day we were so tired and as the light was fast departing, we thought that maybe bumping into Michael wouldn't be such a bad idea as he would quietly walk us out, avoiding another encounter with the palisades but despite our "efforts" to get caught there was nobody around, so up the fence we went and on our way (well sort of as trying to get The_Raw moving is not that easy as he kept going "oh what's this" and off he'd go to check any of the numerous outer buildings, in the dark). So yeah, Sevs..:cool2: =====PHOTOS====== =====THE END=====
  11. UK ICI Nobel Ardeer (North Ayrshire - April 2014)

    Thanks SK!
  12. UK ICI Nobel Ardeer (North Ayrshire - April 2014)

    Thanx mate! Really appreciate the support
  13. UK ICI Nobel Ardeer (North Ayrshire - April 2014)

    Thanks Mookster! Glad you liked it and it's on the map now
  14. On a sunny Saturday morning I met my two partners in crime (non-forum members) in Glasgow and set off on what was a "secret explore" they had planned for me. After a not that long drive I saw in the distance our destination that was kept until then hidden from me. But the sight was unmistakable and I immediately got excited. The place we were gonna explore was ICI Nobel Ardeer. For a brief history lesson, as always taken from wikipedia, here are some info: Nobel Enterprises is a chemicals business based at Ardeer, near to the North Ayrshire town of Stevenston in Scotland. It specialises in nitrogen-based propellants and explosives and nitrocellulose-based products such as varnishes and inks. It was formerly ICI Nobel, a division of the chemicals group ICI, but is now owned by Inabata & Co., Ltd., a Japanese trading firm. Nobel Industries Limited was founded in 1870 by Swedish chemist and industrialist Alfred Nobel for the production of the new explosive dynamite. Ardeer, on the coast at Ayrshire, was chosen for the company's first factory. The business later diversified into the production of blasting gelatine, gelignite, ballistite, guncotton, and cordite. At its peak, the factory was employing nearly 13,000 men and women. In 1926, the firm merged with Brunner, Mond & Company, the United Alkali Company, and the British Dyestuffs Corporation, creating a new group, Imperial Chemical Industries, then one of Britain's largest firms. Nobel Industries continued as the ICI Nobel division of the company. ICI Ardeer was commonly known locally as the 'factory' or the 'Dinnamite'. At the time the company generally provided higher quality employment regarding terms and conditions and pension rights than other local firms. The Ardeer site was almost like a community, and there were so many people employed there that a bank, travel agent and dentist were at one time based on the site. The former Western Scottish Bus Company provided tens of buses per day to transport the workers to and from the site, and until the mid-1960s there were even two trains per day to transport workers to a station within the factory. In the late 1960s construction began on a nylon and nitric acid plant, but this had a short life, closing down just 12 years later. In 2002 the division, now named Nobel Enterprises, was sold to Inabata. On 8 September 2007 a major fire was reported at the site when 1,500-1,700 tons of nitrocellulose, stored in an open area, caught fire. There was little property damage and no serious injuries. For more click here There are interesting details about the place in the "Secret Scotland" website too (here). What is great about I.N.A. is also what makes it a pain. Location. In the middle of this peninsula, at the bottom of sand dunes that make you feel you are in Tatooine, the power station lies in a surreal environment and the views from the rooftop are unique. However, getting to the power station is a b***, as you can easily get lost. My two buddies had been there twice before and once they spent more than an hour trying to locate it. As there are no signs obviously and since the entire complex is next to live sites, the section of the power station that one can explore is about 20'-30' walk from the place where we parked, which I assume is the most logical place to park anyway. On a sunny dry day the trek is at least manageable, despite having to work your way around a very annoying bog, so unless you have wellies or waders on, you will have to do a lot of zig-zaging. There are several ways around it as we found on our way back, but especially for a virgin visitor this thing can easily become a nightmare. However, on the way to the power station there are various interesting bits and pieces, in a ruinous state but at least they give you a nice understanding of how vast the site used to be, with huge complexes for storing the material, blast walls, almost hidden under the earth rail tracks and more. Reaching now the top of a relatively steep hill along a fence you can finally gaze at the power station and the entire live site that lays behind it. It also gives you a clear line of sight to watch for the patrols of the security. Once we were sure the road was clear we ran down the sand dune (which is quite fun) and through the open space we reached the station praying we got there unnoticed in such a bright day. It turned out we did and we walked inside. The entire station is quite trashed as the metal thieves and vandals have done their usual "duty", but it still remains a wonderful industrial sight, so if you fancy that sort of thing, you will not be disappointed. Pipes, cables, dials, gauges... We spent a couple of hours in there and seeing that my 2 friends were really enjoying themselves despite this being their 3rd visit, one can understand that I.N.A. never gets boring. After spending enough time on the ground floor, roaming through some back offices where you still find paperwork and logs, I made it up to the roof, through a pigeon-infested area which gave me some great views of the area. Leaving we made a short stop to one of the huge warehouse-like structures with long corridors and stashes of wires that obviously were never retrieved after being ripped off their original location. I.N.A. is definitely worth plenty of visits for the individual who wishes to really see everything there is to see. =====PHOTOS======= At the quarry on your way to the station. Long way to go. Pipes galore. View from above. Pigeon hall. Ripped apart. Stairs. Turn them all. These readings ain't right. Safety. You know it makes sense. More pipe porn. Lovely details all over. And a chair of course. Roof access permit. I forgot to get one on my way up but nobody asked me for one. The boilers. Just beautiful despite its decayed/trashed state. Stairs leading down to offices. One last look. On our way back up the sand dune. Rows and rows of warehouse structures. Inside one of the warehouses. =====THE END===== Thank you for reading!
  15. UK Asylum X - 2014

    Top report and photos mate!!!!
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