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Found 134 results

  1. The Murphy Ranch is a ranch built in Rustic Canyon, Los Angeles in the 1930s by Winona and Norman Stephens,who were sympathizers of the Silver Legion of America.The owner of record in 1933 was Jessie M. Murphy. Designed as a base for Nazi activities in the U.S.,[4] it was intended to be capable of being self-sustaining for long periods. The compound had a water storage tank, a fuel tank, a bomb shelter, and various outbuildings and bunkers. The estate's main gate was designed by Paul Williams, a well-known African-American architect in the Southern California area.
  2. Hey Everyone, I just wanted to share my latest exploration with you all. I took a trip to the Abandoned Los Angeles Zoo which closed up business in 1966. Be sure to take a look at the video and do a little research on the location as well. The history behind this place will shock you. All The Best, Anthony
  3. Hey All, I recently took a trip to the middle of the California desert to see an old abandoned movie set. While I was there I shot a video of the things that transpired. Be sure to check it out. A link with more information on the site is in the description of the video. I hope you enjoy, Anthony
  4. Hello urbexers, We once again had a trip to Belgium, and had a visit at the so called Agnus Dei(church) We had a great time filming and shooting pics here!
  5. Hello once again, Some footage of an aluminum factory in Belgium, they used to reinforce aluminum parts by a chemical process. Inside the factory there were still alot of unused checmicals so you really had to watch where you were going. Still had a lot of fun filming here! Thanks for watching!:D
  6. HI I´m new here. I´m from Czech and I will show you some places If you want my page is https://www.facebook.com/M%C4%9Bstsk%C3%BD-pr%C5%AFzkum-495287987276687/
  7. The only information I have about this one is coming from my grandparents, who used to know the people that lived there. It was the house of the principal of a little school close by, sadly enough they demolished it before I was into urbex. They called the man "mister pipe" since he always walked around smoking a pipe
  8. Who thought I'd manage to post an entire set! This huge cotton mill was operated by one of the most important Italian textile companies and was abandoned in 2002. There are actually very few details available on this particular site's history, as the company initially started production in a nearby city and gradually acquired new plants. Although some of the buildings have been damaged by the rain and by (more than one) fire and despite the easy entrance, several mannequins, spools, paintings, printed textile samples, original drawings and who knows what else are still there untouched - quite surprisingly if you ask me! I plan on going back there soon as a half-day exploration was barely enough to cover half of the buildings! The infirmary: If you'd like to see the whole set, you can find it here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/neurojuice/albums/72157666964381081
  9. Matthews' Equestrian Center (Or Matthew's Riding School) was a well known, and well used site in medway, featuring on local and national media over the years. The equestrian centre is now in a very run down state, where flytipping is common. The site is badly damaged through fire and vandalism, though, some remains almost intact. The upper floors are difficult to walk on, due to incredibly thin wooden boards supported by rotting timber beams. The building is quite open to the elements, with a broken roof and in some places a non-existent roof. This is my first report, which will be quite picture heavy - Any criticisms will appreciated. And here is one piece of graffiti that we just quite like
  10. A very interesting house but unfortunately in very bad shape. 1 2 3 4 5
  11. Located in the northwestern Bohemia town of Luková, the ‘Church of Nine Ghosts’ first fell into disrepair after the ceiling caved in during a funeral service in 1968. Locals took that as a bad omen, attributing the structural failure to a curse, the superstitious congregation in the Czech village of Lukova abandoned their small church to the elements. For decades the ornate wood and plaster-work interior of St George’s has steadily deteriorated. But many residents saw the church as an important part of the town’s history, and wanted to see it restored. The figures represent the ghosts of Sudeten Germans who lived in Lukova before World War Two and who came to pray at this church every Sunday. Artist Jakub Hadrava is responsible for the ghostly figures which now inhabit the church. Since his work was added the church has seen a huge influx of tourists from counties as far away as Brazil, Australia and Germany. The thousands of visitors who have turned up have now left behind enough money to get much needed repair work done to the church. At first there are only nine ghosts sat within the pews, this has since increased to sixteen and they can be seen now standing throughout the church. This place had been something i had wanted to see for a long time and something of a holy grail for me (excuse the pun) It took us a 4hr drive on a baking hot day with 4 other people cramped into the car to get to this place from where we were based but it was worth it in the end. Anyway, here is a small selection of photographs from our visit. Hope you enjoy. As always, thanks for looking
  12. The first time I saw pictures of this place it made such an impression that I had to try go there. I heard the stories about the notorious gypsy camp outside and the random police training with dogs and guns... However, on a bright morning there we were in Northern France - the first location on what was my first Eurotour. I felt a mixture of things - slight apprehension, massive anticipation and spaced out due to lack of sleep! We managed to get in without too much drama and soon bumped into 4 other UK explorers. Here are the pics from the main section of the prison which is the most-photographed 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Its well-documented that there are 2 separate sections which make up this prison and in-between runs this piece of 'no-mans-land' 10. Sometimes lady luck shines down and so it was - we had timed it perfectly so that access was also possible into the lesser-known section which is either lower risk or female inmates depending on who/what you believe. There was a lot more to see in this bit than just rows of cells covered in graffiti.... 11. 12. 13. 14. 15 &16 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. As I took this pic I thought how ironic it was that we were determined to get into a place that housed so many that would do anything to get out of! And so it was time to leave, and as we did we noticed a couple of dodgy characters from the camp seemed to be following us. Again we were lucky (and relieved) as we bumped into the other 4 explorers and with strength in numbers we got back to the car in very good spirits!
  13. Video report from Kentucky in the United States. This is an early 20th century stone house that was ironically purchased recently by a stone quarry company adjacent to the property. This house is quite rugged and I don't believe much could bring it down, they would have to bring out their biggest wrecking ball for this one lol. Hope you all enjoy
  14. Abandoned Paper Mill, UK Visited with: Alex Visit Date: April 2015 Please Note: Entry is always through an open access point and not by forcing our way in….. We are explorers, not vandals. My Visit I had been wanting to visit the mill for some time, however, I kept pushing this one aside for a rainy day. Eventually myself & Alex decided it was time.... This would be my first visit and Alex's second. So, early on a soggy, wet, rainy and very windy April morning we set off to what would turn out to be one of the best & most enjoyable explores I have been on. The entry to the mill I knew was going to be tricky because Alex had told me the way in when planning the visit. Lots of climbing was needed and the main thing I was thinking was do not rush and avoid any areas that look a little sketchy. It worked and we both made it in without any issues. Now, I knew the mill was a large site after seeing many other photos from people who had been here and within a few minutes of dropping in the scale of this place became a reality! I am no expert in the process of making paper so I will only state what I have read as to what the machinery was used for. I think the yellow machines in this photo fed the pipes in the following photos. I spent a good amount of time in this room due to all the pipework shooting off in different directions. I love lines and angles and this area had plenty to go at. From what I have read the pipes were for feeding pulp into machines on a lower floor. It makes sense as you can see the pipes attached to the ceiling feeding the pipes on the other side of the room that dissapear into the floor. The mill has plenty of large rooms that could have been used for many things such as storage & packaging. Here are a few photos of these spaces. It is always good to get a feel for the people who worked in these places and when you find the brew / changing rooms it kind of brings you back to reality. People once worked here, this was their income for paying the bills, but sadly no more. The different characters that would have been in these rooms over the years and the stories they have told. Does anyone think that this was the male changing room! And no, not because it is messy.... Situated in the middle of the main working areas we found the brew room which consisted of two floors for people to sit and relax whilst on their breaks. A shower room and another changing room are situated off to the side but I never took a photo, why I hear you ask... because my brain gave out on me and I forgot. I remember thinking that it must have been very noisy in here due to the fact that it is surrounded on all sides by large machinery. All I know about these machines is that they were used for rolling the paper. The room is crammed from wall to wall with machinery with only a central isle to walk down. Do you remember earlier in the report that I said the pulp was fed through the pipes and down to machines on a lower floor? Well these are the machines that was fed the pulp. What happened to the pulp at this stage I have absolutely no idea. The room was very dark (and hard to photograph) and I remember when entering feeling like I had been taken back in time to the industrial revolution. Lots of metal on show, dirt, pipes & strange looking machines it was very surreal. I can imagine this area being very hot and noisy with lots of sweaty dirty workers going about their tasks. As well as all the machines there was also a good amount of office space here. Most was very badly decayed or trashed but I did find this room rather interesting. Ok so back to the working areas... This is the largest area we came across on the visit, lots of different areas within one floor all working together in what you could call a production line. Again I got a surreal feeling here due to the fact that at one time this place would have been bustling with people and noise. Now though, nothing, nothing other than the sounds of our footsteps and the rain hitting the roof. Tucked away in the corner of this area we found three forklifts parked up. They look in very good working order and I am sure if you had the keys they would start up. The final photo is of an area where one of the end results is stacked up on pallets and either moved to storage or loaded onto wagons. There is still some paper stacked on pallets that will have come down the conveyors as you can see in the photo. Behind me is two very large shutter doors that open to a loading area. More images available on flickr The images above are just a small selection of the images I have edited. I will be adding lots more photos of Lotus Hall aka Cuckoo Hall on my Flickr page which can be found here, https://www.flickr.com/photos/119757413@N07/ Final thoughts To me having a fantastic location to see is only 50% of what makes a good trip the other is great company and this day had both, I loved every minute we spent here. There was so much to see and with every room being different it allowed your mind to try and figure out and imagine what the area was used for and the communal areas made you think of the people who worked here..... To me that is what exploring is all about! With the size of this place I am sure myself & Alex will have missed some areas and I would love to revisit here at some point. The mill instantly became one of my favorite locations that I have been lucky enough to see and rightly so. Finally, thanks to my good Friend Alex for the company as always. Thanks for reading, Dugie
  15. Had a heads up from a mate about this place, so decided to have a nose around early one morning... VERY CLEAN! After spending some time in Sheffield I was on route back down the country, an after a quick scope of access, I then parked up in another nearby field and caught a few hours kip. Frosty start and inside I went before workmen arrived, gave myself a max time limit and away I went, honestly you could MOVE IN TOMORROW! from a few old newspapers darted about it was left circa 2012, an a tiny bit of damp on the carpet is visible, but hey it needs a new owner thats for sure. On with the shots! My only regret was not taking a cheeky bath after 3 days sleeping in the car oh well all clean now!
  16. Abandoned Abbey somewhere in Poland Hi all! First uploaded on FB group. Now here Thanks for your support! I hope you like it! History of the building/s http://tinyurl.com/q68noe4
  17. Hi! A year ago I was in Czech republic and visited Milovice. Why do we know this town? At first, here parts of popular films "Hostel" and "Eurotour" were shot. And at second, what's more important, Milovice was a place where Soviet military base was situated. After the Second World War the place was used like a military tank base. They built a massive airport and accommodation for about 100,000 Soviet soldiers and their relatives. Soviet army was where till 1991. After 1996 the town is under reconstruction. But still... You can hear the echo of the war here. When you enter it, it's impossible to mix up soviet style of military architecture. It's empty in here. The Czechs are trying to demolish the reminiscence of the base but it's too hard, they need enough money... and you know they need to destroy their history. We were here without a map and didn't find the base and airport itself. But in the city center we found remains of a military village where Russian officers lived. Only in two steps from here there are mordern houses of Milovice. Sounds, laugh and life. And here is the abandoned hospital. Here was a monument to Antonin Sohkor, the commander of tommy-gunners' company in the Second World War, the Hero of the Soviet Union. Now it's demolished and forgotten. Here was the main square, you can still find hints at benches and street lamps. Like a small Pripyat. A gloomy ghost town full of history. I must say it's the most atmospheric place I've ever been.
  18. During our latest trip to France we visited an old factory where pottery etc were made. Although the place is abandoned for a while and most of the factory is empty, one building is (in urbex terms) well preserved. The combination of wood, sunlight, beautiful rooms and left pottery made this one of my favorite locations.
  19. For me this place is the most beautiful lost place i have ever seen. I was speechless, and i really wished i could spend more time here. It is absolutely amazing :-)
  20. Thank you for watching my photos! If you want to see more of my work please visit and like my page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Colourbex/834327016579594?sk=timeline
  21. I'll not write a lot, but enjoy photos The abandoned castle in Moscow, where have been russian queen Ekaterina II Nowdays there is a scientifically research institute here, but this is not work. As far as a wrote rarely, I with my best friend will travel around the Europe this August. We will be in France, Belgium and other countries. The full list is: Barcelona, Spain - Paris, France - Brussels, Belgium (and around) - Amsterdam, Niderlands - Germany (something around by the road to Austria) - and Austria We have not a car and will travel with the blablacar or busses/trains or smth else We will be HAPPY if somebody wants to enter russian explorers OR if somebody wants to explore with us in Belgium or in France I have not a facebook, but I can contact by the instagram direct or WhatsUp. Thank you for reading and for replies!!!
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  25. Decided to combine urbex with a little touch of fantasy.. Hate it or love it?
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