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  1. Grimsby Ice Factory Visited with @EOA and @eastyham after our first stop was a failure and without a back up plan we were struggling so up to Grimsby it was. Good choice. Cracking place this. Old as fook, plenty of decay, rot, growth, shonky floors and endless amounts of pigeon poop. I walked across the bridge of doom but couldn’t really go much further as the floors and stairs are collapsing in the other building. It didn’t look too interesting anyway to be honest. Grabbed some old pictures off google so ive wanged them in here too because I think its proper mint when you can compare times gone by with the derps of today. History The Factory was opened on the 7th of October 1901 as a joint venture between the Grimsby Ice Company and the Grimsby Co-operative Ice Company. The Grimsby Ice Company was initially founded in 1863 by local fishermen to import ice from Norway to help them preserve the fish that they caught, by 1900 however it was obvious that they would have to begin to source ice from elsewhere as the for ice, what made matters worse was that the Norwegians began to charge more for exporting their ice and the supply of ice was unreliable... Hence the need for an ice factory at home. The Original Refrigeration Plant on site where 4 steam powered Pontifex horizontal double-acting ammonia compressors which would operate at 50rpm. These where powered by vertical, triple-expansion steam engines, the steam for these engines where generated from six 30ft long Lancashire boilers. A few changes where made between opening and 1931, changes such as the superheating of the Lancashire boilers and the purchase of a few more bits of kit from the Linde British Refrigerating Company however the majority of the facility stayed the same... Until 1931 when a modernization program under the direction of F A Fleming MBE, who was the General manger at the ice factory at the time was put into place. The program included the installation of four J&E Hall Compressors and Metropolitan Vickers Electrical equipment, replacing the Old Pontifex Compressors and Steam Engines. The specification for the new plant demanded an output of 1,100 tons of ice per day under ordinary working conditions, and by utilising the existing tanks without increasing the number of cans. The use of steam was to be entirely dispensed with and means to be provided for heating the thawing water without the use of electrical heaters. Much as today, this had to be achieved with equipment of the greatest efficiency. Sadly the high demands for ice where short lived, episodes such as the cod wars and the general decline in the British fishing industry led to several units been shut down by 1976, and in 1990 the factory closed it's doors and shut down. Today it is owned by Associated British Ports and is left derelict, although preservationists have tried to save the building, their efforts have sadly so far been in vain. Even though the place makes a great opportunity for us explorers I would like to think it would be saved eventually as the factory is now a unique survivor of a now otherwise extinct industry, that said, I do have my doubts... Pics I’ll start off with one from the depths of google. Two blokes looking rather proud next to one of the compressors. Not a clue of the date but it looks fairly clean and new. I didn’t take these pictures with the intention of getting them at similar angles and what not it was purely coincidence, but has worked ok ish. Looking at the same machine now A couple of control panels that were next to the above compressor Another oldie and the same machine now Looking down on the compressor hall and from the same walkway 1930ish? Moving onto other parts of the factory there was a room with these bins filling the whole floor. These were filled with water from the hoses at the end seen here Frozen. Then moved along on these cranes dumped at the end like this (this isn’t Grimsby) Then slid into the crusher So yeah. Unusual. I doubt I will ever explore another Ice factory so that’s pretty cool. Some more shots of the place. I’ll finish on a picture of the old steam powered compressors.
  2. Kastix Ltd History Built in 1947 as the new drill hall for the 2nd Volunteer Battalion West Riding Regiment. Later used as the offices for Kastix, a textile company producing womenswear and children's clothing, which went in to receivership in 2001 with the loss of more than 50 jobs. Conversion plans There are currently plans to demolish the site to construct an Aldi supermarket. The exterior Bit out of the way... but was in the area so decided to take a look. Its a fair size and considering it's had no owners since 2001 the condition of the place is pretty decent. Stopping at the top of the road and checking for hostiles we decided to take a closer look. Theres lots of works adjacent and we attracted quite a few spectators as we scrambled through the fencing... moving in we could see there were a few CCTV cameras, rusty and outdated these were perhaps part of the security measures when the building was last working. Starting at the front and working our way to the back (drawn quite a crowd at this point) we were intrigued to find an entry point. The exterior is fitting with the period and will be a shame when the building is demolished to make way for the plastic prefabs that are ALDI. Most of the windows and doors are original but it looks like efforts were made to modernise the building at some point. Scaling the roof... checking for open doors windows (bingo).. we were in. The interior Making our way through a small room and then into a much larger hall we were a little taken back by the size of the building... Strewn garments, hangers and palettes of junk made us a little unsettled and it was almost like a worker was about to appear and escort us off the premises (or maybe try sell us some clothing). Making our way past the left overs we headed to the doors littered across the back of the building. slowly working through the rooms we came to the main stairwell... making our way to the upper floors...we made our way through the many offices, empty and miscellaneous rooms ending in an area with some pretty creepy looking changing rooms. Overall theres a few cool bits and in our opinion its worth documenting if not for the very creepy mannequins, the overall condition or the asthetics the sheer amount of stuff left over from previous occupiers. There also an attic area which was a little difficult to reach but it did look like someone had gone to the effort to investigate. That concludes the explore...
  3. History The works was built in 1913 and extended in 1954, to purify water from the Strines, Dale Dike and Agden reservoirs. In 1930 it had the first telephone installed in Bradfield and served well with the Yorkshire Water Authority taking over in in 1974. The UK’s water industry became privatised in 1989, the premises closed in 1994 following the completion of the new Water Treatment Works in the Loxley Valley. More recently Proposals to convert the derelict water filter works into housing have being held up by bats. A protected species survey has to be carried out in the summer (2014) before a decision can be taken on an application to turn the derelict building into 15 studio apartments. The scheme, which also involves adding five cottages in the grounds and using old ponds as a trout farm, off Mill Lee Road, has been withdrawn for the time being. It is due to be resubmitted to the Peak Park planning authority once the survey results are known. Read more at: https://www.sheffieldtelegraph.co.uk/news/environment/bats-delay-village-housing-scheme-in-low-bradfield-1-6525905 Explore Bit off the beaten track this one... that said the works is set in a picturesque village situated just outside Sheffield. The building is built from yorkshire stone and sits well in its surroundings albeit in its derelict state. The building is sat on large plot of land although the works itself is a little on the small side considering its past as a water works. The works consist of three rooms, one of those smaller to the rear of the building. Theres also a raised office area off one of the larger rooms and toilets at the opposite side. The building is in good condition to say it's been left for over twenty years with easy entry to the building. Theres lots of graffiti some of which are shown in the post... this said not all are represented here. Its definitely worth a visit and offers entry level explorers a great insight into urban exploring + theres a great pub just across the road offering a great local ale. Some pics Little lad absolutely loving it from above It's been a while since we explored speaking with others it has a full time security guard and some high end CCTV have also been installed
  4. Here's a little selection of some of the more random, less-obvious shots from 10 years of exploring asylums. One shot each from most of the ones I've visited. Thought I'd try and avoid the obvious shots a little. Aston Hall (Nottinghamshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Ward block Bangour Village (West Lothian District Asylum, opened in 1906) Main administration block Barrow (2nd Bristol Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1938) Main corridor Bethel (Charitable public asylum, opened in 1713) Day room Bethlem Royal (4th incarnation of "Bedlam" (founded in 1247), initially for private middle-class patients, opened in 1930) Admin block staircase Cane Hill (3rd Surrey County Asylum, opened in 1883) Chapel altar Carlton Hayes (Leicestershire & Rutland County Asylum, opened in 1904) Chapel Cefn Coed (Swansea Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1932) South-eastern view of ward block and water tower Colney Hatch (aka Friern, 2nd Middlesex County Asylum, later 2nd London County Asylum, opened in 1851) Admin block tower Denbigh (aka North Wales Asylum, opened in 1848) View from ward block window towards admin block clock tower Fairfield (Three Counties Asylum (for Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire & Huntingdonshire), opened in 1860) South east view of main block Fair Mile (Berkshire County Asylum, opened in 1870) South-east view of main block Fulbourn (Cambridgeshire & Ely County Asylum, opened in 1858) Main elevation (admin block in centre) Gartloch (Glasgow District Asylum, opened in 1896) View from dormitory window Glenside (Bristol Borough Asylum, opened in 1861) Chapel window Goodmayes (West Ham Borough Asylum, opened in 1901) Gallery with cell doors Hanwell (Middlesex County Asylum, later first London County Asylum, opened in 1831) Main corridor in female wing Harperbury (Middlesex Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1934) Dormitory Hartwood (Lanarkshire District Asylum, opened in 1895) Jump-proof fire escape Heckingham (former Norwich Union Workhouse, converted into 2nd Norfolk County Mental Hospital, opened in 1927) Main elevation Hellingly (East Sussex County Asylum, opened in 1903) Corridor network (with random portable bathtub) Hensol (Glamorganshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Interview room High Royds (3rd West Riding County Asylum, opened in 1888) Glazed-tile doorway Horton (8th London County Asylum, opened in 1902) Administration block The Lawn (Charitable Public Asylum, opened in 1820) View from eastern wing Lennox Castle (Dunbartonshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1937) Admin block coaching entrance Leybourne Grange (Kent Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1936) OT room Little Plumstead (Norfolk Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Discarded training material Mapperley (Nottingham Borough Asylum, opened in 1880) Southern aspect Middlewood (2nd West Riding County Asylum, opened in 1872) Chapel Napsbury (Middlesex County Asylum, opened in 1905) Recreation hall (left) and ward block (right), with water tower in background Pen-Y-Fal (Monmouthshire County Asylum, opened in 1851) Ward blocks Pool Parc (Overspill annexe to North Wales Mental Hospital, opened in 1937) Main corridor Rauceby (Kesteven County Asylum, opened in 1902) Administration block Rosslynlee (East Lothian & Peebles District Asylum, opened in 1874) Recreation hall Runwell (East Ham & Southend-on-Sea Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1937) Chapel Severalls (2nd Essex County Asylum, opened in 1913) Gallery with cell doors St Andrew's (Norfolk County Asylum, opened in 1814) Mortuary St Brigid's (Connaught District Asylum, opened in 1833) Ward corridor St Cadoc's (Newport Borough Asylum, opened in 1906) Window in day-room. St Clement's (Ipswich Borough Asylum, opened in 1870) "Quiet room" in medium-secure annexe St Crispin (Northamptonshire County Asylum, opened in 1876) Staircase in Superintendent's residence St David's (Joint Counties Asylum for Carmarthenshire, Pembrokeshire & Cardiganshire, opened 1865) Observation room in annexe St George's (Northumberland County Asylum, opened in 1859) Corridor network St John's (Lincolnshire County Asylum, opened in 1852) Admin block main reception St Mary's (Gateshead Borough Asylum, opened in 1914) Corridor network Stone House (The City Of London Asylum, opened in 1866) Dining hall Strathmartin (aka Balvodan) (Charitable Public Idiot Asylum, opened in 1855) Eastern side of main building Sunnyside Royal (Montrose District Asylum, opened in 1858) Congregation area outside recreation hall Talgarth (Joint Breconshire and Radnorshire County Asylum, aka Mid-Wales Asylum, opened in 1903) View from ward window The Towers (Leicester Borough Asylum, opened in 1869) Main corridor in ward section of eastern block West Park (11th London County Asylum, opened in 1915 as Canadian War Hospital, reopened in 1923 as mental hospital) Geriatric ward day room Whittingham (4th Lancashire County Asylum, opened in 1873) Entrance into ward block from corridor network
  5. Unless you've been to Scarborough you've probably never heard of Peasholm Park. They are currently demolishing the old boat house as it was dangerous. The Chinese gardens at the top never seem to be open so while the water is drained I got in. Bad idea was trying to walk across the pond bed, the mud was so deep my leg just sank and I almost got stuck. They made it easy to get around the big locked gate and up on to the bridge. I got some photos from the top looking down.
  6. HI all Im Urban Cleetus new to this site and photography. I have been Watching the group and waiting to find somewhere which hasn't been done, before i post So here we go, My first post! History: The factory in Harrow first opened in 1891 and was also Eastman Kodak’s first manufacturing base outside America.The factory in Harrow was the largest photographic manufacturing plant in the British Commonwealth and at the height of its output in the 1950s it employed more than 6,000 people. The site provided printing paper for professional use of mural images and also personal use by amateur photographers.Kodak has been present in Harrow for more than 120 years, the factory’s history charting much of the history of popular photography itself. Due to the ever-growing popularity of digital photography, in 2005 track four at the factory was shut and ended the site’s production of film, leading to the loss of 250 jobs.Now due to increasing financial pressures in recent years, Kodak has sold off the Harrow site for development. The last shift was carried out Friday 2nd December 2016 I visited this site three time in the 8 days since its closure with the company of 2 explorers i know. Beware dogs and heavy security on site
  7. So its been done and posted a few times now I think, but I wanted to share my pictures from a few weeks ago, Close in 2016 the place was left untouched till the action men with go pros started running around the place looking for ghosts, Im not going to post all the history of this place, but it was a good explore and was in there for a good few hours enjoy my pictures
  8. Tiny bit of history: This was once the most expensive house built in Britain, costing 25million, as lovely as it looks from the outside this house should never have been built. It was only built due to a council blunder with allowed the build to continue without planning permission. The explore So the explore began with a quick scout of the area, once we located a good way to scale the 12ft fence, the climb began, slipping and a near miss with my manhood on the spiked fence we was in, we headed straight for a way in. inside the house itself is very empty and looks like a few raves and parties have been held inside, below are a few photos from the explore Big Credit to urban loan wolf for the find
  9. I am a filmmaker and YouTuber, and i'm trying to get into Urbex. I really enjoy finding out about the history of the sites that i want to visit and exploring them with my son. Last week we visited a site in West Yorkshire. The site is an old fur fabrics mill and has been covered before on this forum. This is a first attempt at Urbex, so go easy on me! Exploring local abandoned mill in a cinematic style. Dudfleet Mills (Abandoned) - URBEX - Urban Exploration - DJI Spark Footage - Cinematic Edit
  10. Sheffield Old Town Hall stands on Waingate in central Sheffield, England, opposite Castle Market. The building was commissioned to replace Sheffield's first town hall, which had opened in 1700 to a design by William Renny. This first structure stood by the parish church, on a site with little prospect for extension. The Old Town Hall was built in 1807-8 by Charles Watson, and was designed to house not only the Town Trustees but also the Petty and Quarter Sessions. The initial building was a five-bay structure fronting Castle Street, but it was extended in 1833 and again in 1866, the most prominent feature was the new central clock tower over a new main entrance that reoriented the building to Waingate. At the same time, the building's courtrooms were linked by underground passages to the neighbouring Sheffield Police Offices. By the 1890s, the building had again become too small, and the current Sheffield Town Hall was built further south. The Old Town Hall was again extended in 1896-7 and became Sheffield Crown Court and Sheffield High Court. In the 1990s, these courts moved to new premises, and since at least 1997 to present, the building remains disused.
  11. Lovely buildings, could only get a look at the wards etc that are still open. But still managed to have an internal walk areound. The older building still stands but no access was possible. Note the padded seclusion room at the end.
  12. What a beautiful old girl. Managed to get a few pics before the bulldozers came. Wish I had gone sooner and had a sneaky peek inside.
  13. Last year we explored what we could of the mostly demolished Harperbury Asylum. At the time there was a building that intrigued us but was completely closed off and we couldn't get in. Well, we re-visted today and it was all opened up. A few photos from that building below... the full explore information, video and photos are on our website here: http://www.britainsdecays.com/harperbury-hospital-history-the-forgotten-harperbury-mental-asylum-sits-abandoned-decaying/ This is our original explore video:
  14. Recent video of the beautiful example of what was the workhouse and Infirmary. On our first visit the seclusion rooms where visible now reduced to rubble.
  15. A random find recently. Previously a social services department and Children’s home. It’s been closed a while and I can’t find much info on the site.
  16. Been visiting this place for many years apart from the old Workhouse buildings which have almost disappeared, today we visited the chapel. Here are a few pics Added an update of the workhouse conditions too.
  17. Former puppy farm that was often in the local news regarding poor living quarters,alleged mistreatment of dogs and the selling of dogs that often died after new owners took delivery of the young animals..the RSPCA were always closing down the business,but the owner John Lowe simply ignored them and carried on. On February 23rd 2014,Mr Lowe,who purchased Keepers Cottage in 1966,shot and killed his partner and then her daughter,who tried to flee and get help,but died just outside the cottage.Police arrived and arrested Mr Lowe who was found guilty of double murder later that year and jailed for life with a minimum tariff of 25 years so it is likely he will die in prison.From information on several estate agents websites,it seems the 6 acre estate has been sold but last year planning permission was refused for one plan to demolish the cottage and build 3 dwellings so as of January 2018,I have no idea what will happen.We arrived at dawn and immediately noticed red flashing cameras mounted firstly at the gated entrance then further down the track mounted on a telegraph pole and one fixed on the cottage all flashing busily.We were considering retreating however we decided to skirt round the outbuildings to escape the cameras if indeed that is what they are and not dummy alarms which I suspect they are...I have to say I found this explore both intriguing but disturbing at the same time and was glad to leave..I have not felt this way since exploring Cane Hill Asylum in 2008. My pics are only phone shots so please excuse.. Found this on Google Earth to show how haphazard this place is/was We arrive as the sun is filtering through the trees..this cottage sits within a six acre plot nicely hidden by the woods. The farm is surrounded by shanty type buildings largely held together with telegraph poles. Truly awful animal pens..I cannot imagine this was any better before the old man`s conviction. We skirt round the rear of the house avoiding the cameras Amphitheatre style seating/steps. Living room..very surprised to see that this fire place didnt seem to have been used for open fires. View from the master bedroom. And the enormous conservatory built round two elevations. I am glad I saw all this but upon exiting the house,some strange bleeping noise started so it was our excuse to leave!
  18. The George Hotel as stood empty for just a little over 5 years... considering this it's not half bad inside, stairways are still intact, few if any holes through to other floors, little decay in the form of mold or interior fatigue and there's still gas in the pumps in the bar area. It's a fair size and took us over an hour to appreciate some of the victorian features still visible throughout the building. The building was sold a few years back to a local dentist for £900,000 but nothing if anything as started interns of building works to restore the hotel. which is a shame as the Hotel sits in pleasant surroundings within St George square which recently received a £21 million facelift. The Hotel as a basement area which stores the cask ales & equipment needed to run the Hotel bar. Theres rooms a plenty 60 rooms accommodation with bar(s) , ballroom, pool hall and dining room & rooftop area ... we pretty much covered the entire building in a typically dreary Huddersfield afternoon. Hope you enjoy the thread... Exterior Bar Main lobby Stair case shots Corridor shots Bed rooms The caller The ball room and dinning hall The kitchen The roof Other rooms 45 pics later... Hope you enjoyed...
  19. HISTORY: Thanks for looking at my pictures, I hope you enjoyed them. Give my facebook page a like & follow if you want to see what else my friends and I get up too - 0151 Outdoors. E.
  20. After visiting a different location in the city we got a tip off from others about a possible entry point so decided to take a look. Having assessed the building for security we made our way to the entry point. The building is situated in the Neepsend area of the city and forms part of Kelham island one of the oldest industrial sites in Sheffield which as an heritage for producing high-quality cutlery and edge-tools and its pre-eminence in manufacturing heavy specialist steels. The victorian grade II listed building once occupied by Barnsley resides in 37 thousand Sq ft of industrial heritage and is the last significant development opportunity in Kelham island. Today Kelham is a mixed use riverside development which compromise the creation of old and new use of buildings forming apartments, bars & restaurants, and commercial space on the riverside site of former workshops. The development is part of an ongoing regeneration of the area by AXIS and others, which started in the 1990s with Cornish place. The development is intended to create a desirable place to live with a brand new public square, and continuation of the Don riverside walk project. Due to increasing competition from imports, Sheffield has seen a decline in heavy engineering industries since the 1960s, which has forced the sector to streamline its operations and lay off the majority of the local employment. George Barnsley's is a little like stepping back inside a time machine, most of the original machinery and features still exist and for this alone is well worth a visit before the inevitability of re development. Also noteworthy is the local artists that decorate the building with graffiti and art which gives the explore a real urban edge. And to end off a pic from modern day... I went back to this place the other day... Opening the gate to enter i didn't bother going in, the old man was right it is a dump in there and natural decay has took over... but that said if you have never been in take a look, you can get some nice shots even with a crappy iPhone
  21. Well, heres another easy explore I done recently with a few friends. This is only the second location I've visited, so be gentle! I wont bore you with TOO much history, as this has been done numerous times, and I'm sure most of you are aware of this place or have visited yourself. CRANK CAVERNS, ST HELENS, MERSEYSIDE. There are also legends of vicious dwarves eating children, soldiers going into the mines with gunpowder, etc.. But now to the pictures. Sorry, not all the photos are in order, I had lots to do this morning and was just trying to get this uploaded. Hope you lot enjoy the photos anyway! E.
  22. Not sure if this is in the right forum. Park Hill Estate is a gastly sight today although they are regenerating it. This made for quite a creepy explore. We have wrritten about the history of Park Hill Flats here.
  23. The old Coronation Street Film set is currently sat, abandoned , waiting demolition. This video shows an explore of the purpose built film set at Granada Studios in Manchester. Although this wasn't the very first film set at the studio it's one of the most well known and remembered amongst fans of the popular soap. The TV show's production was filmed at this location for over 30 years until it was sold to Manchester Quays Its in 2013 to be demolished and replaced with flats, offices, restaurants and hotels.
  24. looking for couple people who are game for climbs in and around london ?
  25. Explored a long road and found a house that was abandoned, some evidence of vandalism, not the most interesting of building but the way it has naturally fallen is quite beautiful
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