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Found 3,049 results

  1. History Farringdon Hall Police Station was built in the 1960s and, at one time, it was the main station serving Sunderland West. However, in 2014, following a move by Northumbria Police to cut costs and reinvest money in front-line policing, the station was one of many in the north east earmarked for closure. Sections of the four-storey building were closed down in stages, until the last remaining officers were moved from the site at the end of 2015. Farringdon Hall is currently on the property market with an asking price of £400,000. The property description describes it as being a spacious building that provides ‘open plan and cellular accommodation including the old custody suite and cells’. An additional perk is that it offers two separate parking areas. Nonetheless, since becoming abandoned there has been little interest from potential buyers. The only thing the old station seems to be attracting is vandalism. Depending on how you look at it, then, it could be argued that the building is continuing to serve its original purpose as there are still a lot of local goons and yobs inside. Our Version of Events Exploring Farringdon Hall was a last-minute idea after we happened to find ourselves in the land of the Smoggies. We were heading back after an afternoon of hunting for a car and, after spotting Krypton’s report on 28days, decided we might as well have a quick nosy inside. For the most part, we’d say the explore is OK. As Krypton has pointed out, there’s not much point in venturing upstairs. The only reason why you might spend twenty minutes visiting this place lies on the ground floor, and it’s called the custody suite. This is a medium-sized section of the police station that’s designed to process and detain people who have managed to find themselves on the wrong side of the law. In here you can find a reception area, a small medical room, a couple of interview rooms, a fingerprinting/photography room, several cells and a storage cupboard that would have contained documents and all the inmates’ belongings. Once we’d checked out the custody suite, we made the mistake of making our way upstairs. Other than a couple of kitchens, virtually all the other rooms were completely stripped. It is perhaps worth taking the stairs all the way to the roof though. It’s always good to seek out the view from the top. Explored with MKD. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27: 28: 29:
  2. Ever since I started becoming interested in derelict buildings, Houghton Grange was always somewhere I had wanted to visit but for one reason or another I never found myself in the right place, or with the right people, or whatever. However with plans for this weekend changed I was left with a free day so I hastily got on the phone to an old exploring friend and asked if he was about - after a discussion with his wife he told me he was able to come out and play so off we went Cambridgeshire-bound. First stop was for me to show him the Old Rectory Care Home, which I found a whole load more depressing than when I first saw it in the summer - the floors have turned from 'minor deathtrap' to 'outright lethal' in a few short months and the water pouring through from the rain lashing down gave the whole place a real dark, dank feeling that I don't think either of us really enjoyed. So it was onwards to the main target of Houghton Grange and after a trek across the fields we made our way in. The site has clusters of buildings spread over a large area centred around the old manor house which is flanked by two sets of modern buildings. We explored for a while, it's a shame the place is so samey for the most part but then we got to the part of the site which has been dubbed 'Lab X' by other explorers. This building is almost completely dark inside and has an atmosphere to match, I always thought the old BIBRA labs in Carshalton that served a similar purpose which I explored a good few years ago would have been the only one to give me the jitters like that. The building is different to all others on site, the laboratory doors are thick reinforced jobbies doubled up with airlocks and there are extremely creepy concave plexiglass windows looking into each room. After that my friend had had enough - he was with me on the BIBRA explore too - and as time was chopping on anyway we made our exit. The place has been done a million times before so I won't bother with the history, it was an animal research lab, lots of nasty stuff happened there, thats all you really need and probably want to know. Thanks for looking
  3. The last piece of Pye. I’m sure everyone who visited Pyestock before it was demolished will remember the Anechoic Facility, that one last bit of the puzzle that couldn’t be visited. The blue-tailed building was still in use long after the demolition of the rest of the site, and is the only surviving part of Pyestock’s original host of facilities. This last part of the site has now also closed. Visited with @SpiderMonkey and @darbians. The National Gas Turbine Establishment. For those who don’t know, NGTE Pyestock - The National Gas Turbine Establishment - was a huge industrial site in Fleet, Hampshire. The site was used to test jet engines during their development and could simulate the conditions of flight in huge wind tunnels. Large scale expansion took place throughout the 50s and 60s to facilitate the much larger jet engines being developed such as those used on Concorde. The site finally closed in 2000 due to a decline in jet engine development and the advent of computer aided simulations. The Noise Test Facility A lot of research into noise took place at NGTE over the years, and the first anechoic chamber was built in the early 1960s. The increasing demand for quieter aircraft stimulated the more research work, and as a result a larger test facility capable of undertaking large scale noise tests on a variety of gas turbine components opened in the 1970s. The new facility consisted of two main laboratories, fully independent of each other. These were the Absorber Rig Facility and the Anechoic Chamber facility. The Absorber Rig Facility was the first to be completed and it came into service in the summer of 1972. The Anechoic Chamber Facility was commissioned just over one year later in early 1974. The noise test facility in the 1970s before the blue inlets were installed The blue air intakes and associated fans were installed during a refit in the 1990s The plans below show the general layout of the building. The anechoic chamber is central with silenced air intakes to the left and the silenced exhaust duct and extraction fans to the right. The induced airflow passes through the anechoic chamber where the noise tests were conducted. The Anechoic Facility has a 10,000 cubic metre chamber for noise testing in which the enclosed working volume has nearly zero noise reflection, thereby reproducing environmental conditions which can be compared to those in flight, and permits work to separately identify the source and direction of noise wave phenomena. The building is principally intended for the noise testing of jets, turbines and certain configurations of acoustically lined ducts. Broadly, the facility consists of an acoustically lined main test chamber 85ft wide and 46ft high with an overall length of 88ft, but which is reduced to 52ft at the working section. The jet flow from the main noise source is projected towards an acoustically lined, flared duct 28ft diameter at inlet with a 20ft diameter throat, which acts as an exhaust inducer. General view of the anechoic chamber with the exhaust duct to the left and working section to the right View towards the exhaust duct showing fixed microphone towers View from a hatch at the top of the working section, showing ceiling mounted crane Three observation galleries were positioned around the chamber. Each could be retracted to preserve the room's anechoic properties: The most striking feature of the anechoic chamber itself is the sound reflecting wedges of which there are nearly 7,000 units covering the walls, ceiling and floor. Three individual wedges are mounted together on a base-frame to form each single unit 610mm square; these units are then arranged over the chamber surfaces so that each successive unit has its wedge peak edges at right angles to the neighbouring unit. The working section was modified during refurbishment in the 1990s. A permanent nozzle was fitted through which high pressure air could be blown in using the blue external assembly shown in earlier pictures. Inside the working section the area where jet engines would be positioned was replaced with a network of pipelines feeding the new nozzle. Large air inlet pipe behind the nozzle The rig room before the refit The exhaust collector was responsible for transferring the jet engine exhaust gasses and induced air from the chamber to the exhaust silencing structure behind it. It is acoustically treated around its periphery, this lagging consists of heavy density rockwool 8in thick, faced with cotton sheeting and perforated galvanised mild steel sheet. The duct itself is prefabricated from 0.25in thick steel plate and has a total length of 35ft. The exhaust collector Selfie shows the scale of this huge hole in the wall Behind the exhaust collector Air and exhaust gasses then pass into the exhaust silencing structure. The main features of the structure, other than the exhaust collector are the acoustically slabbed walls of the concrete ducts which reverse the flowpath, two sets of silencing exit splitters, high and low frequency, and the ten exhaust extraction fans. Low frequency splitters on the left, and one of the two sets of high frequency splitters on the right. The pole is a fixed microphone boom. Another selfie showing scale The fan units themselves are double axial units having two counter-rotating six bladed fans in each pod, both with its own electric motor. One of the two sets of five extract fans, plus one redundant space for an additional fan. The new arrangement after the refit was particularly suited to testing ducts and propellers. One such item was found boxed up below the working section. This was possibly the last item to be tested at the site. A separate building, houses the control and engineering service equipment. This building has three floors and the heavy service plant was originally installed on the lower floor with the service supplies fed to the rig room via an underground communication duct; the main control room is on the middle floor, while the upper floor houses the ancillary electronic equipment. The control room and Fourier Analyser as originally fitted The control room was refitted with computerised equipment during the refurbishment in the 1990s. All that remains from the original control room is a single panel, the Plant Controller board.
  4. Holdings Country Pottery, Oswaldtwistle, Lancashire – July 2017 Another backlog lol! Back in July, Mookster and myself headed up north for a 650 mile round trip Road Trip with about two A4 pages of sites to do! Very good news; however we only managed four out of about twenty due to loud alarms going off, places being sealed up tight, horrible undergrowth and pretty much every explore failing thing you can think of, such is life. One thing is for certain, “you cant do em all!” Holding's Country Pottery was originally founded in 1842 by James Holding. The original pottery was built a short distance away in Gaulkthorn, another outlying area of Oswaldtwistle. James Holding moved his business to Broadfield in 1860, and in 1900 his son Grimshaw Holding; set up the pottery on the present site where the derelict remains sit. From then till it’s closure; the pottery stayed here and the business was passed down from father to son until it's decline. Holdings was originally powered by a steam engine; sadly no longer in situ, but the line shafting is still present. There were magazines and brochures pointing to a late 1990s closure. I am thinking around 1999-2000 at a guess. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157688819915965
  5. E.P. Bray, Chisworth Dye Works, Glossop – July 2017 So during a fairly unsuccessful road trip of a 20:4 fail ration on a huge 650 mile round trip, Northern Road Trip, Mookster and I arrived here. Nestled next to a public footpath; access was pretty easy, and although stripped, I rather enjoyed this one. Some lovely colours and decay going on inside. What I will say is; there are signs everywhere warning of Lead Chromate contamination inside from the production of coloured dyes. It is absolutely everywhere! Lovely…..! Built at the end of the 18th or in the early 19th centuries; Chisworth Works was as a cotton band manufactory. During these times, the site was called “Higher Mill”. It appears that the original building was extended twice to the rear in its past, as there are noticable lines in the mortarwork and mismatches in the courses along the south-west elevation. It is thought that these extensions took place before 1857 because the building line remains the same on the maps until 1973. The site was used as a dyeing works by 1973; and there was a large T-shaped extension at the rear which looks to have been added in two stages. The only change a decade later, was the construction of a square loading ramp at the front. The outline of the site today is the same as it was in 1984. E.P. Bray began "winding-up" by 2006 and was dissolved/liquidised and the site shut down in September that year. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157685024774162
  6. UK Essence house

    Visited this old house a few months back.from the outside it just looks like a very small run down derelict cottage.but once inside its like a little time warp.nothing had been touched for a very long time.the pictures still hung on the wall.cobwebs everywhere.the place was a nightmare to shoot and very dark and dingy in most rooms
  7. UK Betamax House..

    visited this one early morning.was not expecting great things from this place turns out it was one of the nicest houses I have been too.the place was a bit different to what I am normally use to with stuff from the sixties to the eighties.it had a real vibrant feel to the place,but the same smell and feel as any other derp.
  8. Langwith Mill, Nether Langwith, Nottinghamshire – July 2017 The 4th and final stop on Mookster and my July Northern Road Trip. Nestled almost in a sort of Farm Yard in Nottinghamshire; next to a disused Restaurant (Goff's Restaurant); a rather odd place for an eatery in a very rural location. Access did involve a bit of grazing field to get up to the mill. The disused mill is a four storey Cotton Mill which was constructed in 1786. The mill was originally sixteen windows wide, which would have made Langwith one of the largest mills in the district. Cotton spinning at Langwith Mill ceased around 1848 and the place was converted into a Corn Mill in 1886. Langwith was still operating after WWII. The Mill was built in limestone with a slate roof which is now holed and in poor condition. Langwith was powered by a large water wheel fed from a dam nearby which is now a meadow. The site is a curtilage building to the Grade II listed Langwith Mill House and a building of Local Interest in its own right. The listing was applied in 1985 as the mill is a site of Local Historical Interest. It’s in pretty poor condition in places! #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157688860638275
  9. Bradfield Water Treatment Works, Lower Bradfield, South Yorkshire – July 2017 Day two of Mookster and I’s Not particularly successful Northern Road Trip. We rose stupidly early as usual and missed breakfast; it’s always way too late in the morning!!! We parked my classic Volvo in the middle of the village and proceeded down to the Water Works, which looks rather prominent in the tiny, tiny rural village which feels incredibly secluded. By now it was around 6:30am and there were dog walkers around all of whom were friendly and gave us an obligatory “Good Morning”. One particular chap who was very polite and wished us well wondered off, when he came back passed and we were scoping the joint, his body language changed instantly and he continued walking away. They must get this a lot! Pretty trashed in here, but it had a few nice shots inside! Bradfield Water Works was built in 1913 for the filtering and treatment of water taken from the Dale Dike (the cause of the 1864 great flood of Sheffield); as well as the Agden reservoirs in the neighbouring Loxley Valley. The site was cutting edge technology back in its day and it even included the first telephone to be installed in Bradfield back in 1930 allegedly! By 1974, the Yorkshire Water Authority took over the Water Works, and then during the Thatcher Government a number of years later; the entire UK water industry was privatised with the Water Act of 1989. Eventually, the pumping house at Lower Bradfield was closed down in 1994 when a new pump house and Water Processing Plant was built elsewhere in the Loxley valley. It has been said that the locals believe the building attracts unwanted visitors and is a “constant eyesore” and a “morbid reminder of Lower Bradfields grim past.” Which explains the looks we got! #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157686442257184
  10. Tin Chapel, North Wales – May 2017 Still way behind on the reports lol! The final leg of mine and Mooksters tour of North Wales back in May; took us to this rather nice abandoned chapel made from Tin, a right trek into the woods. It’s incredibly small here and explored in about 10 minutes, but I really rather liked it. It had canvas chairs instead of pews, and has obviously been abandoned for a very, very long time. It was in amazing condition really! The last site of the May Welsh tour, and the last explore of my old cheap run around, before upgrading to a not so cheap runaround! Onto the photos: #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157684346925431
  11. The History There isn't really a great lot to say about this place as its only a train tunnel but the reason behind this being built in the first place is still a little funny. Located in Derbyshire, the 967 meter tunnel was constructed for the sole reason of hiding the view of the railway where this passed Haddon House from the Duke of Rutland. This was clear sign of the Dukes determination to preserve his countryside view . The tunnel was opened in 1863 and remained this way until 1967 when the line eventually closed. There are plans for a future restoration of the tunnel to extend heritage rail services however this will likely require some fundraising to be a possibility. The Explore Again there isn't really a lot that i can about the explore as this is just a walk from one end of the tunnel to the other but the ventilation shafts do create some cool shots in here however I only ended up coming out with a handful. Even though it was only small and not much of a challenge it was still a fun visit and was worth the wander. Thanks for looking!
  12. History T.G.Green & Co Ltd originally operated from the village of Church Gresley, South Derbyshire between 1864 and 2007. More famous for their blue and white striped 'Cornish Kitchen Ware' produced from the early 1920's (then known as 'E-Blue') the pottery produced many hundreds of patterns from Yellow wares, Victorian transfer prints, colourful hand painted Art Nouveau & vibrant enamelled Art Deco patterns, Wartime utility pottery, avant garde Retro designs and many well known Brewery wares, employing up to 1,000 local staff at the height of production. Now, sadly, the old pottery site lays in ruins, the land under private ownership, never likely to ever see production again, the last of the South Derbyshire potteries has gone, although as it nears its 100th anniversary the traditional Cornishware is still manufactured and sold through a new T.G.Green & Co Ltd. Explore This is somewhere I have wanted to visit for some time so pretty pleased we eventually got around to doing it. Visited with @hamtagger. We got here and spent a little while just venturing round the site, there was a bit of activity from the far side but from what I could see there are various parts of the site being used. Not a hugely massive site but we spent quite a number of hours here. I really loved this place. Although a bit late on getting here and missing out on a few bits I have seen in various other reports there was still enough here to see and the decay is so much more established which made everything much more photogenic. Well worth a trip if you havent already. It was quite nice to see some finished products So, on with the pics. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 One of the companies they supplied to 15 16 17 18 19 Thanks for looking!
  13. I've code named this place as Meadows Cottage. This place is a hidden time capsule, with diaries and newspapers from as early as the 1940's. The most recent items had dates around the 1980's so it's hard to say how long this place has even been abandoned for. I actually explored this place back in May but have not yet shared it to the forum so here it is. So this place i understand was owned by a old lady named Mrs Banning, unfortunately when she past away this was past to her nephew that lived in Isle of Man. He had no care or need for the building or his aunties items inside.. it's since become left to decay and nature reclaimed the building and its surrounding area. With the recent sale of the building the new owners plan to demolish and rebuild on the land.. but this is said to currently be on hold due to bats, now taking residency in the cottage. It was obvious the surrounding garden that was once overgrown around the cottage was recently cut back, making for a easy access. I was very surprised to find what we did inside just left and forgotten. Here's some pictures form the explore followed by the Video of the explore. Here's the Video i made from the explore:
  14. History Shildon Friends Mission Hall was constructed in 1897, following the evangelising Quaker movement which thrived in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. The movement is more widely known as the Religious Society of Friends; they had halls across Europe, America, Africa and Asia. The hall was likely to have been erected to accommodate rising patterns of worship, and to tackle widespread illiteracy among adults in the local community. Quakers became renowned for their strict focus on developing behaviour, their private lives and reflecting emotional purity in the light of God. In the past Quakers were also well-known for their opposition to slavery, teetotalism, plain dress and refusal to participate in war. Instead, many Quakers went on to found banks, such as Barclays and Lloyds, and British confectionery makers Cadburys, Rowntree’s and Fry’s. Our Version of Events Following a successful explore over in Gateshead, we decided to head to Shildon, having heard that there was an abandoned community hall of some description there. At first, access looked impossible; everything was sealed tighter than a Yorkshire man’s wallet. However, with a bit of perseverance, we were able to overcome this slight problem. Once inside, it was obvious that the building has been visited by the local idiots, as everything was everywhere it shouldn’t have been. Tables have been turned, chinaware smashed and cupboards ransacked. Despite this, there were still a few odd photogenic bits and bobs lying around. All in all the building is fairly small though, and it doesn’t take long to get through all of the rooms due to its size. Overall, we spent around twenty minutes inside, until we ran out of things to look at. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Meek-Kune-Do and Box. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17:
  15. Heading north from my usual area of abode to pick up myself a new 4 wheeled toy (none from this report of course) and seeing this place was nearby, what better opportunity for a mooch. Being a bit of a car nut myself, I have been on a bit of a mission to see some abandoned vehicles so this was a perfect quick little explore to satisfy that mission. For now anyway. Certainly some interesting vehicles on the site, one of which in my opinion is well worthy of a restoration! Unfortunately I didn’t manage to get inside the station building itself and didn’t fancy crossing the live tracks to see the platform side of the building.
  16. Like afew other people I thought this place would be well gone by now so, it was a pleasant surprise to see a recent report showing it was still worth a look. Demolition has indeed started on the site but there is still abit to see. The hall is still there plus some of the lovely peeling paint corridors and a whole host of cool bits and features, Had a good few relaxed hours round here and pretty much covered what is left. Really glad I got to see this, especially as I thought I'd missed it. Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY St George’s Park Hospital opened in 1859, as the Northumberland County Pauper Lunatic Asylum. During its first 125 years or so, mental health care in Northumberland was based, largely, in St George’s Hospital. Back in 1859 there were 100 male and 100 female patients. By 1888, as additional hospital buildings were being built, the population had risen to 267 men and 244 women. In 1890 the building was renamed the County Mental Hospital and then again in 1937 when the complex became known as St Georges Hospital, the name which was to remain until the sites closure. In 2006 St Georges Park opened which is a new modern purpose-built mental health hospital and has since replaced the services formerly offered at the old county asylum. Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flicker page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/135648593@N02/albums/72157671078557990https://www.flickr.com/photos/135648593@N02/albums/72157671078557990
  17. Visiting a few times previously for non urbex related reasons, and touching on a few abandoned vehicles previously, little did I know the whole site is actually an old military themed action park. Waiting for the next opportunity to pop up and head over again, I took my chance, grabbed the camera and walked about. Even meeting someone on site who knew all about the place when it was open, quite handy to have a tour guide with history on the place! Turns out the whole place used to be an off road action park with climbing and paint balling sections. However considering majority of the buildings were porta cabins and majority of the race tracks were near enough non existent, my main interest was the abandoned vehicles and planes. There’s plenty of history about but to save reading numerous news articles…
  18. This was not an easy one but worth the bruises, cuts and grazes in my opinion! The following information was gleaned from the web and (mostly) from other reports: This is Mount Saint Mary's Convent Church (or “the Famine”) church of Leeds; in an area known as “the Bank” on the crest of Richmond Hill. The church reportedly sits upon a network of mines, split into three levels, that date back to the 1600’s. Built in a Gothic revival style, the building was designed by Joseph Hansom with its interior designed by Edward Pugin (son of Augustus Pugin, who is responsible for the interior of the Palace of Westminster), at a cost of £8000. The church was opened in 1852 although the building was not fully complete until 1866. The building was designated Grade II* status on the 5th August 1976. In 1829 the Catholic Emancipation Act was passed and by 1850 the Catholic hierarchy was restored to England. The country was divided into various dioceses and the construction of various churches and cathedrals ensued – with Mount Saint Mary’s as one of them. The founders of the church begun construction without any explicit guarantee for funding in order to serve the burgeoning Irish population who had emigrated to Leeds to escape the ruinous potato famine in Ireland. The church was dedicated in a ceremony presided over by Bishop Briggs, on the 29th July 1857; the ceremony was attended by the Archbishop of Westminster, Cardinal Nicholas Wiseman, and the founder of the Oblates, Eugène de Mazenod, who was made a saint in 1995. The area in which the church was built had recently transformed from arable to industrial usage and had attracted a large proportion of the incoming destitute Irish Catholic population. They had emigrated there in order to pick up work in the construction of canals and railways, as well as the plethora of local mills. The area itself was denoted by poverty and housing conditions were considerably appalling; being an industrial area the quality of the environment was notably grim. The city council itself was interested in the new demographic predominantly for their utility as cheap labour and as such did very little to meet the needs of their spiritual or physical wellbeing. After the Irish potato famine, the Irish Catholic population of Leeds had risen from a purported 50 in 1780 to 10,000 in 1850. The church was established at the persuasion of a group of men of St Saviour’s church in Leeds, who had left the Anglican church in order to become Roman Catholics. Funding was raised by the local Irish Catholic population, as well as a mysterious benefactor who donated a significant sum of money despite remaining anonymous. A school was founded in 1853 to serve the Irish Catholic girls, who were mostly working in the local flax mills, at a fee of 2d per week. By 1858 they had raised enough funds to establish their own covenant next door which remains open to this day. The church served as testament to the solidarity and resolve of the Irish Catholic refugee community whilst it remained in use. Following the Second World War the majority of those living in the area were rehoused as part of a national relocation scheme aimed at improving the quality of housing in Britain. As a result, the congregation halved in size and by 1979 the parish’s population had fallen to 790. As the church was positioned at the top of a hill it was subject to heavy winds and was especially vulnerable to poor weather. Falling into a state of disrepair it was determined that the cost to bring the church back to a safe state would come to £1.5 million. For such a small congregation, this was considered too expensive and in June 1989 the Oblates of Mary Immaculate passed the church over to the Diocese of Leeds for deconsecration. The site was sold to the Sanctuary Housing Trust in 1996 and has remained abandoned in a state of dereliction ever since.
  19. History (taken from The_Raw) Great Tew Manor was originally built around 1730, with extensions added in 1834 and 1856. Shortly after the First World War the owner died and the house was left empty until the 1960s. A further period of neglect in the 80s left most of the house uninhabitable. Visited after a meal in a nice pub with @The_Raw and @Maniac. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
  20. UK Hobbits House - Aug 17

    Although this place may look old, it actually isn't it was started by a farmer in the 80's. Known as the 'Hobbit House'. The farmer took 11 years to build this incredible two-storey building, which features several turrets, dovecotes and stained glass windows built by a local artist. This was all built by the farmer with this own hands and form stones he found on his land. The farmer built this simply to store hay and other supplies, but rather than stopping at four walls, the building begun to grow, until it eventually became the unusual build it is today. The stained glass windows represent the four seasons, winter, spring, summer, autumn and the four elements, earth, air, fire and water. To give a sense of scale, the doors are normal sized doors. This is not a miniture house, it is full size. The house was not built for a movie set and has not been in any movie. It was built purely as a hobby and a labour of love. In a newspaper interview the farmer said "I just got a bit carried away!" The farmer sold the land in 2000 due to the local quarry disrupting his peace and is now farming in Scotland. The Explore itself was very edgy, after being told the new owner of the land was an angry farmer that didn't want visitors we took our chances. After getting stuck in the building for 30 mins waiting for the farmer to finish cutting the grass on the field the house sits on, we eventually managed a full explore of this place. Pictures form the explore Here's the Video I made from the explore. If you like videos like this make sure you SUBSCRIBE to my YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/rosswallaceadventures
  21. This Avro Shackleton is one of three aircrafts situated at Long Marston. After the small aviation museum had sadly closed its doors, the Shackleton MR3, serial number WR985, was among a group of larger airframes that were not relocated, and is still sat at the old World War 2 airfield today. With plans to tear up the old runways (one of which had been latterly used as a dragstrip) and build thousands of new homes on the site, the future prospects of the decommissioned Shackleton seem bleak. WR985 first flew in 1958 and was later relegated to ground training duties under the maintenance serial 8103M. It was disposed of in 1988 and moved to Long Marston airfield. Also there's the Percival Sea Prince T.1 ex WM735 (ex G-RACA) ex Staverton, on display at the airfield entrance. And finally a Gloster Meteor T.7 WL332 ex Cradiff. More Pictures from the explore... Come along on the explore and check out the video i made. If you enjoyed Videos like this be sure to SUBSCRIBE to my channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/rosswallaceadventures
  22. UK Formula 1 Headquarters - Aug 17

    So this F1 Team entered the sport in 2010. In its five years the team failed to score a single point with its best result being 11th at the 2012 Brazilian Grand Prix. Despite attempts to keep the team going into the 2015 season, the assets were seized and sold at auction while the 230 staff were made redundant. This site includes 150,000 sq ft of buildings, offices and a racing car testing facility. Unfortunately no F1 cars but nevertheless still made for a great explore. That's until the police arrived after we had triggered the alarm.
  23. UK Water Treatment Site 08/17

    A bit about the place to begin with.... This waste water treatment plant is all that remains of the former Bayer Agrochemical Facility in Hauxton near Cambridge, the main facility across the road was demolished in 2010, the land was so badly contaminated with chemicals that a massive decontamination operation was undertaken, and it was reported at the time that the fumes from chemicals being released on site were having ill effects on local residents. The site was finally signed off as safe in 2014 and there are currently houses being built on the old main site. Across the road was the waste water treatment plant which remained in operation until 2012 when it closed for good. This side of the site was also home to the plant's playing field and indoor squash court, I took a quick peek in there on the way out but it was pretty dull and not worth a photo due to very poor light inside. Also had its own on site squash courts. This was a nice little explore and finished off our day. Pretty smashed up inside which was a shame. Great site though so much to see. Please enjoy the photos. I have lots of pictures for this place so feel free to check out our Flickr page https://www.flickr.com/photos/148969450@N07/sets/72157687798116046/with/36318361420/ We are also on YoutTube and Facebook Urbalites.
  24. Very well-known and therefore for British Explorer probably no more a very interesting abandoned place. But I liked the blue ceiling wich I knew from photos (and that reminds me of the former Belgian Chateau de Noisy). Locally I wasn't disappointed. Although unfortunately very destroyed by vandalism, but nevertheless nice. In addition to the already mentioned blue ceiling, I especially liked the many details (the faces inside and at the outer facade). For this reason more photos than usual. History (taken from WildBoyz report) St. Paul’s Church is a grade II listed building that overlooks the small town of Denholme. It was designed by J. B. Chantrell and constructed in 1846, and represents an early English style of architecture which comprises a seven-bay nave and lean to aisles, a Chancel and a vaulted roof with ribs and bosses. As for the exterior, the building is built from coursed gritstone with ashlar dressings and it boasts a large western tower with a Welsh slate roof. The church closed in 1999 due to falling numbers in the parish. In the months that followed the closure of the building, the Church of England were able to remove the majority of the valuable items, such as the bells, the ground floor stained glass windows and the organ. At present, the church is said to be on the market for £170,000 and various plans have been submitted to convert the entire structure into one dwelling. Alternative plans have also been proposed to demolish the church and build residential housing on the site. Many concerns have been raised by local residents and the Bradford Diocese about the current condition of the building as it has been badly damaged by vandals and thieves. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48
  25. RAF Church Fenton The Explore 'Twas a nice easy mooch from about a year ago with @Urbexbandoned. Because I'm so far behind in posting reports I always have to go back and read Tracey's report to jog my memory so I can write some shite here as an intro. I can remember it was a boiling hot day and the pollen levels were reading at about 4 billion parts per square metre. After hacking through a shitload of undergrowth for a good half an hour we eventually found something which resembled an RAF base. I was only a few more sneezes away from death. The jungle made it difficult to navigate around and I remember thinking at the time to make sure I returned during the winter so we could actually see where we were going, but I haven't returned since. I bunged my photo's onto my hard drive back then and only just had a look again recently, and to be honest I was pretty disappointed as they're all a bit samey. Derpy barrack blocks and a JR's mess, blah blah peely blah.. the Upwood of the future.. The History First opened in 1937, RAF Church Fenton is the former home of the first American Eagle Squadrons and was formally regarded as one of the UK's most important strategic airfields, offering rapid reaction fighter defence to the industrial cities of Sheffield, Bradford and Leeds during the second World War. Now, after decades of faithful service in defence of the realm, the air station stands as a lonely hostage to both time and decay. On 1 April 1937 the station was declared open and on 19 April the first station commander Wing Commander W.E. Swann assumed command. Within two months, No. 71 Squadron RAF had arrived with their Gloster Gladiators. During September 1940 Church Fenton became home to the first "Eagle squadron" of American volunteers - No. 71 Squadron RAF and their Brewster Buffalos and Hawker Hurricanes. The airfield was also home to both the first all-Canadian and all-Polish squadrons, No. 242 Squadron RAF and No. 306 Squadron RAF respectively. As air warfare became a more tactical and technological pursuit, the first night-fighter Operational Training Unit was formed at Church Fenton in 1940 and some of the squadrons stationed there began to fly the famous de Havilland Mosquito. After the close of the war, the station retained its role as a fighter base, being among the first to receive modern jet aircraft, namely the Gloster Meteor and the Hawker Hunter. In later years, Church Fenton became the RAF's main Elementary Flying Training airfield. On 25 March 2013 it was announced that Church Fenton would close by the end of 2013 and By 19 December, all units had been relocated and the airfield was closed. Some equipment was be relocated to RAF Topcliffe and MoD security continued to secure the site until disposal. A NOTAM was issued suspending the air traffic zone at the end of 2013. The Pictures 1. 2. 3/4. 5. 6/7. 8. 9/10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. As always thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated

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