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Found 30 results

  1. Visited with @albino jay and @GK-WAX and thanks again to jay for doing the driving and I also stole your history mate because I couldn’t find any hope you don’t mind. We was passing by the mill on our way home so popped in for a look. And glad we did I like these old mills. And the demo team were already on site so don’t know how long it has left to stand. So here’s the history and pics.. Steam-powered worsted-spinning mill built around 1850 on Black Brook. Owners and tenants of the mills have included James Nutton & Company [1863] John Horsfall & Sons Limited [1896] F. K. Adcock & Company [1936] Part of the Mills are still standing though no longer used. The mill had a 170 ft tall chimney which was struck by lightning in 1967. The chimney was reduced in height – to avoid further strikes – and was finally demolished in March/April 1992 The majority of the Mills were demolished in 2017. The mill by Lavino lavino[/ The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr url=https://flic.kr/p/H2Q9pV]The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  2. This place has been on the radar for a while now but never got the chance to properly take a look. The dome itself can be seen for quite a few miles across the surrounding areas. Not a great deal of information available other than it looks like some sort of water treatment site/reservoir possibly used by the MOD, given the land its situated on. It doesn't appear to be fully derelict either as you can still here the sound of running water and the grass seems to be trimmed. The explore went as planned, few dog walkers here and there, other than that spent a little while looking around.
  3. Explore of the year 2017

    So now is the time you start seeing this type of thread pop up. Favourite cereals, dog walking moments, cheesey tunes etc... Favourite derp should have its place For me, this is pretty easy. After a while out of exploring I finally got my feet the taste of mould and pigeon shit they had so desperately been craving. I got out once, nothing crazy, but it was out. A cash and carry in Leicester.
  4. Visited recently on my first foray over to the European side of life (can't believe it has taken so long). It was excellent / cold in the snow! History: On May 9, 1899, Kaiser Wilhelm II laid the first stone of Fort St. Blaise. Group Fortification Verdun group is built on top of two hills, it consists of two forts, the fort Sommy 30 ha in the south, and Fort Saint-Blaise 45 ha on the north. Group Fortification Verdun has four 150mm howitzers and six short 100mm guns. Fort St. Blaise was planned for 500 men and fort Sommy for 200 men. It could then receive two infantry companies, in addition to the gunners. St. Blaise, whose fortified barracks could receive 500 people, has 10 observation domes and 12 lookout posts.[4] The water tank's capacity was 1,300 m. 4 diesel engines of 25HP each, providing the energy necessary for Fort St. Blaise. The fort Sommy, including the fortified barracks, could accommodate 200 people, and has 6 observation domes and 8 lookouts. Its water tank could hold 600 m and it had 3 diesel engines of 20HP each, to provide the energy needed for its operation.[4] The coat of arms of Count of Haeseler is carved on the pediment of the door of the fort. It caused the Americans a huge headache in WW2 and proved its worth as a fortified location. Patton underestimated their strength immensely. Fort St. Blaise: The first of the two forts, complete with short 100mm funs in place showing battle damage. Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Collapsed structure / battle damage Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr The thing you don't realise until you get there is that the French Army have not removed any of the barbed wire entanglements, complete with foot spikes and in some places, unexploded ordnance Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Fort Sommy: The smaller outer fort, with a machine gun cupola and two turrets with guns and a tonne more battle damage, with craters and wall collapses all over the shop! Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr
  5. Germany Beelitz Heilstatten (okt 2017)

    1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: A legal visit during a photo base on 21-10-2017. Felt like a last chance because renovation is being prepared. We could notice the painting done during the filming of 'a cure for wellness' very well since we did the bathhouse an men's complex illegal in 2016. Still an impressive location of course and the photo's won't be much of a surprise i guess. I already had a fascination for abandoned buildings, but my first visit at Beelitz Heilstatten in 2014 really kicked of my passion for photography of the abandoned world. Hope you enjoyed viewing this thread! grts, Peter
  6. Another visit from October with @Andy, @Maniacand@extreme_ironing. From seeing Andy's report I missed quite a few bits but you can't see everything unless you spend the whole day down there. Another epic bit of WW2 history and there's lots more out there. Ouvrage Mont des Welches, a gros ouvrage of the Maginot Line fortifications, is part of the Fortified Sector of Boulay. It comprises two entrance blocks, one infantry block, one artillery block, one observation block and two combination blocks. The underground gallery system is compact, about 200 metres (660 ft) from end to end, and unlike larger ouvrages where the gallery system is linear in concept, the central portion of Mont des Welches is a dense network of tunnels crossing one another, housing the barracks and utility areas. The galleries are excavated at an average depth of up to 30 metres (98 ft). Unlike most gros ouvrages, its 60 cm internal rail network was not electrified, relying on human power to move the rail cars. Relatively small for a gros ouvrage, Mont des Welches saw a brief period of sharp action in June 1940, when German forces moving along the rear of the Maginot Line engaged the position without success. The manning of the ouvrage in June 1940 comprised 490 men and 17 officers of the 167th Fortress Infantry Regiment and the 151st Position Artillery Regiment. After modest renovations in the 1950s, it was abandoned in the 1970s. Bon journée
  7. This fortress was constructed by the Germans from 1907-1914. It served German soldiers during the First World War but saw little action. Then it was occupied by the French between 1919 & 1940, where it was incorporated into the maginot line for WWII. After the departure of French troops in June 1940, the German army took back the fort. On September 2, 1944, it was declared a fortress of the Reich by Hitler. The stronghold must therefore be defended until the last extremity by German troops, whose chiefs all took an oath to the Führer. In October 1944, the fort was captured by the American 3rd Army in the Battle of Metz. Definitely one of the best military sites I've visited yet. Amazing to think it served both WWI & WWII yet remains in such good condition today. There are dozens of murals dating back over a century, and 1,700m of tunnels connecting various sections. I had to be dragged away as I could have spent a week in here. Visited with @Maniac @extreme_ironing and @Andy. "Flourish German fatherland" "Cameroon child in Munich" / "Man does not agree" "Booze kills, so do not drink so much!" (or something to that effect....) "Beautiful is the recruit life" "Whoever quarrels or rushes gets the hell out of it" "May God punish England" Thanks for looking y'all
  8. UK Pool Manor-November 2017

    After discovering this place, reading a news article I decided to take a look. Theres not a great deal of history on this place other than the fact it was used as a home for ww2 soldiers after coming back from war. It's been home to several owners of the years however the place has fallen into disrepair. The manor is currently up for sale. The explore itself went really well, after making our way through the grounds and finding an entrance, we were greeted with a stunning pool, with paintings on every wall. As we moved further on we found a sauna, bar, a superb inside courtyard, a huge basement complete with model railway and what looked like a full size tank made of wood, whoever previously lived in the manor was clearly very creative... The vast majority of rooms have Been emptied out however a few furnishings still remain. We made our way onto the roof when we noticed a man walking down the drive towards the manor, we noticed him walk around checking through the windows before leaving again. Must have been looking after the place and making sure nothing was damaged. We didn't get caught however so that's a bonus! Since then we have been back however our original entrance had been sealed back up. PHOTOS: https://500px.com/serenity4urbex/galleries/pool-manor
  9. Had a look at this place while in the area back in March. The cars where the main attraction for me and they did not disappoint. Excellent examples of cars left to rust and rot until they finally fall in on themselves. The rest of the site consists of stripped huts with some being more interesting and less bear than others. A relaxed and pleasant half hour. Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY Known as Prisoner of war camp 116 was built in 1941 and located in Hatfield heath, just outside Bishops Stortford. The camp mainly housed Italians until about 1943-1944 where it held German and Austrian prisoners aswell. It was known at one point the camp housed 750 prisoners The prisoners had a relatively easy lifestyle here (Unlike the English prisoners in the German POW Camps) and could do voluntary work in the near by farm land in Harlow, they were picked up by the Land Girls and each prisoner had an allotted farm where they would work at. Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/135648593@N02/albums/72157678466406434/with/32853941973/
  10. Quite a big place this one with some great decay throughout. Spent a good few hours round here enjoying a relaxed explore. Some parts of the building are worse than others .There has also been some vandalism and shit graff left behind. Not enough to spoil the over all feel of the place though. And like I said, the decay is awesome. Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY Our Lady’s Hospital first opened its doors in 1868 and was then known as Ennis District Lunatic Asylum. For 134 years it continued to operate on the same site as a mental hospital and indeed until the 1950s very little changed in the manner in which it was run. The hospital was one of the largest public buildings in County Clare and was both a large employer and purchaser of goods from local suppliers.It played an important role in the economic life of Ennis, especially in earlier years when jobs were scarce and pensionable positions were highly prized. Wards were very overcrowded with up to 70 beds per room, with only inches between. It closed in 2002 and there are currently no plans for its development. . . . . . Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/135648593@N02/albums/72157662358523548/with/37531708144/
  11. I was not really sure what to expect from this place. It turned out to be a huge industrial playground with loads to have a look at. The size of this spot is awesome and I could not have asked for a better place to give my wide angle lens it's first outing. The workshops where another nice section in here. Some nice old machinery left to see. I really enjoyable explore this one and having a wide angle with me was a great bonus. Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY Pilkingtons was founded in 1826 as a partnership between members of the Pilkington and Greenall families, based in St Helens, Lancashire. It was originally named Greenall and Pilkington up until 1849. On the departure from the partnership of the last Greenall in 1845, the firm became known as Pilkington Brothers. The Kirk Sandall site came into existence in the early 1920's when the firm looked to establish another site in the UK. Kirk Sandall was an ideal situation. Its excellent waterway and railway facilities were conveniently sited, especially since the Great Central Railway Company had doubled its line in the area. After 76 year producing glass, the factory finally closed its doors in 2008. Not much has changed since it closed, most of it has remained abandoned but some of the site is used by Trackwork for training and storage. . Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/135648593@N02/albums/72157684315511034/with/35460637944/
  12. This is a spectacular location for sure, surrounded by wonderful dramatic coastline. If you've got time I'd recommend bringing a packed lunch!! You could be watching the waves crash against the rugged cliffs, maybe if you're lucky you might spot a seal or a puffin passing by. Here in 1951 plans were set up to build a plant which would extract bromine from sea water and by adding sulphuric acid would then create liquid bromine. The bromine was then reacted with ethylene to produce Dibromoethane which was a key component of leaded petrol. With the phasing out of leaded petrol in the 1990's the plant diversified into other bromine chemicals. Production finally stopped altogether in March 2004. Many of the buildings have been demolished but there was enough standing to make this high on my wish list - plenty of natural decay and lots of interesting stuff left on site. Its been fairly undisturbed due to a combination of its remote location, CCTV and onsite security. Sadly though a recent fire has badly damaged one of the buildings (not quite sure which one). The photos in this report are a compilation. I had to make a return visit because the first time I somehow missed the conference room and the main attraction for me - the medical area. I really like how much variety there is, hence why there's quite a few pics
  13. France Forge Lunaire February 2017

    This location is the one where you quickly hear the stories about: impossible, the mount everest of the urbex, don't even try ... But sometmes this steel giant likes some company over too and there were rumours of a slight chance to get in. The date was set already and actually something else was on the program but when one fellow exploer had heard that there were loopholes in the net of the impenetrable hell gate (read: fences, 3 rows of nato wire and another 200V power wire as icing on the cake) we wanted to attempt. The hell gate was only a smaller obstacle, because once you pass you are on the playground of little demons in white vans that approach almost without any sound, or with a shepherd dog at their side. With all of the above in mind, I had a very turbulent night's sleep 3 nights in advance. In the end, the steel gods favoured us that day, which enabled me to enjoy this beautiful exploration. Very briefly it became exciting when there were 5 people in the building with helmets and hi-visability jackets. After some back-and-forth texting with my mates, and some cat and mouse tricks to avoid thm, I first hid in a closet and then rushed me to the top where the rest of our team was. Once there, I crossed the 5 fluos ... 5 eyes on me, 2 of them with open mouth. A French voice 'mais, elle est ici tout seule?' 'vous n'avez pas peur'? It turned out to be just the most flashy explorers you can imagine, not to mention the decibels they produced. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
  14. The first stop on a recent trip to France and Luxembourg with @Andy. A former limestone mine in France, later used during WW2 for the production of oxygen. Quite a small mine and mostly flooded but there were some nice photos to be had. Thanks for looking
  15. An abandoned villa, named SS after the town it resides in. Not much to say really, a waste of a perfectly good house! Not my usual kind of explore if I'm honest but it made a change and kept @Miss.Anthropehappy! Same room but with the balcony doors opened to allow the sunlight in Thanks for looking
  16. This was the admin block for an adjacent steelworks. It was built in 1704, and despite being pretty battered nowadays, it still retains some of its former grandeur. The mixture of decay and natural light makes it quite photogenic. Plenty of reports from here before so this is just an update on its current state. Visited with @Maniac, @Andyand @extreme_ironing. Thanks for looking you bunch of silly little tossers
  17. Ouvrage Hobling is a lesser work (petit ouvrage) of the Maginot Line. Located in the Fortified Sector of Boulay, the ouvrage consists of two infantry blocks and two observation blocks, and is located between gros ouvrage Michelsberg and petit ouvrage Bousse, facing Germany. Hobling was approved for construction by CORF (Commission d'Organisation des Régions Fortifiées), the Maginot Line's design and construction agency, in 1931 and became operational by 1935, at a cost of 14 million francs. Hobling played no significant role in either the Battle of France in 1940 or the Lorraine Campaign of 1944. After the Second World War it became part of the Mòle de Boulay, a strongpoint in the northeastern defenses against Soviet attack. It remained under Army control until 1971, after which it was declassified and sold in 1975. It has been stripped of metals and left abandoned. I've been to a fair few of these now. It's often a wild goose chase looking for the entrance in the middle of the forest but that's part of the fun. I think this was the only success we had out of 5 attempts that day so it was nice to get something done. There's hardly any pictures online so we weren't sure what to expect. It turned out to be in fairly good condition, no graffiti, the kitchen still intact, and a few other bits worth seeing. As with all of these bunkers it's an important piece of WWII history which is why I find them so fascinating no matter how little or how much is left. Visited with @Andy, afterwards I took him for a romantic meal Not a good time to lose your footing.... [ One of the gun turrets Thanks for looking
  18. Following on from our escapades here is another report from The Derpy Rotten Scoundrels Euroderp Tour earlier this year. Having spent the previous day dicking about by Lake Como, swimming in the lake, the lads got their broga on, whilst Disco Kitten put everyone to shame with her epic yoga skills. fortytwo went jungleering and spent the day battling beasts in the wilderness and arrived back after a fight with a snake. Deciding we were on the move the next day we set up camp in a derelict house looking out over the lake. Chilled out with beer and did the only to do when your Euroderping and your derp has an awesome white wall, slammed Indian Jones and the Temple of Doom on the projector and settled in for the night! Our plan was to head for the Holy Grail of NPU, having visited previously I was still excited about the chance of a revisit. So we loaded up the limo and Zsa Zsa and headed off with a plan to hit the Animal Testing Facility on the way. This is another place that is proper trashed but good for a mini derp adventure. I have no idea of its full name, or where it is as I do an excellent job of sleeping as soon as Im in the car. Its a nice little walk in and there is still some interesting stuff in there to see. I've gleaned a little bit of history from some dude who went in 2016. The place belonged to a Swiss Company who were apparently big in the animal testing industry, they moved to this site and rented the building, however when the rental contract ran out they didn't renew the contract and it fell into disrepair. The land it is built on is partly poisoned, due to there being a chemical site their previously and isn't likely to be cleaned up anytime soon. A couple of years after the facility closed it was hit by a fire, causing acrid fumes to permeate the local area. Firefighters arrived and found evidence the fire had been started deliberately but were able to stop the fire fairly quickly. Although they contained the fire, the whole site had to be checked due to rumours of the facility being occupied by refugees and concerns over the local kids playing in the buildings. The facility still has the animal operating/autopsy table in place and there is lots of medical equipment lying around, lamps, autoclaves and a gloved box unit. Anyway here's a few pics (all from my phone as I lost the ones I took on my camera ) Thanks for looking
  19. Our original plan was to spend Christmas here but weather forecasts were dire and we didn't want to die a watery death so we binned the idea off and went to Wales instead! Planning our summer road trip and this place cropped up again and it was game on! We'd do the island before heading off to foreign lands for a couple of weeks. After spending the previous night watching an awesome lightning storm we were hoping for good weather! Waking up a few hours later in the back of the limo to see rain I snuggled back into my sleeping bag and went back to sleep. When I next awoke the sky was grey and it was drizzly, and with an uncertain forecast we decided to check out a few alternative locations instead. A few fails and some epic jungleering through the undergrowth later, the sun decided to come out and we bit the bullet and decided Operation Island Infiltration was back on! A few hours later and we were busy unloading gear (lots and lots and lots of gear) by the sea and Riddlers was busy blowing up his dingy ready to take us out! There appeared to be quite a bit of interest in our little escapade but throwing caution to the wind the first three intrepid explorers set sail and it wasn't long before all 7 of us were safely on dry land. We set up camp and then went for a bit of an explore, its a lovely little place with lots to see and I proper enjoyed just mooching about whilst the boys played with the cannons and drank beer. We had fire and food before heading to bed for an early night, the Merry Prankster set up his projector and fell asleep to South Park, The Riddlers got shouted at for playing shit music and keeping people awake and me and Jobs had a hammock fail and ended up on the floor! In the morning we were getting ready to leave but when we looked out across the water it was bedlam, the police boat, RNLI and Lifeguards were out in force, initially thinking we had been spotted we awaited their arrival, but much to our bemusement they appeared to be clearing the harbour!! A quick google later and we discovered there was an airshow just about to start and for safety reasons they were clearing the public from underneath the display area. Well almost all the people, we had the choice seats directly underneath as bi-planes looped and dipped across the skies, dropping low enough for them to see us and give us a friendly wave as they passed by! After enjoying the show we got ready to leave, with The Riddlers at the helm, Bigjobs and Motionless Escape were the first to go. We watched them bobbing across the waves until we saw them land but an age passed and there was no sign of them returning. One phone call later and we discovered a pin had broken on the boat and they were frantically trying to fix it. So with visions of having to be rescued by the Lifeguards we waited and waited and waited, then boom across the harbour we spotted him! THey'd fixed the boat and The Riddlers was making his way back Not long after we were back on dry land chattering like excitable children on a school trip planning our next stop! History Located in the heart of the harbour lies Drake Island. The island was originally called St Nicholas' Island and later St Michael's Island before it was renamed and dedicated to Sir Francis Drake in the late Tudor period. Originally is accommodated an artillery battery, this was followed by a larger garrison and during the Civil War, the Island played a key role in the defence of Plymouth against Royalist Attack. In the mid-sixteenth century, the first fortification was commissioned as a result of the war with France. A stone and turf wall built and a garrison was installed in 1551. In 1580 a disagreement between the people of Plymouth and the Government over who had responsibility for paying for the defence it was taken into state ownership. By 1590s a garrison of 100 men and 40-50 guns were installed, increasing further as the war with Spain continued. After the restoration of the monarchy after the Civil War, the island was used as a prison for notable Parliamentary prisoners. Major General John Lambert, the successor to Oliver Cromwell, was held here from 1670-84. Also incarcerated here was Colonel Robert Lilburn, one of the regicides. The defences visible today mainly date from the mid-nineteenth century when the large casemates were constructed complete with supporting magazines and accommodation. Finally, the Island was garrisoned by just under 500 soldiers for much of WWII supporting coastal defence and anti-air operations. In 1963 Plymouth Council obtained a lease from the Crown and a youth centre was opened in 1964, coming under the custody of the Mayflower Trust until they surrendered the lease in 1989. The Island was bought by Dan McCauley in 1995 with a view to building a hotel and helipad. Initial plans were rejected due to the nesting egrets on the Island but as of April 2017 a further plan has been submitted with protection plans in place and work is expected to start in the not too distant future. Hope you enjoyed looking
  20. Germany Bauernhaus S. - 2017

    One of only a few of my discoveries which I have exclusive (at least I didn't find any pictures on the www). I spotted this small farmhouse a few years ago on one of my rides but unfortunately there was no way inside. But happily I decided to keep in mind. This year I detected an open window. Have been in there twice since. #1 DSC09261-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC09282-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC09283-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC09314-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC09268-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC09266-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #7 DSC09311-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #8 DSC09267-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #9 DSC09269-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #10 DSC09312-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #11 DSC09285-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #12 DSC09273-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #13 DSC09274-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #14 DSC09292-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #15 DSC09295-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #16 DSC09278-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #17 DSC09275-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #18 DSC09302-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #19 DSC09276-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #20 DSC09277-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #21 DSC09299-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #22 DSC09304-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #23 DSC09281-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #24 DSC09272-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #25 DSC09271-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #26 DSC09307-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
  21. So this was more of a cheeky little explore than anything planned in advance. A few of us were in the South of France for the Urban Explorer Wedding of the Year, an event that was most definitely epic and involved many many drunken selfies of at least half a dozen drunken explorers (including the Bride and Groom) but hey that's another story and not one for here The day after we left the Bride and Groom to do Honeymoony type things and took ourselves off on a trip to the local cokeworks/coal miney type place. It isn't epic or awesome but it was a pretty damn fine mooch to end the trip with. It is a derpy derp and appears to be a popular place to burn out cars but worth a trip anyway History is limited and in French so here is my best shot at something that vaguely resembles information but however doesn't mean a great deal to me and is probably worth skipping lol!.... The Sainte Marie open pit was a coal mine of the Mining Unit of Tam, H.B.C.M. (Houilleres du Bassin Centre Midi), in the south-western part of France, near Albi. In this area, a large amount of coal has been exploited by Underground mining. This pit was designed in order to exploit the coal remaining around the shaft (Saint Marie shaft) of an old Underground mine situated in the basin of Carmaux.The diameter at the top of the pit was 1200 metres and its final depth was expected to be 300 metres. The first 100 metres were composed of tertiary deposits (clay and sand) which covered the carboniferous formation. The average slope angle of the Tertiary is 37° (without benches) and in the Coal Measures, it was foreseen from 37° to 50° (with benches of 6 metres high) depending on the slope situaüon. At present üme, the depth of the mine is about 160 metres. Nine coal seams have been mined by Underground working between 1900 and 1984. Different methods have been used depending on the thickness, the dip of the layer and the dimension of the panel. In fact, panels were backfilled, caved or undermined long-wall. The basin of Carmaux is a large synclinal split by a dense network of faults which directions are approximately N 140 E. The dips and the dip directions which was left around the shaft, but, close to the slopes, begin the old exploited long walls. These long walls are at different topographic levels due to the particular structure and have been exploited in panels lined by the faults odented approximately N140. The first design of the open pit was done by a Standard geotechnical survey; this one has taken into account the geomechanical, hydrogeological, structural Parameters äs well äs the "decohesion", induced by the revival of subsidence due to old Underground mining. However, some mining slopes can locally present risks of slipping induced by old Underground mining. Anyway here are a few pics Thanks for looking
  22. Crank Caverns have been on my radar for a while, with its mythical history of child eating dwarves, oddly shaped body bags, cannibalism and a hidden chapel who wouldn't want to go and take a look? With a history like that, we decided to brave the night and risk life and limb to go in search of the evil creatures of the caverns. Meeting up with some friends we scurried through the dark to the edge of the woods. Wondering what awaited us we made our way through the trees to the cavern entrance, listening out for the scurry of tiny angry dwarf feet! Much to our disappointment, we heard no such thing so made our way in! It was a little damp and muddy in places but We explored every nook and cranny possible, with one of the lads crawling through some that weren't even possible! He is like a crawly ninja of small holes and gaps that do not exist! Despite our extensive searching, we didn't come across any dwarves or a single human bone and with no evidence of a secret church we called it a night and went our separate ways. Was a fun night out with a cracking bunch of people History Sandstone quarrying began here as early as 1730. As the quarry expanded, the cost of purchasing land to open cast mine it increased, so it was decided to opt for a different method. Instead of quarrying out the stone, they would mine it out, following a seam of stone until it ran out. This resulted in the network of caves, tunnels and shafts we see today. Rainford Delph is listed as a Colliery by 1854, under the ownership of Charles Howarth or Yorkshire Charlie as he was known locally by 1880. Mining finally ceased and the woods and caverns were used as a game reserve by the Earl of Derby until 1939 when they became a storage facility for ammunition for the anti-aircraft position at Crank. After the war, the caverns ceased use as a game reserve. Myths and Legends Child Eating Dwarves "Vicious dwarves" were once rumoured to inhabit the labyrinth of caverns in Crank. In the late 18th century four children decided to explore the sandstone caverns and vanished. One child survived and told a terrifying tale about small old men with beards, who talked in an unknown language, they killed his three friends and chased him. The petrified child stumbled over human bones in the caves and finally managed to scramble through an opening to the surface as a hand was grabbing at his ankle. The authorities became concerned because a number of people had gone missing in the area near the cave entrances and apparently they sent in the army to install gates and bars. It is apparently undecided if this was to keep people out or keep something in. Oddly shaped body bags Apparently about 17 or 18 years ago two young lads entered the caverns and got lost, they had told their parents where they were going and when they didn’t arrive home their parents informed the police. After a couple of days searching the police sealed off the area and removed to body bags from the caverns. This is where it gets strange, they were also reported to have removed 7 more body bags from the caverns, one of the bags was said to have not been in a body shape but was square. Cannibalism There is a story about some scouts who went down the caverns for a look around and at the end of the day one of the scouts had not come back out. Eventually, they called out Cave Rescue to try and find the boy. After a long search they found him or what was left of him, allegedly the boy was partly eaten. The parents of the child wanted it all kept secret so the press didn't get hold of the story and they could give their son a peaceful send-off. Another story tells of a child's head found in a cave, along with evidence of cannibalism. After a second investigation, the caves either collapsed or gunpowder was used to seal them. Church Cavern Two heavily armed soldiers descended into the caverns with torches and claimed that they not only found a heap of human bones, they also found the ruins of an ancient church of some unknown denomination. The interior of the church was lit by three large candles and grotesque gargoyles formed part of an altar. Throughout the exploration of the underground, the soldiers said they felt as if they were being watched, and also heard voices speaking in an unknown language. Anyway enough of this rubbish here's a few pics to look at instead...... Thanks for looking
  23. Designed by Architect to the Metropolitan Police, John Dixon Butler FRIBA, the Greenwich Magistrates’ Court opened in 1909 with an integral police station. The Symmetrical frontage is faced in Portland Stone in a free Classical style and features a central semi-circular tablet with Royal Coat of Arms, carved in stone by Lawrence Turner. Inside, the entranceway leads to the former police station foyer which has a mosaic tiled floor with MP monogram (for Metropolitan Police) laid by Messrs Diespeker. The foyer leads onto Court 1, the main courtroom which is toplit with a decorative plaster frieze around the light well and a monogram of Edward VII in plaster above the bench. The Courtroom has mostly original fittings and the bench is in a curved recess, up three steps. The court has its own custody suite. The suite consists of nine prison cells with associated facilities for booking in prisoners etc. Visited here with @AndyK! a few months back. We sat on this for a while as we were hoping to return and see if we missed any bits but haven't got around to it. Anyway, I think we saw all the best bits. Here are some of my photos to begin with, and a few taken by Andy at the end. I also poached the history from his website report, so cheers for that! A few shots of the custody suite from Andy Thanks for looking
  24. A very early start for this one. And thanks for my invite from the other 2 lads I went with @GK-WAX and @albinojay arrived here in the pitch black early hours. Luckily we didn’t have any trouble finding our way inside. We’re we found ourselves a room to wait for it to come light enough to have a look around. Watching the bustop across the road. That’s one seriously busy bustop. And another 2 guys turned up giving us a surprise we exchanged a few word and we all carried on. Here’s a few photos and history.. HISTORY Located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was built in 1916 and was designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The King’s Hall building has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and it was soon screening religious films. By 1926, it was operating as a regular cinema, still managed by the Methodist church. The King’s Hall Cinema was closed in 1937. It then reverted back to a Methodist Church use as the King’s Hall Methodist Church. They vacated the building in January 2013" 6C566847-A7B2-4B03-8B35-21A83B59D5DD by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 11C63D3A-09F5-4CAF-B8DC-2D9DBAE3A34F by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DF9E3CFA-46FB-4F59-8E89-05044F4D4E0D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 291685A1-C7A5-4C05-AE0D-EAA5E9E3BE3D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr A942D367-319B-4051-9965-CBC9BE782D97 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr B6451F47-AED7-46C9-BC1F-FBB8716DC866 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr EFEFBB87-D905-4675-B792-572677174349 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 4FF422D0-9457-4DBB-A0FD-B3A59E0105DA by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 6388F9DD-1E6B-43E1-B475-C54D7702ADD7 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 8F93F594-6E02-49A8-90EE-77146630400A by Lavino lavino, on Flickr F0EA6489-742D-4A55-B053-E9407A809A35 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr D6912FEB-7A41-4075-BF3F-18CC92A71332 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 82C5654A-58D8-4F3D-ABA7-6FFA3CE99615 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr EF6C4F61-3E43-4EA3-99E3-79E7A4CD7986 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 7E8CA3B9-870B-4597-BE8C-822A743FA4B8 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 05FFBC9B-A065-4D18-ADAA-AC06F324A28C by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 596A95BD-32DA-4213-9C8E-06061841A60B by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 732BCB12-D01B-4F4E-9ADF-B1C86B4F2D95 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 0CCE03D2-1009-4B27-BF40-1FC90159D5C5 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 170B80EE-4ADD-4D0C-9AEE-076DA9AA07D3 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 31BAC71F-DB78-462D-ABC1-08C4DAB3AC19 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 31BAC71F-DB78-462D-ABC1-08C4DAB3AC19 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 2A00922B-01E0-4236-9129-02F812E7E710 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DF19BB97-1E29-4ECC-8B17-A1A4B30B7C95 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr E4354E42-97FB-4BA5-BC76-2304A4DF14CC by Lavino lavino, on Flickr D3A585BC-9EA7-4A96-A87E-58351FCC62B2 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr C88FDA25-E4EC-4269-9D64-A91725F507F2 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 9A4FC978-0A5C-43D3-A340-BF4ABF5EC679 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 6FED0FA9-4A21-4C0B-ABB0-1D6C5EB0721D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 5056F5C5-4624-400D-BF20-7ECF2C724B3E by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 0D7DEB4E-2C2C-4A67-82C6-A80B4153E5DF by Lavino lavino, on Flickr E3A4C8B4-8A02-4816-85BF-51EED2EDFEFD by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 18858080-1428-48B5-8F3F-2416CDCDF481 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 2FA9A65E-7F5B-4BE6-A4E8-2418BAABEB71 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  25. History As far as history goes for this particular property, it is sparse as it is nothing more than a fairly modern residential building. One newspaper based in Barnsley reported that traffic came to a standstill as a result of a fire at the property on Rotherham Road. Two fire crews attended the scene and spent two-and-a-half hours extinguishing the blaze. A second source suggests that the fire was caused by a lit candle, and that a woman had a lucky escape. The woman concerned apparently suffered slight smoke inhalation but was otherwise in good health. The property itself is an average sized two-storey house. Its notable features include an indoor swimming pool and a spiral staircase. Our Version of Events Of all the places we could end up in, we ended up in Barnsley. After looking at the town hall and wandering around the town and its meat and fish market for half an hour it didn’t take long to run out of things to do, so we decided we might as well look for an explore. However, the best thing we could find, unfortunately, was an old burnt down house. We tried a couple of other spots beforehand but didn’t have much luck overall. The house on Rotherham Road is exactly what you might expect for a residential explore – mostly empty and damp. As noted above, though, it does feature an indoor swimming pool where you can try your hand at floating across on doors someone has thrown in. Needless to say, we weren’t very successful but it was certainly worth a quick go. The second bit of the building that’s worth a look at is the spiral staircase in what we think was the former living room. This room was the most photogenic part of the explore so we spent most of our time in here. Going up the staircase turned out to be a complete waste of time because this is where the fire was. There is very little left of the roof and most of the floorboards look rather fucked. Compared to the mansions and castles of Belgium and France, then, this explore is a big disappointment, but it does kill fifteen minutes if you happen to be passing and fancy a swim. Explored with Ford Mayhem. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9:
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