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Found 437 results

  1. In 1910 a garrison of the Imperial German Army was established at the Waldstadt section of the Wünsdorf community. By the First World War in 1914 it had become Europe’s largest military base. During World War I it was the site of several prisoner-of-war camps, including the "crescent camp" (Halbmondlager) for Muslim fighters of the Triple Entente, where the first wooden mosque in Germany was erected. From 1939 to 1945, Wünsdorf hosted the underground headquarters of the German Wehrmacht (OKW) and Army's High Command (OKH). After World War II the area became a Soviet military camp, the largest outside Russia, until 1990. Since then it has been returned to civilian use. You can actually pay the security guards 15 Euros to take a wander around here but we chose to sneak in instead and try our luck. It just so happened it was our lucky day as there was a nude photo shoot taking place, so all the doors were wide open! Result! Anyway, on with the photos. Wünsdorf HQ 1. Haus der Offiziere (Officers’ House). Unfortunately we didn't see inside here as security was onto us before we had a chance (cue much hiding....) 2. Statue of Lenin 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. This is where the naked girl appeared from randomly! 11. Plant room valves labelled in Russian 12. Theatre Entrance 13. 14. 15. Still kept in stunning condition 16. Hospital 17. Some nice natural decay inside here 18. 19. 20. Russian newspapers were pasted onto the walls underneath the paintwork throughout 21. 22. 23. The doors were padded both inside and out along this corridor. Perhaps a secure ward. 24. Maybach & Zeppelin Bunkers 25. Maybach I was built in 1937 and became operational in 1939 as the threat of war loomed. The complex consisted of twelve three-storey buildings above ground designed to look from the air like local housing, and two floors of interlinked bunkers with two-foot thick walls below. Deeper in the subterranean levels of Maybach I, there were wells for drinking water and plumbing, air-filter systems for protection against gas attacks, and diesel engines to keep the system operational. Later in the Second World War, the site was further camouflaged by the use of netting. During 1945 the site was heavily bombed by both the British and Americans. 26. The entrances were all partially destroyed by the Russians in 1946 to make the bunkers ineffective for military use so we had to scramble underneath this mess of twisted steel and collapsed rocks to gain access. 27. Inside the walls were filthy from fire and smoke damage. 28. The ring tunnel connecting all the Maybach bunkers was backfilled so we were only able to walk a few hundred metres in any direction before we reached a dead end. 29. Russian scribbles cover the walls and ceiling throughout 30. Handy that someone has placed these beer crates as stepping stones over an oil spillage 31. 32. 32. Another small bunker a couple of hundred metres away. 33. This small entrance leads to a much larger interior 34. 35. One of the entrances to the Zeppelin bunker, a highly modern underground communications centre which had walls up to 3.2 meters thick and a 1 metre shell around it. The Nazis’ entire second world war campaign was guided from the Zeppelin bunker, providing direct contact through telex to the fronts at Stalingrad, France, Holland and even Africa. Constructed in 1937 it was one of the largest newsgathering hubs in operation during the Second World War. The Zeppelin bunker later formed part of the Soviet Cold war era installations in Wünsdorf under the name Ranet. Further bunker installations were subsequently added to house the central command and communications functions of the Soviet army in the GDR. The bunker grounds were demilitarised following the closing of the army base in 1994, when the last Russian troops left Germany 36. Unfortunately the bunker was sealed beyond this blast door and we ran out of time. We will be back! Thanks for looking
  2. This was a solo venture while on a recent trip to Berlin. It's around 60km outside the city so it's a pain to reach by public transport but big enough to spend a few hours once you get there. The buildings are pretty empty but there are a few cool Soviet murals dotted around and very little graffiti. I'm a bit vague on the history of this one but here's a bit I translated from Wiki. The Fliegerhorst Jüterbog-Damm was an airfield and flying school used by German air forces during WWI (Luftstreitkräfte) & WWII (Luftwaffe). The site was used as an artillery-flying station from 1914 to 1918 for the Luftstreitkräfte. After the end of WWI the installations were demilitarised according to the peace treaty of Versailles, since this prohibited the operation of an air force. The Fliegerhorst was massively expanded from 1934/35, under the direction of the German architect Max Cetto. There were six large hangars in the north of the airport. Behind were other business and accommodation buildings. As early as 1934, the Jüterbog bomber flying school was based here, which was later renamed Kampferliegerschule Jüterbog and Kampfliegerlehrgang Jüterbog. Further aircraft training regiments, aircraft pilot schools as well as a local reconnaissance school were located here until 1945. Foillowing the end of WWII the site was occupied by Soviet forces until 1994 when it was handed back to the German government. 1. Entrance cabin 2. 3. Part of the site is currently being used by a logging company 4. Unsure what this may have been, perhaps part of a gas station 5. A small bunker with a grass roof hidden in the trees 6. 7. A small sub station inside 8. 9. 10. Another strange looking structure 11. Turned out to be the back corner of this massive aircraft hangar, now being used by a farmer 12. 13. Interesting mound in the farmer's field 14. Once a tank emplacement 15. Some scribbles in a nearby outbuilding 16. Soviet instructional posters 17. 18. 19. 20. Back to the main site another small bunker lurking in the bushes 21. Not much of interest inside, just a corridor of small rooms 22. Collapsed hall 23. The main building 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30.
  3. The funeral carriage is in the side building of an empty, abandoned industrial hall. I don't know why, I have no information about this place. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
  4. Visited with a non forum member - This hospital is part of a large former military camp which was taken over by the Red Army in 1945 until they left in 1990. Since then it has sat empty, slowly decaying. In my time I've happily wandered around many abandoned places with no bother including 4 different asylums on my own but, I'm not kidding this place really gave me the creeps. Evidence on the walls of the unmistakable Soviet presence once here - Till next time....be seeing you!
  5. The history of the building already begun in the 1850s. Originally, a wood factory was built on the property, which was destroyed by a fire in the second half of the 19th century. Then there was a brewery with a restaurant, later a holiday home / recreation home of the “Trade Union Confederation”. The hotel, located near to a swimming pool in the forest, opened in the mid-1990s. Last guest reviews on the Internet report about unfriendly staff, bad food and unhygienic conditions. That might have been one of the reasons why the hotel was finally closed about 10 years ago. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
  6. The villa from the Wilhelminian period was built in 1874 - 1880 on the site of a former farm. In the following years, various industrialists lived there. Later in use as a museum, 1945 as a Soviet hospital. After the Second World War the Villa was the seat of the Institute for Teacher Training. Abandoned since 1996, the building will be demolished soon. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
  7. Visited on two occasions with a non-member. The first time round, we spent more time on the East side and completely missed the bunkers. We heard diggers and machinery, but never saw any hi-vis types. There were a fair few explorers milling about though, which gave it a sort of Upwood (but not as crap) vibe. My mate wanted to get a taste of the 'Eastern' weather. Safe to say it was pretty dismal this winter, although he avoided the worst of the snow in January. There was plenty of sludge and mud to go around though On our second visit we managed to get to the bunkers, but found that they were deceptively sealed. We saw less people this time round and realised that much more of the site is now rubble than we originally thought. Considering in its heyday it had over 500 buildings, I'd say there are only now a few dozen of the bigger ones left. We nearly bumped into the demo crew on site a couple of times, but the beauty of this site is that it's so big and there are so many places to hide that they're never going to catch you. Was it worth visiting? For sure. It feels like I've ticked another one off the list and the murals and size of the place really are the redeeming elements to an otherwise bland and fooked Cold War derp. Will it be worth visiting in the future? I very much doubt it. I think within a few months it will have had it, sadly. That said, I don't think the bunkers are going anywhere at least, so I'll keep an eye on them with regards to internal access when I pass by in future. My photos don't do any justice to the scale of the place. For that a drone would definitely be useful. The videos probably give more of an idea of the 'geography' of it all. Anyway on with the photos... Rubbish dump. The Soviets very often dumped their rubbish in pits. This is evident all over East Germany. We found old gas masks, NBC overshoes, milk churns, boot polish, the lot! We bumped into a super-bait, full camo clad German and his missus in this building. Steps in the cinema. One of many small, buried buildings in the woods. Writing on the door. Warhead bunker. Bunged up door. Didn't seem worth digging out as all the other doors were welded from the other side it seemed. Lenin mural... More murals... Videos. Includes other assorted East German and Polish derps from the past couple of months. May contain the odd angry Gopnik and Fietsopa quote or two. Ace couple of weekends all-in-all. Big ups and thanks to DD for providing decent company and lulz. Thanks for looking, SJ.
  8. Formerly, a barracks of the German Army was on the 610 m high hill. Later the area was in use by the US military. The directional antennas at the lattice tower were removed in 2007. Unfortunately a lot of trash and vandalism today, but still some nice details. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 A small part of the area is still active and in use.
  9. The small chapel is idyllically situated on the hillside. Standing at the foot of the hill, the building is almost invisble. Thanks to the season, the knowing eye is able to spot the chapel between the sparse vegetation. Following up the slope for few minutes, a small weather-beaten wall appears. Climibing up the wall, there´s a small, overgrown path to follow. Inside the chapel it´s silent. Peaceful. The roof is full of holes - traces of the ravages of time. Ivy climbs steadily through the biggest of them. There´s still a large crucifix on the wall. The detailed depiction of Jesus is still in an unbelievable excellent condition. While Jesus looks as good as new, everything around him is decaying relentlessly. Unfortunately, I hardly have any information about the chapel. Old commemorative plaques testify that the chapel was probably errected by a local noble family. The building should be far more than 100 years old by now.
  10. Visited with @Miss.Anthrope on a last minute trip to Germany to catch up with our friends @Andy & @MiaroDigital. Not my usual type of explore but there was some nice decay in here and everything left almost in a time capsule state so it made for some nice photos. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. Thanks for looking
  11. The little house in the middle of a small town was found by chance by a colleague. She told me about it and a few days later we went there together. It's near to a pilgrimage route, therefore the name. Judging by the year on a newspaper, it may have been inhabited until the beginning / middle of the 2000s. The door was open and so access was very easy. Inside, unfortunately, there were hardly any furnishings. But at least an old sewing machine, a cross, a blue staircase and a peacock butterfly still offered a few photogenic subjects. The floors were completely removed. Possibly it was originally intended to renovate the house and this plan wasn't completed; Or the wooden boards were used elsewhere after leaving. I don't know... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
  12. Not sure wether or not this fits perfectly in the "military" section but it's close enough. Hey ! I'm an explorer in Frankfurt germany and have had the chance to explore and infiltrate a huge abandonned police station in dowtown frankfurt. The building was abandonned in 2002 and what makes it really unique is the fact that it lies within the city and the skyscrapers, it gives it a special contrast between the lifelessness of the abandonned site and the busy streets and life going on in downtown frankfurt. Here is a link to a youtube video of my visit and a photo of the front of the building ! (note that i do not own the photo it belongs to the site lost-place.info) The video of my exploration, check it out ! :
  13. The history of this railway line begins in the 19th century. In 1927 the tunnel with a length of 481 meters was completed. After financial problems, the route was officially inaugurated on 5. November 1932 - 65 years had passed from the first idea to the completion of the railway line. The construction had cost around seven million reichsmarks, hundreds of workers had been rewarded, dozens were injured, two of them deadly. In Second World War, the railway line was heavily damaged by bombs in 1944, but returned to operation in 1949. In 1976, the Federal Ministry of Transport finally ordered the permanent suspension of the passenger train service. Until 1988, the line was only used for goods transports and finally shut down in the same year. It was already my fourth visit of this place - because the railway tunnel isn't far away from me. So it's easy to go there again and again and show it to others (visited with two non-members). 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
  14. The ball room was part of an accommodation with restaurant and bowling alley. Built at the end of the 19th century, the building is in a very poor condition today and hardly to save anymore. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
  15. Inside of the abandoned, very damp hotel grew mosses, ferns and other plants. Based on the decay, it must have been closed many years ago. Visited with @The_Raw, @Miss.Anthrope and @MiaroDigital. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
  16. The tomb contains the bones of an industrialist and his wife. The industrialist already died in the 1920s, but the mausoleum was only built in the mid-1950s. The bones were then relocated there. Although unfortunately locked, but still a nice exterior view. Visited with @The_Raw, @Miss.Anthrope and @MiaroDigital 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  17. A small summer cottage with nice decay in the middle of the woods. Nothing known about its history. Visited with @The_Raw , @Miss.Anthrope and @MiaroDigital. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
  18. The ballroom was part of an inn. It already existed in the 19th century. I don't know when it was closed. The decay was very nice, but floors and ceilings were partially already very broken. By the way, the sunrays in the pics 4 & 5 are real and not a fake via photoshop. I merely helped and swirled the dust from the floor to make the light beams visible. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
  19. A small underground cistern in Germany. Unfortunately, I have no information about the architectural history or how long it was in use. Visited with @The_Raw, @Miss.Anthrope and @MiaroDigital. 1 2 3 4 5 6
  20. During a little trip trough Germany last year, we've visited this former Military airport. In WWII the Nazi's used it as a training camp for the German Air Force. In 1945 the Russians took it over, now it's abandoned since 1994 Some feedback is welcome, 'cause I'm not sattisfied with all the pictures. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10
  21. Germany

    I don´t have much information about the small brewery which is located in the south of Germany. The current owner is a guy from England, who disappeared some years ago. Since then, the building has been left to decay. The story hit some headlines in the local newspapers. Small, but I loved it anyway!
  22. The mausoleum is the burial site of a baron (died in the late 19th century). The building is located on a hill in the middle of the forest. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
  23. The former inn with a ballroom was already built at the end of the 19th century. After the closure in the 1990s, the building became more and more ruined. The rest of the building was completely stripped and empty, so no photos from other rooms. Unfortunately, I couldn't find an old interior shot, when the ballroom was still in use. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  24. A secluded village with only a few houses. On the edge of the street: an abandoned hotel with swimming pool. Unfortunately, I know nothing about the history. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
  25. The old Soviet military camp is one of my favourite ones in Germany. It was built during the Nazi era and later used by the Red Army. After the fall of the Iron Curtain and the withdrawal of the Soviet troops from the former German Democratic Republic (GDR), the area has been abandoned. I´ve visited this place three times so far, because I´ve been so deeply fascinated by still finding so many authentical remnants of the past, and I´m sure there´s still more to explore.

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