Lenston

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About Lenston

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  • Birthday 10/24/1974

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  • Gender Male
  • Location Wales
  1. Lovley mate, bigger than i thought this place
  2. Both quite similar i think, think i prefer the other one
  3. Belgium

    Thanks for posting up
  4. We gave this one a miss last time if you remember, we did the one the other side of the road with Andy
  5. Welcome to the forum and a great intro there, look forward to seeing some reports, gimme a shout if you need anything
  6. Germany

    Veru nice this Andy
  7. USA

    Soon good pics there mate
  8. Belgium

    Very nice
  9. USA

    Looks an excellent wander this mate, great pictures
  10. History Originally a tiny quarry started in 1872 this huge site is now three quarries joined by short tunnels. Over seven miles of narrowgauge track was laid down and the site gradually grew. Using just a mobile crusher and plenty of local labour 60-65 rail trucks,each carrying 8 tonnes,left every weekend full of stone. With the introduction of steam drills and cranes by 1910 four trains (going in each direction) were leaving. The yard never had a rail sidings at this point and shared the line with passenger trains- Sundays were the only days there wasn't a passenger service! In June 1944 the line was designated freight only and stayed that way until the sites closure in 2012. Thanks for looking
  11. Italy

    Geez those are amazing
  12. History (Forgotten Relics) This is the old severn tunnel that connected to the old railway bridge over the river Severn. Built by the Severn Bridge Railway Company between 1875-78, this 506-yard tunnel formed part of the western approach route to a mammoth cast iron rail bridge of 4,162 feet which spanned the river, joining the village of Purton on the west bank to Sharpness on the east. One man died during the tunnel's construction which, although built for two tracks, only ever accommodated one. Both masonry side walls incorporate several refuges whilst the brick roof has been supported with rail and timber in a couple of places. From the south, the line entered on a gentle curve of 120 chains radius, climbing towards the north end on a gradient of 1:132 before levelling out about 60 yards from the entrance. The line was cut by the partial collapse of the Severn Rail Bridge in October 1960 after being struck by two barges in thick fog. Two rail tours used the line through the tunnel to reach Severn Bridge Station in April 1964. The track was finally lifted in 1968-69. Pics The old railway bridge before it was demolished in 1960 Thanks for looking
  13. Thanks mate, not really sure actually, will google it now Hope alls well with you.
  14. History (Forgotten Relics) The Midland Railway opened its 7½-mile branch from Yate to Thornbury in stages, completing it in September 1872. The line had opened to Tytherington in 1869 but the intervening 2¼ miles required a pair of tunnels to be engineered, totalling 391 yards. The longer of these, at 224 yards, was found 5 miles and 46 chains from the start of the branch and a stone's throw from the station at Tytherington, which gave its name to it. Climbing a challenging 1:59 gradient, trains encountered the unassuming east portal as the single track curved southwards on a radius of 39 chains. Built in brick and colonised by ivy, it features four square pattress plates around the crown of the arch. The lining, comprising four brick rings and vertical sidewalls, only extends for about 10 yards; thereafter the tunnel shows off the rock through which it was driven. Towards the middle is a single ventilation shaft. This was reduced in height and capped with an unusual brick dome when the M5 motorway was constructed across the tunnel in 1970-71. The railway had closed to passengers during the Second World War and goods in September 1967. A final train ran two months later, after which the track was quickly lifted. However in July 1972, the route was reopened as far as Grovesend Quarry, immediately west of the tunnel. This operational period ended in 2012 with the quarry's closure, although there have subsequently been calls to reopen the line to serve the sizeable town of Thornbury. Pics Thanks for looking.

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