Search the Community: Showing results for tags 'France'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Exploration Forums
    • Military Sites
    • Industrial Locations
    • Hospitals & Asylums
    • Public buildings,Education & Leisure
    • Underground Explores
    • High Places
    • Manors,Mansions & Residential
    • Religious Sites
    • Anything Else
  • Other Forums
    • Video Reports
    • Short Reports
    • Themed Threads
  • Discussion Forums
    • Just take a moment & say Hi
    • General Discussion
    • Latest News
    • Camera and Photography Advice
    • Websites and Links

Categories

  • About the Forum
  • Urban Exploring information
  • Photography and camera advice
  • Technical Help

Found 254 results

  1. The Maginot Line, named after the French Minister of War André Maginot, was a line of concrete fortifications, obstacles, and weapon installations built by France in the 1930s to deter invasion by Germany. It was constructed along the borders with Switzerland, Germany, and Luxembourg. Ouvrage translates as "works" in English: published documents in both English and French refer to these fortifications in this manner, rather than as "forts". An ouvrage typically consists of a series of concrete-encased strongpoints on the surface, linked by underground tunnels with common underground works (shops, barracks, and factories etc.). Constructions started in the early 1930s. They served during the Second World War, and were often reused during the Cold War before being gradually abandoned by the French army. Ouvrage Bréhain is part of the Fortified Sector of the Crusnes of the Maginot Line. It was approved for construction in May 1931 and completed at a cost of 84 million francs. The gros ouvrage was equipped with long-range artillery, and faced the border with Luxembourg. It saw no major action in either the Battle of France in 1940 or the Lorraine Campaign of 1944. Bréhain is a large ouvrage with a gallery system extending over 1,500 metres (4,900 ft) from end to end. The munitions and personnel entries are located far to the rear of the compactly arranged combat blocks, with the entries hidden in the woods. An "M1" ammunition magazine is located just inside the ammunition entry, while the underground barracks are located near the junction of the two entry galleries. From there a long, straight gallery runs at an average depth of 30 metres (98 ft) to eight combat blocks. As part of an uncommenced second phase, Bréhain was to receive a second 135mm turret. A gallery was projected to link the turret block to the Casemate de l'Ouest de Bréhain, which was built as (and remained) an unconnected infantry combat block. The ouvrage has two entries and eight combat blocks. The 1940 manning of the ouvrage under the command of Commandant Vanier comprised 615 men and 22 officers of the 128th Fortress Infantry Regiment and the 152nd Position Artillery Regiment. The units were under the umbrella of the 42nd Fortress Corps of the 3rd Army, Army Group 2. On 21 June 1940 Brehain engaged advancing German troops, but saw no serious action Bréhain's chief efforts went to the support of neighboring fortifications, with 20,250 75mm, 1,780 81mm and 2,220 135mm shells fired between September 1939 and June 1940. 4200 shots were fired in support of actions at Esch 10–14 May 1940, and 10,145 shots of all kinds were fired 13–25 June 1940. The 22 June 1940 armistice brought an end to fighting. However, the Maginot fortifications to the west of the Moselle did not surrender immediately, maintaining their garrisons through a series of negotiations. Bréhain, along with Mauvais-Bois, Bois-du-Four and Aumetz surrendered on 27 June. In 1951 Bréhain was renovated for use against a potential invasion by Warsaw Pact forces, becoming part of the môle de Rochonvillers strongpoint in company with Rochonvillers, Molvange and later Immerhof. After the establishment of the French nuclear strike force, the importance of the Line declined, and most locations were sold to the public or abandoned. Visited with @Andy, @Maniac, @extreme_ironingand Elliot5200. This was the main destination of our trip, although we ended up visiting 4 others while over there. The place is huge, we only saw a portion of it due to time. Luckily the one combat block we checked was complete with all it's original gun machinery intact. Another nice feature of this one was the old murals and posters dotted around the place. Amazing place, need to return and see the rest of it! 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. Thanks for looking.
  2. First report from the latest trip abroad! This old mansion sits in a small village, the gates are wide open and the locals don't seem to even care about it. The highlight here was definitely the grand entrance hall, surrounded by pillars, red carpet, grand staircase, and a lumiere-esque balcony above it. There were also some pretty nice side rooms too. From what I can gather the last use this building had was as a hotel, judging by the slight modernization of some areas. A nice relaxed explore with @AndyK! and Kriegaffe9. Featuring: My tripod because I'm too lazy to shop it out. Cheers
  3. Ouvrage Bréhain is part of the Fortified Sector of the Crusnes of the Maginot Line. The gros ouvrage was equipped with long-range artillery, and faced the border with Luxembourg. It saw no major action in either the Battle of France in 1940 or the Lorraine Campaign of 1944. Bréhain was approved for construction in May 1931. It was completed at a cost of 84 million francs by the contractor Ballot of Paris. Compared with its neighbors, the ultimate plans for Aumetz, Bréhain, Bois-du-Four and Ouvrage Mauvais-Bois closely resemble each other, but Bréhain is the most fully realized, with only one unbuilt combat block and an unconnected casemate block. Its neighbors were built as petits ouvrages, to be developed with full tunnel networks at a later date. Bréhain is a large ouvrage with a gallery system extending over 1,500 metres (4,900 ft) from end to end. The munitions and personnel entries are located far to the rear of the compactly arranged combat blocks, with the entries hidden in the woods. An "M1" ammunition magazine is located just inside the ammunition entry, while the underground barracks are located near the junction of the two entry galleries. From there a long, straight gallery runs at an average depth of 30 metres (98 ft) to eight combat blocks. As part of an uncommenced second phase, Bréhain was to receive a second 135mm turret. A gallery was projected to link the turret block to the Casemate de l'Ouest de Bréhain, which was built as (and remained) an unconnected infantry combat block. The ouvrage has two entries and eight combat blocks. The 1940 manning of the ouvrage under the command of Commandant Vanier comprised 615 men and 22 officers of the 128th Fortress Infantry Regiment and the 152nd Position Artillery Regiment. The units were under the umbrella of the 42nd Fortress Corps of the 3rd Army, Army Group 2. On 21 June 1940 Brehain engaged advancing German troops, but saw no serious action Bréhain's chief efforts went to the support of neighboring fortifications, with 20,250 75mm, 1,780 81mm and 2,220 135mm shells fired between September 1939 and June 1940. 4200 shots were fired in support of actions at Esch 10–14 May 1940, and 10,145 shots of all kinds were fired 13–25 June 1940. The 22 June 1940 armistice brought an end to fighting. However, the Maginot fortifications to the west of the Moselle did not surrender immediately, maintaining their garrisons through a series of negotiations. Bréhain, along with Mauvais-Bois, Bois-du-Four and Aumetz surrendered on 27 June. In 1951 Bréhain was renovated for use against a potential invasion by Warsaw Pact forces, becoming part of the môle de Rochonvillers strongpoint in company with Rochonvillers, Molvange and later Immerhof. After the establishment of the French nuclear strike force, the importance of the Line declined, and most locations were sold to the public or abandoned. Visited with @The_Raw, @Maniac, @extreme_ironing and Elliot5200. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
  4. Another tasty french chateau today. Really enjoyed this place, and I had wanted to go back here for a while as last year we were only able to access one room It's a bit of an interesting one, as each room seems to be set in a different style from one another, and this provides for an interesting walk around, and varied photo opportunities. The two main things I wanted to see here were the library and the chapel, and they didn't disappoint at all. Some great architecture and some left over items to see here Visited with @AndyK! and Kriegaffe9. Entrance Hall: Nice Rooms: Library: Chapel: Cheeers
  5. The Maginot Line, named after the French Minister of War André Maginot, was a line of concrete fortifications, obstacles, and weapon installations built by France in the 1930s to deter invasion by Germany. It was constructed along the borders with Switzerland, Germany, and Luxembourg. Ouvrage translates as "works" in English: published documents in both English and French refer to these fortifications in this manner, rather than as "forts". An ouvrage typically consists of a series of concrete-encased strongpoints on the surface, linked by underground tunnels with common underground works (shops, barracks, and factories etc.). Constructions started in the early 1930s. They served during the Second World War, and were often reused during the Cold War before being gradually abandoned by the French army. Ouvrage Rochonvillers Ouvrage Rochonvillers is one of the largest of the Maginot Line fortifications. Located above the town of Rochonvillers in the French region of Lorraine, the gros ouvrage or large work was fully equipped and occupied in 1935 as part of the Fortified Sector of Thionville in the Moselle. It is located between the petit ouvrage d'Aumetz and the gros ouvrage Molvange, facing the border between Luxembourg and France with nine combat blocks. Rochonvillers saw little action during World War II, but due to its size it was repaired and retained in service after the war. During the Cold War it found a new use as a hardened military command center, first for NATO and then for the French Army until 1998. The ouvrage remains under the control of the French Army. Sadly the bunker has suffered badly from fire damage throughout and has been ransacked. Only a few areas remain intact. Visited with @Maniac, @Andy,@extreme_ironing and Elliot5200. 1. Camouflaged entrance 2. No stairs in here, just a long ramp taking you underground 3. Fire damage is immediately evident 4. 5. Burnt bed frames 6. 7. A large section has been rebuilt with mundane breeze blocks for the Cold war era, this was updated in the 80s 8. Lecture theatre with torn projection screen 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. An entire block of bedrooms remains in good condition with all the beds still in place 15. 16. 17. These engines also still in reasonable condition considering. 18. 19. Control room, sadly ripped to pieces now. 20. How it looked in the 90s, a glimpse of how nice this place might have been when it was immaculate. Shame it's so trashed now. Camp d'Angevillers The camp of Angevillers is part of a barracks located near ouvrages Molvange and Rochonvillers. It was built at the same time as the Maginot line, construction was completed in April 1933. It is now used occasionally for military exercises. All the buildings were pretty much empty but still made for a nice wander. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. Inside the water tower Thanks for looking.
  6. A seminary in France that was later used as a medical centre and with a beautiful chapel! I think it closed within the past decade. Thanks for looking!
  7. The Maginot Line, named after the French Minister of War André Maginot, was a line of concrete fortifications, obstacles, and weapon installations built by France in the 1930s to deter invasion by Germany. It was constructed along the borders with Switzerland, Germany, and Luxembourg. Ouvrage translates as "works" in English: published documents in both English and French refer to these fortifications in this manner, rather than as "forts". An ouvrage typically consists of a series of concrete-encased strongpoints on the surface, linked by underground tunnels with common underground works (shops, barracks, and factories etc.). Constructions started in the early 1930s. They served during the Second World War, and were often reused during the Cold War before being gradually abandoned by the French army. Ouvrage Latiremont is a gros (large) ouvrage of the Maginot Line, located in the Fortified Sector of the Crusnes, sub-sector of Arrancy. It lies between the gros ouvrage Fermont and the petit ouvrage Mauvais Bois, facing Belgium. More than 1,200 metres (3,900 ft) of underground galleries connect the entries to the farthest block, at an average depth of 30 metres (98 ft). The gallery system was served by a narrow-gauge (60 cm) railway that continued out of the ammunition entrance and connected to a regional military railway system for the movement of material along the front a few kilometres to the rear. Several "stations" along the gallery system, located in wider sections of gallery, permitted trains to pass or be stored. The 1940 manning of the ouvrage under the command of Commandant Pophillat comprised 21 officers and 580 men of the 149th Fortress Infantry Regiment. Latiremont was active in 1939-1940, coming under direct attack in late June 1940. From September 1939 to June 1940, Latiremont fired 14,452 75mm rounds and 4,234 81mm rounds at German forces and in support of neighbouring units. It was not until June 1940 that Latiremont and Fermont were directly attacked by the German 161st Division, which brought 21 cm howitzers and 30.5 cm mortars on 21 June. By this time, German units were moving in the rear of the Line, cutting power and communications. Heavy fire repelled attacks but Latiremont's garrison surrendered to the Germans on 27 June 1940. After renovations during the Cold War, it was abandoned. This was the first of 3 gros ouvrages I visited with Elliot5200, @Maniac, and @extreme_ironing. Also good to hook up with @Gromr123 who happened to be nearby on this occasion. Photos can't quite convey how large it is in here, 1.5km from one end to the other. We only saw a portion of it due to time constrictions, but you could easily spend a whole day in here. 1. 2. 3. 4. Some amazing blast doors down here 5. 6. 7. Workshop with a lathe inside 8. Remains of a kitchen 9. Shower block 10. 11. 12. Blast door inside one of the attack blocks on the surface 13.Some rusty gun machinery still in situ 14. 15. 16. 17. Another epic blast door 18. 19. 20. Engine Room 21. 22. 23. 24. Train station for bringing in materials, the platform on the left 25. 26. <3 this door 27. 28. Cheers for looking
  8. The Maginot Line, named after the French Minister of War André Maginot, was a line of concrete fortifications, obstacles, and weapon installations built by France in the 1930s to deter invasion by Germany. It was constructed along the borders with Switzerland, Germany, and Luxembourg. Ouvrage translates as "works" in English: published documents in both English and French refer to these fortifications in this manner, rather than as "forts". An ouvrage typically consists of a series of concrete-encased strongpoints on the surface, linked by underground tunnels with common underground works (shops, barracks, and factories etc.). Constructions started in the early 1930s. They served during the Second World War, and were often reused during the Cold War before being gradually abandoned by the French army. This particular ouvrage consists of two combat blocks connected by an underground gallery and was manned by 100 men before surrendering to the Germans in 1940. I put this on the list of things to check despite information suggesting it was secured. Glad I did as it turned out to be pretty nice inside. All items have been removed but it's pretty clean with some nice signage and murals on the walls throughout. Just a small part of a very fruitful trip with @Maniac @extreme_ironingand Elliot5200. 1. Starting from ground level 2. 3. 4. Coat of arms painted on the wall 5. 6. Sealed entrance in one of the combat blocks. 7. Hand painted signage could be found everywhere: 'Victory' 8. 'One for all, and all for one', the motto of the Three Musketeers 9. 'Be a man' 10. & 11. 12. & 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 'Honor work solidarity' 24. 25. 26. 27. 'Secrecy is a matter of honor for communications personnel' 28. Notice the dirty footprints up the wall, not sure how those got there. 29. This mural was definitely the coolest find. 30. Just to finish off, a couple of pics from another petit ouvrage that was also meant to be sealed. It was flooded in here, the water reached waist deep in this brickwork tunnel so we had to give up. 31. Calcite coated the floor throughout. 32. Gun machinery would have been positioned here. Cheers for looking
  9. This was the first stop on our weekend tour. It was a long arse drive from the tunnel to say the least! Cost a small fortune in tolls! A beautiful building inside! History: The construction of the chapel began mid 1800, This chapel is decorated in triforium (the openings of the galleries, above the aisles of a church, overlooking the nave), which is rare, for it is devoid of side aisles. Thanks for looking!
  10. France

    My hometown is very particular. It's not a big city and its kind of lost between bigger ones. But at least, we have a famous car race who happens every year here. ... and a giant train depot ! "TGV (French: Train à Grande Vitesse, "high-speed train") is France's intercity high-speed rail service, operated by SNCF, the national rail operator. A TGV test train set the record for the fastest wheeled train, reaching 574.8 km/h (357.2 mph) on 3 April 2007. In mid-2011, scheduled TGV trains operated at the highest speeds in conventional train service in the world, regularly reaching 320 km/h (200 mph) on the LGV Est, LGV Rhin-Rhône, and LGV Méditerranée. Following the inaugural service between Paris and Lyon in 1981 on the LGV Sud-Est ("LGV") (French: Ligne à Grande Vitesse, high-speed line), the network, centred on Paris, has expanded to connect main cities across France and in adjacent countries on combinations of high-speed and conventional lines."
  11. Another backlog report here. Visited with @AndyK! and @Jamie_P in the pouring rain and as night was approaching, so the photos were a little difficult to process. Quite a nice castle though, completely white on the outside with four massive turrets. Inside there isn't much left aside from some typical french architecture, which was pretty nice to see, but difficult to capture in the fading light. Hope my photos can do some justice, try your best to ignore the noise - Cheers.
  12. France

    Second night of our recent rip went better than the first, we had spent the afternoon in the Catas, got in an early evening rooftop in La Defense (ill post a report soon) and then got some photos in the Paris Metro Network, which was the main reason for the trip, everything else is just a bonus. This time Letchbo was with myself and @Pinkman as he was not well at all the first night we were there. Lets just say after getting to where we were in the photos, it werent long before we were all stood still, shitting ourselves as we had gotten in just before end of service and watched afew trains go past, but when it all went quiet, we could hear walkie talkies going off nearby, and then what sounded like someone creeping up along the ballest alongside the track, we were all packed and ready to run like hell if anyone was to shine a torch at as haha, but no one ever came, PHEW. Heres afew pics i took that night, sorry about them being selfie heavy Odeon by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr And as a train past lighting me up Odeon by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Odeon by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Odeon by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Odeon by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Odeon by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Odeon by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Odeon by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Thanks again for looking DJ
  13. France

    Mad dash with Stussy for a fun dash in france As usual photofuckit has reduced quality
  14. France

    After a successful visit to Hospital Plaza I was most impressed - I thought it would be the highlight of the weekend, until we visited here. A beautiful church tucked away in a sleepy village somewhere. I'm under the impression it's only been abandoned for a year or two, as it's still in immaculate condition with working electricity. The decor is like nothing I've ever seen in a church before, and the stained glass windows were a work of art. We spent a good hour or two here, before moving onto other places! As always, thanks for looking!
  15. Last September myself and Letchbo ventured to Paris to see if we could get a taste of the Abandoned Paris Metro stations. We had some info from Gabe (much appreciated) and we just had to go for it. During the day we walked the abandoned La Petite Cienture (another report for another time) and on our first night, hit up Arsenal. We made our way to the station and jumped the fence to get onto the platform, and sat in the darkness waiting for the last few trains to go through the station. Ince it all went quiet, we went down onto the tracks to take some shots. After about an hour or so, i heard something in the distance, with Letchbo being down the other end of the station, i jumped up onto the platform with my camera gear, then heard nothing. I litrally got another few shots and i see a train heading towards us, at this point, i am shitting myself. I grab my gear and hide in the corner by the arch of the tunnel into the platform. The train puts its brakes on and caomes to a halt, the red lights from the front of the train reflecting off the wall infront of me, i hear a door opn and hear 2 french voices, i thought, thats it, we are fucked. But amazingly, they chatting for probably only afew minutes but to me felt like forever, then the train goes back on and goes back the way it came. PHEW. That was time to pack up and GTFO. Excited to go back though, got another trip planned soon, again with Letchbo and also @Pinkman this time too Thanks for looking DJ
  16. This chateau is located within about 50 metres of a huge abandoned sanatorium so presumably it was connected in some way, perhaps used for training or for senior management accommodation? I don't know, but it's still in pretty good condition for the most part and has some nice features despite being practically empty. An unopened pack of orange juice cartons suggests it has been abandoned since 2005. I'll post a report up from the sanatorium separately when I get time. 1. 2. 3. Scale model of the sanatorium 4. 5. 6. 7. & 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. & 13. 14. 15. 16. & 17. 18. 19. 20. We nearly missed this little chapel, still in amazing condition 21. 22. 23. Au revoir
  17. A very quick stop off last month. We didn't hang around long after setting some motion sensors off so I only took a handful of pics. History During World War II, U-boat warfare was the major component of the Battle of the Atlantic, which lasted the duration of the war. Germany had the largest submarine fleet in World War II, since the Treaty of Versailles had limited the surface navy of Germany to six battleships (of less than 10,000 tons each), six cruisers, and 12 destroyers. Prime Minister Winston Churchill wrote "The only thing that really frightened me during the war was the U-boat peril." A submarine pen (U-Boot-Bunker in German) is a type of submarine base that acts as a bunker to protect submarines from air attack. The term is generally applied to submarine bases constructed during World War II, particularly in Germany and its occupied countries, which were also known as U-boat pens (after the phrase "U-boat" to refer to German submarines). Following the collapse and capitulation of France in June 1940, the Kriegsmarine (German Navy) moved swiftly to establish a chain of U-boat bases along the west coast of France. This afforded much quicker and safer access across the Bay of Biscay to the North Atlantic convoy routes between Britain and North America, compared with the long and dangerous sailing from their Baltic bases around Scotland through the Faroes/Iceland/Greenland passages. These U-boat bases were at Brest, Lorient, St Nazaire, La Pallice and Bordeaux. Construction of the Bordeaux bunker began in Autumn 1941 and was completed in Summer 1943. Overall dimensions were 245 meter long, 162 meter deep (front to rear) with a height of 19 meter. It had 11 pens, eight of which were dry docks. The bunker was base for the German 12th U-boat Flotilla, which operated supply U- boats (“Milch cow”) which would rendezvous with attack boats in mid-ocean to transfer torpedoes, fuel and supplies, lengthening the time they could spend on patrol. The enormous amounts of diesel fuel required were stored in a second bunker – in reality a massive building as high as the pens themselves – a couple of hundred meter away. Capacity was 4 million litres, with an underground pipeline to the pens. This fuel bunker had two flak (anti-aircraft) positions on the roof. The U-boat base was built along an enclosed basin, protected by lock gates against the large tidal range in the river. As at La Pallice and St Nazaire, the lock was protected from air attack by a concrete roof, though this was removed just after the war. Beside the German facilities, there was also an Italian submarine base which operated until the Italian surrender to the Allies in September 1943, after which the five remaining submarines were taken over by the Kriegsmarine. In 1944, to protect the pens from armour-piercing bombs, a second roof was fitted above the existing roof, itself 350 cm. thick. An additional layer of concrete was cast 210 cm. thick, reinforced with blocks a metre wide and two meter deep. Any armour-piercing bomb's fuse would be activated by the upper layer so would explode in the void between the upper and main roofs, rather than penetrating the main roof into the main building. A bombing raid was mounted on 17 May 1943 but regrettably some bombs missed and caused local civilian casualties; a plaque commemorates their contribution to the eventual Allied victory. The bunker complex was bombed again on 11 and 14 August 1944 and received several direct hits; however, after the liberation, Allied troops found no damage had been caused to the massive structure. The last U-Boats left Bordeaux in August 1944, one of them being U-534 which was later sunk off Denmark on 5 May 1945; although a few hours after Grand Admiral Doenitz had ordered all German forces to surrender, U-534 failed to comply so was attacked and sunk. She was raised in 1993 and is now a museum in Liverpool. The Bordeaux bunker is today in private ownership and used by a variety of fishing and pleasure vessels. Bordeaux was liberated by the Allies at the end of August 1944. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Thanks for looking
  18. Colbert was an anti-air cruiser, later transformed into a missile cruiser, of the French Navy. She served in the Navy from 1956 to 1991, before being converted into a museum ship. She was abandoned off the coast of Brittany in 2007 and in 2016 she was taken away to be scrapped. Having missed this ship when it was moored in Brittany, I was pretty gutted to hear of it's removal for demolition. I didn't think much more about it until it popped up in conversation a few months later and I decided to hunt down it's new location. It turned out demolition was expected to take 18 months so we decided to take a punt seeing as it was only 6 months down the line at this point. All we knew was that it was meant to be moored near a certain bridge. On the first night our taxi driver took us to the wrong bridge so there was no sign of the boat. I asked some locals and they told me it was long gone, absolutely gutted. We soon realised we'd been to the wrong bridge so decided to have another look the following day. At this point we weren't feeling hopeful but as soon as we reached the bridge we spotted her in the distance. Bingo! Unfortunately the missiles were gone and much of the ship had been cleared out but it was still a proper adventure and good to finally get on board the dirty bitch! Bigups to @Maniac @Merryprankster Law & Ben. 1. 2. 3. Ventilation system for the removal of asbestos, this was what stopped us from being able to access much of the ship. 4. Officer's bedroom 5. Bunk bed 6. 7. Laundry 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. Gyroscope 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. & 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. The Bridge 32. 33. 34. Bon appétit
  19. Morning All, Im just catching up with afew explores and i thought id start of with this. The plan was to get to this station via the tracks, but that did not happen on the first night, as me and @Pinkman were told to leave the station by some workers as the last train was at the platform (i think they knew our plan) Anyways, walking back to the hotel that morning, feeling sorry for ourselves, we walked past the original entrance to the abandoned station via street level, i was just explaining to Pinkman that this is the original entr.......HANG ON A MINUTE! Looking through the heras fencing down, the door had been kicked off its hinges and light was shining out. So when it was quiet on the streets, i jumped over to see if it would indeed get us into the station, and it did, so over comes Pinkman. Both filled with excitement now as we thought we got the easy way in! We had a look around the station before getting our cameras out and guess what, access all areas, BUT THE TRACKS One side of the platforms had been completely sealed off, and the side we could access, were big metal steel doors welded in place with no way onto the tracks. We could see through the gaps the tracks and tunnels, and could smell the Metro, but could not reach them. So we cracked on with some photos of the station, which to be honest, was better than going home empty handed the first night and i quite enjoyed walking around there. Some history: Champ de Mars is a ghost station along line 8 of the Paris Métro, between the stations la Motte-Picquet - Grenelle and École Militaire. It is situated in the 7th arrondissement of Paris, to the southwest of the public garden called Champ de Mars. The station was opened in 1913 and was closed on September 2, 1939. Today, a station of line C of the RER situated to the northwest of the public garden Champ de Mars has taken its name and is called Champ de Mars - Tour Eiffel, with a connection to line 6 at the station Bir-Hakeim. Now some photos. Champ de Mars by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Champ de Mars by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Champ de Mars by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Champ de Mars by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Champ de Mars by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Champ de Mars by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Champ de Mars by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Champ de Mars by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Champ de Mars by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Champ de Mars by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Not the best photos but gives you an idea of what the station is like these days Thanks for looking DJ
  20. Tucked away in the middle of some woodland was this abandoned car graveyard full of old vehicles rotting away. Even having been given the exact coordinates for this place I still managed to walk past it twice it was that well hidden and overgrown… hard to conceive how the cars ever made it to this post and it gives a good idea to how long these cars have sat here… The vehicles were in varied conditions some being in quite a restorable position with more than a few past salvaging… I really enjoyed seeing the really old one with hand painted number plates! really something else! I’m no good with cars but have so far identified; Citroën Clover 5 CH, Renault nn, Citroën Rosalie, Tube Citroën and Simca 5 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. Hope you enjoyed the photos, the place was pretty cool!
  21. Two weeks ago I was in France. This building stood opposite the hotel where I stayed. It was a former hotel. Large, but unfortunately completely gutted. I don't know when it was built or closed. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
  22. The estate with the main-villa, a side building with chapel and a surrounding park was built from a textile manufacturer at the end of the 19th century, more specifically in 1899 (not in the 18th century, as is to be read often). The textile factory was closed in the 1980s, the villa has been uninhabited for more than 16 years now. Due to stupid vandalism a lot of things were destroyed, so also the piano in 2013. The villa itself burned down in summer of 2014. (about 1908) My fist visit was six years ago, in 2010. Now I’ve visited it again, to take some comparison shots. The current state is very sad ... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Finally, a few more photos from 2010. 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
  23. After only one and a half hours of sleep, I drove to France in the middle of the night. After a three-hour trip, I arrived quite tired at sunrise, climbed back over the wall and went through the bushes to the house. It belonged to a musician and was probably abandoned in the 80s. That’s all I know about it. Three years ago, the house was ransacked and very messy, as can bee seen on older photos on the Internet. Meanwhile, other photographers have tidied up there again. Inside there was still a lot to see: two pianos, an organ, fireplaces, peeled paint, furniture and lots of little things. I really liked the place a lot. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
  24. After travelling through the night and grabbing a couple of hours kip in a rather dodgy service station car park we arrived at this place for sunrise, and what a lovely relaxed way to kick of the weekend. There wasn't too much inside, but still enough to take a few pictures and have a nice mooch round. We didn't spend too long here, before hitting the road again and moving onto the next derp! As always, thanks for looking!
  25. France

    Hi, . here some pictures from my trip in September. Of course this graveyard is known from everybody but i just want to share some of my pictures. This Airbase is still in activity but since 2014 it's no more a military base, it's now a private airfield with an association who dismantle and repair aircraft for museums. The museum can be visited officially but not the graveyard. So we park our car in the small neighbor village and walk a little in the night. We climbed the fence and waited for the sun. We spent just an hour there, not more For more pictures please click here Casse Mirage

Disclaimer

Oblivion State exists as an online forum to allow like minded individuals to share their experiences of Urban Exploration. We do not condone breaking and entering or other criminal activity and advise all members to read the FAQ articles about the forum and urban exploring in general. All posts are the responsibility of the original poster and all images remain copyright to the original photographer.

We would just like to thank

Forum user AndyK! from Behind Closed Doors for our rather excellent new logo.

All of our fantastic team of Moderators who volunteer their time to keep this place running smoothly.

All of our members for continuing to support Oblivion State by posting up the most awesome content. Thank you everyone!