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Found 3,543 results

  1. UK Derelict Hospital

    Abandoned and decayed. One of the most interesting place I've visited with exciting building structure, combined with decaying details. Shame about the place is about to get knocked down. An experience to remember. https://www.facebook.com/manny.teh/media_set?set=a.1945695755495938.1073741854.100001665983033&type=3&pnref=story
  2. Had a look at this a couple of times. First with @slayaaaa and then with @DubbedNavigator. It’s barely worth reporting, but I was practicing with phone photos in dark places and I really like the results. These are all taken on a phone camera - Huawei P10. ISO 50, f2.2 and exposure ranging from 1/15 second to 15 second exposure. History According to Kelly’s directory at the record office this this is listed as Frederick Donisthorpe, dyer and trimmer (Pingle Works) from 1870 until 1963, (It became Donsithorpe Hamilton and Co somewhere in the middle). In 1966 it was listed as JW Loweth and sons, Worsted spinner. By 1972 it seems it was L E Sansom Ltd, Cash and Carry, selling food and assorted goods. Their bank foreclosed on LE Sansom in 2012 due to a massive drop in profits, with the company finally dissolving in 2014. This one of the scales - the only light was coming down the stairs, we could barely see the scales. This is a 15 second exposure with no light painting.
  3. Our original plan was to spend Christmas here but weather forecasts were dire and we didn't want to die a watery death so we binned the idea off and went to Wales instead! Planning our summer road trip and this place cropped up again and it was game on! We'd do the island before heading off to foreign lands for a couple of weeks. After spending the previous night watching an awesome lightning storm we were hoping for good weather! Waking up a few hours later in the back of the limo to see rain I snuggled back into my sleeping bag and went back to sleep. When I next awoke the sky was grey and it was drizzly, and with an uncertain forecast we decided to check out a few alternative locations instead. A few fails and some epic jungleering through the undergrowth later, the sun decided to come out and we bit the bullet and decided Operation Island Infiltration was back on! A few hours later and we were busy unloading gear (lots and lots and lots of gear) by the sea and Riddlers was busy blowing up his dingy ready to take us out! There appeared to be quite a bit of interest in our little escapade but throwing caution to the wind the first three intrepid explorers set sail and it wasn't long before all 7 of us were safely on dry land. We set up camp and then went for a bit of an explore, its a lovely little place with lots to see and I proper enjoyed just mooching about whilst the boys played with the cannons and drank beer. We had fire and food before heading to bed for an early night, the Merry Prankster set up his projector and fell asleep to South Park, The Riddlers got shouted at for playing shit music and keeping people awake and me and Jobs had a hammock fail and ended up on the floor! In the morning we were getting ready to leave but when we looked out across the water it was bedlam, the police boat, RNLI and Lifeguards were out in force, initially thinking we had been spotted we awaited their arrival, but much to our bemusement they appeared to be clearing the harbour!! A quick google later and we discovered there was an airshow just about to start and for safety reasons they were clearing the public from underneath the display area. Well almost all the people, we had the choice seats directly underneath as bi-planes looped and dipped across the skies, dropping low enough for them to see us and give us a friendly wave as they passed by! After enjoying the show we got ready to leave, with The Riddlers at the helm, Bigjobs and Motionless Escape were the first to go. We watched them bobbing across the waves until we saw them land but an age passed and there was no sign of them returning. One phone call later and we discovered a pin had broken on the boat and they were frantically trying to fix it. So with visions of having to be rescued by the Lifeguards we waited and waited and waited, then boom across the harbour we spotted him! THey'd fixed the boat and The Riddlers was making his way back Not long after we were back on dry land chattering like excitable children on a school trip planning our next stop! History Located in the heart of the harbour lies Drake Island. The island was originally called St Nicholas' Island and later St Michael's Island before it was renamed and dedicated to Sir Francis Drake in the late Tudor period. Originally is accommodated an artillery battery, this was followed by a larger garrison and during the Civil War, the Island played a key role in the defence of Plymouth against Royalist Attack. In the mid-sixteenth century, the first fortification was commissioned as a result of the war with France. A stone and turf wall built and a garrison was installed in 1551. In 1580 a disagreement between the people of Plymouth and the Government over who had responsibility for paying for the defence it was taken into state ownership. By 1590s a garrison of 100 men and 40-50 guns were installed, increasing further as the war with Spain continued. After the restoration of the monarchy after the Civil War, the island was used as a prison for notable Parliamentary prisoners. Major General John Lambert, the successor to Oliver Cromwell, was held here from 1670-84. Also incarcerated here was Colonel Robert Lilburn, one of the regicides. The defences visible today mainly date from the mid-nineteenth century when the large casemates were constructed complete with supporting magazines and accommodation. Finally, the Island was garrisoned by just under 500 soldiers for much of WWII supporting coastal defence and anti-air operations. In 1963 Plymouth Council obtained a lease from the Crown and a youth centre was opened in 1964, coming under the custody of the Mayflower Trust until they surrendered the lease in 1989. The Island was bought by Dan McCauley in 1995 with a view to building a hotel and helipad. Initial plans were rejected due to the nesting egrets on the Island but as of April 2017 a further plan has been submitted with protection plans in place and work is expected to start in the not too distant future. Hope you enjoyed looking
  4. Crank Caverns have been on my radar for a while, with its mythical history of child eating dwarves, oddly shaped body bags, cannibalism and a hidden chapel who wouldn't want to go and take a look? With a history like that, we decided to brave the night and risk life and limb to go in search of the evil creatures of the caverns. Meeting up with some friends we scurried through the dark to the edge of the woods. Wondering what awaited us we made our way through the trees to the cavern entrance, listening out for the scurry of tiny angry dwarf feet! Much to our disappointment, we heard no such thing so made our way in! It was a little damp and muddy in places but We explored every nook and cranny possible, with one of the lads crawling through some that weren't even possible! He is like a crawly ninja of small holes and gaps that do not exist! Despite our extensive searching, we didn't come across any dwarves or a single human bone and with no evidence of a secret church we called it a night and went our separate ways. Was a fun night out with a cracking bunch of people History Sandstone quarrying began here as early as 1730. As the quarry expanded, the cost of purchasing land to open cast mine it increased, so it was decided to opt for a different method. Instead of quarrying out the stone, they would mine it out, following a seam of stone until it ran out. This resulted in the network of caves, tunnels and shafts we see today. Rainford Delph is listed as a Colliery by 1854, under the ownership of Charles Howarth or Yorkshire Charlie as he was known locally by 1880. Mining finally ceased and the woods and caverns were used as a game reserve by the Earl of Derby until 1939 when they became a storage facility for ammunition for the anti-aircraft position at Crank. After the war, the caverns ceased use as a game reserve. Myths and Legends Child Eating Dwarves "Vicious dwarves" were once rumoured to inhabit the labyrinth of caverns in Crank. In the late 18th century four children decided to explore the sandstone caverns and vanished. One child survived and told a terrifying tale about small old men with beards, who talked in an unknown language, they killed his three friends and chased him. The petrified child stumbled over human bones in the caves and finally managed to scramble through an opening to the surface as a hand was grabbing at his ankle. The authorities became concerned because a number of people had gone missing in the area near the cave entrances and apparently they sent in the army to install gates and bars. It is apparently undecided if this was to keep people out or keep something in. Oddly shaped body bags Apparently about 17 or 18 years ago two young lads entered the caverns and got lost, they had told their parents where they were going and when they didn’t arrive home their parents informed the police. After a couple of days searching the police sealed off the area and removed to body bags from the caverns. This is where it gets strange, they were also reported to have removed 7 more body bags from the caverns, one of the bags was said to have not been in a body shape but was square. Cannibalism There is a story about some scouts who went down the caverns for a look around and at the end of the day one of the scouts had not come back out. Eventually, they called out Cave Rescue to try and find the boy. After a long search they found him or what was left of him, allegedly the boy was partly eaten. The parents of the child wanted it all kept secret so the press didn't get hold of the story and they could give their son a peaceful send-off. Another story tells of a child's head found in a cave, along with evidence of cannibalism. After a second investigation, the caves either collapsed or gunpowder was used to seal them. Church Cavern Two heavily armed soldiers descended into the caverns with torches and claimed that they not only found a heap of human bones, they also found the ruins of an ancient church of some unknown denomination. The interior of the church was lit by three large candles and grotesque gargoyles formed part of an altar. Throughout the exploration of the underground, the soldiers said they felt as if they were being watched, and also heard voices speaking in an unknown language. Anyway enough of this rubbish here's a few pics to look at instead...... Thanks for looking
  5. Designed by Architect to the Metropolitan Police, John Dixon Butler FRIBA, the Greenwich Magistrates’ Court opened in 1909 with an integral police station. The Symmetrical frontage is faced in Portland Stone in a free Classical style and features a central semi-circular tablet with Royal Coat of Arms, carved in stone by Lawrence Turner. Inside, the entranceway leads to the former police station foyer which has a mosaic tiled floor with MP monogram (for Metropolitan Police) laid by Messrs Diespeker. The foyer leads onto Court 1, the main courtroom which is toplit with a decorative plaster frieze around the light well and a monogram of Edward VII in plaster above the bench. The Courtroom has mostly original fittings and the bench is in a curved recess, up three steps. The court has its own custody suite. The suite consists of nine prison cells with associated facilities for booking in prisoners etc. Visited here with @AndyK! a few months back. We sat on this for a while as we were hoping to return and see if we missed any bits but haven't got around to it. Anyway, I think we saw all the best bits. Here are some of my photos to begin with, and a few taken by Andy at the end. I also poached the history from his website report, so cheers for that! A few shots of the custody suite from Andy Thanks for looking
  6. A very early start for this one. And thanks for my invite from the other 2 lads I went with @GK-WAX and @albinojay arrived here in the pitch black early hours. Luckily we didn’t have any trouble finding our way inside. We’re we found ourselves a room to wait for it to come light enough to have a look around. Watching the bustop across the road. That’s one seriously busy bustop. And another 2 guys turned up giving us a surprise we exchanged a few word and we all carried on. Here’s a few photos and history.. HISTORY Located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was built in 1916 and was designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The King’s Hall building has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and it was soon screening religious films. By 1926, it was operating as a regular cinema, still managed by the Methodist church. The King’s Hall Cinema was closed in 1937. It then reverted back to a Methodist Church use as the King’s Hall Methodist Church. They vacated the building in January 2013" 6C566847-A7B2-4B03-8B35-21A83B59D5DD by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 11C63D3A-09F5-4CAF-B8DC-2D9DBAE3A34F by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DF9E3CFA-46FB-4F59-8E89-05044F4D4E0D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 291685A1-C7A5-4C05-AE0D-EAA5E9E3BE3D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr A942D367-319B-4051-9965-CBC9BE782D97 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr B6451F47-AED7-46C9-BC1F-FBB8716DC866 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr EFEFBB87-D905-4675-B792-572677174349 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 4FF422D0-9457-4DBB-A0FD-B3A59E0105DA by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 6388F9DD-1E6B-43E1-B475-C54D7702ADD7 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 8F93F594-6E02-49A8-90EE-77146630400A by Lavino lavino, on Flickr F0EA6489-742D-4A55-B053-E9407A809A35 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr D6912FEB-7A41-4075-BF3F-18CC92A71332 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 82C5654A-58D8-4F3D-ABA7-6FFA3CE99615 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr EF6C4F61-3E43-4EA3-99E3-79E7A4CD7986 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 7E8CA3B9-870B-4597-BE8C-822A743FA4B8 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 05FFBC9B-A065-4D18-ADAA-AC06F324A28C by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 596A95BD-32DA-4213-9C8E-06061841A60B by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 732BCB12-D01B-4F4E-9ADF-B1C86B4F2D95 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 0CCE03D2-1009-4B27-BF40-1FC90159D5C5 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 170B80EE-4ADD-4D0C-9AEE-076DA9AA07D3 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 31BAC71F-DB78-462D-ABC1-08C4DAB3AC19 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 31BAC71F-DB78-462D-ABC1-08C4DAB3AC19 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 2A00922B-01E0-4236-9129-02F812E7E710 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DF19BB97-1E29-4ECC-8B17-A1A4B30B7C95 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr E4354E42-97FB-4BA5-BC76-2304A4DF14CC by Lavino lavino, on Flickr D3A585BC-9EA7-4A96-A87E-58351FCC62B2 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr C88FDA25-E4EC-4269-9D64-A91725F507F2 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 9A4FC978-0A5C-43D3-A340-BF4ABF5EC679 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 6FED0FA9-4A21-4C0B-ABB0-1D6C5EB0721D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 5056F5C5-4624-400D-BF20-7ECF2C724B3E by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 0D7DEB4E-2C2C-4A67-82C6-A80B4153E5DF by Lavino lavino, on Flickr E3A4C8B4-8A02-4816-85BF-51EED2EDFEFD by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 18858080-1428-48B5-8F3F-2416CDCDF481 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 2FA9A65E-7F5B-4BE6-A4E8-2418BAABEB71 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  7. History As far as history goes for this particular property, it is sparse as it is nothing more than a fairly modern residential building. One newspaper based in Barnsley reported that traffic came to a standstill as a result of a fire at the property on Rotherham Road. Two fire crews attended the scene and spent two-and-a-half hours extinguishing the blaze. A second source suggests that the fire was caused by a lit candle, and that a woman had a lucky escape. The woman concerned apparently suffered slight smoke inhalation but was otherwise in good health. The property itself is an average sized two-storey house. Its notable features include an indoor swimming pool and a spiral staircase. Our Version of Events Of all the places we could end up in, we ended up in Barnsley. After looking at the town hall and wandering around the town and its meat and fish market for half an hour it didn’t take long to run out of things to do, so we decided we might as well look for an explore. However, the best thing we could find, unfortunately, was an old burnt down house. We tried a couple of other spots beforehand but didn’t have much luck overall. The house on Rotherham Road is exactly what you might expect for a residential explore – mostly empty and damp. As noted above, though, it does feature an indoor swimming pool where you can try your hand at floating across on doors someone has thrown in. Needless to say, we weren’t very successful but it was certainly worth a quick go. The second bit of the building that’s worth a look at is the spiral staircase in what we think was the former living room. This room was the most photogenic part of the explore so we spent most of our time in here. Going up the staircase turned out to be a complete waste of time because this is where the fire was. There is very little left of the roof and most of the floorboards look rather fucked. Compared to the mansions and castles of Belgium and France, then, this explore is a big disappointment, but it does kill fifteen minutes if you happen to be passing and fancy a swim. Explored with Ford Mayhem. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9:
  8. History The Waterloo Tunnel is a 779 metre (852 yards) long disused railway tunnel in Liverpool. It opened in 1849. At its Eastern end, the Waterloo Tunnel opens into a short cutting (approximately 63 metres long) which connects to the Victoria Tunnel which is 1.536 miles (2.474 kilometres) long. Effectively, both tunnels are one long tunnel with an open-air ventilation cutting in between; however, they were given different names initially because trains in the Waterloo Tunnel were locomotive hauled while trains in the Victoria Tunnel were cable hauled. In terms of tunnel architecture, the Waterloo Tunnel features a semi-circular opening, wide enough to accommodate three separate tracks. The westernmost section has been backfilled and there are occasional accumulations of calcite on the brickwork. Most of the Waterloo Tunnel is brick-lined; however, it is not listed. The Victoria Tunnel, on the other hand, is Grade II listed. It features a rusticated arch flanked by buttresses, together with a modillioned cornice and ashlar-coped parapet. The first two-hundred yards of the tunnel are brick-arched, but after that it is unlined up to the fourth ventilation shaft. There are five visible air shafts in the Victoria Tunnel, and an additional five hidden shafts. A drain also runs down the length of the tunnel, but this has collapsed in certain places. Both tunnels were constructed because the city of Liverpool is built on a densely populated escarpment (a long, steep slope) that drops down to the River Mersey. This meant building on the surface would have been difficult without causing major disruption, but also that the landscape was ideal for the construction of a line that could be placed beneath the ground. Nevertheless, cutting both tunnels still proved to be a difficult task as care had to be taken to avoid disturbing the buildings above due to their shallow depth. The work from Byrom Street eastwards proved the most difficult and perilous and, despite efforts to excavate carefully, the soft clay in the area caused several houses to give way, rendering them uninhabitable. All the inhabitants were forced to abandon their homes at short notice. What this means is that the design of the tunnel – becoming two separate structures – was a result of circumstance. The first goods traffic travelled through the tunnels in August 1849. However, a three-foot section of Victoria Tunnel collapsed in September 1852. The collapse was quickly repaired and the tunnels were used by goods traffic without any further major incidents until 1899, when a freight train consisting of a tank, twenty-three loaded wagons and a brake van separated when a coupling between the seventh and eighth wagons fractured. Two wagons and the van were destroyed in the incident, and two of the three men aboard were killed. A train that was travelling towards the docks was also caught up in the accident as it collided with the debris and partially derailed. Although both the Waterloo and Victoria Tunnel were initially part of a freight line, they were opened to passenger traffic in 1895. Passenger services continued to run up until February 1971. Many of the large docks in Liverpool ‘dried up’ as they were affected by declining industry across the UK and this resulted in a significant decrease in traffic on the line. Both tunnels were officially closed on 19th November 1972; although, a small section of the Edge Hill line was retained as a headshunt. It is rumoured that this track is still used very occasionally today. Whether this is true or not, though, is another matter. The futures of both the Waterloo and Victoria Tunnel are uncertain. However, the Merseyrail Network have proposed to use part of them to create a connection to the low-level Liverpool Central Station. Creating the connection would reduce journey times to Edge Hill. Unfortunately, though, so far all plans have fallen through due to some local opposition and budget constraints. The last attempt to revive the line was made in 2007, driven by plans to redevelop the north shore area of Liverpool. Our Version of Events After meeting up with a couple of Liverpool based explorers, and hitting an old industrial site first, we decided to head over to the Waterloo/Victoria Tunnel. It was good to meet a couple of locals for a change because they both had an exceptional knowledge of the area – something we lack when it comes to exploring in Liverpool, unfortunately. Anyway, this saved us having to do much research and scouting for a change. So, thanks fellas! When we initially rocked up outside our chosen access point, several Network Rail guys were busy standing around a couple of shovels and one guy down a hole. Rather than leave and come back, though, we decided to sit in the car and wait for them to fuck off. Our patience paid off pretty quickly since the boys in orange decided to down tools literally five minutes after we’d parked up. Once they’d left, we gave them an additional five minutes before we grabbed our gear and made our way into the tunnels, to account for any of them who might have left their beloved tape measure or spirit level behind. The first tunnel, the Waterloo Tunnel, smelt strongly of tar or creosote. We weren’t sure of the source, but the floor was fairly manky, giving an indication that there may have been a recent spillage. That, however, was perhaps the most interesting part of this section of the explore. All in all, it didn’t seem especially exceptional – even if it was quite wide. Hoping the explore would be better in the latter half, then, we cracked on and made our way towards the open-air section. As several other reports have revealed, the open-air section/accident between the two tunnels is full of shit. It seems Liverpool folk don’t bother visiting the local tip, they simply lob their old goodies off the bridge on Fontenoy Street. Anyone seeking spare lawnmower parts, or a second-hand seatee, should get themselves straight down to the Waterloo Tunnel. Sadly, we didn’t need either, so we had to clamber over the mountain of shit instead, to reach the Victoria Tunnel on the other side. Once inside the Victoria Tunnel, we began our long walk towards Edge Hill Station. At this point, we weren’t aware how long the bloody thing is, but it soon became clear to us that the light at the end of the tunnel wasn’t getting much closer any time soon. Nevertheless, we plodded on, heading towards the small dot of light in the far distance. The Victoria Tunnel was much more interesting that its sister. A large proportion of it is brick-lined, but there are also large unlined sections that have simply been carved out. There are several ventilation shafts to look at along the way too, and each one is different to the last. It’s only now, having been inside the Victoria Tunnel, that we understand what a few of the random structures are on the surface directly above. Finally, the tunnel ends with a short section of railway track that is still in situ, which is always nice to find. The only things to be careful of down this end are Network Rail workers and, so we have been told, a camera waiting for unsuspecting visitors to the tunnel. Explored with Veryhighguy and The J Man. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27: 28: 29: 30:
  9. Just a crappy stripped out church, but something about it would tickle the nipples of a god fearing nun. But I liked it enough to take a few pictures anyway. I 'm almost sorry you had to look this report, I am scraping the barrel, but I'm not really sorry
  10. Hello, another from my long long long list of shitty cottages I have to post up on here tp convert you to the deeply weird realm of cottaging! Found this almost my accident whilst exploring with a couple friends, after walking what felt like miles through small forests, over streams, up and down heather marsh lands and over several feilds to visit some of the shittest derps you could probably imagine, I spotted this on the way down the wild hills. We took a chance as it was on a live farm, found the door open and decided to pop in for 30 mins and grabbed some pics. We all felt a bit uneasy as it was a live farm and decided to get out quickly, just as we were closing the door a car came down the drive way, and we bolted like a mini heard of highland cows stampeding our way down the side of the house and over a few fences to safety. Never been back, but one day I will! Thanks for cuming cottaging with me
  11. Kings Hall Cinema, Southall, London - September 2017 Interesting one this one! I'd wanted to do this for a while and had been planning to in the coming weeks but had been put off with the idea of its "unique access" which requires some planning in terms of times of entry! Situated on a very busy road with lots of passersby and businesses open till the very wee hours, there is a very small window to get inside as the Night Shift commute changes to the Early and Day Shift Commute. When we arrived it was around midnight and the streets were busy. We were in London so went for a little drive for an hour or so before returning. Visited with a non-member back in September;when inside we had a little lie down in a dark corner for an hour or so to allow the sun to rise just a little bit, and spent about 2 hours light painting the rooms which were boarded and anything which the abundance of daylight wouldn't help. It's a very interesting building with lots to shoot photos of and with my "loaded" parking meter fast running out, we didn't have as much time inside as we would have liked. The air inside is terrible (understandably) and the damp has caused the parquet floors inside much of the building to bow upwards, making an interesting effect! We started shooting inside the main hall at around 6am and spent some time chilling here and getting photos as the sun came up, but we only had till 8am on the car park. The street was already very busy down below by 6am and the main hall had a hue of red from some of the shops signage. When it did become time to leave, we had to jump into a street full of commuters. We were not getting out without being seen. It was 7:45am and the bus stops had queues of people at them. As I was leaving I did attempt to not be seen, but a middle aged chap turned round and looked right at me. I wished him a good morning, jumped down and walked off to get my externals. He certainly looked slightly bewildered. The cinema come Methodists Church is located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was constructed in 1916; designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The site has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was originally operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and was soon playing religious films. By 1926, Kings Hall was operating as a regular cinema; but was however still managed by the Methodist church. The Cinema was closed in 1937. It then converted back to its original Methodist Church use, and today is the King’s Hall Methodist Church. Some interesting and otherwise controversial quotes taken from comments when closure was announced. The church vacated the site in 2012. More Info at: http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/31352 #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157688232708403
  12. Moreton in the Marsh District Hospital - September 2017 Visited a few weeks ago with Mookster and two other non-members for one of their bithdays. It was a very relaxed explore as you'd expect; pretty trashed and stripped of most things, but still retained some photographic merit. We were caught on the way out by a friendly and incredibly confused security guard who didn't really have an awful lot to say and just smiled a lot! Moreton-in-Marsh Cottage Hospital was a small Victorian hospital built in the Cotswolds. It's closure in 2012 came about after a new much larger facility opened just outside the village. Moreton Cottage Hospital was built in 1873 by private subscription. Lord Redesdale gave the land at the north end of the town in Back Ends. The first small stone building had seven beds, but this was extended in 1879 following a £3,000 request by Dr. William Sands Cox, the founder of Queen's College, Birmingham. In 1886 The Joseph Phipps Charity donated a further £1,000 stock to the hospital in and an operating theatre was built in 1900. By 1919 the hospital was extended further, when £2,000 was given to the hospital, and again in 1935. Moreton in the Marsh Cottage Hospital; which had been managed by trustees, eventually came under the authority of the Banbury and District Hospital Management Committee after 1946. There are a several buildings within the site, the main hospital and a much more modernised outpatients clinic. After the hospitals closure, bits of the hospital have been used by a prop hire company as storage but now the whole site remains disused. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 Thanks for Looking, more at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157686204703971
  13. Been a little while since I posted anything. Derp Cottage, located in what some consider Miserable Scotland, visited on a windy and cold day, but it had rather nice views. Thanks for looking
  14. A piece of British WW2 History hidden under a hillside. HMS Forward, a maritime intelligence centre, was key to monitoring the English channel and and was heavily involved in D-Day. Although it's fallen into dereliction, attempts to restore and maintain it have been carried out by 'Friends of HMS Forward'. History HMS Forward was the Royal Naval HQ, setup up on the 20th of June 1940 in the Guinness Trust Holiday Home. It had responsibility for units along the south cost, including: HMS Marlborough - Eastbourne HMS Aggressive - Newhaven HMS New - Newaven HMS Vernon - Roedean HMS Lizard - Hove The tunnels of HMS Forward began life in March 1941 after an Admiralty direction that ordered channel ports to setup facilities to maintain naval plots and created the need to securely house equipment for plotting and communications. It was decided to built a network of tunnels into the a hillside of South Heighton for operations to take place from. HMS Forward was designed by Lt. Col. F.H.Foster, Commander of the Royal Engineers, and built by the 1st Tunneling Engineers Group and No 172 Tunneling Company. They were completed on the 14th of November 1941. At the time they were a state of the art facility and were kitted out for every eventuality. This including backup power generator and full air conditioning systems with gas filters. They had chemical toilets, sleeping cabins and a gallery. Although the toilet were for emergencies only and it was noted that he veterans who worked here didn't even have knowledge of these toilets. The labyrinth of tunnels had an East and West entrance. The West entrance by the main road was the main entrance. The East entrance was under the West wing of the Guinness Trust Holiday Home (now demolished). There were two Pill boxes at the top of the hill that were accessible from inside the tunnels, but were demolished long ago. During its operational period between November 1941 and August 1945, the tunnels of HMS Forward carried out many key maritime operations. It monitored the English channel from Dungeness to Selsy Bill using ten radar stations from Fairlight to Bogner Regis. It was heavily involved with D-Day as well as nightly raids on the occupied french coast. The Explore A very nice explore in a very nice set of tunnels. They are quite extensive and is quite the maze, however once you get your head round the layout its impossible to get lost. Its quite a shame that such an important piece of history has been left to rot. This is somewhere that really needs to be preserved for future generation. I'd heard that there was intention to turn it into a museum some time ago, but plans for this got scuppered by the local residents up top. It was clear that there was once some kind of open day as there were still laminated signs and notices left up by the 'Friends of HMS Forward'. Photos The West entrance with signs and notices from a previous open day / tour. Looks like it was a good few years ago though. You can see here what looks like a machine gun nest in the brick wall as you turn the very first corner. The large security gate of the West entrance. The long 100m West adit tunnel looking towards the east end. Looking from the East end of the West Adit. The two tunnels going left and right just before are the stairs up to the South and North Pill boxes. Looking up what remains of the stairs to the Northern Pillboxes. It is possible go up to the top of these, but its been sealed up at the top with rubble. The West Airlock. The Air conditioning plant room and standby generator room. The standby generator was a large diesel JP Lister engine. This provided 400V/230V power at 22Kw. Exhaust was piped through to the annex at the back of the engine room where it was exhausted through the ceiling too the surface through a 4" pipe. The start of the operational rooms of the tunnel. The room on the left side is the TURCO Office, and looking right down the long tunnel is down the length of the main tunnel with sleeping cabins. T.U.R.C.O stands for Turn Round Control Organisation, used to 'Assist naval shore authorities in the quick turn around of ships and craft'. The East gallery was used for sleep accommodation, switchboards and coders. The GPO Voice frequency equipment room. The pits in the floor are to fit the equipment in, as the modems were over 8ft tall. Looking down the East Galley and into the Teleprinters room. Looking down the the far end of the plotting rooms. The sleeping cabins. There were 4 of these for personnel on the night duty and split watches. Looking up towards the mock hen house, sealed at the top of course. The stairs up to the eastern entrance with pit at the bottom to slow down would-be invaders. The gate on the way to the East entrance. The remains of a second gate. Thanks for reading!
  15. History- The building is from the 'railway era'. The hotel was a hub of the community, it had a fantastic ballroom and restaurant. Many people came by rail to stay at Sutton Bridge. The hotel from around 2000 was used by an employment agency called StaffSmart to house workers they had lured over to the UK from South Africa to work in the local canning factory. People came from SA on the promise of hotel accommodation and didn't know until they got here that it meant inside the shell of the Bridge Hotel on damp mattresses lined up in each room, including the Ballroom. After StaffSmart vacated the hotel, it stood empty with broken windows until it was bought and restored to a high standard with plush furnishings and chandeliers. However, the hotel rooms were pricey and without the rail trade of people heading to the village, people would be passing through and tended to stay in cheaper accommodation in the area. The hotel wasn't open for long before closing down and ownership passed through several hands whilst falling further into disrepair. In 2015, workmen were spotted on the site removing roof tiles and floorboards to salvage as many building materials before it was demolished but its still standing now, so I don't know what stopped the demolition. Since then the building has unfortunately been vandalised and several fires have been set destroying about 70% of it. The Bridge Hotel in the 50's Explore- The hotel is close to me, so even though I knew the damage of the place it was still worth checking out. Access to the building was easy, a window round back was broken and a board to climb up to it was balanced kind of safely. The cellar floor, ground floor and a few rooms on the first floor were safe enough to walk around but past that there is a lot of fire damage. Pictures-
  16. This one required an early start, but the morning adventure to The Kings Hall was worth the effort. Visited with Zombizza. History "Located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was built in 1916 and was designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The King’s Hall building has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and it was soon screening religious films. By 1926, it was operating as a regular cinema, still managed by the Methodist church. The King’s Hall Cinema was closed in 1937. It then reverted back to a Methodist Church use as the King’s Hall Methodist Church. They vacated the building in January 2013" The Explore Started nice and early, and managed our entrance fairly incident free...if we don't count the massive tear in my trousers.. It's a pretty spectacular place with a wonderful blend of natural decay and marvelous original features/architecture. With little to no daylight, we decided to wonder round the back rooms while the sun came up before the spending too much time on the main attraction, the large auditorium. The rooms around the back are a weird mix of new and old, some of them being more disgusting than others. One room was so pungent that I took 2 steps in before bailing out. There was also one room that was filled with beds, old food packets and needles. Looked a few years old, but squatters for sure. The larger rooms consisted of meeting rooms, prayer rooms and teaching rooms. All of them had funky wavy flooring where the wooden floor tiles had expanded with moisture. Eventually the sun came up and the auditorium started to flood with the golden morning light. After a few hours we left, although the exit was hilariously unsubtle. Photos The Auditorium
  17. Formerly a cable factory was here (founded in 1837, closed in 2008, partially demolished). The air raid shelter was for the company's employees. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
  18. The oldest parts of the church dates back to the 12th century, the octagonal tower was added in the 13th century. The windows were renewed in the 15th century and the roof in 1633. Further renovations took place in 1867 and 1874. The church was closed in 1987, but it's maintained until today. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
  19. So this is my first post on this forum, I found out about these houses on a Abandoned Lincolnshire group on Facebook and thought they were definitely worth a trip, but... the first trip wasn't very successful, the address for these houses took us to two houses on the other side of Withcall that were at one point abandoned but have since been knocked down, so after about half an hour of looking around it became very clear the houses weren't there. After talking to the person who posted them originally and finding out the real location we headed back up to find them. We had to make sure we kept quiet as there is a neighbor attached to the 2nd station house and we weren't sure they'd have appreciated a night time visit from 3 explorers haha. Access to the house is easy, the doors being left open is always convenient. Walking around the houses only took 30 minutes or so , but was still a nice little explore. It's one of them places that besides a few repairs and some serious wallpapering, it looks like the family could just walk back through the front door and pick up their lives where they left off which gave the houses a real creepy vibe. I guess that's all that really needs to be said about these houses. Here's a few pictures: Thanks for reading:)
  20. History Due to the aircraft stationed at RAF Coningsby there was an external bomb dump, in order to Reduce the quantities of explosives stored and the number of personnel exposed to risk, along with separating explosive processing from storage were the major lessons adopted in what I believe was the reason for a bomb dump further away than normal. Historically I couldn't find much on this place. I did find out about an accident that occurred there in 1971 though. An accident which killed 2 armourers while they were preparing 68mm SNEB Rockets. Without warning, one initiated in the process building they were working in. There was an unexplained electrostatic discharge causing the rocket motor to fire. The Explore Well this is pretty close for me, literally just down the road. I have been here before. Obviously having a connection to the RAF held some interest here. I explored with @hamtagger as per We had a relatively leisurely stroll around. As far as bomb dumps go it was 'normal' in layout and relatively huge. Admin buildings scattered the front section of the site past the picket post and the remainder were process buildings or prep buildings. We ventured in to one and noticed that we hadn't seen it before, on any reports or throughout social media but it was what was inside that caught my attention. Guns & not the handheld sort. I have had to do a bit of research on this because I wasn't aware that firstly they were Royal Navy guns & secondly what type of gun they were. It turns out that there was 2 types, the first was a GCM-A03 twin barrelled Oerlikon. This had a firing seat where someone could sit, almost like a little cabin. It was a bloody tight squeeze as well and I am tiny! Apparently capable of firing 650 rounds a minute. The second which there were 2 of didn't have a firing seat so it was fired by someone either standing up and shooting it or controlled electronically. The first fired 30mm rounds while the second fired 35mm rounds. Both would have been mounted on a ship & both had the barrels removed. Next to this we also found what we believe to be a small communication suite. I have never seen one before and may never do again but it was cosy and compact! We had more or less finished when we spotted 2 blokes part literally right outside & jump over the front gate, they seemed to follow us to the rear side of the site. No camera's or owt then just disappeared. Anyway, enough of my waffle & on to the pics This is where they would have serviced Skyflash & Sidewinder missiles 1 2 This is the communication suite 3 4 The GCM-A03 twin cannon Oerlikon 5 6 7 8 This is it in action (Not my photo, obviously) 9 This was the other gun, a GCM-A01 (I believe, could be wrong) 10 The rest of the site 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 A little mention of tornado here, which became stationed at Coningsby during the Gulf War 18 Mercury Thallium is found in AIM-9 sidewinder missiles 19 20 21 thanks for looking!
  21. A look around the abandoned Beijing film academy which includes a large amount of Terracotta Army soldiers, a castle and a large Shanghai style town movie set!
  22. previously known as Frontier City, a former American Wild West theme park in Cornwall. Closed in 2009
  23. History Malsis School located at a mansion known as Malsis Hall in the village of Crosshills, in North Yorkshire, England, was a co-educational independent pre-prep and preparatory school for pupils aged three to 13 years. The school was founded in 1920 and closed due to falling pupil numbers in 2014. Facilities at the school included 3 km mountain bike trail, 9-hole golf course, swimming pool, all weather pitch, rifle range and 40 acres of grounds. The school closed on 10 December 2014, when the final assembly started at 11 am and concluded at 1 pm. The next day the school trust went into administration with Ernst & Young of Leeds. The school's assets were auctioned off and the land and building sold by Eddisons, and having fully paid off its debts it passed into creditors voluntary liquidation and the company was finally dissolved on 4 August 2017. In January 2015, The Old Malsis Association (OMA) was formed to represent the views of school alumni from down the years. Malsis Hall and its grounds have been sold to Seddon Construction, which plans to build 100 new homes on the site and transform the former school building into a specialist rehabilitation centre - subject to planning permission being granted. Proprietors Jonathan and Jamie Seddon were both former Malsis pupils in the 1980s. Explore Me & @hamtagger had seen this pop up online a few times & ventured over to yourkshire. We met @Moz88 while in the grounds before we even got in and was nice to explore with someone new. A rather ungraceful entry by all 3 of us added comedy to the explore. This place was as interesting as it's history. Literally everywhere you looked there was something ornate or some thing that caught our eye. Probably one of the nicest places I have visited. The tower had been unused for some time with no steps up to the top. The place wasn't in bad condition at all. With the main mansion house being where the interesting stuff was the back end of the school which was the newer part did hold some nice bits to see. Some of it was quite sad with pictures of the girls and boys still littering the tables and art/french work adorning the walls. I loved all of the ornamental ceilings & architecture, the pediments outside the headmasters office & main building were very 'stately home'. Anyway on to the pics. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Thanks for looking!
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