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Found 3,696 results

  1. Dawson fabrics ltd The history Built in 1770 by William Marsden who's daughter married Richard Field who then traded there for a number of years until forming the partnership of Field & Bottrill in the 1880's. Now Dawson Fabrics Ltd. The company name Dawson Fabrics closed the doors at Greenside Mill sometime in the late millennium years with the loss of 70 jobs. Administrators from Leicestershire insolvency were called and are now handling the company affairs. The company was said to be doing well with orders from high street stores such as Marks & Spencer. Dawson Fabrics were making fleecing for jackets and blankets. The company closed it's premises on Wakefield Rd in 2000 with a loss of 60+ jobs to focus on their other sites including Greenside Mill. Outline planning for 149 houses have been submitted with a demolition order which was denied but as recentley been re-subbmitted with agreed amendments. The explore This has taken some documenting. We have had everything from Alarms to some very sketchy Security (with authentic teeth missing)... chased around the Mill by guard dogs and the local mechanic filming us through one of the Mill's windows then giving chase up the driveway. But paying frequent visits we are now confident we have documented every part of the Mill. Starting in early 2013 we decided to take a look. Having been denied the first time we were persistent and on returning a further 6/7 times managed to start with some of the Mills out buildings. The repair workshop Typical tools left over which would have been used to repair various pieces of equipment in order to keep the Mill running... we were surprised to see so many of the original materials left behind perhaps not dissimilar to the day it closed albeit with a little more rust. I suppose when your out on an explore like this you know you've hit the jackpot when theres machinery of this nature untouched from vandals or travellers. The roof Offers reprieve when Charlie the guard dog is on the rampage.. The boiler house One of the tricker out buildings to reach which took some careful manoeuvring to enter... The boiler house was a considerable size and housed some pretty impressive pieces of metal. There were quite a few boilers scattered around and we did mange to document a very old looking although perfectly immaculate Ruston & Hornsby boiler... which if we had the time to persevere with the controls would have provided some much needed warmth on the explore. Climbing the boiler The main factory Block A This building forms most of the internal workings of the Mill with huge generators lining the corridor. on previous explores we would have been more than happy with this has the main attraction... It was a little like looking around a museum and we wouldn't have been surprised if a guide had popped out and started talking about how the machinery was used to produce some of the garments. It was one of those buildings that if you had more time you could easily spend hours working out what pieces of equipment do what... maybe a guide wouldn't have been so bad. Block B What we thought was the processing area turned out to be a little more interesting... on entering there was typical garments stored in corridors.. filing cabinets etc. Making our way around we came to what appeared to be a Lab most probably used to test out dye's for the Mill's fabric. There was some wonderful looking pieces of apparatus that wouldn't look out of place on the starship enterprise. we were so tempted to start them up but again time was against us... In the basement we came across a kitchen area which was a little unusual as the main canteen area was in a different location of the site. Block C Separate from the main Mill apart from the adjoining conveyer belt is the substantial finishing area... where guessing that this is where production was finished with garments ready to pack for distribution. standard apparatus consisted of looms ... drums filled with dye ... retro looking PC's and a general supervisors office. natural decay slowly taking over the various leftovers. Supervisors office block C The admin office Beautifully presented and part of the Mills original build was this very well preserved admin block... we felt like we had stepped back into the 1950's with this one all that was missing was a typewriter with someone busy working away whilst smoking an old pipe. Original oak wood entry which expanded to the stairs and the facade. Searching further we came across what looked like a board room i suppose some important decisions will have been made hear over the years and most recently the current owners rubbing their hands in what potentially will make them millions if plans are approved for the demolishment of the site to make way for a housing estate. We've had it all with this explore... a beautiful preserved Mill dating way back. some very heart thumping games of hide and seek... very loud alarms... and a lovely guard dog barking incessantly whilst on site... we even got embroiled with the RSPCA and locals concerned about the health and safety of the guard dog. we're a little reluctant to put this out as the identity of the Mill will probably be compromised... I think though the old girls years are numbered and it won't be long before another part of our history is noted in text form whilst making way for another faceless housing estate. That concludes the explore...
  2. Last year we tried to get in Scarborough sports centre but they have seriously locked that place up tight, nothing on the roof, no tunnels or anything.So we just made a short video of the outside. Today I went back with the newest member of our URBEX team, the drone and got some higher up shots. Here are the photos from the drone...
  3. UK HMP Glen Parva Prison

    Glen Parva was constructed on the site of the former Glen Parva Barracks in the early 1970s as a borstal and has always held young offenders. Since its opening in 1974 the establishment has seen considerable expansion and change and now serves a catchment area of over 100 courts, holding a mixture of sentenced, unsentenced, and remand prisoners. In 1997, Her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Prisons walked out of an inspection at Glen Parva because conditions were so bad. After a subsequent inspection a year later, the report stated that there was "hope for the future" for the prison but added that a lot of work still needed to be done, and recommended that some staff should be moved because of their attitude towards inmates. Our Explore: Late night mission to this place made the entry a slight more easy then in the daylight, secca made this explore a lot more challenging haha! but a shame it had to be in the dark and access to most of the rooms made me see only a slight percentage of this place. but i seen what i wanted to thankfully! And cheers to the lot that helped! Enjoy the pics the few of them the rest are for the archives
  4. This is my first Urbex adventure. I recently moved to West Sussex and though I'd have a look around at some popular and easily accessible sites to explore. I stumbled upon Bedham Chapel and after some quick research, I found the location and travelled there. We drove down a single track road until spotted it in the woodland below us. We parked a few hundred metres further down the road and set out on foot to get there. This is my video report that I captured and I apologise for the clickbaity title of the video and the fact that it's so weird it looks staged. But it really isn't! My girlfriends reaction to this is real and we were definitely creeped out by our find. If anyone has any idea of what this ceremony was about, please let me know! Video Link
  5. Explore This was a fairly easy explore as these buildings are not as protected as the main college and the park relies on tourists to inform security about any vandals. The gymnasium was the hardest to get into as we had to avoid getting seen by any onlookers. So going at a later time of day would be advised. You should be cautious if you get further into the student centre as some of the doors looked to be alarmed. The classrooms are in the open and not surrounded by anything so you are likely to be spotted by security or tourists. We had a run in with security who were quite well mannered and laid back. All they said was that we were not to go near the building as it is a demolition site. Explored with @little_boy_explores History Student Centre I can't believe they left this in the open Gymnasium We didn't need to this door Classrooms
  6. UK Pagefield Mill - Wigan - 2018

    The beautiful post-apocalyptic page field mill - Video Report
  7. UK Coronation Street 2018 - Old Granada Studios

    A post-apocalyptic look into Granada Studios old coronation street set! I felt I had to do this one considering I am a Mancunian and all, but sometimes these expeditions don't always go to plan.
  8. UK The Cold Slabs - Jan 2018

    Stoke Hospital Morgue. Been closed a fair while now, been here 3 times and never been able to gain access to this part of it due to it being locked off and being caught by secca once!
  9. UK RAF Stenigot, Lincoln

    Fantastic place to explore, very interesting. Those dishes are absolutely massive! Details on history coming soon...
  10. UK Nocton Hall & RAF Hospital in Lincoln

    A bit of a pain in the back side to get in this one, they have really made an effort with those fences! There was no security though, once you find a way past the doubled up security fences it's smooth sailing. We did find one particular part of this place rather creepy, there is a rotten bed in a dark basement that was quite eerie and had a different feel than the rest of the decaying building. More information will follow on our website in a day or so.
  11. History Horbury had a chapel of ease to the Church of All Saints in Wakefield, from before the time of the Domesday Book. The chapel was replaced by a Norman chapel with a nave and tower that stood until it was replaced by the present church in 1790. St Peter and St Leonard’s Church, the parish church, was designed by John Carr, the Horbury born architect who built the Georgian neo-classical style between 1790 and 1794 at a cost to himself of £8,000. He is buried in a vault beneath the north aisle. The foundation of St John’s Church at Horbury Bridge was in a mission meeting in a room in what is now the hairdressers in 1864. Funds were raised and the church was built with stone from Horbury Quarry in 1884. The curate, Sabine Baring-Gould wrote the hymn “Onward Christian Soldiers” in 1865 for the Whitsun procession to Horbury Church. Another mission was set up at Horbury Junction in 1887 and St Mary’s Church was built in 1893. The Methodist Church on High Street was demolished. The Salvation Army corps has headquarters on Peel Street and the Tithe Barn Christian Centre is on Westfield Road. Tithe Barn Street in Horbury was so named after the old tithe barn, which was used to store produce of the tithe. A tithe means a tenth and one tenth of every Horbury parishioner's income from produce of the land had to be donated to the church. The right to receive tithes was granted to the English churches by King Ethelwulf in 855. These tithes were taxes, which each inhabitant was compelled to pay. Horbury was a Chapel of Ease to Wakefield Parish Church, and the Vicar of Horbury was a Curate in Charge. The tithes which were collected from Horbury residents belonged to the Vicar of Wakefield and not to the Vicar of St. Peter's, Horbury. Explore By chance we discovered this one on route to Wakefield... The exterior is in good condition and from what we understand the building became abandoned in 2011 after various businesses one including a day nursery had re-located. The interior is pretty heavily vandalised and lots of precious metals & items have been taken... this said theres no real structural damage and was able to negotiate round without any real danger. The main hall of the church still as some original features including coving found typically in a church, unfortunately no pews or alter remain although there was a cool seating area above the main hall. There was also an area round to the rear probably an extension at some point to deal with the volume of people... which had kept some of its original features... quite a nice easter egg this one! Pics Today the Christian Centre lays more vandalised than ever... still worth a wonder in my opinion
  12. My Visit - This one was quite fun, although there is not many items left to see, its a great walk under Liverpool, with some nice stone and brickwork to see. We arrived quite early, and had absolutely no trouble finding and getting into the tunnel, the rest is best seen in pictures!
  13. UK Ark Synagogue

    The Ark Synagogue, Liverpool. Also known as Greenbank Synagogue. History - My visit - I visited this site recently with two friends that I run the facebook page 0151 Outdoors with, if you are on facebook, give us a like! Well, I dont really know if this can be classed as a report, haven't had too much luck on my first few explores, but I'm not letting that stop me. This time, I arrived on site, and took a few pictures of the exterior before two dodgy blokes of possibly eastern european descent came running around the corner, shouting about how the building is ''TOP SECRET'' They weren't too frightening, so I grabbed a few pictures as I walked off the grounds, the guy in the last picture told me as I was leaving, ''£10 pictures outside, £20 pictures inside'' but I think I'd rather try again in future, its part of the fun. I dont know how true it is, but apparently the building is now owned by a man from Pakistan, and a lot of bits from inside have been removed. Anyway, these are just a couple of the pictures I took of the exterior, shame I didnt get inside as it looks interesting on other peoples reports.
  14. The Jordanhill Campus is an historic estate within the boundaries of Jordanhill in Glasgow, Scotland. The buildings have stood empty since 2012, until which time it served as the Faculty of Education of the University of Strathclyde. Sometimes you just can't understand why no one else has posted a report. This is one of those places! Initially @The Amateur Wanderer and I had a look around the place during our Christmas trip to Scotland, and then I returned a short while later with @SpiderMonkey. We only looked around one building, the David Stow Building which is the main attraction, the original and oldest part of the site. There is also a huge 1960s concrete extension behind, but the sooner that gets pulled down the better - we didn't bother with it! History The buildings date back to 1837 when former merchant and educational pioneer David Stow opened the Dundas Vale Normal Seminary, Europe’s first purpose-built training institution for teachers. Some remnants of the old seminary still remain today – rooms with rows of sinks which were more recently used as storage, and wooden lockers can still be found. In 1913 the Glasgow Corporation agreed a deal to buy the estate, and build both a teacher training college and the associated Jordanhill School on the site. A new building was planned to provide teacher training. With the new school completed in 1920 and the college in 1921, the now Grade B listed David Stow Building facilitated all teacher training provided under the unified University of Glasgow. Centrally funded and with no ties with churches, the college was largely non-residential and its range of work was wider. A shortage of teachers throughout Britain in the late 1950s lead to large scale expansion at Jordanhill. Construction of a new purpose-built facility commenced in 1961, replacing a much older manor house on the site. In 1993, the college was required to merge with a higher education facility. The University of Strathclyde approached the college, and an agreement between both institutions was reached. In 1993 Jordanhill College became the Faculty of Education of the University of Strathclyde. With better use of facilities, and an ageing campus at Jordanhill which was highly protected by preservation orders, in 2010 the decision was made to close Jordanhill campus and move the Faculty all courses to its John Anderson Campus. 2011-12 was the last academic year held at the Jordanhill Campus before the move took place. David Stow Building - Entrance Hall Francis Tombs Hall Staircases and Corridors Teaching rooms and facilities Other areas Hidden Relics There were a few areas around the building that hadn’t been refurbished and contained relics from older uses...
  15. We visited St John's Hospital in Lincolnshire on Sunday, here is our video. Although we were told the security at the hospital was extremely tight we didn't actually come across any security at all! They must have been having a day off lol.
  16. UK Moel Fferna Slate Mine

    One from back In Jan As the weekend approached, as did another explore for myself @eoa and @monk. Seems we are a good trio of bell ends and something usually goes wrong somewhere down the line and Moel Fferna wasn’t going to let us (or shall I say me) down. Anyway, Myself and @EOA started the day with our customary maccies breakfast (minus the spiced cookie latte this time) we then met @Monk nearer to the mine. We’d heard the walk was a bit of a pig upto the mine so we opted to utilise the jeep which took us as close as we could manage, but still a bit of a walk away. Ah well it saved our legs A LOT. The weather was, well, yeah…. you can see from the pictures! So after a bit of a trek through the snow we found the air shaft and @EOA worked his ropey magic and rigged up 2 lines for us noobz (me and @Monk) to covert absolute pro umbex urbseil down the shaft to have amooch around the mine! Top day, the mine is bloody huge, unfortunately we didn’t find the bridge of death as we only had wellies and it was a tad too deep for us to carry on that way. So a return trip isin order. As I said earlier, Moel Fferna wasn’t to let me down. As I was trying to ascend out of the chamber I put all of my weight on my right leg pushed up and POP my knee let go. I managed to get myself out and hobble back to the car. Turns out I have partially tore a ligament off my bone and damaged my meniscus. YAY. All in all another fucking epic mooch with two top blokes in some mint weather conditions playing with ropes, beers, mines and cameras. AWESOME Update. So I have been to the fracture clinic I'm awaiting a scan but the consultant is very confident i have torn my cartilage and will need keyhole surgery. Great History Early workings tended to be in surface pits, but as the work progressed downwards, it became necessary to work underground. This was often accompanied by the driving of one or more adits to gain direct access to a Level. In some rare instances, such as here (Moel Fferna), there is no trace of surface workings and the workings were entiely underground. Moel Frerna has chambers which follow the slate vein, connected via a series of horizontal Floors (or 'Levels'). The chambers vary in size and are divided by 'pillars' or walls which support the roof. The floors are connected by 'Inclines' which used wedge-shaped trolleys to move trucks between levels. At Moel Fferna a team could produce up to 35 tons of finished slate a week. In 1877 they received about 7 shillings a ton for this. After paying wages for the manager, clerks and 'trammers' the company could make a clear profit of twice this amount. This system was not finally abolished until after the Second World War. Pics Here we are at the top of the airshaft whilst @EOA rigs it up. (don’t we look like pros?) @monk abseiling in. we did have an electron ladder there too but its bloody awkward so it was easier to just abseil in past it. @EOA urbseiling in The first few sections of the mine are very damp and a pain to photograph due to the amount f moisture in the air. This was the flooded section. It was just above wellies but we couldn’t be arsed getting wet feet. @EOA did though because he is a balloon. @Monk snapping away It’s hard to gauge the size of these chambers even with myself in the shot you don’t get a true feel for the sheer scale of them Pikied carriages RIP ladder Some of the Graff 33ri3 wheelbarrow pushed around by the headless mine man. On the 12th hour of everyday you can hear the squeak of the pikied wheel. There was plenty of cool little walkways between the chambers. A winch still in situ up at the top too. The most photogenic rusty old pump in existence. Last but not least another groupshot underneath the cog support. Oh and if anyone is interested a quick video chucked together. <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/dc_8V5x3KDo" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>
  17. UK Brock Mill Report - 5/2/2017

    Brock Mill video and photographic reports - 5/2/2018 A quality explore that we really enjoyed. Not the most architecturally stunning but still there's a certain beauty about decay.
  18. UK Ice Factory, Grimsby

    Grimsby Ice Factory Visited with @EOA and @eastyham after our first stop was a failure and without a back up plan we were struggling so up to Grimsby it was. Good choice. Cracking place this. Old as fook, plenty of decay, rot, growth, shonky floors and endless amounts of pigeon poop. I walked across the bridge of doom but couldn’t really go much further as the floors and stairs are collapsing in the other building. It didn’t look too interesting anyway to be honest. Grabbed some old pictures off google so ive wanged them in here too because I think its proper mint when you can compare times gone by with the derps of today. History The Factory was opened on the 7th of October 1901 as a joint venture between the Grimsby Ice Company and the Grimsby Co-operative Ice Company. The Grimsby Ice Company was initially founded in 1863 by local fishermen to import ice from Norway to help them preserve the fish that they caught, by 1900 however it was obvious that they would have to begin to source ice from elsewhere as the for ice, what made matters worse was that the Norwegians began to charge more for exporting their ice and the supply of ice was unreliable... Hence the need for an ice factory at home. The Original Refrigeration Plant on site where 4 steam powered Pontifex horizontal double-acting ammonia compressors which would operate at 50rpm. These where powered by vertical, triple-expansion steam engines, the steam for these engines where generated from six 30ft long Lancashire boilers. A few changes where made between opening and 1931, changes such as the superheating of the Lancashire boilers and the purchase of a few more bits of kit from the Linde British Refrigerating Company however the majority of the facility stayed the same... Until 1931 when a modernization program under the direction of F A Fleming MBE, who was the General manger at the ice factory at the time was put into place. The program included the installation of four J&E Hall Compressors and Metropolitan Vickers Electrical equipment, replacing the Old Pontifex Compressors and Steam Engines. The specification for the new plant demanded an output of 1,100 tons of ice per day under ordinary working conditions, and by utilising the existing tanks without increasing the number of cans. The use of steam was to be entirely dispensed with and means to be provided for heating the thawing water without the use of electrical heaters. Much as today, this had to be achieved with equipment of the greatest efficiency. Sadly the high demands for ice where short lived, episodes such as the cod wars and the general decline in the British fishing industry led to several units been shut down by 1976, and in 1990 the factory closed it's doors and shut down. Today it is owned by Associated British Ports and is left derelict, although preservationists have tried to save the building, their efforts have sadly so far been in vain. Even though the place makes a great opportunity for us explorers I would like to think it would be saved eventually as the factory is now a unique survivor of a now otherwise extinct industry, that said, I do have my doubts... Pics I’ll start off with one from the depths of google. Two blokes looking rather proud next to one of the compressors. Not a clue of the date but it looks fairly clean and new. I didn’t take these pictures with the intention of getting them at similar angles and what not it was purely coincidence, but has worked ok ish. Looking at the same machine now A couple of control panels that were next to the above compressor Another oldie and the same machine now Looking down on the compressor hall and from the same walkway 1930ish? Moving onto other parts of the factory there was a room with these bins filling the whole floor. These were filled with water from the hoses at the end seen here Frozen. Then moved along on these cranes dumped at the end like this (this isn’t Grimsby) Then slid into the crusher So yeah. Unusual. I doubt I will ever explore another Ice factory so that’s pretty cool. Some more shots of the place. I’ll finish on a picture of the old steam powered compressors.
  19. Kastix Ltd History Built in 1947 as the new drill hall for the 2nd Volunteer Battalion West Riding Regiment. Later used as the offices for Kastix, a textile company producing womenswear and children's clothing, which went in to receivership in 2001 with the loss of more than 50 jobs. Conversion plans There are currently plans to demolish the site to construct an Aldi supermarket. The exterior Bit out of the way... but was in the area so decided to take a look. Its a fair size and considering it's had no owners since 2001 the condition of the place is pretty decent. Stopping at the top of the road and checking for hostiles we decided to take a closer look. Theres lots of works adjacent and we attracted quite a few spectators as we scrambled through the fencing... moving in we could see there were a few CCTV cameras, rusty and outdated these were perhaps part of the security measures when the building was last working. Starting at the front and working our way to the back (drawn quite a crowd at this point) we were intrigued to find an entry point. The exterior is fitting with the period and will be a shame when the building is demolished to make way for the plastic prefabs that are ALDI. Most of the windows and doors are original but it looks like efforts were made to modernise the building at some point. Scaling the roof... checking for open doors windows (bingo).. we were in. The interior Making our way through a small room and then into a much larger hall we were a little taken back by the size of the building... Strewn garments, hangers and palettes of junk made us a little unsettled and it was almost like a worker was about to appear and escort us off the premises (or maybe try sell us some clothing). Making our way past the left overs we headed to the doors littered across the back of the building. slowly working through the rooms we came to the main stairwell... making our way to the upper floors...we made our way through the many offices, empty and miscellaneous rooms ending in an area with some pretty creepy looking changing rooms. Overall theres a few cool bits and in our opinion its worth documenting if not for the very creepy mannequins, the overall condition or the asthetics the sheer amount of stuff left over from previous occupiers. There also an attic area which was a little difficult to reach but it did look like someone had gone to the effort to investigate. That concludes the explore...
  20. History The works was built in 1913 and extended in 1954, to purify water from the Strines, Dale Dike and Agden reservoirs. In 1930 it had the first telephone installed in Bradfield and served well with the Yorkshire Water Authority taking over in in 1974. The UK’s water industry became privatised in 1989, the premises closed in 1994 following the completion of the new Water Treatment Works in the Loxley Valley. More recently Proposals to convert the derelict water filter works into housing have being held up by bats. A protected species survey has to be carried out in the summer (2014) before a decision can be taken on an application to turn the derelict building into 15 studio apartments. The scheme, which also involves adding five cottages in the grounds and using old ponds as a trout farm, off Mill Lee Road, has been withdrawn for the time being. It is due to be resubmitted to the Peak Park planning authority once the survey results are known. Read more at: https://www.sheffieldtelegraph.co.uk/news/environment/bats-delay-village-housing-scheme-in-low-bradfield-1-6525905 Explore Bit off the beaten track this one... that said the works is set in a picturesque village situated just outside Sheffield. The building is built from yorkshire stone and sits well in its surroundings albeit in its derelict state. The building is sat on large plot of land although the works itself is a little on the small side considering its past as a water works. The works consist of three rooms, one of those smaller to the rear of the building. Theres also a raised office area off one of the larger rooms and toilets at the opposite side. The building is in good condition to say it's been left for over twenty years with easy entry to the building. Theres lots of graffiti some of which are shown in the post... this said not all are represented here. Its definitely worth a visit and offers entry level explorers a great insight into urban exploring + theres a great pub just across the road offering a great local ale. Some pics Little lad absolutely loving it from above It's been a while since we explored speaking with others it has a full time security guard and some high end CCTV have also been installed
  21. Here's a little selection of some of the more random, less-obvious shots from 10 years of exploring asylums. One shot each from most of the ones I've visited. Thought I'd try and avoid the obvious shots a little. Aston Hall (Nottinghamshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Ward block Bangour Village (West Lothian District Asylum, opened in 1906) Main administration block Barrow (2nd Bristol Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1938) Main corridor Bethel (Charitable public asylum, opened in 1713) Day room Bethlem Royal (4th incarnation of "Bedlam" (founded in 1247), initially for private middle-class patients, opened in 1930) Admin block staircase Cane Hill (3rd Surrey County Asylum, opened in 1883) Chapel altar Carlton Hayes (Leicestershire & Rutland County Asylum, opened in 1904) Chapel Cefn Coed (Swansea Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1932) South-eastern view of ward block and water tower Colney Hatch (aka Friern, 2nd Middlesex County Asylum, later 2nd London County Asylum, opened in 1851) Admin block tower Denbigh (aka North Wales Asylum, opened in 1848) View from ward block window towards admin block clock tower Fairfield (Three Counties Asylum (for Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire & Huntingdonshire), opened in 1860) South east view of main block Fair Mile (Berkshire County Asylum, opened in 1870) South-east view of main block Fulbourn (Cambridgeshire & Ely County Asylum, opened in 1858) Main elevation (admin block in centre) Gartloch (Glasgow District Asylum, opened in 1896) View from dormitory window Glenside (Bristol Borough Asylum, opened in 1861) Chapel window Goodmayes (West Ham Borough Asylum, opened in 1901) Gallery with cell doors Hanwell (Middlesex County Asylum, later first London County Asylum, opened in 1831) Main corridor in female wing Harperbury (Middlesex Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1934) Dormitory Hartwood (Lanarkshire District Asylum, opened in 1895) Jump-proof fire escape Heckingham (former Norwich Union Workhouse, converted into 2nd Norfolk County Mental Hospital, opened in 1927) Main elevation Hellingly (East Sussex County Asylum, opened in 1903) Corridor network (with random portable bathtub) Hensol (Glamorganshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Interview room High Royds (3rd West Riding County Asylum, opened in 1888) Glazed-tile doorway Horton (8th London County Asylum, opened in 1902) Administration block The Lawn (Charitable Public Asylum, opened in 1820) View from eastern wing Lennox Castle (Dunbartonshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1937) Admin block coaching entrance Leybourne Grange (Kent Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1936) OT room Little Plumstead (Norfolk Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Discarded training material Mapperley (Nottingham Borough Asylum, opened in 1880) Southern aspect Middlewood (2nd West Riding County Asylum, opened in 1872) Chapel Napsbury (Middlesex County Asylum, opened in 1905) Recreation hall (left) and ward block (right), with water tower in background Pen-Y-Fal (Monmouthshire County Asylum, opened in 1851) Ward blocks Pool Parc (Overspill annexe to North Wales Mental Hospital, opened in 1937) Main corridor Rauceby (Kesteven County Asylum, opened in 1902) Administration block Rosslynlee (East Lothian & Peebles District Asylum, opened in 1874) Recreation hall Runwell (East Ham & Southend-on-Sea Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1937) Chapel Severalls (2nd Essex County Asylum, opened in 1913) Gallery with cell doors St Andrew's (Norfolk County Asylum, opened in 1814) Mortuary St Brigid's (Connaught District Asylum, opened in 1833) Ward corridor St Cadoc's (Newport Borough Asylum, opened in 1906) Window in day-room. St Clement's (Ipswich Borough Asylum, opened in 1870) "Quiet room" in medium-secure annexe St Crispin (Northamptonshire County Asylum, opened in 1876) Staircase in Superintendent's residence St David's (Joint Counties Asylum for Carmarthenshire, Pembrokeshire & Cardiganshire, opened 1865) Observation room in annexe St George's (Northumberland County Asylum, opened in 1859) Corridor network St John's (Lincolnshire County Asylum, opened in 1852) Admin block main reception St Mary's (Gateshead Borough Asylum, opened in 1914) Corridor network Stone House (The City Of London Asylum, opened in 1866) Dining hall Strathmartin (aka Balvodan) (Charitable Public Idiot Asylum, opened in 1855) Eastern side of main building Sunnyside Royal (Montrose District Asylum, opened in 1858) Congregation area outside recreation hall Talgarth (Joint Breconshire and Radnorshire County Asylum, aka Mid-Wales Asylum, opened in 1903) View from ward window The Towers (Leicester Borough Asylum, opened in 1869) Main corridor in ward section of eastern block West Park (11th London County Asylum, opened in 1915 as Canadian War Hospital, reopened in 1923 as mental hospital) Geriatric ward day room Whittingham (4th Lancashire County Asylum, opened in 1873) Entrance into ward block from corridor network
  22. Unless you've been to Scarborough you've probably never heard of Peasholm Park. They are currently demolishing the old boat house as it was dangerous. The Chinese gardens at the top never seem to be open so while the water is drained I got in. Bad idea was trying to walk across the pond bed, the mud was so deep my leg just sank and I almost got stuck. They made it easy to get around the big locked gate and up on to the bridge. I got some photos from the top looking down.
  23. UK Kodak harrow 2016

    HI all Im Urban Cleetus new to this site and photography. I have been Watching the group and waiting to find somewhere which hasn't been done, before i post So here we go, My first post! History: The factory in Harrow first opened in 1891 and was also Eastman Kodak’s first manufacturing base outside America.The factory in Harrow was the largest photographic manufacturing plant in the British Commonwealth and at the height of its output in the 1950s it employed more than 6,000 people. The site provided printing paper for professional use of mural images and also personal use by amateur photographers.Kodak has been present in Harrow for more than 120 years, the factory’s history charting much of the history of popular photography itself. Due to the ever-growing popularity of digital photography, in 2005 track four at the factory was shut and ended the site’s production of film, leading to the loss of 250 jobs.Now due to increasing financial pressures in recent years, Kodak has sold off the Harrow site for development. The last shift was carried out Friday 2nd December 2016 I visited this site three time in the 8 days since its closure with the company of 2 explorers i know. Beware dogs and heavy security on site
  24. So its been done and posted a few times now I think, but I wanted to share my pictures from a few weeks ago, Close in 2016 the place was left untouched till the action men with go pros started running around the place looking for ghosts, Im not going to post all the history of this place, but it was a good explore and was in there for a good few hours enjoy my pictures
  25. UK 25 million mansion

    Tiny bit of history: This was once the most expensive house built in Britain, costing 25million, as lovely as it looks from the outside this house should never have been built. It was only built due to a council blunder with allowed the build to continue without planning permission. The explore So the explore began with a quick scout of the area, once we located a good way to scale the 12ft fence, the climb began, slipping and a near miss with my manhood on the spiked fence we was in, we headed straight for a way in. inside the house itself is very empty and looks like a few raves and parties have been held inside, below are a few photos from the explore Big Credit to urban loan wolf for the find
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