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  1. Hello folks! This site is quite well known I would say - workers left the site for the last time in 2007. It was opened in 1962 as Ferodo brake components and all was dandy for almost 40 years until it was taken over by Friction Dynamics then things went tits up. It was the scene of one of the longest running industrial disputes ever with the T&GW union that lasted 2 and a half years. In the 10 years since it closed its been ravaged by storms, fire, general vandalism and corrosion due to the coastal location. So its an understatement to say its in pretty poor shape! Still, that doesn't mean I didn't find it interesting. I was actually walking to my sisters house to pick up my car and happened to be walking past so popped in to look around. I expected to see a complete dead loss, the kind of place its not worth taking the camera out of the bag. But I saw plenty to decide I'd come back with my camera gear. I decided to do something totally radical that I hadn't done before - do the entire set in Black & White. Here goes..... There are 3 separate buildings, this one housed the heavy industry, generating the power. The second building is the admin block Not so much left in there so onwards to the main building which is VAST! This is probably what most people will see when first entering, although there must be at least 20 other access points! There is a building inside the building I'd be interested to know what these big hanging things are/were in the next 2 pics And this is what held them in place up in the roof Sometimes when there's no epic stuff its the little things, the traces of what's left that I find fascinating. At some point this gloopy stuff had leaked and then set rock solid No security here but I was worried about projectiles of shit from above - a seagull with attitude dropped one a couple of feet away as I took this external
  2. Visited with @GK_WAX and @Dangle_Angle. Don't know much about it, it was used as a school up until closing in 2014. Planning permission has been given to build new houses on the grounds.It was a pleasant surprise to be greeted by the grand hallway with no damage done by the local kids.Here are some of the photos I managed to get: IMG_3932 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3939 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3941 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3960 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3959 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3958 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3957 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3956 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3955 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3954 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3953 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3952 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3951 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3950 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3949 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3948 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3947 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3946 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3945 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3944 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3943 by mike lavin, on Flickr IMG_3942 by mike lavin, on Flickr
  3. Krampnitz Kaserne was a military training complex built by the Germans in 1937. It was used for the training of Nazi troops until the end of the Second World War. The Germans evacuated the barracks on April 26, 1945. A day later it was taken over by Soviet troops who had immediately taken control of the area. The 35th Guards Motor Rifle Division was then stationed here until its abandonment in 1992, after the Dissolution of the Soviet Union. The whole complex consists of more than 50 buildings, mostly accommodation and storage, though it also includes an officers' club, a basketball court, a theatre and much more. Movies such as Enemy at the Gates, Inglourious Basterds, The Monuments Men, and Valkyrie shot scenes here. I came here on my own as I couldn't get any of the other lazy fuckers out of bed. I was pretty glad as it happens as I quite enjoy exploring on my own. You get round places far quicker and your senses are heightened so it can be a bit more intense. They weren't bothered anyway, they got to lie in and have kebabs for breakfast. Anyway, this was my third trip to Berlin, and although my previous two trips were fun, they were pretty boozy affairs so I didn't get much done. This time I was on a proper mission. For me these old German military sites are fascinating. To think that this place was full of Nazi troops during WWII is pretty mind blowing in itself, but even more so when you see the size of it in person. Some of the buildings are easily accessible but don't have much to offer. The more interesting buildings have been sealed pretty well but there are still ways inside for the most part. Here's some photos. 1. 2. I think this was the officers' club. Lots of grand grand rooms inside but looking a bit worse for wear now. 3. 4. 5. 6. This staircase sits underneath the famous Nazi eagle mosaic. I didn't have long here as I heard voices and people entering the building through a locked door. 7. Unfortunately however the eagle mosaic has been completely covered up with plaster. I was pretty disappointed by this but I needn't have worried as Krampnitz has tons more interesting stuff if you keep looking. You can see the eagle mural here on an old report > 8. Back outside I spotted this building through the trees 9. A basketball court / gym hall 10. I wonder if this was part of a school for children, as families spent years living here. 11. 12. 13. This small theatre was quite interesting. Only a couple of rows of seating remain. 14. 15. 16. I spotted some old German writing (siegen oder siberia) under the peely paint which translates into English as 'Victory or Siberia' 17. 18. 19. 20. There's a lot of crap graff all over the place unfortunately, I chose to avoid photographing it for the most part. These are some of the better examples I found. 21. 22. 23. Just when I thought I was done I stumbled across this grand old theatre. 24. On hearing voices approaching I made my way out and narrowly avoided bumping into a couple of men with the keys to the building. They weren't dressed like security but I didn't fancy hanging around after that. 25. Finally, some old Soviet signs and murals I found on the outside of the buildings. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. I'd like to go back and find the rest of these as I missed a large chunk of the site so there must be tons more. Thanks for looking.
  4. History, of which I (believe it or not!!) didn't steal from another poster!! Bletchley Park was the central site for British codebreakers during World War II. It housed the Government Code and Cypher School (GC&CS), which regularly penetrated the secret communications of the Axis Powers – most importantly the German Enigma and Lorenz ciphers. The official historian of World War II British Intelligence has written that the "Ultra" intelligence produced at Bletchley shortened the war by two to four years, and that without it the outcome of the war would have been uncertain. There were 16 huts, mostly timber built. Some of those are still on site, most are demolished. One of them, Hut 4 which was used for Naval intelligence is now used as a restaurant for the museum. There were quite a few brick built blocks too, most of which still stand on the site. Block A: Naval Intelligence. Block B: Italian Air and Naval, and Japanese code breaking. Block C: Stored the substantial punch-card index. Block D: Enigma work, extending that in huts 3, 6, and 8. Block E: Incoming and outgoing Radio Transmission and TypeX. Block F: Included the Newmanry and Testery, and Japanese Military Air Section. It has since been demolished. Block G: Traffic analysis and deception operations. Block H: Tunny and Colossus (now The National Museum of Computing). Explore I visited with @hamtagger & @Session9. We had wanted to visit this place for some time and as we were making our way through the H & V's of Milton Keynes I was vocally expressing my reminiscence at the days I used to take journeys to go raving and got pretty excited when we came across V7 Saxon Street! Anyway when we got there I was quite surprised that this sat literally in the middle of a really built up area. We had a nice dander round Block G and then through to Block D. I really enjoyed it, very leisurely explore. No one around, at all. Everything was perfectly silent and at one point I even sat next to a window listening to visitors of the museum talk about how their wife really did make a shit cup of coffee. I liked the decay, especially in Block D. There was so much memorabilia I could have spent days here just trying to work out what everything was! Really pleased we eventually got around to visiting. Anyway, on to the pics. (apologies, these are completely non edited as Flickr is stillshit but not as shit as photofuckit) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Thanks for looking!
  5. I was not aware of this place until I seen a report on it last summer and as with Octel Bromine it was the medical room that caught my eye. And a little beauty it was too. Great decay with some nice features left. This place is rather big. The sort of place that seems to keep going and going with shit loads to have a look at. The old kilns where very nice, especially a big walk in one down in the lower levels. Some cool decay and nature egress in here also plus some collapsed floors and roofs in parts. A cracking mooch this one which I thoroughly enjoyed. Visited with non member Paul. History T.G.Green & Co Ltd originally operated from the village of Church Gresley, South Derbyshire between 1864 and 2007. More famous for their blue and white striped 'Cornish Kitchen Ware' produced from the early 1920's (then known as 'E-Blue') the pottery produced many hundreds of patterns from Yellow wares, Victorian transfer prints, colourful hand painted Art Nouveau & vibrant enamelled Art Deco patterns, Wartime utility pottery, avant garde Retro designs and many well known Brewery wares, employing up to 1,000 local staff at the height of production. Now, the old pottery site lays in ruins, the land under private ownership, never likely to ever see production again, the last of the South Derbyshire potteries has gone, although as it nears its 100th anniversary the traditional Cornishware is still manufactured and sold through a new T.G.Green & Co Ltd. . . Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/135648593@N02/albums/72157682973777741/with/34569316764/
  6. Visited with @GK_WAX and @dangle_angle this mine was a planned visit when we set out but was driving bye. When GK mentioned the mine was close so thought we would take a look. Inside is very slippery and wet didn't stay long but managed get a few photos.
  7. St. Joseph's Seminary The Explore An unexpected trip but a very welcome one after a very kind last minute invite from Urblex, thanks mate I happened to be in the Shropshire area as it turned out the day before the explore so was already two hours from home but more importantly, less than one hour from Wigan. I was faced with the choice of driving all the way home and returning in the middle of the night 40 squid of diesel lighter, or arriving 12 hours too early and spending the night in the car. Last June when access was a little more tricky here myself, Matt Inked and Catbalou attempted an insane access point here in the middle of an fucking monsoon for well over 18 hours and eventually had to return home defeated. In recent months the place has been appearing more and more online, all good for us at the time, but everyone knows that too easy an access normally only ends badly for the location, which is the most important thing in my opinion. Secca needs to get out of that cabin from time to time and keep the more unsavoury characters out before its DRI'd. Anyway, i digress. I met up with Urblex, Ferox, a nice lady and gentleman called Kirsty and Paul from 28DL and I must've looked a state after a hypothermic half-sleep in my car nearby. Good to meet you all, cracking company! Approximately 25 mins after the access we had our first taste of the ear shredder, fuck me, one to be experienced to be believed. A few minutes after eardrum hell started we decided we might as well push through the known alarmed areas while they were already belting out their decibels, turned a corner into the main corridor at lo and behold, standing at the end of the corridor was a tall bloke dressed in black gesturing us in his direction. Fuck sake, all that effort and busted within half an hour? I walked towards him with a couple of random people that appeared from nowhere just before the alarms started wailing. I could see his mouth moving but couldn't hear a thing, i just assumed he was giving us a bollocking and nodded accordingly. I noticed a Go-Pro attached to his chest but thought nothing of it at the time, in this day and age. He led us out of the of the noise and only then did I hear what he was saying then noticed the tripod on his back. Turns out he was a local explorer and knew the place like the back of his hand. What a mug I felt and he laughed when I told him that i thought he was escorting us off site haha. He said he's a member of OS but didn't mention his user name. If you're reading this mate, big thanks for the info and directions After a quick chin wag i realised i had lost the rest of the group in the commotion so spent the next hour mooching around on my todd whilst looking to re-group. We found each other and spent a good 4 hours exploring this mint place with lots of comedy moments, especially when we walked around blind corners to occasionally set off the alarms and heard other groups do the same a few floors below us. Lots of mini heart attacks each time lol, a fun morning out indeed! The History St Joseph's College was founded in 1880 by Father Dougal Maguire to be the Seminary serving the North West of England. The college was formally opened in 1883 and was situated in Walthew Park, Upholland, the geographic centre of the Diocese of Liverpool. St. Joseph's (usually referred to by its students simply as "Upholland") was one of two main seminaries serving the north of England. Upholland served the northwest, Ushaw College the northeast. For many years, each of these institutions housed both a junior and a senior seminary. The election of Archbishop Ted Crilly from Craggy Island saw the controversial decision to close St Joseph's altogether and the property was sold to Anglo International who instructed AEW Architects for the conversion of the Grade 2 listed RC Seminary to 92 apartments, with 220 new build enabling units. The pictures 1. External taken Jun 14 2. Roof Pano 3. 4. Loved the roof detail in this place.. 5. 6. 7. Ferox at work... 8. Turrrquoise Hall 9. 10. It appears that at one point the security office was in the main building... 11. Up the wobbly ladder to the clock tower with Urblex... 12. The White Arches.. 13. 14. 15. Spider Apartments.. 16. 17. 18. Spiraly-ness... 19. 20. Lower floors area... 21. Some kind of drying room.. 22. Dinner Time.. 23. The old classic from here.. As always, thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated folks
  8. Another eventful evening with @Miss.Anthrope. Things didn't end well here, we were caught by an extremely angry security guard with a baseball bat (inscribed 'Mr Happy'....) and the police got called out. To be honest it really wasn't worth the hassle, renovation is well under way now and they've thoroughly stripped the place of all it's glory. It's been derelict for a number of years but has always been well sealed. This partly explains why there are no interior photos anywhere online, which is a shame because it was clearly an amazing building until recently. The 'no photo policy' (whatever one of those is....) which security highlighted to us numerous times may also be partly to blame. This was what he was super pissed about, the possibility that someone might post photos online and break the 'no photo policy' that he's protected for so many years without fail. We bullshitted that we hadn't even taken any photos yet so were eventually allowed on our way. Sadly the only decent feature left was the gothic staircase with stained glass windows but even that was covered up. I've cobbled together a few other pics to make a report but I definitely wouldn't bother coming here. About 90% of the building is stripped back to the bricks, there was barely anything to photograph. I will add some more history and stuff at a later date once renovations have been completed. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. Thanks for looking
  9. History (courtesy of Wikipedia) Founded in 1447 by John Kempe, the Archbishop of York, as a college for the training of priests, in 1894, the school moved to new premises, and the South Eastern Agricultural College was established in the buildings with Alfred Daniel Hall as principal. In 1898, Wye became a School of Agriculture within the University of London. Until 2005, Wye College was a well-known study and research centre in the fields of rural business and management, biological sciences, and the environment and agriculture. The college was officially closed by its then owner, Imperial College London, in September 2009. Visit Visited with @SlimJim and a non member. Internally the place is bare but the interior is in good condition, any excuse to get out on a summers day. Shown below are only the Biology and Chemistry blocks as the site is spread over several satellite sites.
  10. This was our second attempt at this place after the first one did not work out due to a Sunday league football match going on right outside. Fast forward to April and we where back and access was gained. Really nice site with a lot to have a look at. The variation was interesting also with industrial, labs, offices, locker rooms, workshops and an awesome medical room. The decay in the med room is brilliant and was my main reason for wanting to see this place. We almost did not get to see it but, luckily we managed to find a way in to that building at the last minute. Visited with non member Paul. Info on the site - http://www.octelamlwch.co.uk/ . Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/135648593@N02/albums/72157682773340775/with/33967595542/
  11. This was a fun explore. Presumably there must have been a threat from animal rights protestors when it was active here so the site is well secured. High fences equipped with beam sensors and shake sensors stretch the entire perimeter, with remote controlled infra red cameras pointed at all the weak points. The site is also partly still active as the relocation process hasn't quite reached completion yet. The main building (The Francis Crick Institute) was our main target although we passed many outbuildings along the way; houses, stables, a sub-station and many more. It took us a while to figure out a way into the main building but once inside it was a pretty chilled affair. Unfortunately the labs had already been cleared out so there were no pickled animals in jars lying around, which was a shame, coz you know, that's the kinda grim stuff we were hoping for! However, all was not lost as the building itself had some nice art deco features which sort of made up for it. Visited with @extreme_ironing, and again with @AndyK! and @Miss.Anthrope. History The National Institute for Medical Research (commonly abbreviated to NIMR), is a medical research institute based in Mill Hill, on the outskirts of London, England. It is principally funded by the Medical Research Council(MRC), and is its largest establishment and one of only three designated as an 'Institute'. The Medical Research Council, founded in 1913, was immediately charged with establishing a central research institute in London. Later that year, premises at Hampstead were acquired and the National Institute for Medical Research was founded. In the 1930s, the decision was made to move the Institute to new premises. An imposing copper-roofed building at Mill Hill was designed by Maxwell Ayrton, the architect of the original Wembley Stadium, and construction began in 1937. Occupation was delayed when war broke out in 1939 and the building was given to the Women's Royal Naval Service. The building was returned to the MRC in autumn 1949 and the official opening ceremony took place on 5 May 1950, with King George VI and Queen Elizabeth present. In 1962, Nobel Prize winner Sir Peter Medawar became director and, consistent with his research interests, established NIMR as a major centre for immunological research. Following an illness, Medawar retired as director in 1971 to be replaced by Sir Arnold Burgen. Burgan had an interest in nuclear magnetic resonance techniques and formed the MRC Biomedical NMR Centre at the Institute in 1980. Sir Dai Rees became director in 1982 to be replaced by Sir John Skehel in 1987. Since then NIMR has continued to excel scientifically, reporting perhaps most famously the discovery of the sex determining gene SRY, in 1991. In 2003, as part of their Forward Investment Strategy, the MRC announced plans to consider moving NIMR from its current location to a university/medical school site, to enhance its ability "to translate its biomedical research into practical health outcomes." University College London was selected as a preferred partner institution, and in 2016 the NIMR began its migration to the new Francis Crick Institute, constructed next to St Pancras railway station in central London. The rooms and other locations in the building were used in the film Batman Begins, for the Arkham Asylum scenes. 1. The Francis Crick Institute, Mill Hill Laboratory. 2. Nice art deco entrance hall 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Map of the building layout 10. Some funny scribblings on the wall 11. A few photos from the various laboratories which made up about 90% of the building. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. & 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. A nice safe vault in the basement 22. 23. The Directors 24. 25. Looking down from the roof. The building with a green roof was a nice looking hall but unfortunately locked. 26. 27. Games Room (locked) 28. Refectory 29. 30. 31. Christmas decorations still hang from the ceiling 32. Art deco library, a nice surprise located on the 5th and 6th floors. 33. 34. 35. That's all folks, thanks for looking
  12. History Going to be brief as this is everywhere, I'd recommend rafchurchfenton.org.uk if you're looking for a solid reference on the subject. RAF Church Fenton was opened in 1937, during WWII it had a defensive role protecting the northern Industrial cities from bombing raids. It also hosted the first American volunteer 'Eagle Squadron' during this period. Much of its postwar history was dominated by an emphasis on its role as a training airfield and from 1998 to 2003 Church Fenton was the RAF's main Elementary Flying Training airfield. On 25 March 2013 it was announced that Church Fenton would close by the end of the year. The site was bought by a local entrepreneur in late 2014 and the airfield now caters for private flights, having been renamed Leeds East Airport. The Explore Not much to say here. There's a bit of building going on on some adjacent land, whether this means the airfield owner has more significant plans for the derelict portion of the site I have no idea. All in all despite lots of talk of run-ins with police and security it was a very relaxed mooch, albeit slightly disorientating at points with the overgrown and repetitive nature of everything. There's not a great deal in the way of ephemera or artefacts, just lots of peely paint, first-floor ferns and other fairly natural pretty decay. By and large aside from some new (crap) graffiti very little changed between my visits. The Pictures I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII. XIII. XIV. XV. XVI. XVII. Thanks for looking. If you're anywhere vaguely near Sheffield and want to link up then drop me a line. Cheers, Thirteen.
  13. This place really should have been looked at a long time ago, the history behind the place is literally insane. Thanks to zombizza for putting the lead up, it was still just about worth a look inside although practically everything has been stripped already. I went inside with workers present which made it a fairly tense explore, lots of patiently hiding around corners and sneaking around expecting to get seen at any moment, eventually that moment came and I had to scarper quick sharp. I decided to go back at night and finish off seeing the place assuming there would be nobody present. Surprisingly this turned out to be an impossible mission due to previously unlocked doors being locked and an annoyingly active pair of torch waving security guards with way too much energy. During the day was better. Onto the lengthy history, take a deep breath, there's a lot to read if you can be arsed. Originally known as the Middlesex County Asylum, this was the first pauper lunatic asylum built in England following the Madhouse Act of 1828, which allowed the building of purpose-built asylums. It went on to become the largest asylum in the world at it's peak. When it opened in 1831 the Asylum accommodated up to only 300 patients. The building was enlarged in November of the same year and by 1841 90 staff were looking after 1302 patients. Extensions were added in 1879 and by 1888 there were 1891 patients and the Asylum had become the largest in Europe. Patients were looked after by members of their own sex and there were two gatehouses at the entrance - one for males and one for females. It achieved great prominence in the field of psychiatric care because of two people, Dr William Ellis and Dr John Connolly. Dr (later Sir) William Ellis encouraged patients to use their skills and trades in the Asylum. This 'therapy of employment' benefitted both the Asylum and the patients themselves and was a precursor to occupational therapy. Dr John Conolly became Medical Superintendent in 1839. He abolished mechanical restraints to control patients. This was a great success and encouraged other asylums also to do so. Padded cells, solitary confinement and sedatives were used instead. The extensive grounds were cultivated for produce. The Asylum became self-sufficient, with a farm, a laundry, a bakery and a brewery. Local artisans - tailors, shoemakers - worked at the asylum. There was a gasworks and a fire brigade and even a burial ground for those patients whose relatives had not claimed their bodies. Water was taken from the nearby Grand Union Canal and the Asylum had its own dock for barges delivering coal and for taking away produce for sale. Several name changes took place over the years. In 1889 the Asylum was renamed the London County Asylum, Hanwell. In 1918 it became known as the London County Mental Hospital. In 1929 it was renamed Hanwell Mental Hospital. In 1937 its name changed again, to St Bernard's Hospital, Southall. During WW2 the Emergency Medical Services commandeered one ward for war casualties. The Hospital and grounds received some bomb damage and later the laundry was destroyed by a V1 flying bomb, which caused many casualties. A gatehouse was also damaged. It joined the NHS in 1948 as part of the North West Metropolitan Region, with its own Hospital Management Committee. By the 1960s the Hospital in its 74 acre site held 2200 patients. St Bernard's Hospital was merged with the adjacent Ealing Hospital in 1980 and became the Psychiatric Unit. It was then known as the St Bernard's Wing of the Ealing Hospital. By this time it had 950 beds for psychiatric and psychogeriatric patients. In 1992 the Ealing Hospital General Unit and Maternity Unit split off to form a new Trust and the St Bernard's Wing regained its previous name of St Bernard's Hospital. The Hospital underwent a major refurbishment in 1998. The exterior of the buildings still in use were cleaned, revealing the yellow colouring of the bricks. Scenes from Porridge were filmed in the courtyard here and also scenes from the 1989 Batman movie with Jack Nicholson. Much of the site has been demolished already, and other parts converted into flats. The current hospital has decided that the asylum buildings can no longer be refurbished in such a way as to support a modern hospital so the remainder of the asylum buildings are being refurbished for private housing. The extensive modern buildings at the back (canal-side) of the hospital will remain in use and will be supplemented by further new buildings away from the historical asylum. I didn't know it at the time but the screws on my wide angle were completely loose so the majority of my shots were out of focus unfortunately. These are the shots that came out good enough. 1. How the exterior of all the buildings looked.... 2. 3. I spotted this stuck onto the skirting board in a corridor, I assume this was the adolescents ward... 4. Most rooms had cartoon characters painted on the walls in here 5. 6. 7. Not sure what this old hall might have been used for 8. 9. At this point the place became a little more interesting, this was the busiest area of work so I didn't hang about long 10. 11. 12. 13. The last few shots were all taken on the top floor 14. The ceiling in here was one of the only remaining features left 15. 16. 17. 18. EDIT: July 2017 revisit .... 19. Chapel and Hall, the only two buildings that haven't been converted yet. The chapel was locked and appears to be in use as a site office. 20. Large backstage area behind the hall, difficult to capture the size of it due to the scaffolding and temporary flooring above. 21. Some glimpses of former grandeur with these columns. 22. 23. Temporary flooring below the ceiling 24. 25. 26. The Hall, amazingly still untouched despite the remainder of the buildings being completely stripped or converted. 27. 28. 29. 30. Thanks for looking
  14. This ones been long in the planning, but eventually at some ungodly hour of the morning me and Brewtal managed to get inside and see the place for ourselves. It was a pretty brief visit by all accounts, but we managed to see most of the lower level. History Built as part of the now demolished Melville Barracks in Chatham. This deep shelter was a refuge for the marines at the barracks. The history is pretty vague, but I believe the tunnels existed before the start of WW2. In the early 1960s when the melville Barracks were demolished to make way for the council offices, and most of the tunnel entrances were sealed up. The Explore After a few weeks of planning me and Brewtal finally got round to visiting here. This one requires a little more caution as the entrance method is somewhat brazen. After a bit of head scratching we devised a plan and went for it. We were in! I'd be forewarned about the stairs, and everything said was absolutely right!. The wooden stairs are very rotten and very dangerous. Even when taking extra care, we had a few brown pants moments. Once at the bottom of the lower level we could relax and start exploring. The lower level is quite extensive and we saw as much as we could. Unfortunately we were fairly time limited, so we didn't mess around too much. I found the stairs going up to the upper levels, but decided against it this time. Re-visit for that one me thinks. It was refreshing to see no graffiti or vandalism. The access situation has protected it pretty well I suspect. Photos The bottom of the stairs. These were supposed to be the 'Ok' stairs. Dread to think what the 'bad' stairs were like. The stairs to the upper levels.
  15. After alerting fellow explorer RelictaSpiritus to this place being nearby and a last minute scramble to organised a weekend trip, we were making our way over to Norfolk to visit HMP Blunderston Upon arrival we quickly saw this wasn’t going to be anything easy, after all it is designed to keep people in and everyone else out. Making our way around the front of the site and establishing the main entrances were locked tight or covered with a pile of rubble, we made our way round the perimeter fence with high hopes discovering nothing but the abandoned prison farm and somewhat high fences, unsurprisingly. Unfortunately defeated by the prison itself this time around, we did however bump into an ex prison warden who appeared just as we had lost hope. Again, unfortunately other than telling us he worked there for 25 years he would only say simply that there were many things we wouldn’t like to hear about that he had seen over those 25 years.
  16. Had a look at this spot while crossing the country earlier in the year. It has most defiantly seen better days unfortunately. With the water egress it's slowly crumbling anyway now. A bit more of the stairs had collapsed on the ground level, luckily missing the piano. I thought the big rooms on the ground floor was the most interesting part. They must have been very grand in there day. Just as we where getting ready to go a bloke on a quad bike turned up outside of the manor. He first started shouting hello for a bit then started shouting about the house being private property. Eventually he drove off which was our que to get out of there. Due to this I never got any externals. Visited with non member Paul. Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/135648593@N02/albums/72157683292083825/with/34002816290/
  17. UK

    On the days list with the awesome RelictaSpiritus on a day trip to Norfolk is RNAS Pulham. Not much to report on this location as we actually didn’t find what we was looking for, however we did find some pretty cool old trucks, trailers and an old barn full of junk. Somewhat unexpected find, especially to find everything unlocked and open! With one giving myself the classic urbex fright of a pigeon flying towards me and the other more gruesome find of a dead animal of some sort inside the front of the truck… How does that even happen? But anyway, despite not even knowing if the pictures below are even related to the site, here’s the history once again shamelessly stolen from Wikipedia.
  18. UK

    Passing this place only a few months back and spotting the boarding on the windows, the perfect opportunity arose while on route back from Norfolk with RelictaSpiritus. After various other failed locations of the day, we were pleasantly surprised to find access to the church although a bit of a squeeze and a wedgie mid process. With the slight struggle we found ourselves inside pidgeon shit central, but despite that and the unfortunate damage done presumably by the locals. The church was still absolutely stunning. I would like to point out at this point, noting the news reports on the place and the lack of reports for quite some time. We are explorers, we came, took pictures and left again. It’s unfortunate we’re all tarred with the same brush.
  19. Well here goes a first report on here since i joined in 2013, completely forgetting i had created an account so please accept my delayed apologies for being inactive... I visited this place in 2014, so a while ago now... hence why the pictures are how they are . After an epic road trip up north, we returned to our hometown and had an opportunity for something we had been working on for a while. Exhausted from lack of sleep and driving many miles, we were not going to miss this window of opportunity and visited the place before it was no longer doable. Really not sure on the history of the place, possibly built as wine vaults? Unable to find any records of it to be honest, it was really a right place at the right time thing. I believe it was at some point used as a youth club, then left vacant for a number of years and last i heard it was a gym. Unsure of the current situation, would like a revisit with the new camera and glass but beggars cant be choosers eh!! Visited with non members JDY and xcon2icon. Access at the time was a walk in the park, and ive not seen it posted before so hoping its something that isn't the monotonous same old stuff for people to look at either, despite the lack of decent pictures!! Really not the most exciting evening, no security, no nosy neighbors, no drama! Thanks for looking!!
  20. Knowing this place from years ago in the days it was active, and heading back from a days exploring in Norfolk, this was last on the list for myself and RelictaSpiritus. I had memories many moons ago meeting a girl who worked at Bambers Green, but unfortunately after speaking for many weeks I found her somewhat rude upon arrival. I couldn’t resist including that in the report… But anyway, the site was slowly but surely being reclaimed by nature but still had plenty to see so cracking on myself and Relicta made our way through the site. The highlight for myself was one of the two houses, simply a stunning property which leaves me surprised that such a place has been left to waste away. Even the houses past was clearly shown with equestrian type decoration in various places. Looking for the history on the location, the houses are actually up for sale which again leaves me somewhat perplexed as to how or why they haven’t yet sold. Unfortunately (my favourite report word), much of the remains worth seeing that I have seen on other reports appears to have now long gone. Onto the history and pictures now, along with a huge thanks to RelictaSpiritus for the day out! Fantastic day, even smashing my previous exploring record with 8 locations in one day.
  21. UK

    short vid of a back up splore few months back, nice artwork.
  22. UK

    This was done on a short weekend away this came up on our must do list so we went along access was easy and we got in fine unfortunately both both of our body cameras run out of juice! Lots of photos on our Flickr page but heres the video please enjoy.
  23. UK

    This was a last minute lest go out and explore one Saturday evening. When we first turned up the first few ways in were blocked up or gated. But the other half got in and went and found another way in and gracefully as always it was a case of sliding on my bum lol. once in the tunnels they were amazing there is a mixture of footage some from me on the body cam and some from the other half's Nikon camera sorry i never done photos this time but the other half did get a couple and his little lad was with us. Unfortunately for some reason Max decided to get worried because of the spiders! So i did my best to distract him from them but to no avail did it work even tried the trick of what is football stats!! This kid knows everything there is to know about the guy but nope!!! I hope i have done this right if there is any thing worng with it please let me know so i can try and sort it out. Thank you please enjoy.
  24. Worthen Farmhouse The Explore This was from last April. I can't remember a huge amount about this location as myself and @Urbexbandoned had spent the weekend further south in Wales and we were working our way back up to this area before heading back home. There was a farmer bumming about in a tractor right across the road spreading his animal shite around the place, but from memory it was a nice easy and relaxed mooch. Out in the back garden area there was various abandoned cars and and a couple of old tractors, which were nice to look at, especially the old 3.3 litre Vauxhall Cresta. The History History on this place is pretty vague unfortunately and all that i could find through extensive research (copied from Tracey's report @Urbexbandoned) is that "the former resident passed away some time ago and apparently her son couldn't bring himself to sell the house or sort it out so it has been left to decay naturally." The Pictures 1. 2. 3. 4/5. 6. 7. Bedpans are useful eh? 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. The Vauxhall Cresta 3.3 Litre Straight Six (Thanks to Hamtagger Senior for the vehicle ID ) 20. That's it, thanks for taking the time to have a look and feedback always appreciated
  25. UK

    An accidental find while picking up car parts, the tail end of a plane caught my attention which was a good enough excuse for a mooch for me. Now it is debatable of abandoned or not as these are actually sitting at the entrance to an action park in Essex and the remains of the plane are sitting in what can only be described as a scrappie. However on closer inspection and checking over the action parks website, they are without a doubt abandoned or at least left by the action park owners to rust away. Unfortunately the truck looks as though it was used as a “show piece” at some stage of its life with a fake missile poking out the side, more disappointingly the whole interior had been removed. The tracked vehicles actually looked in better condition and what I could see through the dirty windows, the entire interiors were still intact. Downside is they were all locked. History on them? Well, I guess what you see below is what you get! If anyone can name the vehicles, even better!

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