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Found 153 results

  1. The granite quarry at St Breward's primary function was to supply the building blocks for the re build of Bodmin's notorious Gaol back in the mid 1800's. But granite blocks from this St Breward source have built great bridges and cobbled our roads far and wide, giving rise to some of the most prominent architectural structures in the land. The great Naval College at Dartmouth owes its character to St Breward stone and in Britain's capital, so does, London's County Hall, Transport House, the Esso Tower, the Shipping Office and most of the buildings in Paternoster Row. All owe their existence to St Breward stone, cut from here, dressed and shipped by transport provided by the rail head at Wenford Bridge. Now ironically, the start of the Camel trail, one of the most popular and picturesque nature trails used by cyclists and walkers in the country. Other perhaps more impressive architectural structures are St Breward born too and are laid claim to by the Hantergantick Quarry and St Brewards oldest and perhaps most famous commercial granite quarry, the De Lank quarry, the most famous granite quarry in Cornwall at the turn of the century. The fist quarry here, known as the Eddystone is now unused but forms a part of the whole quarry complex. It was used for the construction of the lighthouse of the same name back in 1750's
  2. The Cornish Alps began to dominate the landscape as every ton of usable china clay that was mined brought with it five tonnes of waste. Railways and tramways were built to transport the material to the coast. By 1910, Cornwall was producing some fifty per cent of the world's china clay, something in the region of one million tonnes every year, seventy-five percent of which was exported. In 1919 the three main producers merged, calling themselves English China Clay, which continued to dominate the market until it was bought by French company, Imerys, in 1999, for £756m. Any visitor to St Austell is likely to be struck by the impressive sharp peaks, known as the Cornish Alps, which dominate the surrounding landscape and represent the most visible part of a story that goes back two hundred and fifty years, the story of china clay. China clay, as the name suggests, is a material known as kaolin, which was first used in China more than ten thousand years ago to make fine white porcelain. Some of this eventually made it's way to Europe, where the gentry still had to make do with crude earthenware pots, and porcelain was highly sought-after. Noticing a gap in the market, a Plymouth apothecary called William Cookworthy began to research the porcelain-making process and spent several years searching for a material that resembled the kaolin that had been used for so long in China. In 1745 he eventually found it, at Tregonning Hill, near Germoe, in Cornwall, where a rare type of decomposed granite, finer than most talcum powders, arises naturally. This material was known locally as Moorstone, Growan and Growan Clay. Cookworthy found a way to seperate the material, using water to remove impurities, and then spent another twenty years developing his own recipe for making porcelain, which he succesfully patented in 1768. Cookworthy immediately established the Plymouth Porcelain Factory, and began making fine china to sell to the gentry. He also began to sell the raw material to other English potteries. By the early nineteenth century the industry was big business. The St Austell deposits had emerged as the largest in the world, and many other uses had been found for the clay, such as in paper, paint and rubber goods. Throughout the 19th century thousands of men were employed, with harsh working conditions, either spraying the walls of open pits with high-pressure hoses to remove the clay, or processing and transporting the material, which was exported to all corners of the globe. By the mid 19th century 65,000 tonnes of china clay were being mined in the St Austell area every year by seven thousand workers. Formerly tiny villages were quickly developed to cater for the industry. West Polmear, for example, which had a pre-china-clay population of nine, was thoroughly transformed by local landowner and entrepeneur Charles Rashleigh, who invested huge sums of money building a safe harbour for ships, and houses and factories for workers. Charlestown, as it became known, soon boasted a population of three thousand, a small dock packed with ships, and harbour sheds and warehouses bustling with boatbuilders, rope menders, brick workers, lime burners and pilchard curers. Today, the St Austell deposits, which have produced around 120 million tonnes of china clay and are good for at least aonther fifty years, have largely been abandoned. Imerys moved most of their operations to Brazil in the early part of this century and there are now fewer than two thousand employees left in Cornwall. The legacy of China Clay still defines the region, however, with even the iconic Eden Project owing it's existence to the industry, sitting, as it does, in a former china clay pit. The China Clay Country Park, which consists of twenty-six acres of woodland located in the Ruddle valley, near St Austell, is home to the Wheal Martyn Heritage Museum, set in the grounds of two former working china clay pits. The museum is open every day throughout the summer and a series of clay trails have been developed by volunteers, providing access to this fascinating landscape for cyclists, walkers and horse riders.
  3. Ive been dying to get in here for ages, Ive heard so much about the place, seen so many pictures and read so much history, I thought Id never get the opportunity so when I heard that EH were doing tours I though Id dip into my pocket and "Go See", History more than covered by Fortknox and Frosty in their bloody marvelous report ,http://www.oblivionstate.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=1925&p=13950&hilit=Dumpy#p13950 , my pics dont do it justice I hate using flash specially when Im surround by 24 other people, so here goes Thanks for viewing Guys
  4. Big Shout To Ratfink And OliverGT for letting us know and for all the hard work and effort they put in. And for the ever so useful intel! Visited with Space Invader and Obscurity… This was my second of the Clapham Shelters and didn’t spend as much time exploring this one as we did Clapham North as they are obviously of similar design..None the less was just as much fun ,especially those pesky Cameras.No big story to tell explore wise but as Oliver said when them choob trains go past it does put the wind up you somewhat!! Some actual info http://underground-history.co.uk/shelters.php On with some pics from the evening Typical DLS design Some of the many, many bunks and shelving to be found Bit of original signage Right down the bottom so to speak And that was our lot…thanks for looking
  5. Not really derelict, but it was a quality mooch!!! _________________________________________________ The General Cemetery of All Souls, Kensal Green, is one of England's oldest and most beautiful public burial grounds The plan for London's first garden cemetery was initiated by the barrister George Frederick Carden, who was inspired by a visit to Père-Lachaise in Paris in 1821. Alert both to the need for new burial grounds, and the commercial potential of the venture, Carden founded the General Cemetery Company in 1830, with influential supporters including Andrew Spottiswoode MP and the banker John Dean Paul of Rodburgh The cemetery was established by Act of Parliament which had its final reading in July 1832, during a cholera epidemic -- a coincidence that implicitly made the case for reform. The Bishop of London consecrated the first 48 acres in January 1833, and the first funeral was conducted a week later. From the funeral of HRH The Duke of Sussex in 1843 to that of his nephew HRH The Duke of Cambridge in 1904, Kensal Green was the most fashionable cemetery in England Its notable personalities include some 650 members of the titled nobility and over 550 individuals noted in the Dictionary of National Biography. Kensal Green is the resting place of the engineers Sir Marc Isambard Brunel and Isambard Kingdom Brunel, the mathematician Charles Babbage, and the novelists Wilkie Collins, Anthony Trollope and William Makepeace Thackeray; Lord Byron's wife, Oscar Wilde's mother, Charles Dickens' in-laws and Winston Churchill's daughter; a cross-dressing Army doctor and the surgeon who attended Nelson at Trafalgar; the creator of Pears' Soap, and the original WH Smith; the funambulist Blondin and the Savoyard George Grossmith; the first man to cross Australia from south to north, and the last man to fight a duel in England; the Duke's nephew who ruined the richest heiress of the day, and the English adventuress who became a French baronne disgraced by the accusation of murder. Kensal Green boasts some 140 Grade I, II* and II Listed buildings and monuments, including the magnificent Anglican Chapel (Top 2 pano's) The Cemetery is cared for by "The Friends of Kensal Green Cemetery" which is an independent registered charity
  6. This tower is reported to be one of the most haunted church's in the UK (If you believe that old twaddle), situated in the middle of nowhere and only accessed by a miles trek on foot. So there was no better time to visit it than at night Visited with Skeleton Key, Billy The Bulldozer and Adam History The old church known as Little St. Mary's is first recorded 1086 where it was part of the estate belonging to Hugh De Desmaisnil. It was demolished in 1853 but the 15th Century Tower was left intact along with the graveyard. The tower has three stagings and some of the original fixtures from the chapel have been incorporated into it as the 14th century window above he door and the 12th century doorway. There has been much interest in it over the years from different parties that have led to a number of stories and accounts of strange happenings. The latest in January 2009 led to a local newspaper sending an investigative reporter to see for themselves after recieving some strange video footage of something inside the tower. This was the video which the reporter received (Make sure your sound is on, contains swearing) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eBfOgLD2h_I&feature=player_embedded Extracts of the report in the East Herts Herald TREPIDATION and excitement gripped me as I saw a narrow bridleway leading to my destination, an eerie church tower looming above a distant copse. The ruined church in Thundridge has been attracting attention of late, with two reports in as many weeks of bizarre and menacing growling noises emanating from the decaying tower, off Cold Christmas Lane. After being sent a video and hearing the growl myself I was unable to fend off my curiosity any longer, and decided that the Herald should investigate. When I arrived at the clearing where the tower stands my mind raced as I recounted the research I had done into this place. It has for a number of years attracted devil-worshippers at Halloween, and is rumoured to be haunted. Before venturing to the site I read in the book Haunted Hertfordshire how, in 1978 a woman was confronted by a terrifying supernatural army which let out blood-curdling screams and walked straight through her. Thankfully (or perhaps unfortunately) for myself and our photographer no such apparition transpired on our visit. I peered into the tower through a small hole hoping to discover what the “menacing groan� which Hoddesdon pensioner Ann Crump, and husband Leonard had heard a little over a week before, but the tower remained silent. Thundridge Bernard and Marion Hill were walking their dog nearby and I asked them if they knew what the fuss was about. Marion said: “It does seem to attract people, there’s a bit of a fascination about it.� But Bernard added: “We come here twice a day, and have lived here for 33 years and have never heard anything.
  7. I had been eyeing this crane for a while - it has been there for roughly a month or two, and recently I decided - why not have a crack at it?! It is very small as tower cranes go, but this isn't London, so we don't get many down here. This was my first crane and I loved it! After the initial fear had worn off I felt quite relaxed (luckily there was no wind!). Some dodgy moments as I watched the occasional police car drive past down below - or a few random drunks! This was a spur of the moment thing, so I went alone at about midnight. Apologies for some of the pictures, hopefully I can do better if I visit a crane again! At this point I contemplated climbing the further 30 odd feet to where the red light is (any crane buffs know what this part is called?) - after finding the ladder was actually quite stable, unlike the various walkways I ventured up. I felt a lot more exposed up here as I didn't have as much cover, and I was illuminated by the aircraft warning light! And a self portrait to conclude the photographs! Thanks for viewing!
  8. The forth and final splore on a great day out in Kent Those in attendance were Skeleton Key, UrbanX, Trog & Mrs Trog, Wevsky, Space Invader and Urban Ginger The History Bit The North Centre and Detached Bastions are located between the Drop Redoubt and the Citadel on the Western Heights. Their purpose was to assist in defending the northern approaches to Dover, particularly from the Folkestone Road, along which it was envisaged Napoleon and the French Grand Army would attack. Work on the North Centre Bastion began in 1804 as part of the main Western Heights works, although it was incomplete in 1815 when Napoleon was defeated at the Battle of Waterloo. In 1859 the Royal Commission which called for modification across the Western Heights reviewed the unfinished North Centre Bastion. Work began on its completion and the construction of the Detached Bastion and its caponier. They were armed throughout the main phase of occupation at the Western Heights, but along with the rest of the fortress, its decline was rapid and at the turn of the century its guns were removed. The bastions saw very little use after this time, with only local defence use during both World Wars. A copy of the 1871 map of the Detached Bastion The Army relinquished the Western Heights after the Second World War and the North Centre and Detached Bastions have remained empty and unused since. Despite the surrounding ditches becoming very overgrown. The views over Dover from the top of the Bastion, the building in the first one is Westmount College, another bloody good explore Click to see it >>>>>>>http://www.oblivionstate.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=1838 The magazines at the top
  9. UK Hartford Mill Oldham nov 2011

    Shame this mill is soooooooo abused it would have housed a well nice engine in the old engine house..... Built 1907 by the Hartford Mill (Oldham)Co Ltd. Extended 1920 and 1924. Closed 1959 and used by Littlewoods as a mail order warehouse until 1992. Architect was F W Dixon, there were 120,000 spindles and power was provided by a very impressive 1500 hp Urmson & Thompson engine. history on the engine builders John Urmson and John E Thompson started business in 1865 in Hathershaw, Oldham. While Urmson was a trained engineer who had worked at Woolstenhulmes & Rye, Thompson is thought to have contributed capital. Thompson died in 1882, and Urmson with his sons John and Andrew continued the business. On the sons' death in 1888 the firm was incorporated, and continued until 1933.[1] The firm operated out of the Hathershaw Foundry. Initially millwrights, in the 1870s they started making stationary steam engines as well. From 1904 they made a series of large mill engines. The largest was a 2000ihp engine for Ace Mill Co. Ltd., Chadderton in 1914. This was erected in 1919. The later engines were large. Arthur Roberts reported that Hartford Mill was powered by a 1800 hp twin-tandem compound engine by Urmson and Thompson, built in 1907. It was steamed at 160 psi at 68 rpm. It had a 5 ft stroke driving a 24 ft flywheel. The transmission method was a rope drive using 40 ropes. The engine was reputed to be the only twin-tandem that Urmson & Thompson built. It had two 30" diameter HP (high-pressure) cylinders at the rear, and two 60" LP (low-pressure) cylinders in front. There were Corliss valves on all cylinders. The air pumps were driven from each crosshead. There was a Whitehead governor. The engine cost £5400 and the three boilers cost £1900. Mills driven by Urmson & Thompson engines Urmson & Thompson produced mill engines in the boom years of the 1870s, and millwrighted (ie produced the bevelled gear shafts) for mills such as Nile Mill, Chadderton. The period 1904–1914 was productive, when they created engines rating a total of 14,300 ihp for nine Oldham mills:[1] Parkfield Mill, Oldham – 1874 Hollinwood Mill, Failsworth – 1874 Honeywell Mill, Oldham – 1874 Copster Mill – 1904 Hartford Mill, Werneth – 1907 Gorse Mill, Chadderton – 1908 Ace Mill, Chadderton – 1914 (aka Gorse No.2 Mill) Falcon Mill, Chadderton – 1915 time for the pic's to get into the boiler house go through the small crawl hole leading into the chimney connector tunnel (left to chimney and right to the boiler house) Engine house and rope race area... looking to the rope race area where a drive shaft came through the wall the bottom half of this cup bearing is still intact, shame the rest has been removed within the lower floor wish i could find more history on this place........
  10. Splored with Skeleton Key, UrbanX, Wevsky, SpaceInvader, Troglodyte, Mrs Troglodyte, Urban Ginger and Ian ______________________________________________________ Planning for this battery situated just south east of the Drop Redoubt started around 1853 and completed in the 1870's and was updated at the begining of the second world war, this included the building of the Deep Underground Shelter The battery housed 10" RML guns which protectively looked out over The Straits of Dover in The English Channel In 1867 a gun exploded during the saluting of the Sultan departing Dover, killing a gunner by ripping his arm off and injuring two others of the crew. The gunner was named Andrew McDowell and his grave can still be found in St. James's cemetery Sadly the bottom half has broken off but the rest reads: "...by the Officers and Non-Com Officers, Gunners and Trumpeteers, No.1 Battery, 2nd Brigade, R.A., to the memory of Gunner Andrew McDowell of the above battery who was killed by acident in the Drop Battery, at Dover..." The Deep Shelter The Deep Shelter has suffered several cave-ins Thanks for looking
  11. visited with ... wevsky, fortknoxo,one flew east ,maniac and chewbacca a little history... This is the Eastern end of a large tunnel complex in Snargate Street, which began as separate tunnels but were linked during WW2 for use as air raid shelters. The main part of this section is the 900ft long Cowgate Tunnel which connected Snargate Street with Durham Hill. Unfortunately, this tunnel was penetrated by a shell during WW2 which resulted in the death of 63-year old Mrs. Patience Ransley, who was sheltering inside at the time. The tunnel is blocked at the point of the shell penetration, which occured within the grounds of Cowgate Cemetery on the surface. It is however possible to go much further than the blockage shown on the plan below, but conditions are poor due to roof falls and rotten timber props. Due to revelopment of the Durham Hill area, the entrance at that end seems to have vanished. The passage going West from the main entrance tunnel passes a vent shaft and kiln, and was originally known as 'Soldiers' Home Caves', due to them being behind the old Soliders' Home. on with the pics ... some graffiti Patience Ransley shoe Thanks for looking
  12. Found this place a ltttle disappointing to start with many of the rooms were plain white wash shells but then i found the staircase. Which made up for what the rest of the place lacked right on with the pics ... a little history... Thanet Place was a large mansion with gardens overlooking the sea, previously owned by the “Beef Baron�, Sir Edmund Vesty, which was 400 yards away from the old home. This catered for 24 residential & 20 day care children. All the suitable furniture & fittings were bought to the new house, even the memorial clock which ticked away for many years in the entrance hall of the old St Marys, was given pride of place in the new entrance hall. Though considerably smaller the new premises even had its own chapel. in 1982 Kent County Council withdrew its financial support for the Home claiming that at £1,600 per week it was too expensive to use, & refused to send anymore children there. A massive protest campaign to save St Marys from closure was backed by the Archbishop & Dean of Canterbury, the Bishops of Maidstone & Dover, plus social workers & head teachers, all supported by a petition of 4,000 signatures. Even the Queen Mother expressed sympathy in a letter, but St Marys finally closed in 1983, & downsized once again, and the house was made into an old peoples home ... thanks for looking
  13. Heres my contribution toward the pool of doom, been so completely and mindlessly trashed, great shame Visited with Space Invader, Obscurity, Wevsky and Jade, History of sorts covered in previous threads so onto the Pics ; The only "Happy" thing left Nice little relaxed Splore, My Thanks to All
  14. Been holding off on this one while I attempted to seek out some much needed history, but regret to say I failed miserably so what little history there is has already been covered by Sx-Riffraff in his thread (http://www.28dayslater.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=63509), I did however discover that the latin motto "Spero Meliora" in the stained glass window halfway up the stairs reads "I aspire to Greater things", it was used by the "Moffat" clan although the Crest does not resemble theirs ?, It also transpired that I had visited this house on more than one occasion back in the late 80's so that explained the great sense of Deja-vu I had whilst walking around the site, I do now remember that it was split up into two houses in one Visited with Space Invader, Obscurity, Jade and Wevsky Right on with my Pics, 2nd outing with the "Wangle" "I aspire to greater things" Sorry about the shadow, just loved the tiling in here Glorious suite from "Back in the day" Sorry for the sheer amount of pics, I took an endless amount and could post loads more but I felt these were the "best of" Thanks for looking !
  15. A brief explore from a month or so ago, visited with Space Invader, Obscurity and Wevsky, I have to admit that pics arent the best but its the taking part that counts Now for a brief bit of history borrowed from Sub Brit These tunnels, in the former Winchelsea Quarry, were used during WW2 as air raid shelters. They were constructed in the form of four parallel corridors with two intersecting passages. There were four original entrances in the quarry and two more which spur off from a junction at the opposite end of the tunnel. The quarry entrances were used as workshops by the company which owned the tunnels and the other two entrances have been sealed. One was located behind the Westmount building and the other was located in another chalk pit in Tower Hamlets, where the houses of 'The Abbots' road are now located. According to ARP records of the time, the shelter was designed to accommodate just over 1,000 people. Some wartime photos still remain of people sheltering in these tunnels as well as many dated etchings on the chalk walls Tunnel Plan And now for the all important pics An almost transparent Space Invader Well worth a visit if ever you're passing, thanks for taking the time to look at my pics
  16. right after being awake for 36 hours having a run in with everyones favorite friends and plan b leaving the four of us caked head to toe in mud soaking wet and ready to call it a night we then get a text from ojay an hour later we find are selves in Victoria arches Manchester ... visited with ojay, obscurity,maniac, wevsky stayed in the car with a four pack kicking himself a big for ojay being tour guide .. a little history .... The Victoria Arches were a series of arches built in the embankment of the River Irwell in Manchester. They served as business premises, landing stages for Steam packet riverboats, and also as World War II air-raid shelters. They were accessed from wooden staircases which descended from Victoria Street. Regular flooding of the river resulted in the closure of the steam-packet services in the early 20th century, and the arches were used for general storage. In World War II the arches were converted for use as air raid shelters.The staircases were removed in the latter part of the 20th century. on with the pics ... Thanks for looking
  17. visited with obscurity ,wevsky ,silverRainbow and mrs obs ... Not alot of history on this place so are get straight on with the pics... thanks for looking
  18. UK Fort Burgoyne 28 Sept 2011

    Fort Burgoyne well where to start. Attempted this one a few months back with no luck just wandered around in the dark for a few hours trying to get down into the moat. Anyway we gave up and i decided it was time for another go. So with the assistance of my brother in law Andy( he has yet to be christianed with an explorerers alias)we set of into the darkness. Now i wont take all the credit for entry as i did have a few pointers a few months back from Wevsky and Space Invader. Cheers guys. So anyway we got into the moat after about 40 mins wandering around and then proceded to try and find are way into the fort itselfs. After a bit more searching we found what looked like our way in so off we went. Alot of climbing and heading off in one direction to find it was the wrong way we found ourselves overlooking the parade ground. Jackpot. So here we go with some pics, there not great as im still practicing and the last few are taken with flash as my camera batteries were dying. brand new duracells too lol. Well anyway here they are Thanks for looking
  19. Well we were very disappointed with this mine due to not having our 4gas meter..... all i will say is if you go in FFS take a meter 30 yards in we could not breath hardly and that was just walking, the mine had NO air flow at all..... time for the pics first the beach with the fossils within the mine next time we go it will be with a meter and i hope better air..... if you go in please be careful ....death awaits !...
  20. UK Scarborough night shots sept 2011

    well had a week in Scarborough and most of it was spent underground in several mines from jet to iron stone etc, by night well its below.....
  21. UK Bolton stone mines and quarry 2011

    This was our second visit to this area, i have no history on this place all i can tell you is it is a stone quarry with 4 stone mines within the faces, there was a rail line within the quarry which went down hill to the railway for off loading there stone. on with the pics. 2 of the ways in woot. A reet nice 'miners deads' wall hope you liked the pic's ill see what info i can dig up, to be honest im mowed under with work
  22. visited with wevsky, troglodyte ,peach, silver rainbow, oliver gt and one flew east a little history... At St Margaret's Bay there is the underground deep shelter for St Margarets 5.5" Battery. This site was the first one to use the unrotated projectile known as the Z - Rocket which was a anti - aircraft (AA) weapon. It was officially known as a UP or unrotated projectile. It was not particularly accurate, but the thinking was that if fired in large enough amounts an enemy plane just might get hit! on with the pics ..... Thanks for looking
  23. UK summerlands lodge, sept 2011

    visited with obscurity... a little history.. Built in 1906, as new premises for a preparatory school,called Doon House School. The school was closed in the early part of the Second World War and the property requisitioned by the military as an officer's mess for nearby Manston airfield. In 1946 it became the headquarters of the British Legion Homes, Maurice House. The home moved to new premises in nearby Broadstairs, the building became the head office for a construction company and then, in the mid-1980's a nursing home. A large neo-Georgian property set back from the road with substantial gravel approach and grounds. Constructed in red brick with stone dressings it comprises of a central projecting gable flanked by two of similar design to the left and right of the property. A tiled roof with central glazed timber lantern and six dormer windows to the front elevation. Three round windows with decorative brick surround to the gable ends with decorative timber soffit and corbel. To the centre of the building to the first floor is an impressive leaded window the upper portion divided into four parts. These contains the coat of arms of colleges that two founders and original masters of Doon House School attended. The main entrance, which is situated below the leaded window, has a fine stone arched broken pediment surround terminated with two well-detained Corinthian columns. on with the pics.. thanks for looking
  24. Couldn't find a lot of history on this place apart from an episode of Mr bean was filmed here and it closed down last year. visited with wevsky, obscurity and Silver Rainbow on with the pics ... thanks for looking
  25. A early morning drive and after a sizeable mcdonalds we headed up to hayes to check out rph's mr beans pool..it is indeed trashed broken glass city..This site was closed and a new one built..since then the kids have broken every window and indeed emptied pots of paint down the slope into the deep end,the pikeys have cut the bars off away from the parts of the pool you climb out of!! There was a lot of flooding in the below pool section and tbh not much to see down there ,so heres a few pics of the first part of the day. Visited with SpaceInvader,Obscurity+jade and Silver Rainbow. a few pics ..its a pool dont expect amazement.. Nothing much different from RPH'S report but like i said its a Pool
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