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Found 39 results

  1. Going Shopping In Pripyat, (Chernobyl Exclusion Zone), Ukraine- Oct 2016 Apologies for the photos here! These were all shot on an phone as my DSLR had completely succumbed to the damp weather by this point and was acting as a weight in my bag!! So, our last day in Pripyat, we were dropped off outside the former Hair Salon and Chemists and sent on our way to explore what we wanted for 2 hours. I had my dosimeter on hand as a lot of walking was needed through the woods for the lesser seen things; things which may be overlooked by normal tours because they are small and tucked away, but full of old gems! Pripyat was one of the more privileged places in The Soviet Union because of the Power Plant. For example; it was one of the only places you could get Chanel No. 1, and various quality Western Goods, second only to Moscow, Russia. We know from before that Pripyat was a city of privilege and culture, where pianos were commonplace in many buildings and our first stop was to a Piano shop tucked in the shopping district of Pripyat. Pianos in here as far as the eye can see; but none were in particular great shape after 30 years of being left to the elements. Its funny, its hard to picture Pripyat as being anything but a city with lots of buildings among the shrubbery, but these buildings were once on concrete plains with massive roads and wide open spaces. The trees were all saplings or young when Pripyat was evacuated. Its interesting to see how nature has taken over. Behind the Piano Shop was an Electrical Goods Shop which housed many models of appliance which could also be found inside the apartment blocks within The Zone; a good marker of the standardisation within the Soviet Union. Situated behind the white goods shop was a large Meat and Dairy Supermarket with all of its chillers still inside. These would have been emptied in 1987 and the food buried by the Female Liquidators to stop the spread of infectious diseases from the perishable goods within. After doing these shops, it was onto Pripyats Hair Salon and finally the chemists which was in the same building but on the Ground Floor Pripyat Piano Shop #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 Electronics Shop #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 Meat and Dairy Market #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 Pharmacy (Apotheke) #22 #23 #24 #25 Pripyat Hair Salon #26 #27 #28 #29 #30 #31 As always guys, its been a pleasure, thanks for looking; sorry for the iphone pics! DSLR has been replaced, I have gone from Sony to Canon! Play More Melodies at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157674635479840 Purchase more Twin Tub Washers at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157675713305646 Grab a joint of meat at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157676105120095 Pick up your prescription At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157676049336235 Get yourself a nice blue rinse at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157676105842235
  2. Reactor Number 2- V.I. Lenin Nuclear Power Station (Chernobyl) Well, you will all have to forgive on my photo quality here! Both my DSLR bodies card readers FAILED this morning at the worst possible moment, so it was iPhone to the rescue. I have fixed them as best I can but some are slightly Noisy I'm afraid! The wet weather and knocks that these bodies sustained put an end to them! I have to confess that; for the days leading up to this, was slightly concerned about this one at first but I needn't be. I suppose going into a Nuclear Reactor (not the core of course) was an unknown, scary prospect. It was the one and only place that we required to be suited and booted, and this was to minimize contamination through radioactive dust landing on our clothes, and we were chaperoned at all times. It was an interesting experience to say the least, and we had a long talk in one of the Visitors Centres there about the future of the site, what was being done, and a close up tour of The New Safe Confinement (More about that below) Reactor 2; a Soviet made "RBMK-1000" Nuclear Reactor; capable at the time of 1,000MW, was opened after completion in 1978; one year after the first reactor was completed in 1977. Reactor 2 continued to operate long past the 1986 accident and right up until a fire in one of its turbine rooms closed it in 1991. The Control Room and turbine halls are down a 1,926ft (600m) corridor in front of the reactor room which much like almost every other room and corridor in the plant, is painted golden! One can only imagine the terror, panic and rush among these "Golden Miles" within all four reactors on that day in 1986! Especially Number 4! It was interesting to see the colourful button panel (pictured), which would have once lowered Graphite Control Rods into the Reactor. We were also shown a basic insight into how a Nuclear Reactor operated. Sadly it was very busy in here and getting shots with no one in them was not easy! RBMK-100 Control Rooms (Reactor 2) #1 #2 #3 The all important Control Rod Buttons! #4 #5 #6 #8 #9 #10 #11 Corridors to Control Rooms and Turbine Halls (including one of The Golden Corridors) #12 #13 #14 RBMK-1000 Turbines #15 #16 Around the Reactors We weren't allowed to visit Reactor 4; the one which exploded in 1986, something which I am fairly pleased about! #17 Pictured above is the remains of the exploded Reactor 4 in its original 1986 "Sarcophagus" which was designed to last 30 years and has since been replaced by a 2 Billion Pound, 30,000ton cover which has been designed to last 100 years and enable workmen to begin dismantling the failed Unit 4. Please follow links at the bottom for more information. Pictured immediately below is a Cross-Section Model of Unit 4. #18 As always guys, thank you for your continued support For More information on the New Safe Confinement which was moved in place at the end of November 2016 Please follow this link: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157674395924951 For More of Reactor Number 2, follow: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157674378131372
  3. Pripyat River Cranes and Vehicle Dump, Pripyat, Ukraine (Chernobyl Zone) - Oct 2016 I'm not 100% pleased with how these came out, HDR'y and almost Pastle like. I had the cameras light meter turned right down in an attempt to remove the condensation on the lens from the heavy rainfall the day before; little did I know about my poor Sony's imminent failure! These cranes are situated on dockland and presumably haven't been disused since the disaster in 1986; and have all been partially stripped by looters. They are decaying from 30 years of no maintenance. The cabs and engine areas on these are huge! Among these dock mounted cranes; lies a sinking "floating crane". The view was nice on these cranes, but chose carefully as one has lost its cab floor! This was shot toward the end of our second day! If anyone has been following my posts lately, we are still on day 3 of 4 and now at around twenty sites! This tour was worth every single penny! #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 Nearing the end of our Third Day in The Zone, time was getting on and light was getting low so I only got a handful of photos here. This is one a few Vehicle Scrapyards around the zone where Radioactive Vehicles were dumped. These vehicles were used in the Clean Up Operation after the 1986 Chernobyl Disaster, and as always, some were Red Hot, some were not at all hot, so use the Dosimeter and Common Sense here! It is apparent that these vehicles are undergoing stripping and many have been relieved of their engines and other valuable parts. Time here is often limited, probably because some of the vehicles are pretty bad; the truck I sat in was not. Part of the site is live; scrapping is going on in the compound behind where these were taken. #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 Rest Assured; I gave the cab a good check first! More Cranes: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157672207705293 Sift Through more Radioactive Scrap at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157675786704955
  4. Mašev Community Hall & Mašev School, Mašev (Mashevo) Village -(Chernobyl Exclusion Zone) - Oct 2016 Still on Day Number 2, we had driven way out into the sticks and were making our way back on the roads. The weather had dried right out but dosing in and out of sleep at this point (the early morning and late nights had really done me in), I managed to drop my camera in my sleep. It was ok but this impact mixed with the rain and damp may have led to its failure later on in the trip.... So as we neared the Belarus Border of the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone; we stopped in Mašev (Mashevo), one of many abandoned villages and towns in the 1,600 square mile area of abandonment. Here was a few houses, this little Community Centre and a small school. Another insight into how mind bogglingly large The Zone is, it took us a few hours to get here on the overgrown roads which were once large main roads. This building was very small and we didn't spend very long in it. Right across the road from the Community Centre is another reasonably intact building. This school looked pretty well equipped with good scientific equipment (for the time) scattered about classrooms. It's still trashed and looted but looking pretty good for being abandoned in 1986. The school is located 6.8km (11km) as the bird flies from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, and approximately 1km from the Belorussian border. As huge, wide laned roads are now reduced to the width of British Green Lanes; it took some time to get here! This is right out in the sticks and little is published about it. I would hazard a guess its a Middle School as those more looted examples in Pripyat looked similar Community Centre #1 #2 #3 #4 - School #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 #22 #23 Thanks Guys Study More at: Community Centre: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157675685067286 School: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157672198699044
  5. Disused Farm and Equipment, Красне Village (Chernobyl Exclusion Zone), Ukraine - Oct 2016 Today was a very good day because we decided to see mostly things which aren't on any Tour Bus Itinerary! So, second day in the zone, second trip to said zone. The first site of the day and the rain was absolutely hammering it down. Hard going as we were catching the early trains from Slavutych each morning at 07:40, up at 06:00! By now the weather had cleared up; but my poor camera equipment had suffered in the heavy rain earlier that morning and didn't want to play ball with misting and all sorts. The rain really was DRIVING that morning, soaking through EVERYTHING! Today; we were going to do a half day in Pripyat after the Reactor 5 and 6 Complex, but instead we decided to drive right out into the sticks and experience some of the smaller towns and villages within the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. It wasn't until this point that I realised quite the insane level of abandonment in The Zone. We drove for what felt like miles and miles to get here, this was right out in the sticks, and though all main roads are now reduced to narrow, single track lanes due to vegetation and shrubbery growth, it seemed like a long way away. What also hit me is what a rush everyone was made to leave in. People thought they would be returning in a week, but they never did and this is obvious with all this equipment left behind to rot; in this case, several "Niva SKP-5M-1" Soviet Era Combine Harvesters, Hay and crop sorting equipment; among other farming items. These vehicles have since been relieved of their engines and gearboxes by thieves and looters intent on selling radioactive scrap and parts on the black market. The military squeezed passed us in their UAZ on patrol when we were parked up here. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 Thanks Guys! See More Radioactive Farmland At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157674245286871
  6. Unfinished Reactors 5/6 & Cooling Towers, Chernobyl, Ukraine - Oct 2016 Taken from Day 2 and 3 of my October 2016 visit to The Zone are these two which I have combined. The weather had improved greatly on Day 3 from Day 2; the rain had played havoc with my camera unfortunately! At the time of the disaster on April the 26th 1986, the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station was running on 4 reactors and a 5th and 6th reactor was on its way. It is said that these new reactors were 70% complete. The first reactor was finished in 1971 and the 4th in 1983. The 6th was scheduled to be completed by 1994 and if gone to plan, The Plant would run ten reactors; making it the largest power station in The Soviet Union. Of course, this did not happen. The Plant continued to operate on 3 reactors until final closure in 2001 and the plans for these two were canned. I visited the unfinished cooling tower in 2013 so didn't spend too long there. The next day we went into the actual reactor building; which never contained any radioactive material, though the dust inside it is now radioactive from what has blown inside so do not work any dust up! The site was sold onto a scrap company who have begun removing metal. The Cranes here are highly radioactive so we did not go near these at all. The scale of this building is unbelievable, huge great empty turbine halls and monumental drops where the reactors core would have been placed had construction taken place. The buildings are surrounded by old vehicles, including two awesome Volga Cars! #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 Thank you! Discover more Unfinished Reactor at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157674196693952
  7. The Russian Woodpecker Transmiter & Control Rooms, "Chernobyl-2" (Chernobyl Exclusion Zone) - October 2016 So, second day in the zone, second trip to said zone. The first site of the day and the rain was absolutely hammering it down. Hard going as we were catching the early trains from Slavutych each morning at 07:40, up at 06:00! - Well what can I say about this one, the first stop of our second day. What a place!! This absolutely VAST structure called "Duga" is situated near the abandoned town of Pripyat in a town named "Chernobyl-2". I cannot describe how big this thing was to stand next to, measurements are 150m tall by 500m wide 492ft x 1,640ft. This "Over The Horizon Radar Station" was built to detect early missile strikes from the West during Cold War Era. The name "Woodpecker" came about due to the noise it would make On Air. It was constructed between 1970 and 1975 and remained operative until 1989, 3 years after the Chernobyl Disaster, though most equipment was moved in 1987. This monster disappeared up into the fog both up and along and the driving rain led me to not climb it, but instead explore the Control Rooms which fed Duga. Chernobyl-2 was interesting with a Fire Station, Cinema and various other buildings, but I only got a few photos round these buildings; including a model of The Russian Wood Pecker Antenna! #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 Inside the Fire Station in Chernobyl-2 Detect More about Duga at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157674224896671
  8. Pripyat Police Station and Jail, (Chernobyl Exclusion Zone), Ukraine - Oct 2016 These were shot on my second time to The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. I visited in October 2016 for a four day tour which took us to many places which one might not see on a normal tourist trail to the zone. It was getting late here, our last site of the day before a meal at The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Canteen. It was an amazing experience to see The Zone again and each day was packed, getting up at 06:30 to catch the 07:40 train from Slavutych to The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Station, and back to our rented house in Slavutych (the town built to house those who lost their homes in Pripyat) at around 20:00/21:00. - Light was fast fading and we were all tired at this point! Most of this Police Station wasn't particularly interesting, so I focused on by far the best bits; the Jail! The Police Station was surrounded by Highly Radioactive Vehicles which were also, oddly on the roof of the buildings! I didn't go very near any of these here. The Police Station closed in 1986 after the disaster at The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant #1 #2 Note the Hammer and Sickles on the doors! #3 #4 #5 The site had a large vehicle scrapyard behind it, old Russian V8 engine blocks could be seen scattered about the place and rotting cars and trucks. Thanks everyone :-) More Justice At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157672015004973
  9. Middle School No.3, Pripyat (Chernobyl Exclusion Zone), Ukraine - Oct 2016 Middle School Number 3! I visited here in 2013 but had run straight to the Gas Masks then. I decided to do the whole thing this time, the building is huge! These were shot on my second time to The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. I visited in October 2016 for a four day tour which took us to many places which one might not see on a normal tourist trail to the zone. It was an amazing experience to see The Zone again and each day was packed, getting up at 06:30 to catch the 07:40 train from Slavutych to The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Station, and back to our rented house in Slavutych (the town built to house those who lost their homes in Pripyat) at around 20:00/21:00. The school is commonly known as "Gas Mask School" because of the large pile of gas masks in one room; presumably removed from cupboards by looters and placed there as they stripped precious metals from within the filters. The school possessed these masks due to the threat of Nuclear Warfare from the West at the time and nothing to do with the disaster. Middle School No.3 is located on Sportivnav Street, Pripyat, next door to the indoor swimming pool "Azure". The school was modern and equipped with decent Music and Sporting facilities and has held up against the elements well, but has suffered from scrap metal thieves. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 So much Soviet Propaganda/Posters on the wall in this school. It's so interesting to see all of it. See More at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157674199256531
  10. Pripyat Fairground, (Chernobyl Exclusion Zone) - Oct 2016 These were shot on my second time to The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. I visited in October 2016 for a four day tour which took us to many places which one might not see on a normal tourist trail to the zone. It was an amazing experience to see The Zone again and each day was packed, getting up at 06:30 to catch the 07:40 train from Slavutych to The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Station, and back to our rented house in Slavutych (the town built to house those who lost their homes in Pripyat) at around 20:00/21:00. - One of the most clíche, "tourist" places in The Zone. I extensively covered this one in 2013 so didn't shoot toooo much..... This is literally the most shot place here...But its important nonetheless. The fairground was being prepared for its opening on May Day, which was most a important day in the Soviet Union/C.C.C.P. This never happened and work was immediatly finished when the town was evacuated a couple of days after Reactor 4 at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant blew up on April 26th. Some reports say that the park was opened briefly on April 27th to distract people from the events unfolding at the Power Station but this is unconfirmed. Radiation here is generally low, but pockets of moss have incredibly high levels so these are best avoided; these are usually in the moss and vegetation It is thought that the Ferris Wheel has never rotated an inch since being erected, and quietly creaks and groans in the corner. The lamp posts in this area where adorned with old red "Soviet Stars" for the May Day Parade. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 Thank you for looking :-), More attractions at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157674198627731
  11. Polissya Hotel (Готе́ль Полісся, Pripyat (Chernobyl Exclusion Zone), Ukraine - Oct 2016 These were shot on my second time to The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. I visited in October 2016 for a four day tour which took us to many places which one might not see on a normal tourist trail to the zone. It was an amazing experience to see The Zone again and each day was packed, getting up at 06:30 to catch the 07:40 train from Slavutych to The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Station, and back to our rented house in Slavutych (the town built to house those who lost their homes in Pripyat) at around 20:00/21:00. - The Polissya Hotel (Готе́ль Полісся in Ukranian) was a large hotel right in the centre of Pripyat, constructed in the mid 1970s to house visitors to the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant and visitors to Pripyat. The hotel closed in 1986 after the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant disaster. Again, time was of the essence so no internals. It wasn't anything special inside, very very stripped and damaged with a few beds left behind and a trashed stage in a bar area downstairs. The roof is really cool with all the old busted up Neon signs and good views of Pripyat. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 Thanks Again everyone for looking and commenting Check a more comprehensive Hotel status At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157671827282684
  12. The School of Music, Pripyat (Chernobyl Exclusion Zone), Ukraine - October 2016 These were shot on my second time to The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. I visited in October 2016 for a four day tour which took us to many places which one might not see on a normal tourist trail to the zone. It was an amazing experience to see The Zone again and each day was packed, getting up at 06:30 to catch the 07:40 train from Slavutych to The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Station, and back to our rented house in Slavutych (the town built to house those who lost their homes in Pripyat) at around 20:00/21:00. - So, onto another cool but quickly explored site. Rushed this one too as we were not allocated very much time to The School of Music. Pripyat seemed to be a very musical place, perhaps a Soviet Era trait? Pripyat was known for being a very well educated city; many products not available to the rest of the U.S.S.R. were available here and education was very good, as would be expected with a city occupied mostly by workers of a Nuclear Power Plant. Many buildings had Pianos in and this School was among many Schools and Nurseries around the town; but this was the only professional music school. Very little remains here to show that it was a music school; except for a large auditorium with a Grand Piano rotting away since the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant disaster in April 1986. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 More Music At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157675249665626
  13. Cáfe Pripyat (The Dish),(Chernobyl Exclusion Zone) - October 2016 Again, I visited here in 2013 so took very few photos as there is just so much to see in "The Zone". These were shot on my second time to The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. I visited in October 2016 for a four day tour which took us to many places which one might not see on a normal tourist trail to the zone. It was an amazing experience to see The Zone again and each day was packed, getting up at 06:30 to catch the 07:40 train from Slavutych to The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Station, and back to our rented house in Slavutych (the town built to house those who lost their homes in Pripyat) at around 20:00/21:00. - Cáfe Pripyat was once a bustling harbour side spot where the young locals (Average age of Pripyat was 26) would drink and enjoy sun-drenched BBQs by the water and ice skating and fishing in the winter months. It was known locally as "The Dish" and was surrounded by Rose Bushes before The Accident; the Pripyat river where it sat would be adorned with boats. It now sits crumbling away after thirty years of abandonment with varying patches of radiation in the vegetation which surrounds. It makes you feel quite cold inside that many of these "kids", just young men, either received a fatal or life changing dose of radiation on the evening of the 26th April 1986; or during the clean up operation in the following months. It seems there was a bit of a disco vibe in Pripyat; photos of parties can be found online. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 Thanks for reading :-) More Deserted Hangouts at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157675336359955
  14. Hospital No. 126, Pripyat (Chernobyl Exclusion Zone) - Oct 2016 These were shot on my second time to The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. I visited in October 2016 for a four day tour which took us to many places which one might not see on a normal tourist trail to the zone. It was an amazing experience to see The Zone again and each day was packed, getting up at 06:30 to catch the 07:40 train from Slavutych to The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Station, and back to our rented house in Slavutych (the town built to house those who lost their homes in Pripyat) at around 20:00/21:00. - Again, another whistle stop explore here. I covered this well in 2013 so rushed on to other sites in the 2 hour Time Slot, which covered a small district of Pripyat. One point to note, is that on neither of my trips did I ever venture into the basement of this hospital for a very good reason: Radiation on the ground and upper floors is relatively low but the basement is incredibly hot, adorned with the severely radioactive uniforms of the fire fighters and clothes of power station workers which were discarded in the basement, as this hospital is where casualties were rushed immediately after the disaster. Many of these men died in this hospital and in Hospital No.6 in Moscow (A specialist in Acute Radiation Sickness), and their garments remain absolutely radioactive so the basement is not the place to be. Unfortunately incredibly stupid people have brought small items up which are in various areas of the hospital, and even the city, so should be avoided when seen. The hospital closed in 1986 after the disaster and holds many beautiful shots, pure decay and all the beauty which comes with it. I wish I had spent longer here, but there was a lot to see. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 Thanks again guys, was a quick stop off at this pretty large hospital! More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157675238896476
  15. Sanatorium Solnechny, Pripyat (Chernobyl Exclusion Zone), Ukraine - Oct 2016 Starting to romp through my huge backlog now! These were shot on my second time to The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. I visited in October 2016 for a four day tour which took us to many places which one might not see on a normal tourist trail to the zone. It was an amazing experience to see The Zone again and each day was packed, getting up at 06:30 to catch the 07:40 train from Slavutych to The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Station, and back to our rented house in Slavutych (the town built to house those who lost their homes in Pripyat) at around 20:00/21:00. -- I didn't take many photos in this one, we were in a bit of a rush at this point to see the hospital (just across the street) so, "Профилакторий Солнечный", aka Sanatorium Solnechny (Sunny in English) did not get as much photo time as I would have hoped. Chronic diseases were treated here and Supervised Recuperation was carried out. It closed in 1986 following the Chernobyl Disaster and is largely bare. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 Thanks for looking guys! More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157675293438935
  16. The Jupiter Factory, Pripyat, (Chernobyl Exclusion Zone), Ukraine - Oct 2016 So now my huge backlog takes me into my second time to The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. I visited in October 2016 for a four day tour which took us to many places which one might not see on a normal tourist trail to the zone. It was an amazing experience to see The Zone again and each day was packed, getting up at 06:30 to catch the 07:40 train from Slavutych to The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Station, and back to our rented house in Slavutych (the town built to house those who lost their homes in Pripyat) at around 20:00/21:00. The Jupiter Factory Opened in Pripyat in 1980 and was known for hiring the more academic people in Pripyat and Chernobyl. It was known for making electronics and Magnetic Tape, but this was all just a fácade and it actually made Semiconducter Products for the Military. It closed shortly after the Chernobyl Disaster in 1986, but reopened before too long and remained operative until 1996 in radioactive conditions as one of many Radio-Logical Laboratories around Pripyat. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 Some of the lowest radiation I've seen, it can be 0.30 in London on some days! Thanks again Guys More Jupiter Factory At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157671731703993
  17. Ukrane Chernobyl Exclusion Zone 2016

    April 26, 1986. One single day, that changed the day of numerous people overnight. One day, that entered the annals of world´s history. It was the day, when reactor no. 4 of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant was destroyed after a power failure simulation gone wrong. On that day in April 1986 the nightsky exploded. The Chernobyl disaster released as much radioactive material into the environment as 400 atomic bombs would have done. I think, a lot has already been written about that topic and the Chernobyl catastrophe. A topic that I´ve always been fascinated of for many different reasons. Years ago, I told myself, I would never ever visit the zone. Last year, I´ve changed my mind and visited Chernobyl in September. I´m glad, I did. Around the nuclear power plant: [/url] Kindergarten of the former village "Kopachi" Kopachi was a former village near Chernobyl, today located within the Chernobyl exclusion zone. After the nuclear catastrophe in 1986, it was hit hard by nuclear fallout and had to be evacuated. All former houses were demolished and buried. Today, every mound of earth with a warning sign in it, marks the remains of one of the former houses. Only the kindergarten has survived time and does still exist. Pripyat "[...] we lived in Pripyat, near the reactor. I can still see the bright- crimson glow, it was like the reactor was glowing. This wasn´t an ordinary fire, it was some kind of emanation. It was pretty. [....] We didn´t know, that death could be so beautiful." (Nadezhda Vygovskaya (evacuee from Pripyat), excerpt from the book: Voices from Chernobyl by Svetlana Alexievich) Middle School No. 3: Palace of Culture "Energetik": Amusement park: Hospital No. 126 The hospital no. 126 consisted of 410 beds and was - among three further clinics - the biggest medical center of Pripyat. Until today the basement of the hospital is not only one of the most contaminated places of the Chernobyl exclusion zone, but of the world. Still, the pitch-dark cellar, holds the suits of the six firemen that were the first to work on the wrecked reactor and afterwards were instantly brought to the city hospital. Of course they received a lethal dosis of radiation. Consequently, they died shortly after their operation of radiation sickness. Still, 30 years after the catastrophe, they are so highly cotaminated that you would receive a lethal dosis in only short time. Café Pripyat near the same-named river: Post Office and Supermarket: Above the roofs of Pripyat: There´s no better way to get a glimpse of the former size of the city than standing on a 16-storey-building, where the following captures were taken. For me, standing up there, was by far one of the most impressive experiences of my whole life. Only short time after the hard climb up the stairs, one thing really hit me in an instant: an indescribable silence I´ve never witnessed before. No cars, no air planes, no humans. Even birds are hardly singing. It´s probably hard to imagine for lots of people, at least for those living in densely populated areas. Even during a walk in the woods, one normally can hear the typical background noise of civilization. Suddenly, that noise was gone. My first thought was: dead silence. That impression is still affecting me deeply. The fact to look down on former traces of human lives only add to the unreal atmosphere. A whole city is at my feet and all I can hear is simply - nothing. I take a last look at the wrecked reactor no. 4 in the distance that soon will be disappeared underneath the new so-called New Safe Confinement (NSC). Despite the peaceful atmosphere, I still have the uneasy feeling of being a belated witness of a catastrophe which is hard to comprehend. DUGA - "The Russian Woodpecker" The DUGA-array was part of an over-the-horizon radar system (OTH) and was located near the former Chernobyl nuclear power plant. It´s highest antenna was around 150 metres high and does still exist. The range of the array was around 9,000 kilometers. During the cold war era, the radar station was of course like similar stations top secret. Already at the end of the 1970's an interfering signal was received by short-wave radio stations. It sounded like a woodpecker that´s why it was later called "the Russian Woodpecker". It was early suspected, that those sounds might belong to a Soviet over-the-horizon radar. When reactor 4 of Chernobyl blew up, the OTH system could not be kept secret any longer. Thus, the theory was confirmed There are also many conspiracy theories concerning the radar station. According to those theories, mind control and the possibility of influencing the weather were made possible by DUGA.
  18. Havent posted for an age but saw another excellent report and inspired me to post again (after sorting out resizing issue I had months ago (thanks andyK)) Fun time, few hours tour inside, with a group of 8 of whom only 3 of us where taking photos cheers The Baron
  19. Chernobyl & Pripyat - Ukraine OCTOBER 2014 I've been sat around on these since 2014!....seeing it was my last jaunt I thought I might as well chuck something up.....better late than never. There's a lot of reports online so I've tried to mix it up a bit and add something a bit different. Theres a couple of generic Chernobyl shots with bits and bobs of what I liked the look of. Its an incredible place as those who have visited will know, We spent 4 days in total having a good mooch with Nikolai as our guide, he's an absolute legend and made it an outstanding trip, he comes highly recommended as does his moonshine!. I'm well aware that a lot of you will know the history but for those who don't I've added a bit of literature. In the early hours of 26 April 1986, one of four nuclear reactors at the Chernobyl power station exploded. The April 1986 disaster at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine was the product of a flawed Soviet reactor design coupled with serious mistakes made by the plant operators. It was a direct consequence of Cold War isolation and the resulting lack of any safety culture. Engineers on the evening shift at Chernobyl's number four reactor began an experiment to see whether the cooling pump system could still function using power generated from the reactor under low power should the auxiliary electricity supply fail. At 2300 control rods, which regulate the fission process in a nuclear reactor by absorbing neutrons and slowing the chain reaction, were lowered to reduce output to about 20% of normal output required for the test. However, too many rods were lowered and output dropped too quickly, resulting in an almost complete shutdown. Concerned by possible instability, engineers began to raise the rods to increase output. At 0030 the decision was taken to carry on. By 0100 power was still only at about 7%, so more rods were raised. The automatic shutdown system was disabled to allow the reactor to continue working under low power conditions. The engineers continued to raise rods. By 0123, power had reached 12% and the test began. But seconds later, power levels suddenly surged to dangerous levels. The reactor began to overheat and its water coolant started to turn to steam. At this point it is thought that all but six control rods had been removed from the reactor core - the minimum safe operating number was considered to be 30. The emergency shutdown button was pressed. Control rods started to enter the core, but their reinsertion from the top displaced coolant and concentrated reactivity in the lower core. With power at roughly 100 times normal, fuel pellets in the core began to explode, rupturing the fuel channels. At about 0124, two explosions occurred, causing the reactor's dome-shaped roof to be blown off and the contents to erupt outwards. As air was sucked in to the shattered reactor, it ignited. flammable carbon monoxide gas causing a reactor fire which burned for nine days. Because the reactor was not housed in a reinforced concrete shell, as is standard practice in most countries, the building sustained severe damage and large amounts of radioactive debris escaped into the atmosphere. Firefighters crawled onto the roof of the reactor building to fight the blaze while helicopters dropped sand and lead in an effort to quell the radiation. The disaster released at least 100 times more radiation than the atom bombs dropped on Nagasaki and Hiroshima. Much of the fallout was deposited close to Chernobyl, in parts of Belarus, Ukraine and Russia. More than 350,000 people resettled away from these areas, but about 5.5 million remain. Contamination with caesium and strontium is of particular concern, as it will be present in the soil for many years. After the accident traces of radioactive deposits were found in nearly every country in the northern hemisphere. But wind direction and uneven rainfall left some areas more contaminated than their immediate neighbours. Scandinavia was badly affected and there are still areas of the UK where farms face post-Chernobyl controls. The sarcophagus encasing Chernobyl was built in haste and is crumbling. Despite strengthening work there are fears it could collapse, leading to the release of tonnes of radioactive dust. Work is currently ongoing on a £600m replacement shelter designed to last 100 years. This New Safe Confinement will be built on site and then slid over the sarcophagus. The shelter will allow the concrete structure to be dismantled and for the radioactive fuel and damaged reactor to be dealt with. The ends of the structure will be closed-off. Despite the lasting contamination of the area, scientists have been surprised by the dramatic revival of its wildlife. Wild horse, boar and wolf populations are thriving, while lynx have returned to the area and birds have nested in the reactor building without any obvious ill-effects. Thanks for looking
  20. Ukrane Chernobyl (October 2015) Pic Heavy

    It's been a long time since i've posted anything here and I was surprised to see my account was still active. Been quite an absence for me for any UE and am starting to feel slightly out of touch with the community, so having had the pleasure of seeing Chernobyl last October i thought this gives me the perfect opportunity to re-introduce myself. Anyway, enough of my dribble, on with the report. Brief history The Chernobyl disaster was a catastrophic nuclear accident that occurred on 26 April 1986 (30th anniversary this year kids!) at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine (then officially the Ukrainian SSR), which was under the direct jurisdiction of the central authorities of the Soviet Union. An explosion and fire released large quantities of radioactive particles into the atmosphere, which spread over much of the western USSR and Europe. The Chernobyl disaster was the worst nuclear power plant accident in history in terms of cost and casualties. It is one of only two classified as a level 7 event (the maximum classification) on the International Nuclear Event Scale, The battle to contain the contamination and avert a greater catastrophe ultimately involved over 500,000 workers and cost an estimated 18 billion rubles. During the accident itself, 31 people died. The rest as they say is history. Visited October 2015 with a load of other lunatics. Enjoy Cheers for looking
  21. I have been wanting to go here for years and finally got round to going earlier this month on a 2 day tour. It was awesome to go and so hard to explain what its like there. The Chernobyl disaster was a catastrophic nuclear accident that occurred on 26 April 1986 at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine, which was under the direct jurisdiction of the central authorities of the Soviet Union, Id put more but you all must know about it. Here are a few of the photos I took
  22. Next batch from my trip to this amazing place Just pics for this report Rare B&W, not a huge fan but thought this worked This one reminds me of Stussy, not sure why Cheers The Baron
  23. Next set from this amazing place Cheers The Baron
  24. Ukrane Chernobyl Hospital June 2015

    Day 1 of a very memorable trip, wanted to do this for so long and as such the opportunity arose a few weeks back to make it happen. With it being very short notice, I went on my own and joined a public tour for 2 days, with 5 other folk, only 1 other person taking pictures !! time was limited in each location as we tried to cram in as many different locations as possible. As such I only had approx 45 mins in here............. first of a few reports to follow of each place i thought worthy of a report Cheers The Baron
  25. Ukrane Chernobyl, October 2013

    Following on from my Pripyat post, one of the other places on the mini tour was a visit to the Chernobyl power plant. I must admit that this was an extra, and to this day I am not sure that it was a good thing. But go I did. Outside the entrance to the power plant is the memorial to the Liquidators. These were the people who took on the job of "cleaning up" after the nuclear explosion. Interestingly a number of studies indicate that there is no increase in incidents of cancer among the Liquidators. The cynic in me wonders if the government that only allowed the world to know of the explosion after it was obvious to do the massively high radio active readings in Scandinavia, would allow a report which indicated more casualties were the result of the accident? In the background is the sarcophagus which is the structure that "contains" the nuclear core of Reactor 4. The sarcophagus is corroding, far quicker than the scientists thought, and should it breakdown completely, the reactor core would be exposed. In order to prevent this from happening, a new structure is being constructed to encase the reactor. Known as the "New Safe Confinement", the NSC is an incredible structure. I watched a short video on how it was constructed. The dome was assembled first, and then lifted so that the remainder of the arch could be raised in to place. The idea is that the completed arch could be slid over the top of the reactor building. This could only be done once the chimney was removed. Seen in the image below on the left - the chimney has now been removed. I learned on my return from Chernobyl that the removal started the day I returned to the UK. More by luck than any sort of judgement, I had seen, in a manner of speaking, how the reactor would have looked before that fateful day in 1986. As part of the visit to the power plant, we had a talk / presentation on the disaster, the explosion and how that affected the structure of the reactor. After this, we went to one of the control rooms - similar in design to the one that the operators looking after Reactor 4 would have worked in. The processes and procedures governing the operation of the nuclear power plant were so important that only the president could sanction a change in them. However, people will find a way of doing things more quickly, maybe skipping out a step or two here and there. Over the years, and without incident, the strict procedures were not all followed. On the fateful night, there was an experiment. It went horribly wrong. A power surge occurred and when the operators attempted to shut the reactor down, a larger power spike occurred. This cause a series of explosions resulting in the reactor being exposed to the air - the fire that raged sent radioactive particles in to the atmosphere. As the group walked through various corridors, we passed this large red door. I asked our guide what was behind the door. Reactor 4 I was told. I thought he was joking. I mean, why would anyone want to go anywhere near Reactor 4. The reactor that was at the centre of the world's biggest nuclear disaster. I later learned that it was no joke, that is what lurked behind the red door. At the end of the corridor was a memorial to the first person who died as as result of the nuclear disaster. Valery Ilyich Khodemchuk was stationed in the southern main circulating pumps engine room, likely killed immediately; his body never found, buried under the wreckage of the steam separator drums. Valery was posthumously awarded the Order "For Courage" of third degree. As we gathered near the memorial, the air was filled with the sound of our radiation detectors. With so many going off, warning of the levels of radiation, the sound was eerie, scary and hypnotic all at the same time. We were asked to turn them off, so that we could have a 2 minutes silence in memory of those who died. A few seconds after turning off the radiation detectors, the realisation that we were standing very close to the centre of the world's biggest nuclear disaster slowly seeped in. Almost without saying anything we started to move away and walk back down the corridor we had walked along to get to this point. Once outside, we visited a memorial to all those who had died in the explosion. There are no official figures for the number of deaths that could be attributed to the disaster. I am not referring to those that may have contracted cancer of some description as a result of the exposure to radiation, that number will never be known. Rather the workers, both military and civilian who worked around the power plant to contain and make the area... safer. There are 28, I think, official deaths as a result of the explosion. The statue of Prometheus is part of that memorial. It was originally located in Pripyat, and was moved to this spot after the disaster. Hopefully I haven't offended anyone with my, sometimes scathing report, thank you for viewing
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