Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • Dubbed Navigator

      Style   11/21/2017

      Hello - we are pleased to announce that there is now a light version of the style. If you wish to use it, go to the bottom left of the site where there is an option to change it 

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'brewery'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Exploration Forums
    • Military Sites
    • Industrial Locations
    • Hospitals & Asylums
    • Public buildings, Education & Leisure
    • Underground Explores
    • High Places
    • Manors,Mansions & Residential
    • Religious Sites
    • Anything Else
  • Other Forums
    • Video Reports
    • Short Reports
    • Themed Threads
  • Discussion Forums
    • Just take a moment & say Hi
    • General Discussion
    • Latest News
    • Camera and Photography Advice
    • Websites and Links

Categories

  • About the Forum
  • Urban Exploring information
  • Photography and camera advice
  • Technical Help

Found 35 results

  1. Germany Small Brewery - September 2016

    I don´t have much information about the small brewery which is located in the south of Germany. The current owner is a guy from England, who disappeared some years ago. Since then, the building has been left to decay. The story hit some headlines in the local newspapers. Small, but I loved it anyway!
  2. They could have easily named this place 'The Mad Dog Brewery' due to the large rabid hounds that guard the place! Nearly gave me a bloody heart attack! 'The Devils Juice Brewery' Thanks for lookin' in... ... and drink responsibly!
  3. Hi mates! One more Serbian factory for you now. The brewery was founded in 1722, it's the oldest brewery in Balkans. In 1874 it came to Weifert family from Germany. The factory was rebuilt and it was the golden age for it. In 1948 the factory was called a cultural monument. Now it stays delirict. Some years ago there was a great fire that destroyed all wooden constructons. A brich with German words: «Zu Erinnerung widmet J. Fatra und J. J. Hoyer. Wasserhohe aus 1. April» More modern part. Ruins from the roof. Modern underground. So that's all for the brewery! Have good time!
  4. This is one of those locations you look at and wonder 'why the hell doesn't it get explored more?'. I can't for the life of me work out why it has flown under the radar so much, it's a massive old brewery ripe for photographing. Currently the smaller parts of the site across the road are being turned into housing, but the main brewery and associated outbuildings are sitting there waiting for whatever fate will come their way. It has a really nice mix of architectural styles and decay, from the main brew house tower through to the maltings section full of beautiful woodwork, and the more modern yeast fermenting areas. Plus there is a nice carpet of pigeon poo over quite a lot of the floors and some very sketchy areas rotted through from water damage. Overall a very enjoyable explore and a total surprise as we turned up without knowing the site, whether it would be accessible, or even how much of it would still be there. Despite ruining my back and ripping my coat getting in and out, it was smooth as could be. Thanks for looking, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/albums/72157660200086409
  5. This was one of the sites we did on a full day in Sheffield. We bumped in to come pensioners at this site who explore but mainly for the street art. History Stones Brewery (William Stones Ltd) was a regional brewery founded in 1868 by William Stones in Sheffield, West Riding of South Yorkshire, England and purchased by Bass Brewery in 1968. After its closure in 1999 its major brand, Stones Bitter, has continued to be produced by the Molson Coors Brewing Company.
  6. Met up with extreme_ironing and maniac in Tooting about 8pm for some food with the intention of heading to East London to check out some cinemas. Four beers later and so much Lebanese food that we all had the meat sweats, we realised none of us could deal with going too far with so we decided to pop in here and see what's left. Although a fair bit of stuff has been stripped out and asbestos removal is in full flow we found a surprising amount of epic stuff still inside. Access is far easier than it was too which was a bonus, especially with broken ribs. We spent a couple of hours inside and there is a lot more left than shown in my photos, much better than I expected. History (shamelessly stolen from Bhg's report ): The Young’s Brewery has been a familiar local landmark for both Wandsworth residents and visitors for over 150 years. Opened in 1831, the site has contributed much to the borough’s social and historic fabric. In 1831, Charles Allen Young and his partner Anthony Fothergill Bainbridge bought the Ram Brewery site. The new partnership suffered a serious setback in 1832 when a disastrous fire destroyed most of the brewhouse, but it was quickly rebuilt and in 1835 a new beam engine was erected inside the brewery. It is thought to be the oldest working beam engine of its kind in the world still in working condition and in its original location. It and its sister engine built in 1867, provided steam power in the brewery right up until 1976. In 1883 another fire, started in the offices, caused extensive damage to part of the brewery and the Ram Inn. Both were rebuilt the following year.A number of animals were resident in the brewery, including a ram, a number of geese and about a dozen working draught horses. It is claimed that the Ram Brewery was the oldest British brewery in continuous operation. At its closure in 2006, the brewery was a mix of ancient and ultra-modern plant and horses and drays were still used for local deliveries of beer within a mile or two of the brewery. The Ram Brewery officially closed on 25th September 2006. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Brewery humour, this was quite appropriate actually 9. 10. 11. 12. These beam engines are the most historical machinery in here. One of them was built in 1835. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. Stay classy Oblivion State
  7. It took me quite a while to figure out where this brewery was when i first saw it's pictures and name appear. But I decrypted the message, and found it after a while. Next issue: It was locked !!!! No possible way to get in, like a chastity belt ! After another long while i saw new pictures pop up and found out that there were festivities at the brewery. We managed to get an appointment to get in to take pictures on the day they were cleaning up from the festivities. 1. coquitur im vulterum by Dafne Op 't eijnde, on Flickr 2 coquitur im vulterum by Dafne Op 't eijnde, on Flickr 3 coquitur im vulterum by Dafne Op 't eijnde, on Flickr 4 coquitur im vulterum by Dafne Op 't eijnde, on Flickr 5 coquitur im vulterum by Dafne Op 't eijnde, on Flickr 6 urbex-0044 by Dafne Op 't eijnde, on Flickr thank you for watching.
  8. Belgium The Brewery (visit 2015)

    The Brewery by Vancolen Kevin, on Flickr The Brewery by Vancolen Kevin, on Flickr
  9. I think we all know and love this place so ill try and keep it short and sweet. A nice long re-visit to this place with zero. We was lucky and clever enough to get in 90%+ of this place, lots of dodgy climbing, balancing and ripped clothes was worth it. Designed specifically to facilitate three key stages in the production of beer, Bass Malting's is a Grade II* listed complex built between 1901 and 1907 that consists of nine parallel ranges. The central block with its engine house and water tower is flanked by six-storey malt houses on either side and occupies a site of 13.3 acres with a frontage almost 1,000 ft long. Malting's operations ceased in 1959 and the buildings were subsequently used for poultry farming and vegetable processing. Every year is meant to be progress for regeneration, all that happens is fires, vandalism, red tape from councils and company's whilst she continues to deteriorate. Developers say they are still committed to transforming Sleaford’s iconic Bass Malting's buildings, despite one of the key partners pulling out of the project. Avant Homes, which owns the Grade II Listed structure, is sticking to its original proposals to transform the buildings into a mixed development of residential, healthcare and community facilities, but the developers say the progress of the redevelopment will be delayed. The plans were dependant on a new road from Boston Road to Grantham Road being built, which supermarket giant Tesco had agreed to pay for as well as building a brand new superstore for the town. When and what happens next is anyone's guess. I love exploration and everything that goes with it, well apart from doing reports, FB, websites etc. Ill try my best to improve on this in 2015. Hope you enjoyed the report.
  10. Visited with Hamtagger and Session9 After a cold night in Severalls and considering exploring a close by Hospital (That we soon found out wasn't derelict) we decided to head over to Tolly Cobbald Brewery. By this time we had been awake for about 40 hours and been to the poshest McDonalds on the Planet 4 times for Winter Warmer meals. We parked around the corner and walked from there to the easiest access of any place I have been. There was practically a Red Carpet, don't get too excited though because this red carpet was a special one covered in needles and swabs. The building itself has a lot of potential so it would be sad to see it knocked down, although the inside is a death trap. After dodging 200 dead pigeons and various other rodent skeletons I felt some steps crumble beneath my feet... Luckily there were only 3 steps so my camera wasn't damaged! (Anyone visiting here should be careful as the floor is like play doh) The best part was probably the view from the top, I think on the way down I counted around 600 steps all together so it's a bit of a climb. History Short and sweet - In 2002 Tolly Cobbold became part of Ridley's and the Cliff Brewery in Ipswich closed ending 256 years of brewing at that site. The company itself claims a history dating back to 1723 and this site is dedicated to the company, its history, its people and its pubs. Pictures 1 I'm not sure what these hooks were used for... At first I thought meat until I realised where we were. 2 Next rounds on me 3 It took us a while to figure out how to get up there. 4 Roulette anyone? 5 It's rare to see this much metal in one place... Ipswich must be posh 6 Red Machine 7 A whole new meaning to Sticky Keys 8 It's a long way down 9 This poster aged rather well 10 Room with a view Thankyou for taking time to read my report. I can't wait to never visit Ipswich again
  11. Tolly Cobbold Brewery The Explore Visited with Matt Inked and Session9 after spending the night in Sev's with them. A nice easy one to finish off after a ridiculous amount of time awake, and with the long drive back in mind we bombed across to Ipswich for a sniff around. I was quite surprised there was anything left to see inside to be honest and there was a cracking view from the top. The History The business that became Cliff Brewery was started in 1723 ( in Kings Quay Street, Harwich) by Thomas Cobbold and is believed to be the second oldest independent brewery in England. It stood above the quays of the River Orwell at Ipswich, since 1746. The Cobbolds have an important status in Ipswich as the family were landowners in the town and surrounding area. Christchurch Park was donated to "The people of Ipswich" by the family, along with many other donations of land such as Ipswich Racecourse. The family also provided several Members of Parliament for Ipswich over the years. In addition they have provided five chairmen of Ipswich Town Football Club, Lady Blanche Cobbold was President of the Club for many years, ITFC have even named part of a stand in their stadium and a prestigious member's club after the Cobbold family. Eventually Cobbold merged with local rival, Tollemache Breweries in 1957 to form Tolly Cobbold. The brewery ceased operations in 2002, when the Tolly Cobbold company merged with Ridley's brewery. The site has been abandoned ever since and is now in a pretty poor state no thanks to copper thieves and the effects of nature. (History stolen from Session9, thanks!) The Pictures 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. As always, thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated
  12. Tolly Cobbold brewery Intro After a frustrating visit to St. Clement's I wandered down to this and spent a few hours here. I think the reason I didn't enjoy it so much was because I was annoyed I didn't get into St/ Clement's/ Don't get me wrong, it's a nice place. Just not quite as good as I was expecting! The building itself looks awesome and hopefully it does get renovated, even if it's over priced flats, at least the building would be retained. I'd been siting on these pics for a while, t'is about time I posted them up. Enjoy the essay! Pictures at the end as always. History The history of Tolly Cobbold starts with the original Cobbold brewery at Harwich founded around 1723 and ends (almost) in 2002 with the merger with Ridley's and closure of the Cliff Brewery at Ipswich. It should be noted, however, that Ridley's have retained the Tolly "brand" for versions of the Tolly Cobbold beers brewed by Ridley's. It should also be noted that the name Tolly Cobbold comes from the merger of two family brewers - the Tollemaches and the Cobbolds in 1957. The intervening events reveal the interesting story of a pioneering regional business in an ever-changing world. Time line 1723 Harwich Brewery Founded. 1746 Cliff Brewery Founded. 1752 Thomas Cobbold (maltster) dies. 1754 Thomas Cobbold (brewer) opens the "Brewer's Baths" at Harwich. 1767 Thomas Cobbold (brewer, born 1708) dies. 1770 The Cobbold & Cox partnership is running the Harwich operation whilst John Cobbold is running the main company including the Cliff Brewery at Ipswich. 1835 John Cobbold dies. 1840 Thomas Cobbold (son of John) retires and the Harwich Brewery closes. 1863 John Chevallier Cobbold acquires the new Harwich Brewery 1876 New Harwich Brewery closes. 1880 Tollemache brothers acquire the Ipswich Brewery from Cullingham & Co. 1894-1896 Cliff Brewery Rebuilt. 1920 The Tollemache family acquire the Essex Brewery at Walthamstowe and become incorporated as Tollemache Breweries Ltd. 1923 Bi-centenary of Company. Cobbold acquires half of the Catchpole tied estate. 1924 Company becomes incorporated as Cobbold & Co. Ltd. 1930 Tollemache Breweries Ltd. acquire controlling share of the Star Brewery, Cambridge. 1947 White Star Brewery becomes wholly owned by Tollemache Breweries Ltd. 1957 Cobbold & Co. merge with Tollemache's Breweries Ltd. to become Tolly Cobbold. 1961 Tollemache brewery at Upper Brook Street, Ipswich closes. 1972 Star Brewery, Cambridge closes 1973 New corporate image launched. 1973 New bottling plant installed at Cliff Brewery. 1977 Company taken over by Ellerman Shipping Group. 1979 Tolly Original launched 1983 Company sold to Barclay Brothers. 1989 Brent Walker buy Company. 1989 Cliff Brewery closes. 1990 Management buyout saves Cliff Brewery. 1991 Brewing starts again in Ipswich. 1992 Brewery tours start at Cliff Brewery. 2002 Ridley's acquire company and Cliff Brewery closes. In 1746 they founded their powerbase at the Cliff Brewery in Ipswich. Their brewing ambitions had started at Harwich and although it is now known that the operation at Harwich wasn't abandoned when the Cliff Brewery came on line it was a leap to a much larger scale and was used as the springboard to greater things. When we look at the Cliff Brewery now what we see is basically the brewery that was rebuilt and extended between 1894 and 1904. Large sections of the old brewery were demolished during this time and what original parts survived were pretty much erased during the 1904 expansion and adaptation. The brewery finally changed shape again in the 1990s when production moved away from the Victorian apparatus and into, effectively, a modern microbrewery out the back. This left the old building free for brewery tours and gave the economy the modern business required. Everything, of course, changed again in 2002 when the brewery finally closed and it remains today, in a virtually mothballed state, protected by its Grade II listed status but slowly decaying in a poor state, re-development would cost a lot. Moving back in time to 1746 it is easy to see why Thomas Cobbold set up where he did. He had been plagued by the troublesome water supply at Harwich for some time and although moving up-river disconnected him from some of his customers he could obtain good water and malt in Ipswich and use the Harwich operation as a staging post, this worked well, Ipswich was where the materials could easily get to, and Harwich was just down the river where it could be exported. In fact it is quite possible that the Cobbolds started off in Ipswich malting barley and decided to take over the Harwich Brewery - probably from George Rolfe - having previously supplied it with malt. Certainly there are stories of the Cobbolds supplying malt to brewers as far afield as London. Water transport was the only way this could happen so it is quite possible that having had good success at Harwich Thomas Cobbold decided to setup a new, larger brewery close to his maltings at Ipswich. Old Maltings at the Cliff Brewery The original Cliff Brewery was probably a good deal larger than the one at Harwich but we willmost likely never know its exact size. It is quite clear that, in common with many breweries, extensions and adaptations were added over the years until in the late 19th century the complex was not fit for purpose and the brewery simply had to be rebuilt after all the chopping and changing. The old brewery before the 1984 rebuild and part of the old building left standing after the rebuild That said the new brewery wasn't greatly larger, in terms of the ground it stood upon than the one it replaced. It was just that the old brewery had evolved bit-by-bit and the new one was designed to do exactly what it was supposed to do - brew beer in an age when the brewery process had been industrialised, it had adapted what it was to fit the modern demand and new products. To achieve that designs of the day made use of gravity - the so-called tower brewery - so the raw materials started at the top and made their way downwards, via the brewing process, to be matured and put in casks at the bottom. This method worked well and proved to be a more organised way of creating products to be sold. So over this two year period from 1894 to 1896 a new brewery replaced what occupied the site before but it was a staged process and was probably carried out by Cobbold's own local people and workforce. Certainly the driving force behind the design was William Bradford & Sons, the eminent London brewery architects but we know that parts of the old brewery were retained after the 1896 rebuild was complete so in some ways the organic expansion of the brewery simply gathered pace in the late Victorian period as opposed to there being a defining moment when a complete new brewery suddenly appeared and analysis of old maps and photographs that have been documented support this idea that it is true. The Cliff Brewery after 1904, OS Map from 1887 and OS Map from 1905 After this period of frenetic development it seems that the brewery underwent little change until it was closed in 1989. Of course equipment was modernised and adapted and capacity upped as the tied estate increased and the merger with Tollemache meant that beers once brewed at the brewery in Upper Brook Street now had to be brewed at Cliff Quay. After the management buyout, a lot of things changed and with no large tied estate to guarantee sales the capacity offered at the Cliff Brewery was too much. The decision was therefore made to build a new, smaller brewery in buildings on the site and the old plant turned into a museum. Thus tourists could be staring into the old mash tuns whilst beer was being sparged out the back in the new ones. It was an interesting decision and one that worked well, But not for long, many items remain with plaques and things set up for when the museum was still open, but in a poor state covered in pigeon defecation and thick dust. Unfortunately no business stands still and the 2002 merger with Ridley's meant that the Cliff Brewery was really surplus to requirements and cost the company more than it's worth. New rumours about potential redevelopment of the site quickly began to surface. The 1989 closure, however, had prompted Ipswich Borough Council to list the brewery building and its contents and the proximity of the Vopak Terminal mean that scope for redevelopment is very limited, hence why it is still derelict. Indeed the brewery buildings stand today pretty much as they were left in 2002 and 260 years after brewing started at the site and 100 years after the impressive Victorian expansion, the future for this imposing collection of buildings seems very uncertain as they are decaying slowly. To see them standing after 260 years is pretty impressive, but to see them in this state? I can't say they'd last too much longer. History thanks to a mix of many sites but this one in particular was very helpful and great for further reading: http://www.tollycobbold.co.uk/ Future The future is still very uncertain, ideas and plans have been revealed and have crumbled or just not gone ahead. One idea seems to look very good: Pigeon Investment Management wants to turn the former Tolly Cobbold site into a mixture of flats, businesses and leisure use. Part of the plan is to convert the listed building into an auditorium, commercial units and a museum space. Outline planning permission was granted by Ipswich Borough Council and Pigeon said it hopes to begin work next year. A proposal to turn the brewery building, which dates from the middle of the 18th Century, into 26 apartments and build a further 46 flats elsewhere on the site was turned down in 2004. The latest project includes 27 flats and a supermarket on the six acre (2.5 hectare) site. Clive Thompson, project co-ordinator, said: "It's very exciting as I've spent two years working on this project and we now have the support of the council to regenerate this part of the waterfront. "The brewery building will provide an auditorium with wonderful light through the lantern roof, commercial units similar to Snape Maltings and a museum space reflecting the brewing history of the building. The old Tolly Cobbold brewery in Ipswich Tolly Cobbold brewed beer on the site in Ipswich for more than 200 years "We can now beaver away to create detailed designs and consent for the prospective demand." Pigeon said it was in discussions with the Ipswich Transport Museum and Suffolk Record Office about possible moves to the site. Mike Cook, planning officer with the Ipswich Society preservation campaign group, said: "We're very pleased because the brewery building is leaking, it's on the buildings at-risk register and its contents have been ransacked apart from a valuable steam engine and copper vat which are still inside. "I think this scheme is sympathetic in the way it will combine the Victorian history of the docks with modern design. "It could become a real visitor hub if they can get all the attractions that they're talking to to move there." (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-suffolk-21701997) A quote from Pigeon Investment Management in that report. So that being said, I doubt the plans will go ahead, which is a real shame as the building is really nice and I suspect it'll be victim to one of those "arson" attacks. Then 2 days ago this popped up: http://www.ipswichstar.co.uk/news/gallery_do_you_remember_the_former_tolly_cobbold_brewery_share_your_memories_and_help_bring_ipswich_s_history_back_to_life_1_3845407 Now, project workers assisting with the redevelopment of the site, are looking for residents to share their memories, stories and pictures of the old brewery for a display, which will be on show at the orangery and stables next year. Charlotte Bethel, a Heritage Management student at University Campus Suffolk who is working on the project with Ipswich Borough Council, said: �This is about local history for local communities, and our aim is to bring information about the brewery to life with personal stories of people who worked at the Cobbold Brewery. �The project will be displayed at Holywells as part of the �3.5 million Parks for People Heritage Lottery Fund award.� Work to create an education space and visitor centre is ongoing, with contractors expected to be finished on-site in December, with the developments completed for an Easter opening next year. The Cobbold Brewery, which was located near the park from 1770 until 2002, was run by the Cobbold family, and became the Tolly Cobbold after a merger with the Tollemache family brewery in 1957. Anthony Cobbold, 79, from Devon, is a descendant of the Cobbold family from Elizabeth, the second wife of the original Thomas Cobbold, who founded the brewery, and has been involved with the heritage of the site. Mr Cobbold, founder and keeper of the Cobbold Family History Trust, said: �I have throughly enjoyed discovering my past, and it is certainly a great pride, I have loved every minute of it. �To me it is more than just the brewery, it�s a story of social history. What is so good about the Holywells project is it�s a place where we can display these bits of social history.� For those wishing to share their memories and pictures, the project team can be contacted on 01473 433 541, or by emailing holywells.hlf@ipswich.gov.uk. So who knows, maybe this will give them the kick up the arse they need to begin re-development! The present site The site as it stands now is in a very derelict condition. Floor boards are lowly rooting and you have to watch your step. Machinery has slowly begun to oxidise and rot. Stairs have either, already broken, or are slowly falling apart. A lot of equipment is left and there's a lot of labels, posters and mats that have been sat since closure of the short lived museum. I did notice a few needles, some from the testing equipment, and some that clearly weren't from the testing equipment and so I kept a wide birth away from them. Office equipment is still in situ but rotting slowly with the carpet I=on the floors slowly rising and bubbling. False ceilings slowly falling and the clear stench of rotting asbestos in some of the more modern extensions. Pigeon defecation, deceased pigeons and scrawny pigeon nests litter every surface on the upper levels and fern bushes are slowly growing up the walls in some rooms. Windows are smashed and there are gaping holes where old equipment has been removed. Partially open areas also show that some demolition has taken place, maybe older failed attempts to re-develop the site? Many of the fittings etc. have been stolen for obvious reasons and much of it is now slowly rotting. My explore I spent a while circling the place trying to gain access without success, then I found it and was kicking myself. I got really bored here if I'm honest, not much to see unless you like brewing. One bit that I did enjoy was going up the tower, nice views and cool breeze, had myself a drink up top as usual and wasn't to bad spending a little while up top. No security on the place as far as I could see, however there is a brewery tap next to the site so you can't really make much noise, but then why would you want to it's nice and peaceful up there. Hope you enjoy he pictures. Pictures My DSLR was being a pain that day, so in the end I gave up with it and used my phone. Didn't fancy continually unpacking ad re-packing my tripod. Standing in the same place for too long is a bit dodgy in there. A few externals, as you can see, externally the sites looks stunning Few from the brewery tap Partially demolished Doors Second floor storage Nice decaying paint in the "blue" room Bitter The "blue" room The next room with the mixers etc. Descending stairs Big mixer things Vandalism Slowly rotting beams Fire exit Looking through the decay and destruction Check list left on the window sill Mixer Nice old thing Acid Big empty room with the hatch To be continued...
  13. This had been somewhere I wanted to go since I set eyes on the first set of pics from it a few months back. Visited 2 weekends ago with Obscurity and Frosty. A little bit of History. The Berkshire Brewery opened its doors in 1979, and at the time was cutting edge with the technology and materials used. Right up until its closure it was still regarded as one of the most modern and efficient breweries in the UK, as most are significantly older than this place. Unfortunitely since the time of its opening, beer sales have steadily fallen meaning a brewery which was built to produce 6 million litres of beer was running at only half that capacity. On 12 February 2008, Scottish & Newcastle announced its intention to close its Berkshire Brewery Operations by early 2010. Fast forward 2 years, and the place closed its doors for the last time on 2 April 2010. It was a simple question of economics at the end of the day which forced the site to close, a brewery running at half capacity is just not economic to run, couple that with the higher than average wages for the berkshire area and it was obvious what its fate would be. If you like industrial sites full of pipes and big shiny metal things, then this place is like heaven for you. It's absolutely pristine on the inside which you would expect really given it's only been closed 5 months. It also has that smell that you only get in a brewery, which was just brilliant! Unfortunitely our visit was cut short after 40mins as we literally opened a door right as a security guard was going to open the same door from the other side. Totally bad luck and bugger all we could do except leg it out of there. Was a fun explore for the time we were there. And here our short but sweet explore of this place ended, just up the corridor from this plant room was where we got spotted. We know there's lots more to see, so we shall return at some point.
  14. The business that became Cliff Brewery was started in 1723 ( in Kings Quay Street, Harwich) by Thomas Cobbold and is believed to be the second oldest independent brewery in England. It stood above the quays of the River Orwell at Ipswich, since 1746. Cobbold merged with local rival, Tollemache Breweries in 1957 to form Tolly Cobbold. The brewery ceased operations in 2002, when the Tolly Cobbold company merged with Ridley's brewery. Gave this a shot as were were heading to Sevs, but had to wait for someone to finish work before we could go. The place is part demolished, but theres still plenty of gems, and cool bits to wander round. It's mostly a shell, but still a pretty cool place, and an easy in, so it was a nice start to the day. Visited with Sentinel, The_Raw, and 5PR1NK5. Be sure to check out their reports when they go up! I know they have some great photos! This was one of my favourite rooms because of the blue glass in the roof. It gave this awesome tint, but the light coming from the windows below was normal so it gave this very cool contrast. This is what I liked to call the pidgeon graveyard. Its a real shame that these birds get in, then can't find a way out. Most seemed to congregate in this room, and as such eventually die, either from flying into walls, or I guess starving. I counted at least 12 carcasses in here, and there were more around. This is personally my favourite shot from this site, and not one I had seen before.
  15. The History (nicked from basboyjoe and Boops....) The business that became Cliff Brewery was started in 1723 ( in Kings Quay Street, Harwich) by Thomas Cobbold and is believed to be the second oldest independent brewery in England. It stood above the quays of the River Orwell at Ipswich, since 1746. The Cobbolds have an important status in Ipswich as the family were landowners in the town and surrounding area. Christchurch Park was donated to "The people of Ipswich" by the family, along with many other donations of land such as Ipswich Racecourse. The family also provided several Members of Parliament for Ipswich over the years. In addition they have provided five chairmen of Ipswich Town Football Club, Lady Blanche Cobbold was President of the Club for many years, ITFC have even named part of a stand in their stadium and a prestigious member's club after the Cobbold family. Eventually Cobbold merged with local rival, Tollemache Breweries in 1957 to form Tolly Cobbold. The brewery ceased operations in 2002, when the Tolly Cobbold company merged with Ridley's brewery. The site has been abandoned ever since and is now in a pretty poor state no thanks to copper thieves and the effects of nature. The Explore A pleasant spot to visit if you're in the area, we went on the way to Sevs and it was a really relaxed couple of hours with some really interesting stuff to see. Nobody bothered with us on our visit although I've heard that isn't always the case so perhaps we just got lucky on the day. I particularly enjoyed looking through the bits and pieces such as beer bottle labels and documents, and it's amazing to think that some of the machinery may date back to as long as 250 years ago. I visited with Sentinel, bassboyjoe and 5PRINK5, been a while getting round to posting this so it's a couple of months old now, hope you enjoy... The Pics 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. Thanks for perusing....
  16. Founded in 1868; Stones Brewery went on to brew various beers on site until the 1999 closure after a takeover from Bass. On site Stones Bitter was brewed from 1948; an extremely popular tipple with the local steel workers. The drink availability expanded across the North of England in 1977 and was available nationwide from 1979. It became the highest selling Bitter in the UK by 1992. The Stones Brewery underwent a rebuild in 1962 so was only around 37 years old by the 1999 closure. Stones Owner Bass relocated production to Burton on Trent and Tadcaster and the brewery has sat ever since. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157644632054683/
  17. This is actually the second part of mine and Landie Man's trip up to the land of pies and gravy this weekend but the first part was much more video-oriented as you'll find out in due course hopefully. Again the trip up was a mixed bag with some disappointing fails, some interesting experiences like feeding tangy cheese Doritos to a pair of ducks in a car park and me taking an early foot bath at another of the locations and of course some great successes. Cannon Brewery in Sheffield has been done many many times before so I'll save the history and get on with some photos. It's bashed, trashed and semi-demolished but it's a place I've wanted to see for a while and it was a very enjoyable few hours, personally I find these sort of locations very photogenic. Lots more photos here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157644102866800/
  18. I loved it in here, it's a big old place with various buildings and lots of cool street art dotted around. I visited with Acid- Reflux a couple of weekends ago and we enjoyed some glorious sunshine despite initially fearing the worst. Demolition has begun inside one of the buildings but they haven't really scratched the surface yet so it's still well worth a visit. History (stolen from Und3rcover Genius): Stones Brewery (William Stones Ltd) was a regional brewery founded in 1868 by William Stones in Sheffield, West Riding of Yorkshire, and purchased by the Bass Brewery in 1968. After its closure in 1999 its major brand, Stones Bitter, has continued to be produced by the Molson Coors Brewing Company. Stones Bitter was brewed at the Cannon Brewery from 1948 and was popular with Sheffield's steel workers. Stones Bitter was originally available across the south of Yorkshire, Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, with distribution extended to the rest of the north of England in 1977, and nationwide from 1979, accompanied by a considerable marketing push. Increasing demand saw it also brewed at other Bass breweries from the 1970s onwards. The beer's popularity reached its apex in 1992 when it was the country's highest selling bitter, selling over a million barrels. The beer has been lauded in certain quarters as "one of Sheffield's most famous exports". Sadly, the declining demand for Stones Bitter has meant that this once bustling brewery has been stood empty for a decade and a half, and demolition work has started recently. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. Few more bits here Flickr: The_Raw's Photostream Thanks for looking
  19. Visited this location a while ago, still missed some small details so i will revisit this before demolition (i hope). Its an abandoned brewery, somewhere in Belgium. After they stopped brewing beer it was left to rot away. Its been used for airsoft for quite a while, but after a fatal accident is forbidden to enter the site. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5:
  20. Cains is a brewery in Liverpool, England, founded in 1858 by Robert Cain. The company, with its 200 pub estate, merged with Walkers of Warrington in 1921, with the brewery operation being taken over by Higsons in 1923. Boddingtons of Manchester took over in 1985, and shut it down in 1990. It was reopened by GB Breweries, who became part of Bryggerigruppen in 1991, and in 2002 was sold to Gardener-Shaw for £3.4 million. The Cains brewery was founded by Irish immigrant Robert Cain in 1858 when he was able to buy an established brewery. Cain had begun his brewing career aged 24 when he purchased a pub and brewed his own ales. Within 25 years of founding his brewery, Cain had established 200 pubs, including the Philharmonic Dining Rooms, the Vines and the Central Commercial Hotel, which are currently listed as being of architectural merit. His personal mansion had each window arch inscribed with his monogram. In 1887 construction began on a second brewery. In 1921, 14 years after Cain's death, the Cains brewery merged with Walkers of Warrington becoming Walker Cains. Then in 1923 the original Stanhope Street Brewery was sold to Higsons, who continued to brew Cains ales. In 1985, Higsons was bought by Boddingtons of Manchester. Five years later Boddingtons opted to concentrate on pub ownership and sold all its breweries to Whitbread, at which point the Stanhope Street site was closed. However, not wishing to see the Cains name die, the Danish Brewery Company reopened the site. The new Robert Cain & Co Ltd faced financial disaster in 2002, but was rescued by the Dusanj brothers — the first Asian owners of a British brewery. At the time it had a turnover of £30 million. A reverse takeover of AIM-listed pub operator Honeycombe Leisure plc was agreed by the company’s board in June 2007, giving Cains access to Honeycombe's 109 outlets and their stock market listing. The company was renamed Cains Beer Company PLC. On 7 August 2008 the company was placed in administration following problems caused by an unpaid tax bill. Negotiations with its bank failed to reach a conclusion that would have avoided administration. The brewery and eight original pubs have since bought back by the Dusanj brothers. Cains website > http://www.cains.co.uk/index/articles_view.php?article_id=45&main_cat=0&cat_id=46&first_art=true&logger_name=The%20Story NOW MOTHBALLED....... Robert Cain.. Can room.. Brew house.. Hops room.. thanks...
  21. UK cannon brewery sep 2013

    I know this has recently been done so ive taken a few different shots, I enjoyed this one a nice big place and your just left to wander freely, Ran into a couple of explorers here from 28 days. tried to convert them ha. Stones Brewery (William Stones Ltd) was a regional brewery founded in 1868 by William Stones in Sheffield, West Riding of Yorkshire, England and purchased by Bass Brewery in 1968. After its closure in 1999 its major brand, Stones Bitter, has continued to be produced by the Molson Coors Brewing Company. William Stones had started brewing in 1847 in Sheffield with Joseph Watts. Following Watts' death in 1854 Stones continued brewing by himself. In 1868 he purchased the lease of the Neepsend Brewery, and renamed it the Cannon Brewery, and he continued to brew there until his death in 1894. Stones' success saw him die as one of the richest men in Sheffield, although he lived a modest life. The company was taken over by Bass in 1968, then in 2000 Bass sold its brewing operations to the Belgian brewer Interbrew who were ordered by the Competition Commission to sell the Stones brand. In 2002, the brand was purchased by the American Coors Brewing Company, who merged to become Molson Coors in 2005 Stones Bitter was brewed at the Cannon Brewery from 1948 and was popular with Sheffield's steel workers. Stones Bitter was originally available across the south of Yorkshire, Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, with distribution extended to the rest of the north of England in 1977, and nationwide from 1979, accompanied by a considerable marketing push. Increasing demand saw it also brewed at other Bass breweries from the 1970s onwards. The beer's popularity reached its apex in 1992 when it was the country's highest selling bitter, selling over a million barrels.[2] The beer has been lauded in certain quarters as "one of Sheffield's most famous exports". After the Cannon's closure production was continued elsewhere. Keg Stones Bitter (3.7 per cent alcohol by volume) is brewed by Molson Coors at their brewery in Tadcaster, North Yorkshire and the canned product is brewed at their Burton upon Trent brewery. And finnaly somebodys bed :/ Thanks for looking.
  22. Me n da boi + beckypoo + jessington decided to hit this place up its rate good. Stones Brewery was a regional brewery founded in 1868 by William Stones of Sheffield. William Stones had started brewing in 1847 in Sheffield with Joseph Watts. Following Watts’ death in 1854 Stones continued brewing by himself. In 1868 he purchased the lease of the Neepsend Brewery, and renamed it the Cannon Brewery, and he continued to brew there until his death in 1894. The company was taken over by Bass in 1968, then in 2000 Bass sold its brewing operations to the Belgian brewer Interbrew. Shepherd, Green & Hatfield were the first to brew at the site in 1838 at what was then a respectable residential district. By 1895 the brewery was equipped with “an expensive plant…excellent stores and cellars, spacious covered and open yards, offices, stabling and workshops.The marketing and sales offices on the brewery site were completed in 1958. A new £500,000 five storey brewhouse was operational by 1962, and was one of the most up to date in the country. An on-site public house was opened in the basement of the brewery in 1964, initially named The Underground, but later renamed The Pig and Whistle; it was used by brewery workers and visitors to the brewery. At its peak the brewery produced 50,000 hectolitres of cask conditioned Stones each year. The office building was sold off in 1985. In 1992 a visitor’s centre building was opened. In 1995 the brewery was used as a shooting location for the film When Saturday Comes. It all finally closed in 1999 and now has become derelict and an area for local graffiti artists to show off their talent.
  23. Well this was actually the backup plan, after our failed revisit to Lancaster Moor. I had seen previous reports and thought it looked a nice little place, so off we went! Explored with TeeJF and Zero81, great company The History on this place is a little hard to come by, but a large part of the site was designed by W A Deighton in 1901. Deighton was a well-known brewery architect who was also responsible for the Grade II-listed Cook Street Brewery in Salford. Mitchell's were established in 1865. Mitchell's of Lancaster is a well established family owned pub and hotel company, operating seven individual, quality hotels and 55 traditional inns in North Lancashire and Cumbria. Established for over 140 years, the company was founded by William Mitchell and is now run by the founder's great-great-grandchildren. The story goes that a chance meeting with a friend provided the money William needed to build his own brewery. Once the brewery was built, William went on to build a number of large hotels and inns, strategically sited within the Lancaster and Morecambe area. The company no longer brews its own beer, but maintains the family traditions of running good quality establishments offering an excellent range of cask ales, fine wines and home-cooked food in comfortable surroundings. Well on with the show Well thanks for looking, and I hope you enjoyed
  24. 2013: Now totally demolished and part of a Tesco warehouse site. 2010: Quoted from a Derelict Places member This was a bit of cat and mouse with security! MY photos #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 Rooftop Service Tunnel #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 More at: http://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157624407098063/
  25. 2013: This was a good day out, and in the old Landie it was a trek! I'm not sure how this looks now, but in empty building terms, 4 years is an absolute ETERNITY and its probably knackered now. This was a lovely piece of abandonment and had a wonderful malty smell. 2009: Visited with Fraser (Layz) Mcmullen and sons opened up their brewery in Hertford in 1891. The site was expanded in 1984, with a modern “Brewhouse†built next to the current site. Mcmullens brew cask ales, and pasturised beer in bottles. McMullens produce three regular cask ales and several occasional ales. The regular range consists of Original AK, 3.7% abv 'McMullen's Cask ale' a new, hoppy ale launched 2006 Country, 4.3% The beers are advertised with the tagline 'from the whole hop brewery'. The New site over the road from the old site opened in 2006, making the old site obsolete. More at http://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157622814355542/
×