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Found 2,854 results

  1. Been wanting to see this place for a while so I was well happy to finally get a nose round here. G Block was the first area we covered. Would have been better doing it the other way round with hindsight but, we where not to know at the time. This block is pretty much stripped with some nice peeling paint and decay in places. This was the traffic and deception operations block and was later used by the GPO. A nice relaxed wander around a interesting and history steeped building. Visited with non member Paul. Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/135648593@N02/albums/72157680397416355/with/32775422922/
  2. Situated on a main road from England into Wales this place shut down back in 2012 when a number of the restaurants were closed, it's been empty ever since. Seemingly well secured I never investigated until I passed early this year and noticed the front door was wide open. Being recently shut it was in relatively good nick, but the back door had in fact been knocked in some time ago. I didn't stay too long as it's quite open but took the time to get as many snaps as I dared. I'm glad I did, a couple of weeks after the doors and windows were sealed shut and boarded up. Thanks for looking.
  3. Well, I'm probably a bit late in posting this, but I was going through my old shots and thought good old Pyestock was worthy of another report with some of the classic shots. These took a bit of editing, all taken with a basic camera that I didn't really know how to use properly at the time, but I still have fond memories of our visits. If you don't know what Pyestock was, welcome to the most epic industrial derp of all time! Sadly now completely flattened to make way for a distribution centre, the place became one of those "must visit" places for most explorers for awhile. Enjoy! History NGTE Pyestock - The National Gas Turbine Establishment - was a huge industrial site in Fleet, Hampshire. The site was used to test jet engines during their development, and was expanded over time to accommodate engines such as those used on Concord. The engines could be tested in the giant wind tunnels while the conditions of flight up to 2,000mph at an altitude of 65,000ft could be simulated. To achieve such a feat, the largest wind tunnels ever constructed were needed, and a vast array of additional services including the huge compressors in the Air House, which could be configured to blow air into, or suck air out of the test cells. Each compressor set, of which there were eight, were driven by 36,500hp electric motors. Originally opening in the 1949 with a number of small test facilities, the site was top secret at first, but that didn't last. I should imagine the noise alone would have generated a lot of interest. Large scale expansion took place throughout the 50s and 60s to facilitate the much larger jet engines being developed such as those used on Concorde. The site finally closed in 2000 due to a decline in jet engine development and the advent of computer aided simulations. Head on over to the excellent ntge.co.uk for loads more detail - by far the most comprehensive resource ever assembled about Pyestock. Aerial view of the site before demolition. Cell 4 Constructed in 1965 at a cost of £6.5 million, Cell 4 was the last large development on the site, and also the most complicated. It was capable of free-jet testing jet engines, whereby a jet engine could be run up to full speed while the conditions of flight were simulated. The humongous Cell 4 - a supersonic wind tunnel for testing jet engines. Higher view of cell 4 and its building. The huge hole is where air would be blown in at supersonic speeds. Looking the other way, we can see a hole where a huge pipeline would once have entered the building. Viewed from the other end with spill air pipes either side. Close-up to Cell 4. Looking over the other way. Inside the plenum chamber, where air enters the test cell. This selfie (yeah, the one that everyone got!) demonstrates the size of this thing. Inhibition torches around the outside would have had nozzles where gas was ignited, like giant flame throwers, to burn off any residual jet fuel before the air recirculates around the system. The lattice of pipes behind is the first-stage cooler for cooling down the hot jet engine exhaust gasses. View from crane operator's cab. Cell 3 Built mostly underground within a huge trench, Cell 3 was the first testing cell built after plans in the early 1950s to expand the initial capacity of the site. Constructed at the same time as the Air House, it was designed as a general purpose cell to provide greater capacity than Cell 2 - it could cater for the new larger engines with their improved performance, and could simulate higher altitudes, all within a wider range of engine entry temperatures. The "supersonic nozzle" of Cell 3. Looking at the nozzle from where the engine on test would be installed. These "blast doors" were installed for the filming of the movie Sahara. Looking back through the blast doors. Further behind the blast doors we find this other-worldly sight, the stripped out cooler of Cell 3. The Air House The Air House was an integral part of the site's expansion to cater for the new breed of supersonic jet engines. It was clear that the new Cell 3 would require more high pressure air or more suction capability than the Plant House could provide and so the Air House was constructed. It performed one function: to generate right atmospheric conditions to fly a supersonic jet engine on the ground. Looking across the motors and compressors in the Air House. The compressors were responsible for moving air through the test cells at up to 2000mph. One of the 8 GECcompressor/exhauster sets. Panels in the Air House control room. The huge pipelines that connected the Air House to the Cells 3 and 4. Plant House Built in 1954, the plant house contained all the equipment necessary to run the original two test cells at Pyestock - Cells 1 and 2. Its job was very similar to that of the Air House, but on a much smaller scale. Parsons compressor in the Plant House. End view of the Parsons compressor. Local control panel. Plant House control room. Exhausters 9 and 10 With the advent of even larger jet engines, such as those used on Concorde, more suction through the test cells was required. Exhauster 9 (in addition to the 8 existing compressor/exhauster sets in the Air House) was built adjacent to Cell 3, and later Exhauster 10 was built for exclusive use by Cell 4. Exhauster No. 9. The much newer Exhauster No. 10. Cells 1 and 2 The original two full scale test cells at Pyestock, Cells 1 and 2 were constructed in 1957 as a way to test jet engines on the ground while they were fully fired up and running - essentially two large tubes with an exhaust duct and silencer. Selfie in Cell 2. Inside Cell 1. Inside the exhauster stack of Cells 1 and 2 I make no apologies for all the selfies
  4. This has turned into a annual trip. Santas mine trip on this festive outing @GK-WAX came to my house then it was off to meet @paradox and @bigjobs we're we loaded up the car and "jobs" in the driving seat off we went to ystrad einion mine in Wales. Once on the steep slippery road to the mine we met a frantic @the Kwan and @trancentral. Who thought we wouldn't be able to get "jobs" limo up the hill. But we were in hill car so all was good. Once the TK set out the BBQ and it didn't disappoint we had the full monty and even pulled a few crackers. Then when we had full bully a short track upto the mine entrance. This isn't a massive mine. But a nice one. With star attraction the big water wheel. I'll be the first to admit I don't always read the history from other report but please take a look at this history it is quite interesting. Ok on with a few photo and history.. Site Description 1. Ystrad Einion lead-silver, zinc and copper mine is one of the most northerly metal mines in Ceredigion, situated in the heart of Cwm Einion. Mining had been carried out here in a small way since the 18th century, but the main period of activity came in the final decades of the 19th century, when Lancastrian entrepreneur Adam Mason leased the land from the Pryses of Gogerddan and sank over £3000 in state-of-the-art equipment. Ystrad Einion was a relatively small mine; a report of 1891 notes just 11 miners working at the site, 9 men labouring underground and 2 lads, aged between 13 and 18 above ground. It also proved spectacular unprofitable, with minimal, if any, returns. In 1891 the mine produced 5 tons of silver bearing lead (value £37), 10 tons of zinc ore (value £15) and 5 tons of copper ore (value £7). The mine was closed in 1903, when much of the machinery was sold or scrapped. The above ground remains of the mine have been consolidated and are accessible to the public. Here processing to recover the metal ore took place. Water provided the main source of power and was brought to the site via a leat running off from the River Einion 2km up stream. The wheel pits for three waterwheels survive, one wheel powered the pumps and winding drum at the main shaft head, another powered the stone breaker and crusher machinery in the crusher house, where lumps of ore bearing rock were reduced to a manageable size, and the third powered the jiggers and buddles which sorted and separated the metal ore. Other features of the site included waste tips, two stone ore bins, a blacksmiths shop, an ore store, an elaborate system of settling troughs and ponds to purify the poisonous wastewater, a gunpowder magazine set away from the other buildings and a series of tramways together with an incline that transported ore, waste and other materials around the site. Below ground are 4 levels of workings, accessed through adits cut in the hillside and linked by a number of shafts that reached an ultimate depth of 50 fathoms. A waterwheel (NPRN 415676) which operated drainage pumps and a winding drum survives below ground and is unique in its survival. Louise Barker, RCAHMW, January 2011. 2. Interest in the derelict mine site was reprised in the 1970s through investigations by the Ceredigion Mines Group. The survival of the great underground water wheel was first confirmed on 17th September 1971 by Simon Hughes acting on information recieved from a former miner. Plans were variously made during the 1980s to remove and re-erect this wheel to an industrial museum, or to preserve it in-situ. During the 1980s further plans were instigated by Dyfed County Council to restore the mine and make it safe for the public to visit, including new plans of the proposed works drawn up in 1989. Following the necessary permissions work got underway in 1993 to reclaim parts of the mine and open it as a visitor attraction. These works included capping the main mine shaft, the provision of steps to parts of the mine and consolidation of the standing ruins and footings. The latest phase in the interpretation of Ystrad Einion mine involved the production of a computer animation with voice-over in 2013, reconstructing the history and process of the mine. It was produced by ay-pe Ltd, based on research by the RCAHMW and the Welsh Mines Preservation Trust. The project formed part of the Ceredigion County Council PLWM initiative, which received funding through the Rural Development Plan for Wales 2007-2013, which is funded by the Welsh Government and the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development.
  5. Now onto the main target. This is the block that contains all the bits and bobs. Total contrast to G Block with this one being more intact and full of interesting stuff. It seemed like a storage place for things from the museum. The Bombe machine that had been made for the 2001 film Enigma was cool from the front anyway Some nice decay in here also. The block is alot more derelict then I expected it to be. We where pushed for time in the end and rushed round the place abit. With hindsight it would have been better to do them the other way round. Visited with non member Paul. Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/135648593@N02/albums/72157676836766674/with/32103170494/
  6. I had a few days off last month so decided to go to Dyson. As you can see it was quite foggy which made the whole thing feel pretty creepy, solo explore as well. lotta fun. I will be doing a revisit at some point and hopefully with a drone The building, in Sheffield, closed its doors in 2006 and since then the gutted remains have been left to rust. The Dyson Group, founded by John Dyson, opened their first factory in Sheffield in 1834 at the tail end of the Industrial Revolution, before later moving to this site. Using new software to edit videos so should be a big improvement in quality!
  7. History This mortuary was nestled in the Northern Ireland countryside. It was small, quaint & perfect! A small chapel inside accompanied the mortuary. With no body fridges which was one of the first things I noticed I could only put that down to either it was a mortuary whereby bodies were not stored or given the history of Northern Ireland & tradition with death they were not needed as bodies are usually buried within 3 days. Possible that a body fridge could have been removed I guess but no signs that there was ever one there. The main thing I noticed which was pretty hard to miss was the perfectly kept porcelain table. Not only porcelain but a rotating one! I had the pleasure of visiting another in the north of the UK a couple of years ago & that in itself shows how hard to come by these are. Now anyone who knows me & my love for death/mortuaries/embalming etc will know this was like pure porn to me. When searching for new places, the unseen if you like.. to find a fresh one and one of this kind is infact a rareity. To be able to put together the history, including that of the slab is as interesting as visiting it The table was deep, very big lip on it. No drainage channels at all, just a nice recess around the perimeter which deepened leading to a drain at the far end. Then on the foot of the table was the word Twyfords, now I Still haven't got around to seeing 2 Twyfords porcelain tables at another uk mortuary and others which have long gone. Twyfords are known for their sanitary products, toilets, basins etc but they extended in to the mortuary field too. Cliff Vale potteries was built by TW Twyford in 1887. It was Cliff Vale where the slabs were fired in Stoke On trent. The word Twyfords would have been added with a 'flow blue' application..a deep cobalt blue inking. An underglaze pottery printed. The blue tends to flow in to the glaze giving off a blurred effect. This would have been done prior to firing the slab. The slab itself would have been fireclay, as would the belfast sink that you see in the same room. This firing recipe would have required particular firing conditions. Buff Coloured clay body with a bright white enamelled surface built to withstand strength and rough usage it was perfect for mortuary slabs. Lucky enough to find the porcelain slab and a Belfast sink with both wings intact was something of a find. The explore I explored with @hamtagger, we hadnt been out much lately due to family commitments and took the opportunity to put our research to good use while out there. Visiting family over there always gives us a good enough reason. I knew from looking at this place that it was what we thought, it was what was meant to be inside that was questionable. Having made a journey to Frenchay to discover that only the previous week the ceramic slab and all stainless ones had been removed I was holding not much hope. I tend not to get my hopes up nowadays, just take the rough with the smooth. But this... well.. we couldn't have hoped for more. It was somewhere I didn't want to leave, very atmospheric despite being quite sparse. Literally no vandalism or graffitti at all. Just how we like it. There were signs that someone had been in recently but they had respected it as we had. I would definitely go back here, even just to give the old girl a good old polish! On with the pics... 1 2 3 4 An old advert from Cliff Vale & Twyfords (I found this online) 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Thanks for looking
  8. Thought i would jump on the tour bus with this one being as its quite close to me. Visited with Lolly92 Some History Saint Cadoc's Hospital is located in Caerloen on the northern outskirts of the city of Newport. The building was designed by Alfred J. Wood FRIBA, London and named after Saint Cadoc. Saint Cadoc's church is located in the town. The hospital, which opened in 1906 as the Newport Borough Asylum, was built to accommodate up to 350 patients. Extensive outbuildings were later added on the site, but since 2005 the number of residents has been very small with the growing emphasis on care in the community. St Cadoc's Hospital provides a number of mental health services, Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services, Adult Mental Health Services are provided by 11 Community Mental Health Teams and Elderly Mental Health Services provided by 5 multi-disciplinary Community Mental Health Teams Pics Thanks for looking
  9. New Scotland Yard New Scotland Yard was located on Broadway in Victoria and has been the Metropolitan Police's headquarters since 1967. By the 1960s the requirements of modern technology and further increases in the size of the force meant that it had outgrown its Victoria Embankment site. In 1967 New Scotland Yard moved to the site on Broadway, which was an existing office block acquired under a long-term lease. The Met's senior management team was based at New Scotland Yard, along with the Met's crime database. This uses a national computer system developed for major crime enquiries by all British forces, called Home Office Large Major Enquiry System, more commonly referred to by the acronym HOLMES, which recognises the great fictional detective Sherlock Holmes. The training programme is called 'Elementary', after Holmes's well-known, yet apocryphal, phrase "elementary, my dear Watson". A number of security measures were added to the exterior of New Scotland Yard during the 2000s, including concrete barriers in front of ground-level windows as a countermeasure against car bombing, a concrete wall around the entrance to the building, and a covered walkway from the street to the entrance into the building. Armed officers from the Diplomatic Protection Group patrolled the exterior of the building along with security staff. In May 2013 the Metropolitan Police confirmed that the New Scotland Yard building on Broadway would be sold and the force's headquarters would be moved back to the Curtis Green Building on the Victoria Embankment, and renamed Scotland Yard. Ahead of the move to the Embankment, the Metropolitan Police sold New Scotland Yard to Abu Dhabi Financial Group in December 2014 for £370 million. Staff left New Scotland Yard on 1 November 2016, when ownership of the building was passed to Abu Dhabi Financial Group who plan to redevelop the site into luxury apartments, offices and shops. The Metropolitan Police are due to move to the Embankment in early 2017. Since this appeared on here a couple of months ago I've visited a few times with @Maniac, @KM Punk, @starlight, @extreme_ironing, @Miss.Anthrope, @adders, @Porkerofthenight, @DirtyJigsaw, @TrollJay, @Merryprankster, monkey, suboffender, silentwalker, theriddler, dragonsoop, and many non members. Most of these photos were taken on my first visit when we did a sweep of every floor looking for anything of interest. Much had been stripped before the Met handed it over unfortunately but there was still enough to make it a decent explore. The view from the roof is pretty sensational on a clear evening, made even more special by the fact you are sitting on top of perhaps the most notorious police Headquarters in the world. A great place for a dragon soop and some classic 80s tunes. 1. Starting from the bottom and working our way up, the underground car park. Sadly no bunkers or anything quite so interesting under here. 2. Security control room for monitoring cctv and opening gates. 3. 4. 5. Press conference room 6. Briefing room 7. Locker room, now in use by construction workers. 8. A message from the last officer to leave 9. These marble lift lobbies were the only bit of grandeur really, the lifts were still fully functional which came in handy a couple of times. 10. 11. The remains of a once plush office 12. How most of the building looked....stripped and being prepared for a new lease of life 13. Pretty much every floor had large server rooms in the centre, this one in particular held restricted access servers. 14. Where firearms would have been distributed, there was a similar firearms storage room on the ground floor. 15. Label on the cupboard above 16. Sand boxes presumably for discharging rounds of ammo when handing in firearms 17. safe room 18. 19. Bridge connecting the two buildings together 20. Just off the bridge sat this lecture theatre, a week later it was completely ripped to pieces. 21. 22. Canteen 23. Cctv monitoring work station 24. 25. Plant room on the top floor 26. Engineer's control room 27. 28. And last but not least, the rooftop. 29. 30. 55 Broadway, TfL's art deco Headquarters until recently 31. Buckingham Palace 32. One of the best views in London really 33. 34. 35. Fish eye view from the top of the mast. Scotland Yard, it's been emotional.....
  10. After being tipped off and visiting this place a fair few months back without my camera, the perfect nights opportunity appeared and grabbing my camera I was on my way. The building itself appears in relative good condition, which is unsupprising considering the google street view of the property shows it still in use. Other than the dampness and mould growing everywhere, most likely from the numerous broken windows and front door wide open. No hints on location there, yep Vincent Lodge is a code name! Unfortunatly the building has been stripped of anything worth while other than the kitchen appliences, an iron and the odd photography or broom. I am not one for the supernatural but I will admit a door did slam shut behind me for no obvious reason but being an explorer that I am, I ignored that and carried on snapping away. History? Well, what can I say… I can’t find anything without giving it away. Sorry people! But here’s the pictures anyway.
  11. So 2017 went with a fairly slow start, having only done a site I have done to death before (just to get that floor in shot!). Me and two local friends (non-members) headed to the Midlands with a list of sites to do; a very rare occasion that I was navigating as opposed to driving! Said friends were keen as mustard to be exploring and joining me in delving through the history, so all good on that front! The first two sites were total failures, Forest Glades in Kidderminster was being demolished, we turned up to the scene of carnage as the interior was being pulled out, and our next site; a local school was also no go. I had a few places further East from here and Stourbridge was only up the road, so we decided to try Longlands! I have been wanting to do this one for about two years, and its now sadly totally ruined, but we still spent a good few hours on site exploring the mix of modern and not so modern school, and we were able to find the odd cool thing! There was some really good Art coursework left behind here, which is a real shame! Longlands was first built and opened in 1912, and was extended quite extensively during the 60s with a new gymnasium and class blocks built. This extension included a classroom perched right on top of one of the original 1912 wings; not a common “improvement” to a school. The school closed in 1990 as Longlands School. Despite having 500 students on it's records in 1989. Longlands was amalgamated with High Park School in Wollaston. In the later years, the school was taken over by Stourbridge College who used it as their centre for Creative Arts and Design, and that eventually closed its doors in around 2011. In September 2011 a reunion took place in the grounds for pupils of the original Longlands School which saw hundreds of former pupils turn out from all over the world. There is some lovely architecture remaining, but the place is sadly absolutely wrecked by local kids/scumbags. After several hours here, and navigating between the wings of the O-shaped school, we found ourselves sealed into the grounds and had to find another way out to that of the way in. Once back at the car, we headed toward Birmingham for our next site. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157675752950653
  12. External, as viewed from Google History Kodak’s first facility to open outside the US was located in Harrow, on a 7 acre plot of land. Opening in 1891, the site was originally used to develop photographs and kept around 100 chickens on site to supply the egg white required to coat the paper. As the factory expanded, production of film rolls started, along with the manufacture of photographic paper. By the 1950s Kodak was the largest manufacturing plant in the British Commonwealth and employed around 6,000 staff. Much more of the production process took place at the Harrow site in years gone by than it did more recently, including more coating and printing of the back of the paper. By the time of closure, only the final photographic coating was applied at Harrow, everything else was done at Kodak's site in Germany before shipping the rolls of paper over to the UK for completion. Production of photographic film ended in 2005, owing to the increasing popularity of digital imaging. As the demand for photographic prints dropped, so did production at the Harrow site. Closure was announced in April 2016, and production ceased in December 2016. No. 2 English Electric turbine with 3.6MW alternator Originally there were two of these, one was removed some time ago Turbine and lubrication systems Turbine control panel English Electric makers plate on access panel The more recent alternator No. 3 - A 5MW English Electric No. 3's Control Panel Wider view of the turbine hall These gas units replaced the old coal-fired boilers The power house control room was a bit disappointing! The retro-styled board behind was interesting - individual square pins marking out the shift patterns The old boiler house Panels and deaerator in the boiler house More panels Base of the old chimney. The chimney and power house building will be retained as part of the new development, although will be re-purposed. Switchroom Moving into the main factory - this was already mainly stripped with only a few bits of machinery remaining... A photosphere inside the control room when it was in use can be seen here Another stripped out control room Labs Lab equipment Melting vats As you approach the production lines called tracks, lighting levels become gradually dimmer. This allowed the operators eyes to adjust to the near-darkness conditions they would be working in during their shift. Rolls of paper are first loaded into the unwinder machine This machine could handle two rolls at once, one feeding into the track, whilst the other was being made ready Next the paper is fed into the coating station which bombards the surface with electrons Back of the coating station, where the paper then moves to the curtain coater to have the photo-sensitive coating applied. Finally, the coated paper is put back onto rolls by the realer, ready to be packed and shipped. The rolls of paper both begin and end their journey in the loading area
  13. Built in 1881 Stephenson Brothers Dry Salters were responsible for making dyes and colourings which would have been in demand by the neighbouring textile mills across Bradford and the rest of the north. They also manufactured soaps, polishes and lubricating oils , that would have been used across the city and beyond. After a walk around at Malham Cove with @Fatpanda we decided to pop in this place on the way home before it spontaneously combusted like most of the other mills in bradford. it was the first time in a while visiting a needle infested crackhead grotto instead of the massive industrial site's we have been spoiled by last year, it was nice not creeping around corners and getting ready to leg it at any minute! anyway enough babbling on with the pictures As soon as we squeezed through the access we were greeted by the crackhead grotto! I always thought this staircase was in Dalton Mills in Keighley for some reason, it was nice to finally see it even though I couldn't get a good shot of it! @Fatpanda Posing Thanks for looking sorry if your not a fan of needle infested derps!
  14. UK

    Shot a few years ago before all the vandalism. No edits just a walk around. Was such a lovely place then. I believe restoration work is now well ongoing. This is great to hear. Thanks for looking I got plenty more films in the pipeline.
  15. I've driven past this place many times but only recently realised it was empty as I passed it on a day out to explore, I know nothing of its history but deduce it's been empty around 5 years according to magazines found inside. It's situated in Mid Wales on a main road and the gardens are quite overgrown, thankfully this time of year the greenery is manageable! All doors were closed but thankfully one of them wasn't locked. There is also an outbuilding next door which I didn't have time to check out properly to see if there was access, next time maybe. Thanks for looking.
  16. Came across this place while driving through Anglesey recently. A nice little one floor cottage full of bits and bobs. Alot of old tape players, radios, TV's and ornaments. There is also two caravans behind the cottage. One was full of old clocks. Visited with non member Paul. Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/135648593@N02/albums/72157678242863220/with/32575985486/
  17. Hey all. Here's the "Maidstone Social Education Centre", later named to "(Social Services Directorate) Boughton Mount Centre. It was closed down in 2009 due to major roofing problems. It's a pretty decent sized bit of land and is being reserved for historic interest. Have a look here; http://list.historicengland.org.uk/resultsingle.aspx?uid=1413737 They really went to town boarding the place up though, and there are plenty of Asbestos warning signs around. Exterior shots Old sign New sign A house belonging to the Social Centre One of my favourite shots I've ever taken (below) of a derelict place, not bad for a phone camera! Underneath the site there are various tunnels, no idea where they lead. Apparently people have found some strange things down there though.. Thanks for looking, hope you enjoyed.
  18. As mentioned on my previous post I wanted to make some films that were a bit different to your normal exploring video. No shaky gopro or selfie sticks. So I went to a local walk in and started to film. It took a few visits and experiments to get the final result which is a mixture of filming and timelapse So RAF Sculthorpe was last used by the USAF. Some of the site has been repurposed but most of the residential blocks are left to decay. Thanks for watching I hope you enjoyed.
  19. The Royalty Cinema, Birmingham - Jan 2017 So yet again, a very slight backlog going on here but nowhere near as bad as before! Mookster, two Newbie explorers (friends of mine) and myself visited The Royalty in Birmingham on the start of a big road trip of the midlands. I had wanted to do this one for quite some time, so I made it the main spot for the day. We arrived around 7am, but it was far too dark, so off to a greasy spoon we went till it got a bit lighter! This is a bit of a funny one really as it used to be occupied by a Hand Car Wash who used the old car park, and access was allegedly through various different ways. I once rocked up outside about two years ago, but never actually explored it then so it was good to finally see it! - The Royalty was opened on 20th October 1930 with Maurice Chevalier's "The Love Parade".The cinema was built for and operated by the local independent Selly Oak Pictures Ltd. Eventually the site was taken over by the Associated British Cinemas(ABC) chain in March 1935. The site was closed by ABC on the 2nd November 1963 with Cliff Robertson in "P.T.109". It was later converted into an Alpha Bingo Club (operated by ABC) and later a Mecca Bingo Club. By 2010 it was operated as a Gala Bingo Club which closed around 2012. In the summer of 2011, the Royalty Cinema was designated a Grade II Listed building by English Heritage. in 2012, police raided the site when a large scale weed farm was found in the attic. In 2017 the site stands derelict but there is hope on the horizon with local rumours of it reopening as a cinema. What a beauty she is as well. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157680388004465
  20. History Runcorn, which derives its name from the Anglo-Saxon term rumcofan (meaning a wide cove or bay), is a small industrial town and cargo port in Cheshire. It is located alongside the southern bank of the River Mersey, where the estuary narrows to form the Runcorn Gap. For much of its existence, Runcorn was a small isolated village and a fort, defending the borders of the lands of the Kingdom of Mercia. However, the Industrial Revolution transformed the entire area towards the end of the 18th century. Due to its topography, a large number of manufacturers established a presence in Runcorn, to the extent that all of its open green spaces were quickly occupied. It did not take long for the original village to expand beyond its own borders either, so the town now also comprises a number of the former outlying villages. Today, as the surface space has been significantly reduced, large proportions of the small streams and brooks that flow into the River Mersey have been culverted. Even though the industry in Runcorn has been in rapid decline in recent years, new housing developments have been established in their place, so the culverts remain. Double Trouble, which derives its name from the large dual entranceway, is one of those drains. It is made up of several different sized chambers that are positioned between sections of RCP. Double Trouble also features a number of concrete stairs that are encased within brickwork; these structures allow water to follow with the natural gradient of the landscape and so prevent water from accumulating at certain junctions in the drain. Our Version of Events Double Trouble was the last 2016 explore for us. All of a sudden we’d run out of time to fit anything else in. We’d been keen to get a good old dirty drain done on our trip to Liverpool, but it seemed that all the city has to offer were small shitty RCP’s – as far as we deduced anyway. It was for this reason we had to travel all the way over to Runcorn to find what we were looking for. Once we arrived in Runcorn, we quickly realised that finding the bastard thing wasn’t as straightforward as we’d first imagined. Nonetheless, after foraging around in the trees and bushes for a while, and finding a smaller drain that smelt very strongly of sewage, we eventually stumbled across the two great entrances that denote the start of Double Trouble. The sheer size of the outfall makes this drain especially inviting, even if it is a concrete monolith, and we couldn’t wait to have a peek inside to see what it might have in store for us. We climbed up the side of the overflow weir and onto a raised platform to reach the entranceway of the left-hand side tunnel. From there we plodded on for some metres, before we reached a junction where both of the initial tunnels join together. We continued on, following a long square passage for what felt like a long time; having said that, we did stop several times to take a few photos. At the end of the long square concrete section, we came across what was perhaps one of the best parts of the whole explore: a large concrete chamber with a staircase positioned in the centre, alongside two smaller RCP’s either side of it. This room was perfect for flinging a bit of steel wool around on a whisk, so the next fifteen minutes or so were spending doing exactly that. Leaving the smell of burnt wool behind us, we climbed up the stairs and discovered that the next section was a stoopy RCP. It looked boring as fuck, but we carried on anyway. It wasn’t too bad at first, apart from the monotony and stoopiness, but it did have a few surprises in store for us along the way in the form of small brick chambers that are presumably access areas for engineers and maintenance crews. However, the best bit was yet to come. Towards the end of the insipid RCP, another staircase was gradually becoming visible. When we did in fact step out of the cylindrical pipe we found ourselves inside a brick-lined chamber with a concrete staircase straight ahead. More fire and flames ensued as we tried to make use of the aesthetically pleasing setting surrounding us. The final part of Double Trouble takes you through more RCP that eventually leads to another staircase and a second split in the system, where you can carry on towards Liverpool if you want by taking one of the two the back-breaking RCP’s that lie ahead. For us, however, this is where we decided to call it a day. As the next section was considerably smaller than what we’d just wandered through, we decided that what lay ahead was probably the same shitty concrete. Besides, it was almost New Year at this stage and we all had places we wanted to be, such as the pub. With that, we took a quick group shot and turned around to make our way back to the entrance. Why we didn’t pop a lid to get back out a little sooner is beyond me, but there you go. It seemed WildBoyz were in the mood for more walking that day. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Meek-Kune-Do, The Hurricane, Box and Husky. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17:
  21. Visiting this site once before but with a lack of camera equipment, the opportunity arrose to visit again on the off chance so took the camera along with me. Unfortunately, not only has this location been done to death by other explorers, but it would now seam anything worth seeing has been well and truely trashed. On the upside it was a good opportunity to crack out one of my other camera lenses for a change too. Onto the history and some pictures anyway… St. Peter’s Hospital was initially built to house the casualties of the Second World War. The mortuary was built in the 1940s, but after much redevelopment it was decided that the site was too small to cope with the increase of bodies. So, in April 2009 the mortuary closed and moved to the new building which is now central to the main hospital.
  22. Twenty Foot Farm The Explore Visited with @Urbexbandoned on a chilly March morning. Thanks to @Mikeymutt for the location of a place that I'd probably driven past a few hundred times when I lived nearby and an classic example of me not keeping my eyes open when I should've done. This place confused me a little bit. The family who ran their pork/bacon business from here are supposed to have only moved premises to another location in Lincolnshire, so i'm unsure as to why they left such a large property full of furniture and stuff empty and falling into dereliction. Anyway, glad they did and I walked away from the place dreaming about renovating the place and living there... The History (Stolen as per) Not a lot of history to be found online about this place but the residents were well known within the area and their family dates back to the 1800's. This was once a thriving farm. Producing Pigs for Bacon as well as other fresh produce. The Pictures 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. As always, thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated
  23. So its been well over a year since I last posted anything, and thought its about time I started up again! Since the brickworks was quite close, I decided to go have a mooch around and do some filming. Quiet explore with no interruptions
  24. History Today, Newsham is a small suburb of Blyth. Blyth itself, meaning ‘gentle’ or ‘merry’ in Old English, is a town and civil parish in Northumberland, England, and from the early 18th century the town rapidly expanded as a result of the Industrial Revolution, as coal mining, fishing and ship building industries quickly established a foothold in the area. Newsham quickly became part of the town as new houses were required for the growing number of workers in the area. Prior to the growth of industry, however, it is noted in John Wallace’s History of Blyth and a number of other sources that Newsham comprised only a few farms and a mansion as early as 1341, which were occupied by the prominent Ogle family. Despite the distinguished status of the Ogle family though, it is reported that the main holders of the lands and buildings at Newsham were in fact the Delaval family. They owned the lands from the 12th century right up until the 17th century. The 3rd Earl of Derwentwater, James Radclyffe, was the last successor to Newsham after the death of his father in 1705. It is unknown how the lands passed into the hands of the Radclyffe family, but they were said to have several estates in Northumberland and Newsham was one of those. James Radclyffe’s reign over the estate was short-lived, however, as he became a Jacobite – a member of a rebellious movement that sought to restore the Roman Catholic Stuart King James VII of Scotland, II of England and Ireland, and his heirs to the thrones of England, Scotland and Ireland. After his following of 70 (mainly gentlemen, a small number of soldiers and servants) were defeated in a short battle he was captured in 1715 and escorted to the Tower of London. The 3rd Earl of Derwentwater pleaded guilty to the charge of treason held against him, in the hope that he might gain a royal pardon. Radclyffe lost his trial and was immediately stripped of his honours and titles and sentenced to death for treason. Although most of the other Lords and Earls were granted clemency, Radclyffe’s sentence remained to set an example for others who might try to overthrow the king. He was beheaded on 24th February 1716. Following the death of Radclyffe, the Newsham estate fell into the hands of the Ridley family. At some point during their tenure of the lands (one source suggests 1880) the mansion was dismantled and the materials were said to have been used to construct a farmhouse. Another source from 1720 suggests that the former mansion was already in a state of dilapidation, with it being described as ‘an ancient structure but something ruinous’. An additional reason for its demolition may be attributed to the fact that the mansion itself was a relatively basic structure; it was only two storeys high, the grand hall was plain and simple and it had only a small number of surrounding buildings. In other words, the building was no longer deemed important enough to warrant its ‘mansion’ status. Now in the 21st century, the farmhouse and its surrounding buildings lie derelict. It is not known why the site is abandoned, the only hint is that Wallace of Kelso Ltd., a large independent agricultural company, may have been based at the Newsham site but decided to close or relocate their premises. Their main base in Dundee still exists still, so the company did not fall into different hands or go into liquidation. As things stand, there are plans to build forty new homes on the site. The main farmhouse and its other buildings will be demolished to make spaces for the new development; however, the stone wall bordering the property will remain to give the scheme a so-called historic link. A number of local residents have opposed the plans, having raised concerns about flooding, loss of privacy and the increased pressure on nearby schools, GP surgeries and other important amenities. Some residents also suggested that the old farmhouse ‘boasts character and holds heritage value’. The council, though, disagree, and argue that the site has no heritage value whatsoever. Our Version of Events Our night beganwith high aspirations. To start off with, we tried our luck at getting ourselves inside an abandoned museum. As it turned out, the museum was much less abandoned that we’d first thought. A large number of sensors were the first indication that the site was still quite active, and then the alarms we triggered supported the fact even further. We left in a hurry, feeling fairly disappointed, and continued on well into the night trying various other explores that would all turn out badly. As a last resort we found ourselves just outside Newsham, where we decided that we’d try our luck with a farmhouse we’d recently heard about. We gathered outside the car – at least what was left of our sorry looking assemblage did. Spirits were low and the night had resulted in an abnormal number of injuries. At this point the opinion was unanimous, if we failed to get into a derelict farm we would be forced to retire from exploring and take up something else. Knitting, swinging and baking were the favoured options. After that quick discussion, we decided to stop wasting time and scale the really high three-foot wall to get inside the farmyard. From there we ran for the shadows and set about trying to find a way inside the farmhouse. Inside the house it felt as though we were suddenly in an episode of Only Fools and Horses. In fact, for the entire half an hour we spent in that building it felt exactly as though we were in Nelson Mandela House. For instance, the carpets throughout the building were… Well, they were very different by conventional standards. We might even go so far as to say they were a little spicy. What is more, though, is that even the furniture matched the Peckham vibe we had going on. We were half expecting to find Uncle Albert in the living room sitting in one of the armchairs sipping on a snifter of rum, or a blow-up sex doll tucked away in a cupboard somewhere. Needless to say, we found neither. Unfortunately, we were prompted to move on to the other buildings on the site after hearing what we thought sounded like a riot outside. In the knowledge that we didn’t have any ski gear to protect ourselves, or a Russian VCR to film it, we decided to split. As for the rest of the premises, it had its own unique bits and quirks, such as the pianos we stumbled across in small backroom, or the strange dining room setup inside one of the large barns. All in all, then, considering the place looked like an incredibly trashed farm from the outside it ended up being a decent wander. After taking a look around the entire site and seeing everything there was to see, we headed back to the car. It was just starting to snow at this point, so it was time to switch the car heater to full blast and warm up a wee bit. Explored with Meek-Kune-Do. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23:

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