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Found 2,894 results

  1. History St. Peter’s Hospital is an NHS general district hospital in Chertsey, England. It is located on the Metropolitan Green Belt, between Woking and Chertsey. Originally, the hospital was built to serve casualties of the Second World War. Since that time, however, the facility has been rebuilt, developed and extended several times to include additional services such as a maternity ward, a new theatre complex and a clinic area. What is more, the main part of the hospital itself now has over 400 beds and a wide range of acute care services. As for the mortuary, it was constructed in the 1940s on the very edge of the site. It was in service up until April 2009, when it was decided that the building was too small to cope with the increase in cadavers. A new, larger, morgue was built closer to the central hospital. Our Version of Events It was three minutes before midnight, and we were racing down a brightly lit corridor. At the end there was a large, heavy, blast door, and we were trying to reach it. A volley of red laser beams followed us, ricocheting off the walls as we legged it. “Halt, stay where you are”, someone yelled. Not likely I thought, as I risked taking a quick glance behind me to discover that it had come from a security guard dressed entirely in white armour. There were at least eleven of them in total, all firing their blasters in our general direction. Luckily for us, though, the force was with us, or they were incredibly bad shots; either way, all of them missed us. We’d been trying to find the Millennium Falcon in Pinewood Studeos, but secca had discovered us. So now the chase was on. At the blast door, DRZ_Explorer whipped out his 1250 lumen Olight SR95S UT Intimidator which, at the push of a button, produced a long white vertical laser beam – a bit like a sword. The door was locked, so DRZ_Explorer decided to improvise. He thrust his torch into the door and set about tearing a hole in it. The rest of us watched, ducking occasionally as flashes of red erupted above us. Amazingly, even though we were motionless now, the guys in the white armour continued to miss us. It was a bloody good job too, because I’m almost certain they were breaking one or two health and safety rules. Imagine if they’d actually hit us with one of those laser beams! After hacking away at the door for a few minutes, DRZ_Explorer eventually made enough of a hole for us all to squeeze through. One by one we clambered into the other side of the corridor. All safely on the other side, we yelled for DRZ_Explorer to join us. We peered back through the hole to see what the fuck he was up to. As it turned out, he was rather preoccupied, trying to fend off security. “ Using his UT Intimidator, he managed to deflect several blasts, but one caught him on his left arm. He grimaced, but continued to waved his torch around wildly, repelling all further shots. He was doing well, until a large black figure emerged among the guards. It was the site manager. He was wearing a long black cape and wielding his own 1250 lumen Olight SR95S UT Intimidator. His was red, though, and looked a lot cooler than DRZ_Explorer’s. The site manager strode forward with his free hand raised in front of him, and then, as he continued walking forward, he clenched his fist tightly. DRZ_Explorer suddenly dropped to the floor. Gasping for breath, he grasped his throat with both hands. He was being strangled by some sort of mind control trick. “Run!”, he coughed, “Run! You must get to the Millennium Falcon!” He didn’t have to tell us twice, we didn’t want to risk getting caught, so we legged it. The last thing we heard was the site manager shout, in Intergalactic lingo, was, “Summon the droids! That will flush them out”, which in hindsight probably meant, in Planet Earth English, “turn on the fucking CCTV, that’ll put a stop to these bastard trespassers!” An hour or so later, however, and we were all in St. Peter’s Morgue. It wasn’t a great end to the night, given that this place is a right shithole, but it was better than some alternatives – such as a crematorium, or Sunderland. Unsure how long we were going to be here, or what else the evening might have in store for us, we made do with wandering around heavily graffitied rooms that were filled with heaps of shit for a while. Thankfully, though, our cameras had survived our ordeal, so we were able to take a few snaps along the way. And there we have it, that’s how we’ve all ended up with another report of St. Peter’s Morgue rather than a victorious tale with the Rebel Alliance. Explored with Ford Mayhem and DRZ_Explorer. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11:
  2. This was another stop on the Wales tour we did with @GK_WAX and @dangle_angle and dylan.afrer the early start this was the first stop of the day where we met dylan. This big old house is in a amazing location.there isn't any history on this place is simply a abandoned house and has been named AR house I presume because of the trunk in the hallway with the AR initials on it. So if anyone does have a name or more info then please tell me.the place is in a bit of a state.but does have a nice waterfall running alongside it. So here's a few photos I took..
  3. History The Odeon Cinema in Harlow, designed by T. P. Bennett & Son, was constructed in 1959. It opened on 1st February 1960 and in doing so became the first cinema to be built for the Rank Organisation (a British entertainment conglomerate) after the Second World War. The cinema originally had 1,244 seats and featured a stepped raised section at the rear, rather than the traditional overhanging balcony; a design style that had initially been common throughout the UK in both theatres and cinema houses. The projection suite was positioned above the raised section of seating and had an almost level throw to the large screen in front. The cinema closed in 1987 for refurbishment and expansion plans to be carried out. The venue was converted so that it could feature three screens and increase its overall capacity. The raised section at the back was converted into two separate smaller cinema rooms, while the ground floor, which retained the original box and screen, was kept as a larger screen room. No further work was carried out on the cinema until 2001, when the venue was rebranded to follow the new Odeon style. Only minor stylistic changes were made throughout the building. Despite growing competition in and around the local area, as larger modern multiplex screens were opened, the Odeon in Harlow managed to survive until August 2005. Nevertheless, owing to the rapidly declining number of visitors the venue was forced to close as it was no longer economically viable to run. Although it was purchased almost immediately after closure, the premises has remained abandoned since the year it closed. Our Version of Events After hearing that the old Harlow Odeon was once again doable, we decided to head over that way while we happened to be south of the border.As rumour had it, the main cinema rooms were said to still be largely intact in terms of how vandalised they were. When we first arrived, though, we thought we’d made a terrible mistake. The building looked tiny from the outside, and incredibly plain. What made things worse was that we’d managed to time getting out of the car with a freak torrential downpour, so we got fucking soaked. We made the classic mistake, unlike those quintessential British individuals out there, in that we forgot to bring a brolly with us. With there being no obvious way of getting inside initially, we were forced to take shelter for a while beneath a grotty bus stop that was obviously a popular chav haunt. There were that many empty bottles of White Lightening around us, and green gozzies on the pavement, it should have been done out in Burberry Tartan. But, the upside to seeking shelter was that we had time to think about how we might get inside the cinema. So, after a bit of creative thinking we came up with an elaborate-ish plan to access the premises. All we can say is that it’s a good job it was still raining because we were pretty damn visible getting in the way we did. Once inside we quickly discovered that the rumours seemed to be true. All around us there was a distinct lack of graffiti and still plenty of ‘stuff’ lying around to satisfy our bizarre fascination for dusty things. We quickly dried ourselves off as best as possible and then proceeded to get the cameras out. The only disappointing thing about the place at this point was the noticeable number of dead pigeons scattered around the room. It looked as though there has been an epic pigeon battle with very few survivors. There were enough skeletons to rival the Catacombs of Paris, albeit these take up much less room. Some were still fairly squishy too, as I discovered when one of my tripod legs accidently went through one of the poor bastards. Getting it off again was another issue, but we won’t go there. Anyway, despite the pigeon problem we cracked on and it wasn’t long before we found ourselves among three large-ish screen rooms. Each of them are in various states of decay, but if anything this makes them all the more photogenic – if you manage to light the fuckers up that is! That certainly wasn’t an easy task. What made it even more difficult were the surviving kamikaze pigeons that seemed determined to challenge our presence in the cinema. These must have been the victorious ones from the carnage we found earlier. Nevertheless, despite the pigeons there was still a powerful feeling as we stood amongst hundreds of empty seats. The room was silent, except for the odd flap of wings. All those empty eyes were looking ahead, all facing the same direction, mindless in their long wait for the show to begin. Perhaps it was the previous evenings beer and whiskies still talking, but this got us thinking. We were creating new images of a place – one that used to display images to wide audiences who each had their own discrete image (apparently) – whose own image was built entirely around images. Out of all those images, then, was there anything real about any of the images this building has accommodated? Or are they all just for the point of satisfying those empty eyes and minds? Absolutely fucking baffled with our own bullshit, we promptly decided to drop the topic and go check if the lights still worked. If anything, they would offer us some sort of clarity… We concluded our wander around the Odeon with a quick look at the main entrance area which was by far the most fucked part of the building. Our search for the light switches had brought us here. Despite our initial disappointment at the state of this part of the building, we did in fact find the light switch room where we discovered that the power was still turned on. Obviously, an occasion like this called for us to turn all the switches on and run around the building to see which lights were working. It was like Durham Palladium all over again! Without the risk of falling through the floorboards of course. This kept us occupied for a good fifteen minutes or so. After that, though, we decided to switch everything off and make our escape to continue with our day of intrepid exploring… Or not. As it turned out, we didn’t end up getting into anything else, so by the evening we found ourselves back in the company of a fine single malt. Explored with Ford Mayhem. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25:
  4. History Lombard Street is reputed to be one of London’s streets that is steeped in seven hundred years of banking history. It began life in the Roman times of Londinium as a wealthy city road. It later became a notable banking street on account of several Jewish goldsmith occupants sometime during the Norman conquest. However, the street did not acquire its name until Italian goldsmiths, the Longobards from Lombardy, were granted the land during the reign of Edward I. The badge of the Medici family, the three golden pills, was first displayed here, and since then it has remained as a traditional sign of the pawnbroker. It is reported that most of the large present day UK banks share history with Lombard Street. For instance, Lloyd’s of London, an insurance market now located in London’s primary financial district, began as Lloyds coffee House in 1691. From around this time, most banks established their headquarters on Lombard Street. Many remained there right up until the 1980s; the decade that signalled the end of ‘runners’ donning top hats to deliver bills of exchange to the Bank of England. Number 60., which is the rooftop this report is based on, was occupied by T.S.B for many years and it was the last bank to move its headquarters out of the street. T.S.B have assured people that their legacy will continue to be an important part of the street and that their colourful sign hanging from the front façade will be a tribute to this. On the topic of signage, Lombard Street is said to be famous for being one of the few places in London where 17th and 18th century-styled shop signs still survive, jutting from buildings on wrought-iron brackets. However, it is said that some lateral thinking is required to decipher what the old signs signify: Adam and Eve meant fruiterer; a bugle’s horn, a post office; a unicorn, an apothecary’s; a spotted cat, a perfumer’s. Many of those that remain today were the emblems of rich families and Edwardian reconstructions of early goldsmiths’ signs. It is well-known that many early 20th century banks, such as Barclays with their eagle and Lloyds with their horse, re-appropriated some of these signs as company logos. It is important to note, though, that they all chose to adopt lifeless signs as their logos, as opposed to ‘breathing signs’ (cats in baskets, rats and parrots in cages, vultures tethered to wine shacks etc.), which were very fashionable at one time. Finally, another interesting fact about Lombard Street, but one that is completely unrelated to banking, is that it is where the first love of Charles Dickens lived. The girl’s name was Maria Beadnell, and she was the daughter of a bank manager. It is said that Dickens would often walk down Lombard Street in the early hours of the morning to gaze upon the place where she slept. By today’s standard that certainly would not be considered a romantic gesture – Dickens may well have landed himself in a spot of bother if he tried peeping through girl’s windows in this day and age. Our Version of Events Despite havinghigh aspirations for the night,all of them failed. So, we were heading back to the car to call it a night when we noticed some scaffolding thatlooked ‘a bit bait’ as the locals might put it. It involved a bit of a climbing and there was no way of avoiding any onlookers from seeing us. But, since we were very desperate for a rooftop at this point, we decided to have a crack at it anyway. In the end, and contrary to all appearances, getting onto the roof of 60 Lombard Street was easy, and it wasn’t long before we were ascending the last bit of scaff to get up to the highest point on the roof. One by one we gathered in a small sheltered space, waiting for everyone to catch up before we climbed the last ladder that took us up to the highest point. But, it was at that moment we noticed that there were suddenly a lot more people around than what we’d first started out with. As it turned out, another couple of lads had decided to have a crack at the bank rooftop too. It seemed that they were just as surprised to discover us lurking about up there. At first we had thought it might some over-zealous security guards on the verge of losing their jobs if they didn’t catch us, but thankfully we were wrong. Fortunately, there was enough space up top for all of us to congregate. Since it was pretty chilly, though, we wasted no time setting up the cameras to grab a few shots. As always, the views of London were spectacular. Sadly, however, all the buildings we had wanted to get on top of were the ones surrounding us, taunting us from every direction – and they looked even more enticing from where we were standing. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Slayaaaa and Stewie. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7:
  5. visited one evening with @dangle_angle after receiving a phone call if I want to take a look. And not being to far away we met a hour later at the library.this once would have been such a grand place it still holds a lot a character but sadly this is all being stripped back to bare brick as you can see in the photos. So there looks to be work ongoing. Would have loved to have seen it in its heyday with all the fancy plaster ceilings.heres some history and photos. History West Derby Library (known locally as Lister Drive Library) was established with funding from an Andrew Carnegie (Philanthropist and Industrialist) grant, and opened in 1905. The Library is a one-storey brick built structure with stone dressings, a slate roof and an octagonal turret and was designed by Thomas Shelmerdine. The Library originally contained a lending library and a number of reading rooms. Sadly, following health and safety concerns, the library closed in 2006 and has remained vacant since. This period of un-occupation has resulted in the library being subject to theft, vandalism and neglect. In the spirit of Hidden Liverpool I am pleased to share the following exciting news.......... The ‘Lister Steps Carnegie Community Hub’ project (funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund) is currently in its development stage, however once completed Lister Steps aim to relocate their existing childcare services into the building. The completed Library will also serve as a centre for community engagement, a ‘hub’ offering refreshments, activities and training opportunities for the local community and visitors. The project will shortly begin a period of consultation with stakeholders and members of the community. The project aims to host a number of heritage activities in the near future such as tours of the Library and an oral history project.
  6. UK

    This is one of the most ornate and beautiful chapels I've ever seen, even though its been deteriorating badly since closing around 1999. Bought at auction three years back, but it seems nothing has been done to stop it the rot. Call me cynical but sadly it's the same old story of cash-rich buyer sees a medium term investment on a listed building. The plan? Simple: let it get beyond repair, knock it down and build some shitty apartments thereby making a handsome return on the investment. I hope I'm wrong. It was built in 1842, rebuilt in 1867 and elaborated in 1890. In its day this place would have hosted the biggest and most important events and in a back room here there was a meeting that ended up having a huge impact on recent Welsh history. In fact there's a blue plaque outside to commemorate it. On with the pics - Be seeing you
  7. Went to do the shopping but the shop was abandoned! We found a cookie though, but it was out of date. Far from the average explore this one. Maybe not at the top of everyones list to explore, but let’s face it… How often is it your local co-op or any supermarket in that fact is closed and abandoned? Best of all with power left on! Explored with onethirtytwo_ for the second location of the day, we feared it may be a failed explore as the outside of the building looked like a new build. However on closer inspection the building was sealed up and locked tight. After a brief hop over the fence and casual stroll around the grounds, we soon found our way in. Making our way through building, we found our way to the shop floor. What a sight it was, excuse the cliche but it really did look like a post-apocalyptic scene with the power still on, alarms beeping away and fridges and freezers still humming. History on the place? Well… it’s a co-op, what more do you need to know?
  8. With a slightly later Easter weekend start to the day than usual, making my way over to a certain church in Essex to meet with onethirtytwo_ to kick off the days splore. Now before I continue with this, despite our best attempts and even flagging down a local, we did not manage to venture inside the church itself, so in effect was a failed explore. However in true UD fashion a report is a report so I will share the few external shots I did get. There’s very little history on this place so won’t be posting any history with this report unfortunately.
  9. History HM Prison Bullwood Hall in Hockley, Essex, was a Category C (for individuals who are unlikely to attempt escape but cannot be trusted in open conditions) women’s prison and Young Offenders Institution run by the Her Majesty’s Prison Service. It was built in the 1960s to service as a female borstal – a type of youth detention centre sometimes known as a ‘borstal school’ – on the grounds of Bullwood Hall and its 48.2 acre estate which was purchased by the Prison Commissioners in 1955. In later years, the facility was extended to hold adult female prisoners. This amalgamation, however, was the cause of much controversy as many critics argued that it is unlawful and unethical to hold young girls in the same institution as adult female offenders, especially since they cannot be treated in the same way. All in all, the prison had a maximum capacity of two hundred and thirty-four. These cells were split between seven different wings designated A-G. A Wing had thirty cells over two landings; B Wing had thirty-two cells over two landings; C Wing had thirty-three cells over two landings; D Wing had eighteen single cells and eight doubles; E Wing had six single and six double cells; F Wing had six single cells; and G Wing was an induction area with forty double cells over two landings. As with most prisons across the UK, Bullwood also featured a sports hall, outdoor Astroturf field and gymnasium, communal and general recreation areas and other services that were housed in adjoining buildings to the prison. In 2002 Bullwood Hall prison was featured in a television series of six thirty minute documentaries titled ‘The Real Bad Girls’. Although the facility was portrayed in a positive light, a report by the Chief Inspector of Prisons emerged in 2005 criticising the establishment for still using the practice of ‘slopping out’ (the manual emptying of human waste when prison cells do not feature a flushing toilet). In 2006 the prison was also singled out for its high levels of attempted suicide and self-harm amongst its inmates. By the end of 2006 a decision was made to move all female prisoners to alternative sites and change the facility into a prison targeted specifically at housing foreign national prisoners. On the whole, the institution was rated as being successful, safe and purposeful; although, a number of concerns were still highlighted. While the general environment was rated as being good, there were still concerns about sanitation arrangements, which were viewed as degrading, and the rehabilitation programme that was meant to reduce the risk of reoffending and support resettlement back into the community. The reoffending criticism was highlighted as the principal concern because there was no offending behaviour programme in place. Instead, prisoner’s immigration statuses were reported as taking precedence over behaviour management. Despite efforts to improve the standards of the facility, the government announced that the institution would be one of seven British prisons to close in 2013. The announcement was made on 10th January 2013 and the site closed on 28th March 2013. Bullwood Hall has remained abandoned since this time. Our Version of Events Although we’d heard that Bullwood Hall prison was sealed up tight we decided to try our luck and pay the place a quick visit.After all, there’s something particularly enticing about breaking into a prison. So, after a spot of breakfast on our journey over to Hockley, we arrived at the site in good time to have a proper search around for a possible way in. The first twenty minutes of wandering and examining every potential way of getting inside proved fruitless though, and we were rapidly losing all hope that we’d get inside. However, after squeezing our way though some very prickly brambles and other spikey shit around the back of the site, we stumbled across a gaping hole in the fence. The only problem was that someone had cut it fairly high up, to avoid a solid metal plate fixed behind the lower levels of the wire mesh. Somehow, we managed to scale the fence and squeeze our way through the makeshift gap. But, in the process we pretty much destroyed the clothes we were wearing by puncturing them with holes as the cutters of the opening had done a very crude job. It was certainly a very painful experience; although, getting in and out this way was still way more preferable than clambering over the razor wire at the top of the fence. Once on the other side we hobbled on and headed straight for the cell blocks ahead of us. Unfortunately, we quickly discovered that the main cell block was sealed up tight, so we had to make do with touring around some of the smaller wings. However, this quickly turned out to be a lot more interesting than we’d first anticipated because we ended up convincing ourselves that we’d tripped some sort of alarm. After spending a little over five minutes in one of the cell blocks, we suddenly heard the all-too-familiar sound of bleeping. But we were unsure where the alarm was actually coming from, or where the live sensors were, and after a fairly thorough search we still failed to uncover the cause of the sound. From that point on we were almost certain that security would be on their way – because we’d heard they’re pretty ‘on it’ at this site – so we made haste to cover as much of the facility as possible before we ended up as temporary residents of Bullwood Hall. Half an hour later, though, and with much of the site covered, it was pretty obvious that no one was coming for us. So, feeling less like fleeing convicts, we slowed down the pace and took a bit more time taking our photographs. All in all, then, the prison was fairly photogenic, but the fuck load of graffiti scrawled over the place spoiled it a wee bit. It kind of reminded us of an Aussie explore – which tend to be absolutely caked in shit graff. Nevertheless, it’s always cool to have free roam of a prison for a couple of hours. After that, having satisfied our desire to be governors of the institution for a while, we called it a day and made our exit through the same painful entranceway we’d used previously to get in. From there we made our way back to the car and quickly discovered that we’d left the driver’s side door wide open the entire time we’d been in the prison. Fortunately, everything was still in place inside the car, including our phones, and the vehicle itself was still there. Our luck must be down to the fact that we were parked outside a former prison. Had we done the same thing outside George Barnsleys or the Falcon Works, I can’t say there would still have been a car there upon our return. Explored with Ford Mayhem. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27:
  10. History RAF Spadeadam is an active Royal Air Force station in Cumbria, close to the border of Northumbria. Covering 9,000 acres, it is the largest RAF base in the United Kingdom. It is currently used as an Electronic Warfare Tactics Range, to train the Royal Air Force and NATO allies. It is also the only mainland UK location where aircrews can drop practice bombs. Spadeadam has always been a remote and uninhabited part of England, until 1955 when the Intermediate Ballistic Missile Test Centre was constructed for the Blue Streak missile project – a project that was launched to develop a nuclear deterrent missile. The RAF took over the base in 1976 and under their control it became the Electronic Warfare Tactics Range in 1977. The range itself contains ground-based electronic equipment, including some that was manufactured in the Soviet Union, that create simulated threats to train aircrews. Across the site there are different real and dummy targets which include an airfield, a village, portable buildings, tanks, aircraft, anti-aircraft guns and vehicle convoys. The site was originally used in secret as part of Britain’s Cold War nuclear weapons programme. This information was only made public in 2004 when tree-felling work uncovered the remains of abandoned excavations for a missile silo. Since then, the RAF and English Heritage have attempted to survey the site and record what was so secret about the place, because there are no official records or plans for the base still in existence from the Cold War period. What is known, however, is that Spadeadam was chosen as a launch site because of its isolation, access to road connections and the surrounding environment which supported it with plenty of water. It is thought that Spadeadam was meant to be one of sixty launch sites across the UK, but most of these were never built. This report is based on the practice airfield area of RAF Spadeadam. It is hidden away in a small forest and completely surrounded by a peat bog. The airfield itself comprises a triangular shaped runway which features a number of aircraft (mostly MIG fighter jets), military vehicles and anti-aircraft guns. Our Version of Events It was a decent sunnyafternoon and we were a little tired of being indoors, so we decided to follow up a lead we had on an abandoned airfield somewhere in Northumbria. The journey was great, all the way up to the borders of Northumbria at least. But, from that point on the heavens opened and what had previously been a glorious day was now a very shit one. Nevertheless, rather than turn back we figured we’d just get wet and have a look for abandoned aeroplanes anyway. We arrived, in the middle of absolutely fucking nowhere and were getting slightly concerned about how long it had taken us to get there. It took a moment to get our bearings, since there is no signal out in the sticks, but we had a vague idea which way we had to walk. So, ready to rock and roll we ditched the car at the side of the road and headed off into the vast bog in front of us. Fortunately, at this point the rain had stopped, but unfortunately we instantly got soaked as we plodded across land that deceived us into thinking it was solid. This epic struggle continued the entire way. If anyone has ever seen the Vicar of Dibley sketch, where she jumps into the puddle and completely disappears, this was exactly like that. After much scrambling around in the bog, and wandering through dense patches of forest, we were well and truly lost. No signal, no map, no food, but plenty of water… It was bad craic. For some reason, though, we decided to have one last wander through some pine trees. We were feeling pretty deflated at this point, so I’m not sure what was driving us on, but in the end we were glad we did carry on. After another ten minutes of aimless wandering, we caught a glimpse of something that looked conspicuously like the tail of a fighter jet. I’ve never heard of mirages in a peat bog before, so I instantly decided that what we were seeing must have been real. Instantly forgetting about how miserable we’d been feeling, we waded on, working our way towards a great big silver MIG that was glistening in the fading sunlight. Once we reached the runway, we were surprised to discover that it wasn’t tarmac. It was some shitty gravel substance that was just as waterlogged as the damn bog. But, right in front of us were two shiny MIG fighter jets, and they looked fucking awesome after all the walking. So, conscious that daylight was rapidly turning into night, we whipped out the old cameras and began our invasion of the airfield. We began with the first two jets and then made our way towards what appeared to be an abandoned fuel truck further in the distance. It took a few minutes to get there, but it was well worth it since we could suddenly see six or seven more aircraft and several guns a little further ahead. Our assault had been successful, and we soon found ourselves surrounded by more guns and bombs than even Rambo could handle. We also found a few unused smoke grenades which is something we’ve never encountered on an explore before. We hung around the airfield until darkness was nearly upon us, then decided to call it a day because we suddenly remembered we had to walk back through a forest and a bog to get back to the car. So, still having been undetected by the RAF, we made our way back to the treeline. A little more worried about stepping on a mine now after discovering the grenades, or some sort of unexploded bomb, we headed off back into the bog. The same shit journey we’d endured an hour or so previously began all over again. Splish, splash, splosh… Those three sounds were back again, and they all sounded just as shit as before. Explored with Rizla Rider. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22:
  11. This nice chapel was found by chance as we drove past and noticed it wasn't in use anymore and looking a bit sorry for its self with a few broken windows and overgrown so decided to take a look inside. Here's a few photos and a bit of history ..visited with @dangle_angle and @GK_WAX and a non member.. Site Description Soar Methodist Chapel was first built in 1806, rebuilt in 1845 and enlarged in 1864. Soar was rebuilt for the final time in 1877, by architect Richard Owen of Liverpool, in the Romanesque style of the gable entry type with an integral tower.
  12. History “Here in Sheffield we have a proud sporting heritage and it is important that we build upon that to create the right environment in which the sportsmen and women of the future can train, develop and thrive… But it isn’t just about the elite, it is about every man, woman and child in our city being fitter, healthier and enjoying physical activity” (Isobel Bowler, cabinet member for culture, sport and leisure at Sheffield council). Chapeltown Baths opened sometime at the beginning of the 1960s. Locally, the facility was very popular, especially among children, and many people have indicated that the place has played a big part in their lives. The baths also held regular swimming galas which always attracted large audiences as parents and guardians would flock to the stands to observe. However, despite the fondness for the centre, it was often regarded as being too small and outdated. One for the clubs that used the pool on a regular basis, for instance, had to establish a waiting list for the people wanting to join. New plans to redevelop the site into a larger, more modern, venue were launched by Sheffield Council sometime between 2010 and 2015. Plans for the new facility revealed that a two-storey extension would be added to the front of the existing building, to house a gymnasium, flexible activity/exhibition space and a community café. The aim was to create a welcoming and revitalised health and fitness centre for the local area. The main entrance was to be moved to the back of the current site where a large glazed atrium would be constructed, and, as for the pool itself, it was to be modernised and larger changing areas for both males and females were to be installed. Nevertheless, in the end the plans were scrapped as it was decided that the site was simply too small to revamp and in the long run would not offer value for money. After the original plans were abandoned, a plan to build a brand-new leisure centre was proposed. The new £7 million project was quickly accepted and construction of the facility began in 2015, up the road from the old site in High Green. The erection of the new leisure centre was said to have been one of the first leisure developments in Sheffield in over a decade. The Thorncliffe Recreation Centre is now open and most of the staff from Chapeltown Baths were said to have been moved over. Various reports suggest that the new pool is larger and has an extra lane, and that a new community has been established there. Although the new site does not have the same character, local residents generally seem happy with the new facility. As for the former Chapeltown Baths site, it has remained abandoned since the beginning of 2016. No plans have been set in stone yet; however, it is rumoured that the building will be demolished to make way for affordable housing. In the meantime, like most abandoned sites, the building has experienced increasing incidents of vandalism in recent months as local goons have managed to get their hands on a few brushes, several tins of Wilko One Coat and a box of safety matches. Smoke at the site was reported in March 2017, coming from the basement, and this resulted in the fire service being called to attend the scene. It is reported that they and had to cut their way into the building to extinguish a small fire. Fortunately, in this instance there was very little damage. As things stand presently, SCAFF Security Alarms Ltd. claim they have sealed the premises and installed various security systems to prevent any further vandalism. Our Version of Events With a couple of hours to kill before we hit some of Sheffield’s legendary pubs later that evening, we decided to pop across to Chapeltown and take a look at the old public swimming pool that had recently been brought to our attention. None of us have ever been to Chapeltown before and I can’t say we were expecting to discover anything amazing there, but one thing we did notice is that the townspeople aren’t doing themselves any favours in terms of attracting tourists to the area. For instance, there’s a large sign in the centre of the town that reads, ‘Fast trains to Sheffield and Barnsley’, implying that you should probably get going as soon as possible. However, we chose to ignore the advice and hang around for a little while instead. Finding the old swimming pool wasn’t particularly difficult. We sort of stumbled across it before needing to consult Google Maps for guidance. After that, we lingered around the bus stop that’s positioned right outside for a while, trying to work out why the metal shutter that should have been covering the main entrance looked like someone had had a go at it with a tin opener. At first, we were convinced that some incredibly ambitious explorer had decided to break in that way, rather than simply peel off a board. But, as we discovered later on, it turns out it was the firefighters who’d hacked a hole in the shutter. Even so, there was no evidence that they’d managed to get into the building that way – unless they had the keys to the building – because the front door behind it was still locked up tight. Fortunately, though, the shutter wasn’t the only opening the fire service had created. It is thanks to those guys, then, and their arsenal of cutting tools that we managed to get inside. Once inside the building, we didn’t have to worry about being spotted from the outside since all the windows at ground level had been boarded over. This made capturing images a bit easier because we could wave the torches around a bit. However, the downside to our visit was that we were a bit late getting to this one as the local goons have been inside and clearly they got a little bit overexcited. Hence why there’s a mountain of shit in the pool and broken glass everywhere. On the positive side, however, the fire damage was minimal, limited to a very small section of the basement area. In that sense, the rest of the building remains unscathed. All in all, it took us around forty minutes to cover the building from the basement to the loft. Afterwards, we left feeling satisfied that something new in Sheffield had turned up, but even more delighted that we were heading straight for The Fat Cat for no fewer than eight pints of Kelham Island’s finest and a plate of homemade curry. Many hours later, after an innumerable number of pints, two curries and several packets of peanuts, we staggered back out onto the streets of Sheffield. We were tempted to have a quick look at Minitron while we were so close, but since the lampposts on the other side of the street were swaying in a very unusual manner, we decided to call it a day and head back into town for one final pint before bed. Explored with Soul. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27:
  13. Another stop on our Wales tour was this old mill. Myself @dangle_angle and @GK_WAX and non member Dylan. The mill is in bad condition but I was surprised how bright and good condition the spools had kept. Wasn't a lot to see. But it did have a nice river and waterfall running along side the mill. Here's some history and photos.. History Leri Mills was one of Ceredigions first woolen mills. It was built from around 1809 consisting of several buildings; two tweed mills, a spinning and carding shed, a wool / washing shed, a dye shed and a craft shop. Initially the tweed was sold locally to farmers and miners but for at least the last thirty years of operation the mill was open to the public, with demonstrations of all of the processes on view, and most importantly a shop that sold tweed, garthen (a tapestry used as a bed covering), rugs and postcards. The rise of foreign travel in the late seventies led to a fairly rapid decline in business Sadly the mill finally stopped trading in April 1981 and was initially put on the market for £150,000. A buyer wasn't found and the mill remains in the family that ran it from at least 1950.
  14. Visited with @GK_WAX and dangle_angle and another non member this was another place on the Wales tour. And this little old chapel had certainly seen its best days.it was totally rotten with huge holes in the roof. We didn't stay very long and only took a few photos so here's a bit of history to go with them History Salem Methodist Chapel was built in 1833 in Arthog, near Barmouth in North Wales. In 1868 it was rebuilt in the Gothic style of the gable-entry type, by architect Thomas of Landore, and eventually closed in 1973. Apparently the owner of the building moved abroad to avoid paying a bill for a quarter of a million pounds, which means as a result the walls and other works of the structure are unsafe to passing motorists and local residents due to lack of maintenance. It has been assessed and surveyed and is deemed likely to collapse on itself if it does go.
  15. This house seemed to come on the urbex scene then vanish.I was asked along on a visit here early March 2017.It was indeed a very interesting explore due the massive content of personal affects left behind as you will see.I understand the house was built 1865 and in the last few decades was converted into four flats.Each flat had a piano and we counted at least six pianos throughout! The house belonged to Doctor Annette Drummond-Rees and I reckoned she was a shopaholic as all over this house in the last few years was bags of china ornaments that was purchased from charity shops,but the thing that surprised me was it appeared she simply put the bag on the stairs unopened never to be looked at again.Lets show you what I mean... The House Part of the conversion has already started falling down A few old cars have been left to rot In the hallway we see the first of many many places to sit The good Doctors lounge or at least one of them! One of six pianos Another lounge Heading upstairs now The sight that greeted us on the landing..flats 2 and three with spare pianos ..more pianos later Those shopping bags containing ornaments from charity shops were strewn on every stair One of my fellow explorers got this to play the Dambusters record..a most surreal thing to hear from a distance I loved this arched window atop of the stairs Flat 2`s lounge..yes another piano! Flat 2 bedroom Dr Fox Flat 3 lounge..yep,complete with piano We are now in the attic rooms now Attic bedroom..looked pretty comfortable And lastly,some essential bedtime reading.. Well that was Mountfield House folks,if you want a more concise walk through,the rest can be seen yer below https://klempner69.smugmug.com/Mountfield-House-2017/
  16. UK

    So here is a short film I made on a few abandoned train carriages in Norfolk. Probably not going to appeal to all tastes, ya may find the intro comical though. As I have said before I don't want to make shaky cam videos so trying to work out ways of making them with steady shots. Thanks for watching and I hope you enjoyed. I have a few other bits on my channel from non exploring to tutorials. Feel free to take a look.
  17. My latest short film turned out to be a bit special. I learnt a lot making this film, from shooting to editing. It could be considered a bit arty farty by some. So I returned to an abandoned house I found just over two years ago. The first visit I didn't get any footage I was happy with so returned with a new plan. Sadly I can't find any history on this small house but I believe the site was once a garden centre. Thanks for watching and I hope you enjoyed. Apologies to the Raw One for another video report.
  18. History Built in 1902 the now disused Theatre Royale located on Corporation Street, Hyde, Manchester has a nicely preserved auditorium and an excellent projection booth full of 3 large projectors. The building opened as a Theatre in 1902 with a seating capacity of 1000 and briefly operated as a Cinema in 1914 when its name changed to New Royal Cinema. This was, however, short-lived and the name reverted back to Theatre Royal as pantomimes became the regular performance of choice. In 1950 the building was used as a repertory theatre for two years before reverting back to a Cinema use with only the occasional Christmas pantomime being performed. The last formal theatre performance took place in 1972 after which time the building was used completely as a Cinema until its closure in 1992. Demolition consent was obtained in 1999 with plans to redevelop the site for housing however, the building was spot-listed in 2000 preventing the demolition. A preservation trust was established in 2001 Theatre Royal Onward and they continue to fight for the preservation of the building. Most recently the building was reported to have been sold to The Islamic Resource Centre in November 2016. Our visit Visited with @AndyK! and @SpiderMonkey This was quite an unusual explore given the location of the building being attached to a live theatre. Co-incidentally the theatre next door had a performance on when we were exploring and the noise of the laughter and participation from the building next door echoed through the empty auditorium as we photographed it. It was strange and surreal having a distant muffled soundtrack of the building going on in the background but for me, it really made the explore all the more interesting. First stop was the projector room… Wow! probably one of the best and most well preserved I have seen. 2 large Kalee Projectors and another even bigger projector behind it, plenty of film reels and a cool little record player. The auditorium itself was cosy and had 2 balconies decorated with plasterwork. The stage still had its golden curtains hanging above it covered in dust, all in all, an awesome Cinema explore, enjoy the photos: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. Higher res copies and a couple more photos on my website: https://www.proj3ctm4yh3m.com/urbex/2016/12/17/urbex-theatre-royal-hyde-manchester-march-2016/
  19. I have held back on posting this place for quite a while, but it seems everyone knows about it now and all of the contents of these rooms has since been removed. This one may be quite graphic or disturbing for some, and I understand that. These were found inside a live university building, tucked away on one of the top floors, behind a locked door and somehow forgotten about. There were a few bits in this building that had been unused for quite some time, including another room full of organs, and two autopsy rooms hidden away in the basement. It seems that some of these areas may have been open to the public at one point, judging by various information posters on the walls. This place was really interesting to see, incredibly surreal when close up and in person. Visited with Val and @AndyK!. Organs - The "Little Miracles" - It seems as though these were previously part of some sort of exhibition, at a sort of museum the medical school had in house at some point, perhaps? Pretty dark stuff. One of the autopsy rooms - Complete with tools and a porcelain table. Hope posting this here is OK. Thanks for looking.
  20. Last month @SpiderMonkey and I were given the heads-up on this place and after a quick Google we decided to head down to Worcester at the next available opportunity. We noticed a few people had tried before, only to find active security scuppering their success, so we were slightly apprehensive about what we may have to deal with. It would seem we got lucky with timing and found it relatively relaxed. I had serious wind that day! History St Mary’s Convent School was originally Battenhall Mount, an impressive house built around 1865-9 for William Spriggs, a Quaker and Worcester Clothier, in the Italianate style popularised by Prince Albert. In the 1890s the house was enlarged in a matching style by the architect John Henry Williams of Worcester for the Hon. Alfred Percy Allsopp. Allsopp was a local brewer who owned the Star Hotel and was Mayor of Worcester in 1892, 1894 and 1905. The original house is now incorporated into the South West corner of the property. The building was used as a convalescent home during the First World War. It then became the home of the Sisters of St. Marie Madeleine Postel, a Roman Catholic Teaching Order, in 1933. St. Mary’s was a popular and well-regarded independent nursery and school until its closure in 2014. Italianate styled interior, matching the external appearance... Moving into the music room, which was just as impressive with its large fireplace And this drawing room! Entrance lobby and top of the tower Moving further, we find the later addition of buildings that forms the main concentration of classrooms Yes, we tried it out! Nursery St Mary's School also has a nursery in the same grounds, in a separate building set a little away from the main buildings.
  21. Visited this one a year ago on the way to Scotland with @AndyK! The mortuary sits just on the edge of the Maiden Law hospital site, where there a few other derpy looking buildings and a live nursing home at the back of the site. Not really a lot to say about this one. It's a pretty nice morgue with a great amount of derp, and a tasty porcelain slab. Enjoy! Pics - Cheers
  22. History Teesside Steelworks was a large steelworks located along the south bank of the River Tees between Middlesbrough and Redcar in the unitary authority area of Redcar and Cleveland in the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, England. Located near the mouth of the River Tees close to the river’s outfall into the North Sea, the site’s blast furnace was the second largest in Europe (The largest at the time when it first fired up in 1979). Originally mothballed in 2010 after the loss of a large contract the Blast Furnace was relit in 2012 after new owners stepped in to restart production. However, the new owners fell into liquidation in October 2015 prompting the closure of the site once again. Parts of the site still remain in use but a lot of the production within this area has ceased with the loss of thousands of jobs. Our trip Visited with Pete (non-member), we had intended to get there early and climb the furnace in the dark, however, when we arrived we found all the access ladders had been cut away leaving us to have to find a more creative way to get up there… Needless to say, the delay led to a daylight climb as far as I could manage without becoming too exposed to the countless security patrols below We had fun having a mooch around the blast furnace but after deciding we had pushed our luck enough for the day we made our exit narrowly avoiding a foot patrol meters below us as we were climbing down Fun times enjoy the photos: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. Higher res copies on my site along with a couple more shots: https://www.proj3ctm4yh3m.com/urbex/2017/01/07/teeside-steelworks-blast-furnace-redcar-april-2016/
  23. History Originally a tiny quarry started in 1872 this huge site is now three quarries joined by short tunnels. Over seven miles of narrowgauge track was laid down and the site gradually grew. Using just a mobile crusher and plenty of local labour 60-65 rail trucks,each carrying 8 tonnes,left every weekend full of stone. With the introduction of steam drills and cranes by 1910 four trains (going in each direction) were leaving. The yard never had a rail sidings at this point and shared the line with passenger trains- Sundays were the only days there wasn't a passenger service! In June 1944 the line was designated freight only and stayed that way until the sites closure in 2012. Thanks for looking
  24. History (Forgotten Relics) The Midland Railway opened its 7½-mile branch from Yate to Thornbury in stages, completing it in September 1872. The line had opened to Tytherington in 1869 but the intervening 2¼ miles required a pair of tunnels to be engineered, totalling 391 yards. The longer of these, at 224 yards, was found 5 miles and 46 chains from the start of the branch and a stone's throw from the station at Tytherington, which gave its name to it. Climbing a challenging 1:59 gradient, trains encountered the unassuming east portal as the single track curved southwards on a radius of 39 chains. Built in brick and colonised by ivy, it features four square pattress plates around the crown of the arch. The lining, comprising four brick rings and vertical sidewalls, only extends for about 10 yards; thereafter the tunnel shows off the rock through which it was driven. Towards the middle is a single ventilation shaft. This was reduced in height and capped with an unusual brick dome when the M5 motorway was constructed across the tunnel in 1970-71. The railway had closed to passengers during the Second World War and goods in September 1967. A final train ran two months later, after which the track was quickly lifted. However in July 1972, the route was reopened as far as Grovesend Quarry, immediately west of the tunnel. This operational period ended in 2012 with the quarry's closure, although there have subsequently been calls to reopen the line to serve the sizeable town of Thornbury. Pics Thanks for looking.

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