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Found 35 results

  1. I visited the chocolate factory already more than four years ago. Inside it was partly very dark - much darker than it looks in the photos. The plaster had fallen from the ceiling; a gray damp mud lay on the floor and stuck stubbornly to the shoes. After the owner died, the factory was closed over 20 years ago. The widow of the manufacturer still lives in a dilapidated house next to the factory. In the past years, the condition has worsened a lot. Meanwhile, the roof of the former factory has almost completely collapsed. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
  2. So, after discovering a thread I convinced my camera club that Loudon would be worth a wee visit. We set off this evening to explore and take some photos. Remarkably easy to get in, despite the big gate - it was just a matter of walking around the outside of the gate and then up to driveway to the castle. That's it really - you have complete access to the site. To be honest it appears to be far from abandoned - in fact it is very well looked after. The grass is mown and everything appears to be largely undamaged. Many of the rides have been taken down and removed but there was still a fair bit to see. Well worth a visit if you are in the area.
  3. 2013 Showreel urbex

    Enjoy !
  4. Pyestock 2 Visits early 2013

    RIP :jump
  5. Lier Mental Hospital, Norway Built 1921, 5 buildings closed 1985 the Interior was removed 2010. Demolition started Autumn 2013 and the Photos from july 2013, from just one of the buildings. The Hospital area still has several buildings in full use. r I think I finally got it now. You can see the photos, right? Hope you like them
  6. Hello, I have had this on my list for a long time and after a few messages we arranged a meet. Access was piss easy and we didn't see anyone or security. got lost loads of times inside and found the famous white room show flat but couldn't find access to the other control room. A revisit is on the cards i think. On our exit we found our original entry point had been sealed! Must be a magician Secca! Battersea Power Station is a decommissioned coal-fired power station located on the south bank of the River Thames. The station ceased generating electricity in 1983, but over the past 50 years it has become one of the best known landmarks in London. On 7 June 2012 it was sold to SP Setia and Sime Darby. In January 2013 the first residential apartments went on sale. Construction on Phase 1 is due to commence in 2013, with completion due in 2016/17.
  7. Evening all, I'm sure that its OK to post in here now considering the amount of people that are doing it lately? If not, please move and accept my apologies. I'll try not to bog down the post with too many photos, as I have a lot more to go and a lot on Flickr. Lots of detail shots in with these. I decided that I needed to do this, apart from a handful in the UK, I've not done much in this country this year. After help from some fellow explorers (you know who you are) I decided that a day off work was in order and a drive from sunny South Wales to London in the early evening was on the cards. In the meantime, I arranged to meet with Dursty, a fellow member of the OS forum and community who kindly took me to B and we did the roof together. On arriving and making it to the site and negotiating my way to control room A, I spent some time in here and worked pretty quickly for me, swopping between lenses and making the most out of the early part of the explore. Once Dursty arrived, we did Control Room B and climbed up to the base of the chimneys to get that awesome skyline. Some history Battersea Power Station is a decommissioned coal-fired power station located on the south bank of the River Thames, in Battersea, an inner-city district of South West London. It comprises two individual power stations, built in two stages in the form of a single building. Battersea A Power Station was built in the 1930s, with Battersea B Power Station to its east in the 1950s. The two stations were built to an identical design, providing the well known four-chimney layout. The station ceased generating electricity in 1983, but over the past 50 years it has become one of the best known landmarks in London and is Grade II* listed. The station's celebrity owes much to numerous cultural appearances, which include a shot in The Beatles' 1965 movie Help!, appearing in the video for the 1982 hit single "Another Thing Comin´" by heavy metal band Judas Priest and being used in the cover art of Pink Floyd's 1977 album Animals, as well as a cameo appearance in Take That's music video "The Flood." In addition, a photograph of the plant's control room was used as cover art on Hawkwind's 1977 album Quark, Strangeness and Charm. The station is the largest brick building in Europe and is notable for its original, lavish Art Deco interior fittings and decor. However, the building's condition has been described as "very bad" by English Heritage and is included in its Buildings at Risk Register. In 2004, while the redevelopment project was stalled, and the building remained derelict, the site was listed on the 2004 World Monuments Watch by the World Monuments Fund. The combination of an existing debt burden of some £750 million, the need to make a £200 million contribution to a proposed extension to the London Underground, requirements to fund conservation of the derelict power station shell and the presence of a waste transfer station and cement plant on the river frontage make a commercial development of the site a significant challenge. In December 2011, the latest plans to develop the site collapsed with the debt called in by the creditors. In February 2012, the site was placed on sale on the open property market through commercial estate agent Knight Frank. It has received interest from a variety of overseas consortia, most seeking to demolish or part-demolish the structure. Built in the early 1930s, this iconic structure, with its four distinctive chimneys, was created to meet the energy demands of the new age. Sir Giles Gilbert Scott – the man who also designed what is now Tate Modern and brought the red telephone box to London – was hired by the London Power Company to create this first of a new generation of ‘superstations’, with the building beginning to produce power for the capital in 1933. With dimensions of 160 m x 170 m, the roof of the boiler house 50 m tall, and its four 103 m tall, tapering chimneys, it is a truly massive structure. The building in fact comprised two stations – Battersea ‘A’ and Battersea ‘B’, which were conjoined when the identical B section was completed in the 1950s, and it was the world’s most thermally efficient building when it opened. But Battersea Power Station was – and is – so much more besides. Gilbert Scott lifted it from the prosaic into the sublime by incorporating lavish touches such as the building’s majestic bronze doors and impressive wrought-iron staircase leading to the art deco control room. Here, amongst the controls which are still in situ today, those in charge of London’s electricity supply could enjoy the marble-lined walls and polished parquet flooring. Down in the turbine hall below, meanwhile, the station’s giant walls of polished marble would later prompt observers to liken the building to a Greek temple devoted to energy. Over the course of its life, Battersea Power Station has been instilled in the public consciousness, not least when Pink Floyd famously adopted it for its Animals album cover and launch in 1977. As a result of its popularity, a great deal of energy has been expended in protecting this landmark. Following the decommissioning of the ‘A’ station in 1975, the whole structure was listed at Grade II in 1980 before, in 1983, the B station was also closed. Since that time, and following the listing being upgraded to a Grade II* status in 2007, Battersea Power Station has become almost as famous for plans heralding its future as for its past. Until now, that is. The transformation of Battersea Power Station – this familiar and much-loved silhouette on the London skyline – is set to arrive, along with the regeneration and revitalisation of this forgotten corner of central London. History is about to be made once more. Getting out in the early hours after a good 5 hours in here and then driving home. Glad I made it to this place to see for myself. On with some photos. A side B side External Thanks for looking in. Tim
  8. Well here we go, I’ve wanted to crack this for a few years but never got round to it, and once again Northern_Ninja came to my aid. So to help my continuing depression and sadness, I decided a trip here was on the cards. We planned to go the following evening, but with meal plans disrupted we decided to make it into a last minute road trip. I arrived at the Ninjas HQ at about 7:30pm and off to London we went in my small run around Punto armed with a stove, frying pan and sleeping bags. After a short drive we were finally there. We did the run across no mans land, through all the mud and crap and straight into A-side. For me; it did not disappoint. So many photographic wonders right in the centre of London. We spent a good few hours inside A-side before heading for the roof and getting some shots of the chimneys (it would be rude not to!), where I kindly received some help taking night time shots. After that we went straight up the scaffold on one of the chimneys. It was wet, cold, and quite scary, but totally wonderful at the top. I went about shooting my pictures of London and Battersea from the base of a chimney, which I shamelessly hugged for about 30 seconds. For me, Battersea was a bit of a milestone! After this, we headed down back into A-side and made the quick dash to B-side, where we spent the best part of an hour. It wasn’t as good in here, but still amazing nonetheless. Remember, here it is about the history of the place, and the purpose it served. From here, we went across onto the pier and checked out the cranes. The pigeons inside the internal ladder behind the operators cab thwarted our progress, but we admired the views from halfway up nonetheless. After Battersea we enjoyed sausage and bacon baps, cooked by Northern_Ninja under a railway bridge at 2:30am. We drove through Central London to West Silvertown where we slept uncomfortably in the back of the car, with only the view of Millennium Mills to keep us company. Busted within five minutes sadly in MM, but a good night before made up for that. P.S. I am a big Pink Floyd fan! Taken from SirJonnyPs report, probably harvested off Wiki! First of all, sorry about the amount of piccies!
  9. I wasn't going to bother putting up a report anywhere on this, as we got caught by the farmer and he's pretty fed up with people going onto his land to photograph it, he actually asked us not to post the images on the net anywhere. To be fair I can understand as it must be quite exasperating for him to keep telling trespassers to bugger off, and he is after all only going about his business. So not wanting to encourage too many visits, I'll stick it in private so it doesn't really count. If anyone does go seeking this out, don't park outside the gate with the big 'private land keep off' sign. School boy error, it's pretty obvious why you're there. Go park a distance away and walk to it. The history is borrowed from another report on another forum, as there's really not much info out there about it. Colin Stokes was a local eccentric artist who began building a barn for his sheep in the 1980s. It started out as a single storey shed, but within a decade it had spread upwards and outwards into a hocus-pocus tangle of towers, turrets and arches. It was originally small enough not to need planning permission, but the council eventually told him he had to stop. However by this point he had hidden it from them for ten years, and it had grown so massive it's basically as large as a house. This was in the 1990s. Colin moved to Scotland soon after, and since then, the "shed" (if you can call it that, it's certainly the best shed I've ever seen!) has been left empty and open to all weathers. But it's remote location, and the fact that Colin put a lot of effort into making sure it was built to last means it is unusually intact. It really is an intriguing little place. I only got a couple of quite poor exteriors as I was meaning to take some more on the way back, but of course we got seen before that happened. This one has a Frosty in it for scale. As you can see, this part is approximately 1 1/2 frosty's high. And some of the stained glass is beautiful. It's amazing that this survives in the middle of the countryside like this, was very surreal. Thanks for looking, Mike.
  10. Yes, it's another Battersea report! Well it had to be done really, I've put it off long enough, what with stories of ruthless security and a guaranteed night in the cells if you got caught, the place being like a maze if you didn't know it well, the chances of actually getting across no-mans-land unseen being slim and finding yourself in the control rooms even slimmer, it just never seemed worth it. Now with development starting, it seems security have got rather lax and Battersea has opened its doors to practically any explorer who can be bothered to climb over the fence. I'd be gutted if I never saw it, so it had to be done. See frosty's report for a more detailed write up of our evenings trip, he's pretty much nailed it. It was tons of fun, and we spent waaaay longer in there than we expected to, so much so that we had to postpone something else we were going to do that night until another day. Please Note, due to large volumes of people, it was tricky to get any shots without people in them. Also please note the gift shop is out of "I've been to battersea" car stickers such is the volume of traffic through here lately Visited with so many people I can't remember, but among them was Frosty and SirJohnnyP who deserves a shout as despite the fact he was a little worse for wear not to mention a bit lost at times, he did guide us mostly round the place and it would have been a lot harder without him. Also shouts to another member who has been more than generous with sharing information on the place, you know who you are. So without further delay I present to you "YABR" (Yet another Battersea Report) starting, as always, with control room 'A' We did a brief visit to the 'white room' a curious mock up of a hotel room in the middle of the place, quite surreal. I didn't bother with any pics, but we chilled there for about half hour, had a fag and watched and episode of danger mouse on youtube. Then control room 'B' this wasn't as big as I expected it to be, but it's still impressive none the less. Yeah it HAD to be done, I know it's not original but I don't care. And after that and much farting around getting back down, we decided the night wouldn't be complete without climbing up to the base of at least one of the stacks, so we picked the North tower of 'A' side and went for it. Unfortunitely it was very windy and spitting with rain so I didn't really get any good pics, I wasn't really that bothered, I just wanted to get up close to one of the famous white chimneys. And that was that, mission accomplished. It's only taken me 6 years to get round to it. Now, anyone else thinking of going just go get it done, it IS worth it despite the millions of reports, you'll regret it if you don't make the effort! Thanks for looking Maniac.
  11. Was a little disappointed in this, but when I saw the chapel my opinion changed.
  12. Sheffield General Cemetery august 2013

    Sheffield General Cemetery I was in Sheffield and my friend wanted to show me this cemetery so we went and had a look and i must say i really enjoyed walking around even got inside the chapel bonus . I like the history of this place too and enjoyed doing the research here is a few photos i took and some history i got on it. the first pic isnt mine. The General Cemetery was one of the first commercial landscape cemeteries in Britain. Its opening in 1836 as a Nonconformist cemetery was a response to the rapid growth of Sheffield and the relatively poor state of the town's churchyards. The cemetery, with its Greek Doric and Egyptian style buildings, was designed by Sheffield architect Samuel Worth (1779–1870) on the site of a former quarry.[4] Landscaping was managed by Robert Marnock, who also designed Sheffield Botanical Gardens (1836) and Weston Park (1873). The first burial was of Mary Ann Fish, a victim of tuberculosis. An Anglican cemetery was consecrated alongside the Nonconformist cemetery in 1846â€â€the wall that divided the un-consecrated and consecrated ground can still be seen today. By 1916 the cemetery was rapidly filling up and running out of space, burials in family plots continued through the 1950s and 1960s, but by 1978 ownership of the cemetery had passed to Sheffield City Council and it was closed to all new burials. In 1980 the council got permission by Act of Parliament to clear 800 gravestones to make a recreation area. Through the 1980s and 1990s most of the rest of the cemetery was left untouched, becoming overgrown and an important sanctuary for local wildlife. Unfortunately, many of the buildings also fell into disrepair. In early 2003 work began to restore the gatehouse and catacombs funded by a £500,000 grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund The Gatehouse (Grade II listed) is built directly over Porter Brook in classical architecture with Egyptian features. The gateway resembles a Roman arch. It was possibly built over the river so that entering the cemetery was symbolic of the crossing of the river Styx in Greek mythology. The Egyptian Gate (Grade II listed) is the entrance to the cemetery on Cemetery Road. It is richly ornamented and possesses a sculpted gate bearing two coiled snakes holding their tails in their mouths. The Nonconformist chapel (Grade II listed) is built in classical style with Egyptian features. The sculpted panel above the door shows a dove, representing the Holy Ghost or the Holy Spirit. Stone steps lead down to a wall with catacomb-like entrances. The Anglican chapel (added in 1850; Grade II listed). Designed in the Neo-Gothic style by William Flockton. Unlike the other buildings in the cemetery, the chapel was built in Gothic style rather than Classical or Egyptian. The building is distinctive in style due to its ogival windows, the porte-cochere and the spire. The spire is indeed far too big for the rest of the building, built purposely so that it would be seen from afar. The Registrar's house (Grade II listed) The Catacombs. There are two rows of catacombs built into the hillside, this method of burial was unpopular and only ten bodies were laid to rest in the catacombs in the first 10 years. The Dissenters' Wall was built between 1848 and 1850. It divided the older Nonconformist part of the cemetery from the consecrated Anglican ground. The wall runs almost uninterrupted, from the perimeter wall on Cemetery Road to the path beside the Porter Brook at the bottom of the cemetery. George Bassett (1818–1886). Founder of The Bassett Companyâ€â€the company that invented Liquorice Allsorts. Lord Mayor of Sheffield (1876). George Bennett (died 1841). Founder of the Sheffield Sunday School movement. The memorial to him (c.1850) is Grade II listed.[11] John, Thomas, and Skelton Cole. Founders of Sheffield's Cole Brothers department store in 1847â€â€now part of the John Lewis Partnership. Francis Dickinson (1830–1898). One of the soldiers who fought in the Charge of the Light Brigade during the Crimean war. William Dronfield (1824–1891). Founder of the United Kingdom Alliance of Organised Trades, which inspired the creation of the Trades Union Congress. Mark Firth (25 April 1819–28 November 1880). Steel manufacturer, Master Cutler (1867), Lord Mayor of Sheffield (1874), and founder of Firth College in 1870 (later University of Sheffield). The monument to Mark Firth is Grade II listed,[12] the railings that surround it were made at Firth's Norfolk Works. William Flockton, architect. John Fowler. Father of the designer of the Forth Rail Bridge (also called John). John Gunson (1809–1886). Chief engineer of the Sheffield Water Company at the time of the collapse of Dale Dyke Dam on 11 March 1864, which resulted in the Great Sheffield Flood. Samuel Harrison, who documented the flood, and 77 of the flood's victims are also buried in the cemetery. Samuel Holberry (1816–1842). A leading figure in the Chartist movement. Isaac Ironside (1808–1870). Chartist and local politician. James Montgomery (1771–1854). Poet/Publisher. The grave and Grade II listed monument to James Montgomery, were moved to the grounds of Sheffield Cathedral in 1971.[13] James Nicholson (died 1909). Prominent Sheffield industrialist. The memorial that he commissioned for himself and his family c.1872 is Grade II listed.[14] William Parker, merchant. The monument to William Parker, erected in 1837 by the merchants and manufacturers of Sheffield, is Grade II listed.[15] William Prest (died 1885). Cricketer and footballer born in York, who lived most of his life in Sheffield. Co-founder of Sheffield Football club These are the crypts. aparantly theres been satanic rituals done inside here and night time atracts many um disturbed people. the chapel has been arsoned before (SO annoying drives me crazy!) still a cool explore for me had fun.
  13. Explored with one other non member Fab little place with the most beautiful stairs i have ever seen
  14. Intresting place this,not huge for a hospital,and a little trashed in some parts....tripped a siolent alarm and secca booted me off,but they were sound...no externals im affraid,as i had to leave sharpish... Thanks for looking...
  15. My first post on here,so hope i dont mess it up,,,here are a couple of pics of a place i found yesturday in Shropshire....fully boarded from the inside,so no shots of internals unfortunatly...think it would be a belter though... Hope this works......
  16. UK Fan Bay, Dover, Feb 2013

    This shelter is at the site of Fan Bay Battery a WWII site originally comprising 3 x 6" guns with associated magazines, shelters, Plotting room, Admin and accomodation areas. Today only traces of the gun pits can be found underneath the undergrowth and all surface buildings have been demolished. How ever there are still extensive underground remains to be found at the site, the largest of which is the deep shelter, This was constructed in 1941 by No.172 Tunneling Coy Royal Engineers, it is still accessible as are the magazines. Visited with Dan H (Non Member) so on with a few Pics, Firstly the one of the Magazines And now the deep shelter which in my Opinion is still more than worth a visit Thats all Folks
  17. explored with wevsky and urban ginger ... a big to humpa and his cousin As wevsky explained things didn't quite go to plan on this trip, but saying that cars can be replaced good friends cant ! so all good in the end . After a flying visit to Amsterdam on the way through we push on to Berlin . We arrived at beelitz early morning and as we had been told of different things to look out for we expected someone to be on site. After coming out the third building and bumping into a group of seven German explores. We exchanged a few locations and they told us that secca wasn't a problem i didn't really get anoth pics to show the place in all its glory but no doubt it wont be long before were heading back that way really need a couple of days to cover it properly ... on with the pics .... thanks for looking ...
  18. Another one from our trip down South. More goodness revealed by SK! Here's some history. In 1864, Fr Herbert Vaughan, the later Cardinal Vaughan, gained approval to build a missionary seminary in England. On the 28th February 1871, after considerable difficulties had been overcome, the new seminary in Mill Hill, London, was built and occupied under the patrimony of St Joseph. Fr Vaughan's outstanding trust in St Joseph was thus rewarded. Mindful of St Joseph's finding of the stable for Mary when no other roof was to be found, Vaughan, on his first approach to the landowners of the new seminary, carried with him in a parcel a little statuette of St Joseph. When the landowner showed him the door after refusing Fr Vaughan's negotiations, Vaughan asked if he might leave the parcel in the house saying that he had some other business to attend to and he would collect it later in the day. When he returned, the landowner, Mr Druce, had changed his mind and the land was for sale. In 1871, this same statuette was solemnly installed in the simple little cloister of the seminary bearing the inscriptionOeconomus Domus Nostrae (Provider of our Home). The laying of the foundation stone of the seminary was a very public occasion on the 19th March 1871, the Feast of St Joseph, with the ceremony performed by Archbishop Manning. All that was required now was the funding to actually build and finish the church! The Holy Father had agreed that the Church would be the home of England's national shrine to St Joseph and fittingly, on the feast of St Joseph in 1873, the church was officially opened. The debts were finally paid off in March 1874, and the church was consecrated. By a special indult of Pope Pius IX, Cardinal Manning was permitted to crown the statue of St Joseph, which, with its altar, was declared the national shrine of Saint Joseph for England & Wales. This ceremony was performed in the presence of the hierarchy of England and Wales on 13th April 1874, and the statue became one of only a handful of crowned statues of St Joseph in the world. The once thriving English and European seminary of St Josephs in Mill Hill, has now given way to the reality that most of the Missionary Vocations are coming from Africa, only a few from England. The number of vocations from Africa is testimony to the great work and witness of the Mill Hill Missionary Fathers and the seminary of St Josephs. The Mill Hill site of St Joseph's closed on 1st July 2006. The new seminary of the Mill Hill fathers will be built where their vocations are strongest - in Africa. A big question mark hung over the shrine of St Joseph. The Mill Hill Fathers, eager to preserve their patrimony and to continue to foster devotion to the Patron not only of their order but also of the Church and of families, entrusted the shrine to the Benedictine monks of Farnborough. The shrine was transferred early in 2008 to the south transept of the Abbey Church where it continues to be a focus of devotion. Mint corridoors. And corners Chapel, used as a film set so repainted in places. Sun playing ball. Looking like I'm from an 80's electro band.....(Thanks SK) View from the top. Frontage. Rear view. Mint day all round!
  19. Visited with Urban Ginger,SpaceInvader and met up with Humpa and his cousin..and a few random German bods while there This trip was supposed to be a day or so longer and we had a full on list to get thru. That all went tits up after a car crash bad enough to write off two cars.The insurance company mugged us off and although saying they would get the car moved it was down to the breakdown cover people to get us home.. The breakdown cover said it was the other way round and when we tried to get back to insurance company the automated message informed UG that business was closed till Monday morning ,so we where stranded..Thankfully Humpa and co. came back and got us to the hotel which we had booked for that night and after getting quoted 800 for train tickets for us to get to Calais or a hire car for 600 euros we where getting rather stressed as we didn't have a huge amount of money..UG' family to the rescue and easy jet tickets where paid for in the uk and we had our way home and could get some sleep before we had to leave.Big thanks to silver rainbow for the lift back from the airport.. So all in all bloody stressful few days after a ten hour drive to Germany..The upside was a visit to Amsterdam to check out the tulips and the women in the little rooms with big windows where very friendly:) History from wicki On with some pics Couple of shots from the hotel roof to finish..and thank you for bearing with me i know its a bit pic heavy Sad to say this is the only report but thew trip did end with a Bang!
  20. This is my first ever report so please bare with me Payed a visit to this beauty last Sunday ... after an hour of scawering the fence ... we were in Now for a bit history on the joint Colliery known as “The Dukeries� because of the number of stately homes in the area. The colliery was owned by the Bolsover Colliery Company and passed to the National Coal Board in 1947. The colliery was sunk to exploit the Barnsley seam or “Tophard�, as it known locally. In the 1950s the shafts were deepened to over 1000 yards (920 m) to exploit other seams. The colliery was closed by British Coal, as the National Coal Board had become, in 1993 and reopened by RJB Mining (now UK Coal) in April 1994, the licence to dig for coal being limited to the Yard seam which is located at a depth of 957 yards (870 m). The colliery was finally closed in April 2003. The headstocks of the colliery are regarded as the tallest in Europe and the third tallest in the world. They are Grade 2 Listed structures and can be seen all over the district. They are expensive to keep in good repair and there have been a number of appeals, as yet to no avail, to demolish them. But however the headstocks are nearly demolished now and no one knows what will happen in the future. Now the good bits ... hope you like
  21. When SK offered Andy and me a place to crash and the promise of some exploring fun, we jumped at the opportunity, one of the sites was this: Goodmayes Hospital, a Victorian former asylum, now not used for patients, rumored to be ready to be sold to developers to be made into yet more unafordable flats and prime for some fun. Up, down, round and round, some adrenalin and the fear of disappointment turned out good, not the usual sort of thing we do, but brilliant! Some pics. SK doing his picture thing. Room with a view TOP TIP: Always stick fingers up when being photographed! Don't go into the blue room! Derpchair, a must! Pepermint room! Confusion and amusement was the order of the day as SK told me to get my kit off (I suddenly worried what the cost of this tour was) but he only wanted me to set up a shot..... So I stole the idea and came up with this! Andy doing his best impression of a dead drunk...........he only had to play dead! Anyway, there you go, brilliant explore, brilliant laugh and all thanks to a brilliant bloke..........ME for driving all day! LOL Cheers SK for a mint weekend.
  22. Visited with one non member Hidden away in a country lane is this little gem full to the brim with personal treasures and memories. I spent hours looking through stuff and reading old letters from the 1920's onwards Some of the letters were so sad i shed a tear
  23. Right people, it's back to school for you lot! luckily for the guy's it's a girls school!! The school was designed by J. M. Bottomley and G. T. Wellburn of Leeds and built in 1910. It was built in an Edwardian Baroque style, in an English cross bond utilising red brick and with white faience dressings. In 1971 the school amalgamated with Doncaster Grammar School and was renamed Hall Cross Comprehensive. The building here is the Waterdale location.
  24. Never leave without bobbys splore food...cheers tink I even got there early to show willing....... JUST SEND HER DOWN!!!!
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