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Found 74 results

  1. Out and about looking for derps, drove past this interesting place by the roadside, turns out the cottage was lasted used as an office for a small firm. Quite shit, but hey worth a couple pics Not the best, but far from the worst I've done, still another one ticked off the list and a 40 min explore done
  2. This explore was a fairly random find for myself, after a day out looking around my local area some locations I had spotted previously I passed this place unexpectedly. A quick stop, run along and peek in the windows to check if it was empty and had potential, creeping up behind the building peering in the small back window, it a cracking looking vintage cooker it looked like it had potential!! A week or two passes before I return to avert any suspicious neighbours wondering why my car would be parked up close by. After my first look, I was excited to get in and have a proper look around, I wasn't disappointed! This place has lots more to offer, and need revisit it sometime to capture more have a proper look around, there are a couple more photos on my Flickr, if you are interested to see more! Thanks for looking!
  3. Birkwood Asylum dates from the 1860's and closed in 2002. The most attractive of the buildings and the feture of this report is the old Birkwood House which was constructed in 1819 and was a stately home until the 1860's when an additional wing was added and the Asylum established. Many additional buildings were added over the years within the grounds which are all now crumbing and falling apart while the old stone built stately home remains! Supposedly haunted by some doctor who was killed by a patient in one of the pink coloured wards upstairs the site has become a frequently visited location for 'ghost hunters' infact we saw some on our first trip here but thankfully this time we had the place to ourselves. Visited with Baron Scotland and Lowri, we mainly just went for the spiral staircase but I snapped a few other shots before we moved on to the next location. Currently developers are working on the building as part of a £50 million rennovation and I believe some new contractor lighting has been installed on the staircase. Anyways on with the photos! 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Few more photos and high res copies of the ones above on my website: http://www.proj3ctm4yh3m.com/urbex/2014/06/15/urbex-asylum-b-somewhere-scotland-april-2014-revisit/
  4. Not much info on the history of this rather nice Cottage, however there is a lot of information on the owners found inside. The man who lived her was David Sharp and also I believe his brother Victor, two of three brothers, the third being Douglas. Born around 1927, David and his Brother Victor went on to become Sheep Farmers eventually buying the Farm Shearers in his early twenties. David lived in this cottage for a good 60 years, his last known occupancy being around 2005, working his life as a Sheep Farmer all those days. I believe David passed away in 2007, his 80th year. Living in the same cottage for some 60 years he became a bit of a recluse, working, living, hoarding in the farm. Living near the bread line for many years this Gentleman ended up becoming a bit of an alcholic and developing ppor health in later years. I found this place a while back and been waiting patiently to explore it, waiting for one of those rare Scottish Bluebird days. This today turned out to be one of the best explores I've had in my local area. Spending around 5 hours here looking around getting true sense of what this Gent lived through and learning about his life. This is Shearer's Cottage. First entering the Cottage, it was soon to hit me this would be awesome. Thank you for looking!
  5. Been a while since I last got round to uploading a set and doing a report on here, so a bit rusty, I present to you The Fly Agaric Cottage. Having a crazy alien come spend a couple days at my federation space shuttle deployment centre. After an initial pleasantries, an agreement between the grizzly bearded mongrel and the alien invader was set in place to visit a couple of Scotland's finest well protected and preserved residential dwellings. Prior to departure for the fine examples of derp dwellings, a night of festivities had to be conducted. After several other worldy concoctions, the beer googles and cider visor was firmly in place and a solid nights slumber ended a night of much laughter and race relations between the intrepid explorers. The time came for departure and a wild space race ensued with meteoroid dodging and asteroid belt of razor edged mountainous rocks, the race was an impending carnage or tragedy waiting to happen, until full reverse thrust was applied and grizzly mongrel and crazy alien found themselves in a strange new world. Climbing the gates of Black Cow Gate, the adventurers saw mystical erratically wandering clouds in the distance, as they grew closer, black snarling faces grew upon them, the adventurers presence were obviously not welcome in this new world. "We must move forward" shouted the grizzly mongrel, "follow the Ent like creatures" screamed the alien. The ent like creatures swayed in the wind offering protection from the snarling fluffy clouds. Finally the adventures reached civilisation... Entering the imposing castle, the adventurers were relieved to find they had in-fact found safety. It was time for the weary travelers to return to the shuttle and head off at warp speed to a new world, they ran from the castle, hurrying past the fluffy clouds who had gathered menacingly at the door, their snaring faces foaming at the mouth!! Finally they made it back to the shuttle, unscathed, but the did learn a lesson that day! Don't mess with the Fly Agaric! Stussy & Oldskool
  6. I've fallen behind quite a bit with posting reports, because I have been exploring so much lately. To speed things up a bit I've decided to post a several smaller ones in one post. These are from a trip I took in July to the far reaches of Scotland, almost every one I went into was a bit a little bit special. So first up was the day three of the adventure and nineth explore of the trip. First Chance Cottage On a miserable rainy day, this was the first opporunity that presented itself for an explore! Little derp next door, not much going on inside it though. Pink Carpet Cottage Number #11 on the trip, lovely n pink! Lords Helper Cottage Number #13 on the trip, this more new styled Cottage, full of religious items. Teddy's Gathering Cottage Last explore of the day was this surprising little cottage which was once the home of a soft toy maker. Thanks for looking!
  7. Took a few days to go round some new Scottish locations I had found, ended up doing 16 locations over 3/4 days, didn't find any really amazing locations but a lot with nice bits to them all, so throwing some of the better shots into this one report. If you would like to see any more of the places, you will find them on my Flickr, the website is a little behind atm Anchor Cottage Ram Cottage Sinners Cottage Lobster Cottage Mary's Cottage Mario Cottage Spinners Cottage Horn Cottage Rat Cottage Vinyl Cottage TV Cottage Peebles Cottage Bird Cottage Black House
  8. Not much history on this weirdly superb explore, situated in the rolling hills of Scotland, a country estate owner created a mini religious haven / retreat for himself. This small report is over 3 of the buildings within the estate, first up... The Garden Room The Chapel The Residence Thanks for looking
  9. So, after discovering a thread I convinced my camera club that Loudon would be worth a wee visit. We set off this evening to explore and take some photos. Remarkably easy to get in, despite the big gate - it was just a matter of walking around the outside of the gate and then up to driveway to the castle. That's it really - you have complete access to the site. To be honest it appears to be far from abandoned - in fact it is very well looked after. The grass is mown and everything appears to be largely undamaged. Many of the rides have been taken down and removed but there was still a fair bit to see. Well worth a visit if you are in the area.
  10. Last post on the July trip I promise, but still more to some after these (another three adventures). Lady's View Cottage Perched on top of a hill overlooking a stunning inlet of the sea, beautiful!! Dirt Cottage Hidden in amongst some trees not far from Lady's View was this little hidden secret. Oldies View Last two explores sat nicely beside each other with some of the best views of the trip, superb way to end the trip to the far reaches of Scotland. Squatters Holiday Just down the hill from Oldies View, this place seemed to have been recently used by a squatter. As Always there are loads more pics of all these places on my Flickr on the link below. Thanks for taking the time to look at my pics!
  11. Last Collection of pics from the tour of far reaches of Scotland. Day 4 = Explore #15 Radio Cottage Fishermans Cottage This was one of the best finds of the trip, a fully loaded cottage and even a gun! Woobly Cottage This place shook with every step! Chaise Cottage Scotlands version of Chaise Abbey, or not! Thanks for looking!!!
  12. Well its not a quite a cottage, and it was quite manky in places with used bog paper and toiletries and raw food packaging lying around. It was a quick visit to the Seamans Discharge Hoose! Thanks for looking!!
  13. Too finish off day 1 of the trip (yes the 5/6 previous posts were all in one day!) It was probably a perfect way to end it before heading off to camp and have a couple whisky's in front of a fire! The Blue Chair Tea Party is one of my personal faves from the whole trip, so I may go a bit pic crazy here! Thanks for looking!!
  14. Two explores in one, a kinda crappy cottage and a suprisngly quaint church in a former Mill building! Half Cottage, only half of it remained! Mill Church Thanks for looking!!
  15. Haven't posted a set of pics on here for a couple weeks, but I have been a very busy explorer. Completed to trips, one in Scotland to see some of the best cottages / crofts / residental explores I have ever had the pleasure of seeing. More recently I was on a Euro explore, but those pics are still in the works. The Scottish adventure lasted 5 days, and the quality and quantity of potential explores was unbelievable, this one will take a couple re-visits to get through the sheer volume of places I have identified. To kick things off, the first explore of the trip was the Blue Stove Cottage. What a cracking wee find to start the adventure, lots more to come! Thanks for looking!
  16. Second explore of the trip was this superb little derelict cottage, my jaw dropped when I had a little wander about! The Cottage of Three Hats (Scotlands attempt of Belgiums 5 Hats) The views from this lonely cottage was simpy breath taking! Thanks for looking!!
  17. Third find of the trip was the unassuming wee cottage on the cliffside. The Yellow Chair Cottage. Thanks for looking!!
  18. After being out of exploring for a almost 2 months, I got back on the scene with this nice wee find. Have previosuly visited here before with Mad Max, but my SD Card corrupted and lost 6 locations for that day. So will get round to visiting them all again. This old Farmhouse was built in 1827 outside a small town and original was part of a mill. It appears to have been abandoned for sometime little bit trashed in some parts and a few things have gone missing since my first visit, but still well worth the trip! This is the Rabbit Farmhouse. Coming down the driveway it is very inviting. The kitchen is very dark and as someone pointed out it the collection could be from Dexter. The living room, with a superb collection of Osman & Sons Cow Medicine Bottles Upstairs is well lit and some nice pics to be had. There is a good bit more to this place, but the heavy rain forced me to leave it for another day. Thanks for looking!
  19. These photos were taken at the derelict Dunaskin brick works near Dalmellington, East Ayrshire, Scotland It used to be the base for a heritage centre until funding was withdrawn in 2005. The Ayrshire railway preservation group use the site which means access is good and there are some interesting locos, carriages etc to see.
  20. On a sunny Saturday morning I met my two partners in crime (non-forum members) in Glasgow and set off on what was a "secret explore" they had planned for me. After a not that long drive I saw in the distance our destination that was kept until then hidden from me. But the sight was unmistakable and I immediately got excited. The place we were gonna explore was ICI Nobel Ardeer. For a brief history lesson, as always taken from wikipedia, here are some info: Nobel Enterprises is a chemicals business based at Ardeer, near to the North Ayrshire town of Stevenston in Scotland. It specialises in nitrogen-based propellants and explosives and nitrocellulose-based products such as varnishes and inks. It was formerly ICI Nobel, a division of the chemicals group ICI, but is now owned by Inabata & Co., Ltd., a Japanese trading firm. Nobel Industries Limited was founded in 1870 by Swedish chemist and industrialist Alfred Nobel for the production of the new explosive dynamite. Ardeer, on the coast at Ayrshire, was chosen for the company's first factory. The business later diversified into the production of blasting gelatine, gelignite, ballistite, guncotton, and cordite. At its peak, the factory was employing nearly 13,000 men and women. In 1926, the firm merged with Brunner, Mond & Company, the United Alkali Company, and the British Dyestuffs Corporation, creating a new group, Imperial Chemical Industries, then one of Britain's largest firms. Nobel Industries continued as the ICI Nobel division of the company. ICI Ardeer was commonly known locally as the 'factory' or the 'Dinnamite'. At the time the company generally provided higher quality employment regarding terms and conditions and pension rights than other local firms. The Ardeer site was almost like a community, and there were so many people employed there that a bank, travel agent and dentist were at one time based on the site. The former Western Scottish Bus Company provided tens of buses per day to transport the workers to and from the site, and until the mid-1960s there were even two trains per day to transport workers to a station within the factory. In the late 1960s construction began on a nylon and nitric acid plant, but this had a short life, closing down just 12 years later. In 2002 the division, now named Nobel Enterprises, was sold to Inabata. On 8 September 2007 a major fire was reported at the site when 1,500-1,700 tons of nitrocellulose, stored in an open area, caught fire. There was little property damage and no serious injuries. For more click here There are interesting details about the place in the "Secret Scotland" website too (here). What is great about I.N.A. is also what makes it a pain. Location. In the middle of this peninsula, at the bottom of sand dunes that make you feel you are in Tatooine, the power station lies in a surreal environment and the views from the rooftop are unique. However, getting to the power station is a b***, as you can easily get lost. My two buddies had been there twice before and once they spent more than an hour trying to locate it. As there are no signs obviously and since the entire complex is next to live sites, the section of the power station that one can explore is about 20'-30' walk from the place where we parked, which I assume is the most logical place to park anyway. On a sunny dry day the trek is at least manageable, despite having to work your way around a very annoying bog, so unless you have wellies or waders on, you will have to do a lot of zig-zaging. There are several ways around it as we found on our way back, but especially for a virgin visitor this thing can easily become a nightmare. However, on the way to the power station there are various interesting bits and pieces, in a ruinous state but at least they give you a nice understanding of how vast the site used to be, with huge complexes for storing the material, blast walls, almost hidden under the earth rail tracks and more. Reaching now the top of a relatively steep hill along a fence you can finally gaze at the power station and the entire live site that lays behind it. It also gives you a clear line of sight to watch for the patrols of the security. Once we were sure the road was clear we ran down the sand dune (which is quite fun) and through the open space we reached the station praying we got there unnoticed in such a bright day. It turned out we did and we walked inside. The entire station is quite trashed as the metal thieves and vandals have done their usual "duty", but it still remains a wonderful industrial sight, so if you fancy that sort of thing, you will not be disappointed. Pipes, cables, dials, gauges... We spent a couple of hours in there and seeing that my 2 friends were really enjoying themselves despite this being their 3rd visit, one can understand that I.N.A. never gets boring. After spending enough time on the ground floor, roaming through some back offices where you still find paperwork and logs, I made it up to the roof, through a pigeon-infested area which gave me some great views of the area. Leaving we made a short stop to one of the huge warehouse-like structures with long corridors and stashes of wires that obviously were never retrieved after being ripped off their original location. I.N.A. is definitely worth plenty of visits for the individual who wishes to really see everything there is to see. =====PHOTOS======= At the quarry on your way to the station. Long way to go. Pipes galore. View from above. Pigeon hall. Ripped apart. Stairs. Turn them all. These readings ain't right. Safety. You know it makes sense. More pipe porn. Lovely details all over. And a chair of course. Roof access permit. I forgot to get one on my way up but nobody asked me for one. The boilers. Just beautiful despite its decayed/trashed state. Stairs leading down to offices. One last look. On our way back up the sand dune. Rows and rows of warehouse structures. Inside one of the warehouses. =====THE END===== Thank you for reading!
  21. Another Scottish hospital report, so here we go. "East Fortune is a village in East Lothian, Scotland, located 2 miles (3 km) north west of East Linton. The area is known for its airfield which was constructed in 1915 to help protect Britain from attack by German Zeppelin airships during the First World War.[...] In 1922 several buildings and an area of land were used to create East Fortune Hospital. This served as a tuberculosis sanatorium for the south east region of Scotland until the onset of World War II. The airfield was then brought back into service as RAF East Fortune, initially a training airfield, and the hospital patients were transferred to Bangour Hospital in West Lothian. The hospital re-opened after the war, but by 1956, as the number of tuberculosis patients began to fall, the hospital changed its function to house the mentally handicapped. In 1997, the hospital closed down, and its patients were transferred to Roodlands Hospital in Haddington." [source: wikipedia] East Fortune is one of those typical old hospitals that look more like a collection of barracks at an army camp, rather than an actual hospital. The site is comprised of a main "street" along which all the wards and buildings are lined up. Access is as straightforward as can be, so we parked along the main road and got into site easy. As the hospital has been closed down now for almost 2 decades the place has been properly stripped and decay has set in well, though from a structural point of view it doesn't feel risky. Biggest problem is asbestos and dusts as most buildings are still quite boarded up and even if you do get in, you end up in backrooms where the air is thick and there is no light whatsoever. Still that, to me, is always quite an experience as you torchlight your way from one room to the next (no door handle left unturned, that's what I always say). For lovers of peeling and decay a visit to East Fortune is definitely worth it, plus there are still quite enough things left behind to give one a really good idea of life in EF while it was open. The kitchen is still there with all its machinery, lots of bed skeletons lying around, and mattresses, tons of them. At the time of our visit several buildings were accessible and it didn't feel as if someone would care to board the place up anytime soon. Throughout our time there, of course there was not even a hint of security, all we saw was an old lady walking her dog. The distant sound of some farmer shooting his rifle(?) was also a nice addition to our visit, as well as the sight of the Scottish Museum of Flight at the other end of a field at the back of the complex, where I believe a Concorde is stationed and is quite a beast even from that distance. The machinery and pipes at the first building we entered was also a lovely thing to see up close and generally, and while searching for a way up the tower I found another fitness bicycle (a week after a similar discovery at Rosslylnee). All in all, I have to say that I really enjoyed East Fortune and as it is so easy to get in with lots of buildings to explore it is definitely worth the visit. PS. It always surprises me when I look at what metal thieves etc. leave behind after they had stripped down a place. To my eyes their work seems quite random so I don't know if to anyone who is more familiar with their work and purpose, maybe it's not, but to me it feels like people looking randomly for a buried treasure as there is no real pattern to their stripping. There. I said it out loud now. And here are the photos: Loved this one. I can say that if I get so excited by something this small in terms of industrial machinery, I can only imagine how much drooling there's going to be if and when I get to places like BPS. I could really use one of these while working. I had seen this in other reports and I was glad I caught it myself as well. Lovely peeling. So...organized. Watch your step! Plenty of lockers with names of employees still on them. Nice little corner. Loved the simplicity of this. Probably not sharp. Chimney! One of the various random pieces of paper left behind that are always interesting to read. Maybe it's just me but these things always catch my attention. Sure is! [1994] I thought about going out there but the roof was quite rotten so I decided to stay in with all the pigeon poo. Kitchen. This one has been really hit hard recently as a previous report from 2013 showed it in a much better state. A$$holes. The mattress graveyard. More from the kitchen. Love the broken glass shots. So there it is. Thank you for reading!
  22. Hello again. Here is another hospital report. I visited Thornton last February and it was my first explore done with another fellow explorer (non-member). In retrospect, the place is not all that interesting as a whole, but at the time it the first hospital I had the chance to get into, and it was a place of firsts. Thornton, located in Fife in Scotland, was a fever hospital. It is hard to find a lot of information online. Here is one bit of info I located: These buildings were built as part of an isolation hospital (serving mainly patients with diphtheria, scarlet fever, meningitis etc); later one building was used as a hotel but now the whole place seems to have been abandoned. [link here] It has also been made known that after the hospital was shut down, the place served as a children's home and later they used it to park lorries used by Strathore Plant Hire Ltd. If you consider the hotel business that also ran for a few years, one can understand why this place holds a million of random stuff piled up and laid to rest there, from lorry tires and magazines, to toys and a wheelchair. The whole complex is right on Strathore road, but apart from a house where people still live in, there is nothing else in the vicinity. So if you are relatively quiet and avoid attracting the attention of the residents of that house, it is a very easy explore. We parked on the side of the road and headed up the muddy pathway leading to the west side of the complex. No big drama, very easy to get instant access (no fences etc). The place has been left to rot and fall into the hands of vandals for some time now and it shows right from the get go. What is also clear is that you can find many interesting things to shoot. Love switches One of the big rooms. The typical hanging apparatus. A red door always makes the explore more exciting. We spent quite some time there, mostly because we were on a mission. As Di had been there before, she knew of a wheelchair that was said to be around. In older reports we had spotted the old wheelie and we really wanted to locate it. Weirdly enough, the chair at some point had decided to play the role of the Chief and McMurphy and we found it in the position below: It took about 30' to free the wheelie. I must say I felt a far more greater sense of accomplishment having dislodged the tree branches that had managed to grow through the wheel's spokes, than when I got my master's degree. I literally wanted to lift the chair over my head and scream. Instead we rushed it into the almost perfect corridor and had a bit of fun. One of the 2 corridors. The other corridor. Another interesting bit was when walking around a room I suddenly, in a very bullet-time slo-mo effect kinda way, felt my right foot sink into the floor. It was my first ever experience of the sorts and the feeling was a mixture of "what the heck is going on here?" and "should I laugh or turn white?". It's funny that several explores since then and some really bad floors, stepping on a rotten floor that feels like a waterbed has become such a familiar feeling. Psycho shower. Silent hill. Just piles of trash upon trash upon trash...and a chair. And a baby chair. After running through all the hospital buildings we moved to the hotel that was in the worst shape of all as clear indications of a fire and a collapsed roof invited us in. We both climbed halfway up the stairs but I believe we made the right call of not trying the first floor. When you feel you can squeeze your fist through the floor I think it's a sign not to continue. But then again who knows...that's the beauty of this I guess. The fact that you really can't tell most of the time so you just use your gut feeling at any given moment. Maybe a different day I would have tried it. Bar fight results. Wallpaper delight. The hotel was quite interesting with its big bar/restaurant bit where tv stands where still screwed on the walls and several curtains still hanging untouched by the fire. The kitchen was also quite cool with nice peeling. Generally all the buildings had some really nice wall decay. Thornton is one of those places where setups are so over-done that I guess it might end up feeling too staged to satisfy you. Don't get me wrong, I loved the glow worm doll in the baby trolley and other stuff, but yeah, I always prefer experiencing something that nobody has messed with, despite the obvious value from a photographer's point of view. Like this one, one of the best setups I have encountered. After taking a few more exterior shots (nice cloudy day) we left Thornton. I can safely say I won't be revisiting ever. However, I am really happy I got that under my belt. For more photos on Thornton and other explores check my facebook page. Thanx for reading!
  23. Been hitting the countryside a lot lately finding a lot of small explores, so thowing a couple smaller places in one place. First off we have some finds in a old Barn Secondly - The Hilltop Cottage Thirdly - The Fireplace Cottage Fourth - The Cramp Cottage Finally - Lager Cottage Thanks for looking!!
  24. Ahh how I love my Farms and cottages! Recent drive through the countryside in search of some derps, I was heading for a cottage I hoped would be a potential and passed this on route. The place I was looking to explore happened to still be lived in, so a what was going to be a quick stop here, turned into a 2 hour explore of the jolly wee place! This was a total joy to explore, plenty to see, but not too much either, and the views were rather nice! Thanks for looking!
  25. So, first of all, hello to everyone! This is my first report in Oblivion State (and any UE-related forum to be honest). Haven't been actively involved with any type of forum for a decade so it's a nice feeling to be back in active duty. Very briefly, I would like to say a few bits about me. I have been actively exploring since January this year (2014). Did a couple of explores last summer back home, but at the time had no idea there was a thing called "Urban Exploration". Despite it being very recent, it's a bit hard to draw a line between the various incidents that led me to UE taking up 80% of my time. I guess it's one of those things... I was pretty lucky to quickly get involved with seasoned explorers and already feel that I have seen some really amazing places, always with a true sense of "belonging". Ok that's it. On to the report! I visited Birkwood Hospital earlier this month (March 2014) with 2 non-forum explorers with whom I mostly run with. It was their first time there as well so it was great sharing this experience for the first time as a group, and as individuals. A few words about Birkwood taken from Archiveshub.co.uk "Birkwood Hospital was run by Lanarkshire Council for the care of children with severe learning disabilities. Opened in 1923, it provided care for both boys and girls and was one of the few psychiatric hospitals which dealt exclusively with children. Birkwood House, situated in Lesmahagow (Lanarkshire) was originally a stately home built in 1887 for the McKirdy family. Birkwood was purchased by Lanarkshire Council in 1920 and was first occupied as a certified Institution for Mental Defectives on 3rd July 1923. Birkwood House was one of several institutions which opened in accordance with the Mental Deficiency and Lunacy (Scotland) Act of 1913. The Act was passed ‘to make better and further provision for the care of Mentally Defective Persons and to amend the Law relating to Lunacy in Scotland.’ Birkwood House is a Grade B listed building and had extensions erected in 1921, 1946 and 1958. The new wing added in 1958 cost £94,000 and accommodated up to 80 more patients. The 1966 Western Regional Hospital Board, Hospital Survey and Draft Proposals for Mental Health Services, stated that Birkwood had 316 beds but suggested that could be extended to a further 376 beds to accommodate for overcrowding in Kirklands Hospital. However, by 1976, The Evening Times reported that Birkwood would have to cut beds due to a degree of overcrowding. Gradually, community based care became more acceptable concerning psychiatric patients and The Evening Times reported in 1981 that Birkwood was trialling an independent unit which would allow improving patients to look after themselves with minimum supervision. The Community Care Act 1990 gave rise to a more community-based focus for long-term care and consequently many of the long-term psychiatric hospitals closed. The hospital began to relocate patients in 2002 and officially closed in 2005." Arriving at the nearby village it already felt like a great day to explore an old abandoned hospital. The day was cold and miserable, though it wasn't raining (much) which is always a plus when you are unsure about your entry points and feel there's bound to be a lot of walking around. We made it over the bridge and started heading uphill a bit worried about a guy and his dog who was way up ahead. There have been earlier reports (and photos) of the owner's caravan laying at the front of the building with the owner living in it actually so we thought this could go either way. We decided to skip the pathway and walked uphill to cut directly to the back of the hospital. Reaching the high fences that ran the perimeter on the side and back we found a welcoming opening and once we were in we knew that all we needed was just a nice broken...and there it was, a nice basement window open and waiting for us. We climbed in and found ourselves in the pitch-black basement. A quick look around revealed amazing decay, though at no point did the place feel dangerous. Little did we know. We found a staircase and at the top was a small opening through a door through which we squeezed in. Right in front of the opening was just a couple of boards that we decided to avoid stepping on as the gaping holes revealed a significant drop that none of us wanted to experience. After getting through that bit, the first big room we encountered was a clear indication of how beautiful Birkwood was (and still is in a way), but also how decayed and dangerous it also was. The floors were constantly making me feel as if they were about to disappear under me and in many parts of the building there were big holes. However, it was such the excitement of being in there that we just kept going and going and spent a lot of time in there. After all, we knew of the famous spiral staircase and all 3 of us were desperate in getting there. The first big room we encountered. Stairs. Peeling. Decay. What's not to love. And a nice fireplace at the most inconvenient place ever. Awesome rooms. Simply breath-taking beauty. More stairs. And there it was, the spiral staircase leading to the top of one of the towers. I couldn't resist not stepping outside but as I put my foot down I realized the floor on the top was wooden (?) and obviously in terrible decay so I just stood on the edge of the door and took a few shots. One thing I love about UE in Scotland is that I get to see so much of this beautiful country. After the spiral staircase was done we were done with most of the main building and after taking another look around we made it back out. It was time to explore the rest of the site as there have been many extensions built through the years. All of these buildings were for the most part completely open, so obviously the level of decay was huge. Still, some pretty interesting bits and pieces. I know, I am a sucker for two things. Stairs and hanging lights/cables. I loved this instantly. Reflections are great. This chair screamed "shoot me". At the restaurant, a small room with beautiful peeling. And last, but not least, the Birkwood Hospital (main building) in all its glory. It is clear that there was no caravan at the entrance at the time of our visit and generally we found no security, or no sign of the owner. As it turned out however, they recently started restoring parts of the building. I think they started with the roof and the window we got in was boarded up recently, plus there are workers at the site now. I feel very lucky to have been there, not sure if they will actually make it into something or at some point (as it always happens) work will stop as money will run out. I would love to return one day. So there it is my first report and I feel I overdid it with the narration. I get carried away so I apologize. If you want to see more photos you can check my FB page (see signature). Thanks for reading and stay frosty people!

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