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Found 38 results

  1. hallo, this video is about abandoned swimming pool in Slovakia. It is my first (but not last - soon there will be more) so I hope you like it. Thank you.
  2. I've got a bit of a thing for theatres and cinemas and this one had been tightly sealed for many years and had the reputation of being a real tough nut to crack. When I heard there was a whiff of a chance I realised that I had to act quick if I was to get inside this rather special place. I'm certainly glad I made the effort! Here's a bit of history n' stuff - The ABC Cinema is Grade II listed. It rounds the corner of Lime Street and is one of the first historic buildings, still standing, that visitors see when leaving Lime Street Station. ABC acquired the building in 1930, known as The Forum, it opened a year later to become one of the finest cinemas of the era. The six storey exterior was designed by A. E. Shannon and its sleek portland stone has very little decoration other than motifs over the entrance. Despite this, the building remains a very distinct feature on Lime Street. The building is listed for its grand interior, which was later subdivided, which is said to remain one of designer William R. Glen's best cinemas. There's a news report from December 2016 reporting that the City Council had sold the building to Neptune Investments who say “The next major phase of Lime Street regeneration is now coming forward with the refurbishment and re-opening of the former ABC cinema building on the corner of Lime Street as a major new music and live entertainment venue for the city.” A planning application is due to be submitted shortly, with an aim of giving the city a venue of "international standing", that will see the former cinema converted to hold crowds of up to 1,500 for live performances in its famous auditorium, with complementary ancillary uses.
  3. This big complex closed down in 2006, with almost 3500 seats in 15 différents cinema room. Now it's a 21,515 square meters ghost town. The building is in poor condition. The business was managed by a Chinese billionaire. But he had some troubles with the justice and has few years in jail. Inside, the temperature was around 40 degrees. And unfortunately the cops caught us, before we visited the whole area.
  4. This one is quite a personal report for me. My mum remembers with fondness visiting the local cinema. During the 1940's and 50's before homes had TVs it wasn't just films that were shown - this is where you could see footage of the important news events of the day. For example she remembers school visits to see the Queens coronation and the celebration of Edmund Hillary conquering Everest. The Coliseum opened in 1931 with "Romance" starring Greta Garbo. It was partly art-deco style and seated 630. Its sound system was state of the art for its day and widely acknowledged as being perfect. Fast forward to 1983 and the management decided that it was no longer financially viable. However, the locals were not prepared to see their beloved picture house bite the dust so they clubbed together and it re-opened in 1984 and was mostly run by volunteers. 1,000 residents bought £50,000 worth of shares. Things seemed to be going well - in 1995 it hosted a European Premiere of First Knight starring Sean Connery and Richard Gere (although they didn't appear on the red carpet). Sadly despite all the efforts the venture couldn't carry on and the doors finally shut in January 2011. Worse news was to arrive 2014, when the group set up to save the cinema had its plans rejected by the Coliseum Shareholders, who voted to sell the property rather than grant a long-term lease to the Friends of The Coliseum. Once in the hands of the developers the game was up. I had been keeping an eye on the place for some time in the hope that I could have a sneaky mooch around inside. No such luck, I also asked for a permission visit but as there's no money in it for the developers this was ignored. So one day last February I happened to get speaking to the guy who was taking the seats out ready to be shipped to Sheffield. I was only able to take a few crap hurried shots in the dark auditorium. A couple of days later I had another look around the back and... BOOM.... an entry point! Perseverance had paid off in the nick of time. The photos you see were taken just a few days before demolition began. Almost one year on there's no apartments or redevelopment, just an empty space. The projectionists room A poignant reminder There were many quotes on the walls upstairs from classic films written by the projectionists over the years The lost property box I just wondered about all the people that would have gone up these stairs full of anticipation... Finally an exterior shot (not mine) taken during the good times. Some much older photos show it originally had a porch above the front steps and some 'embellishments' either side of the name. Well that's all folks - thanks for looking
  5. Opening in 1936 the Danilo Cinema had seating for 1,250 people and was the most luxurious available at the time. The cinema opened with a single screen and small stage, and the seating was split between two levels – stalls at ground level and and a circle balcony. The cinema was decorated in an Art Deco style with simple, modern lines throughout. A lot of thought had gone into the design and layout to ensure that all seats had a clear and uninterrupted view of the screen. In August 1973 the Danilo was re-opened as three screen cinema which later became the Cannon. The circle level became one large screen and the stalls split into a further two smaller screens. The proscenium arch of the original stage can still be seen behind the current screen, however the bottom half is now cast in concrete from the creation of the lower two screens. The cinema closed in 1993. The lower levels were converted and used as a bar called All Bar Sports from 1998 until 2004, unfortunately loosing the two smaller screens. The building has been out of use ever since and is now starting to suffer decay and water ingress. Visited with @SpiderMonkey 1. External 2. Main auditorium 3. Side view 4. Read of auditorium 5. View from back 6. Decaying seats 7. View from stage 8. Entrance to auditorium 9. Entranceway 10. The proscenium arch of the old state. The lower half was set in concrete during the creation of the lower two screens. 11. Rear of the cinema screen 12. Projector seats 13. No projectors left in the projector room 14. A Nevelector. Always a joy to shoot. 15. Entrance foyer 16. Steps from upper lobby 17. The upper lobby 18. Sports bar
  6. Opening in 1902, the Theatre Royal in Hyde was a replacement for an older theatre nearby of the same name. The theatre was built by S. Robinson and Sons of Hyde to the design of Campbell and Horsley of Manchester and could seat 1400 people. Two balconies curve round to meet the proscenium, the stage area was large and included a host of dressing rooms to one side. In 1914 a movable screen was added onto the stage to enable the theatre to operate as a part-time cinema. The popularity of live performances declined in the 1970s so the decision was made to convert the theatre to cinema-only use. In 1972 the main auditorium was used as a full-time cinema screen, with the stage area being converted into a second screen. The cinema closed in the 1990s when the London-based owners uncovered fraudulent activity taking place there. They considered the theatre a liability and the final film was shown in August 1993, despite being full. Visited with @SpiderMonkey
  7. The Explore Tried this one a few times with no luck at all so very happy to finally get inside! Quite a personal one for me this as it was were I watched my first movie at the cinema (Superman 4).. strangely the place doesn't look anything like I remember it, only the entrance area seemed familiar to me. The History 'Opened as the Forum Cinema on 16th May 1931 with Clifford Mollison in “Almost A Honeymoon”. It was designed by William R. Glen and Alfred Ernest Shennan for Associated British Cinemas(ABC) at a cost in excess of 200,000 pounds. A massive six-storey curved Portland stone facade remains a distinctive and highly prominent feature of Lime Street – one of Liverpools major thoroughfares. The foyer was lined with Italian marble. The auditorium, in a semi-Atmospheric style, depicted Venetian scenes, contains an amazing proscenium treatment consisting of a vast curved canopy over the arch and the side boxes. Indirect light light was a feature, except for a huge ‘sunburst’ light fitting above the balcony. A shallow stage was provided together with a Compton 3Manual/12Ranks organ on a lift in front of the stage, which was opened by organist Reginald Foort. Because of the relatively small width of the site the 1,835 capacity was achieved by having a huge circle containing 750 of the seats. It was re-named ABC from 17th February 1971 and due to its opulence and excellent location the cinema survived intact until 1982 when it was converted to a three screen operation by installing two mini-cinemas under the balcony seating 272 and 217 seats. From 1986 it had been re-named Cannon. It closed on 29th January 1998 with a special screening of Humphrey Bogart in “Casablanca”, when a special admission fee of 50p was charged. There were proposals to convert the building into a conference centre, but these stalled and the building has stood empty since closing. Proposals were put forward in late-2007 to convert it into a ‘boutique’ hotel and supper club, with plans going to Liverpool City Council in July 2008 and if permission was granted, work could start in late-2008. The building remained unused in April 2012. It is Grade II Listed building.'
  8. History; The Futurist was the 12th largest capacity theatre in the country being able to seat 2,155 people. It is a theatre and a cinema based in Scarborough, on the sea front of South Bay. Futurist closed in 2014 on the 6th of January due to the operator's lease expiring. The theatre was built in 1921 and remained the same until 1958 when the theatre was extended to allow live performers at the location. In the 1980's Scarborough Council took over the theatre and handed the lease to Apollo Leisure who then ran the theatre till 2002! In December 2002 the operator of the nearby cinema, Hollywood Plaza took over the theatre and refurbished it, installing new projectors and sounds systems. Until 2014 when it closed. Explore; Explored with @SpiderMonkey and @AndyK!. Whilst visiting for a weekend, we decided to go for an explore up North, which turned into 3. However, our first stop was Scarborough, early wake up call and a few hours trip we were there. After many look arounds for an easy access and trying to avoid the people in the flats next door and the homeless man sleeping just outside the main entrance we found access and we were in. This was a great explore, and even better when we found out the lights still worked after switching all the switches we could find. Unfortunatley I don't have many photo's due to my tripod being useless at the time. Stage. Seating Booth. Stand. B. Projector. Projectors. From the Top. E,D,C. One of those Generic " I'm a photographer" shots modelled by SpiderMonkey. Ad Board. Stage. Thanks for looking, ! JP.
  9. Built in 1921, the Futurist Theatre was a theatre and cinema in Scarborough, England. The large auditorium has a seating capacity of 2155 people – the twelfth largest in the UK. Originally opening as a cinema, the stage was extended in 1958 to allow live performances at the venue. The Beatles performed twice in 1963-4 and many other large shows were staged there. Then and now - how much nicer was that exterior before the cladding! The local council took over the theatre in the 1980s and leased the premises to Apollo Leisure until 2002. The lease was then taken over by the same owners of the nearby Hollywood Plaza cinema, who fully refurbished the theatre, installed new projectors, sound system and screen. By 2013 the theatre was struggling and the leaseholder pulled out. The council were unable to find another operator, forcing the Futurist to close in January 2014. Visited with SpiderMonkey and Jamie_P. The old exterior is still there, hidden behind the awful cladding.
  10. Crescent Cinema

    After visiting this place at least 4 or 5 times within a couple of weeks I managed to gather some footage from my camera to throw together a video, I didn't spent that much time editing as I am sure you can tell! The place was slightly different on our first visit alot of stuff had been moved around or been pikey'd by the time I recorded the footage! Cheers for watching
  11. i just felt left out so i googled images of a local burnt out cinema by me. here goes first attempt. hope it works lol.
  12. Explored with Raz, but i have revisited and met various others. I apologise in advance for the amount of photos but I LOVED this location. Background; The Crescent Cinema stands on the corner of Ropergate and Front Street and was designed by local architects Garside and Pennington. It opened on 2nd November 1926 and within the complex was the 2 tier, 1,190 seat cinema which had a fully equipped stage with associated dressing rooms for such plays as Dirty Dancing, and a cafe and a substantial dance hall which in its day hosted balls for the mayor. It was taken over by the Leeds based Star Cinemas chain in 1944, (as was the Alexandra Cinema in town) and as the popularity of cinemas waned the Alexandra Cinema was the property turned over to bingo in 1961 with films continuing at the Crescent Cinema. However when the Alexandra Cinema was sold off for redevelopment in 1971 Star sub-divided the Crescent Cinema forming a bingo hall in the former stalls and a new 412 cinema in the balcony that, like many of their cinemas, was renamed Studio 1. Further changes in ownership to the Cannon Group took place, bingo was superseded by snooker and the Cannon Cinema closed in 1993. It has not been used since although the snooker continues and a school of dance occupies the former ballroom. The old cinema is the upper tier of the grand film hall and is complete with full projector set and refraction mirror. The Explore; If i was to set the scene of our endevours well, it would start with something like this; "One dreery night, with the clouds covering the moon and the rain whistling in the cool wind. We approached the old oaken doors set back in the darkness of the alcove from the amber glow of the street lights..." But this is not a story. We arrived on a pleasant September evening with the sun just going down, after a stealthy entrance and a quick stoop i was instantly impressed by this place. Having been in ABC in Wakefield, I expected a pigeon shit filled, asbestos topped death trap half flooded in water that smells a lot like the swamp from Never Ending Story... However this was not the case and it is in fact filled with some of the coolest little gems ive ever seen. When myself and raz were first exploring this place we felt very very paranoid and im not entirely sure why. At every sound this old creeky building made we would stop dead still and hold our breath. In hindsight i wish id have been recording all the way round as it would have made for some hilairious and strangley fitting footage of us creeping round a derelict theatre to Benny Hill. At one point we made it into a tunnel system which we at first hoped to be the fabled "Market Run" but obviously its not as i am writing the report on the Cinema rather than still trying to find my way out after stumbling across the many beer cellers we know to be down there Over the last few days i must have spent around 4 hours just moving room to room taking it all in and really experimenting with light painting. I hope this stays in NP for some time as the minute it comes out into the public forums the local scroats will be in the rob the place blind and leave behind well... The ABC Theatre, Wakefield. Heres some of the finer areas Nice one of the dance hall to finish If you got this far, thanks for reading
  13. Evening kids, another one from a little belgium trip a couple months back, got to admit the photos i saw of this place made it look a lot better than it actually was if i honest, was a little bit underwhelming, the projector is super cool, (especially as it has a tiny bit of film in it!) and the place is weirdly photogenic in places but given its well in the middle of some sort of restoration the place just hasn't got much feeling left in it unfortunately, explore wise was a fairly average access, bit of a climb and a bit of duck and cover, not much really to say about the explore inside, anyone going in be careful on the stage holey shit its holey. The Cinema-Theatre Varia was built in 1913 and designed by architect E. Claes. Closed in 1986, the particular facade and roof structure were listed as historic monument in 1992. Renovation started end of 2004 but was recently cancelled by lack of funds (roof and windows was reinforced and sealed to prevent any further damage). aaaand a rather short, rather dark and dingey set of photogrpahics thanks for looking kids, play safe n take it sleazy
  14. This currently serves as a Gala bingo hall but it used to be a cinema and the upstairs is no longer in use. It doesn't really warrant a proper report so I thought I'd stick it in here. I went for a nose around with extreme_ironing one evening after someone tipped me off that they thought much of the place has been disused for years. We found our way up to the upper circle which is gathering dust and has some paint peeling off the walls in places and from there we found our way inside the projection room. A couple of old projectors that haven't moved for over 40 years were a nice find. There wasn't much else to be seen in all honesty but it's a spectacular building and a real shame to see it going to waste. There were only 2 people playing bingo in the entire place on a Friday night. We shouted bingo from the balcony for shits and giggles before we left, only to find ourselves locked in. This was followed swiftly by an embarrassing call to staff down below to come and let us out. Not Pro. The cinema opened on 7 September 1931, as one of the Granada chain, and screened movies sometimes with stage shows or organ recitals until it closed as a cinema on 10 November 1973. The seating capacity was over 3000, and was often completely sold-out. Stars such as Frank Sinatra, Danny Kaye, The Andrews Sisters and Carmen Miranda gave concerts there. After closing as a cinema the building reopened as a bingo hall. BINGO! Amazing architecture An old spotlight gathering dust Dusty seats with the odd broken one..... The lost projectors Natural light coming through from the auditorium The Hall of Mirrors Thanks for looking
  15. History The Futurist Cinema and Theatre, which can be found in Scarborough, was constructed and fully competed in 1921. Originally it functioned exclusively as a cinema, up until 1958 when its stage area was extended to provide live performances; Shirley Bassey, The Beatles and Ken Dodd were some of the notable acts. In later years, as the site expanded, it also absorbed the adjacent Arcadia Theatre and this was developed into a lounge area. By the 1980’s, Scarborough Borough Council assumed control of the venue and thereafter it was leased to Apollo Leisure Ltd. who ran it until 2002. In December 2002, Barrie C. Stead, the owner of Hollywood Plaza Cinema, bought the Futurist Theatre and refurbished it; installing new projectors, a CinemaScope screen and a DTS sound system. The Futurist, however, closed on 5th January 2014 because a report conducted by the local council suggested that the site was “beyond the point of refurbishmentâ€. The council is now marketing the entire site for redevelopment. Inside, the Futurist Theatre has a large auditorium with a deep circle, and it is supported on twelve individual columns. In addition to these features, there is also a raised gallery which is divided into separate boxes. The ceiling is divided into two sections which are split by a wide arch: the front part is original with an elliptical dome containing three ornamental ventilation grilles, while the second, which dates from 1968, is much more basic. Finally, there is a deep wide stage with a full tower and counterweight sets. In October 2014, the BBC reported that Flamingo Land placed a bid to purchase the Futurist Theatre. If successful, the developers intend to demolish the site to make way for a rollercoaster, botanical gardens and a magical cave-themed attraction. The proposed name for this new attraction is ‘Flamingo Land Coast’. Although campaigners have petitioned to save the 1920’s Futurist Theatre, no further decisions have been publically released. Our Version of Events It was 1am (ish) one random week day when we found ourselves inside a car travelling towards Scarborough. Up front, the conversation was rather philosophical (trying to fathom the nature of reality, and that sort of stuff), while those in the back were enjoying a quick bevvy. Outside though, the exhaust was beginning to fall off, and the temperature… Well, that was pretty chilly. Nevertheless, we managed to survive the conversation and, although the car began to emit sounds similar to those of a tank, the exhaust didn’t completely fall off. So, in the end we made it to Scarborough ready and eager to explore. After taking in a bit of good old sea air, a quick look around and fucking about on a roof for a while we managed to find our way inside. The air was immediately incredibly stale and there was a bit too much asbestos for my liking, and if you’re not careful in the dark you can easily fall through the ceiling, but we carried on, and, suddenly, we were inside an almost working theatre. For once, I mused, I could sit wherever I fancied, without the Odeon Ticket Inspector watching to ensure that I sit in the inferior chair I’ve been allocated; not the more sophisticated seating that’s always towards the rear of the auditorium. In fact, by my recollection, all of the seats were exactly the same, which to me seems like a reasonably equal way of organising things. That aside, on the whole the Futurist is absolutely huge, and it takes a long time to get around the whole building – when we eventually decided to leave the sun was already beginning to rise over the seafront. But, since all of the electrics work, finding your way around the cinema becomes more or less straightforward once you begin to gather your bearings. Explored with Ford Mayhem and Deems. 1: The projector 2: Cupboard in projector room 3: Other side of the projector 4: Smaller projector 5: Cream sherry 6: Standing in the upper gallery boxes 7: The main auditorium 8: Which seat is mine? 9: Light filter machine 10: Top boxes 11: Main corridor at the rear of the auditorium 12: Heading down the stairs 13: Just another row or two 14: The Secret Life of Walter Mitty 15: The decorative ceiling 16: Ice cream stand 17: The chiller room 18: Schweppes soda water 19: Bar area and Wizard of Oz cardboard advertisement 20: The single mysterious chair 21: Managerial office 22: Backstage machinery 23: Backstage pass 24: Side view of main auditorium 25: Planes 26: Leaflets in the bar 27: View from the rear of the auditorium 28: The backroom 29: The Futurist Theatre and Cinema
  16. Lovely art deco cinema tucked away in sunny south brum, this was the second time i tried this place, first time was a fail but its not too far from me so it was only a matter of time until it happened. pain in the bum of a place to light up, light comes tearing through the few windows that are in this place and makes for very uneven lighting, should really learn to layer different exposures but hey ho. bit of history The Royalty Cinema was opened on 20th October 1930 with Maurice Chevalier in "The Love Parade". It was built for and operated by the local independent Selly Oak Pictures Ltd. The Royalty Cinema was taken over by the Associated British Cinemas(ABC) chain in March 1935. ABC closed the cinema on 2nd November 1963 with Cliff Robertson in "P.T.109". It was converted into a Mecca Bingo Club, and in 2010 it is operating as a Gala Bingo Club. In the summer of 2011, the Royalty Cinema was designated a Grade II Listed building by English Heritage. n 2012 police raided the cinema and discovered that the attic was being used as a cannabis factory. 40 plants were found, together with 10-15 kilos of dried cannabis leaves. the royalty has been empty since the raid. picture time thanks for looking, have fun and stay safe kids.
  17. Carlton Cinema Hull

    Hi Guy, was just wondering if anybody has been to the cinema lately and if you would be able to get me a little help with access please or any information that would be helpfull. Thank you!
  18. Been eyeing this place up for ages but is it's in the middle of town & even at stupid o'clock that area is still full of club goers trying to make their way home :zombie:zombie .... Anyway popped out to get some milk the other day & spotted a much easier way, knew that i'd be kicking myself if i didn't use it before it gets sealed which has happened with other places & luckily had my exploring stuff with me (been back since & it has been sealed again). First solo explore in a while, apparently it's not the done thing but there's nothing like a solo explore in the dark to get your heart racing & make you feel ALIVE! Was a bit wary at first because of the easy access & i've been told that homeless people used to sleep here. Didn't get any good shots of the main screen as i heard a BANG when i was in there & nearly legged it, managed to 'man up' telling myself it probably came from outside but still didn't want to stay in that spot. Was pleasantly surprised to see some of the things i've seen in other peoples photos have remained in the exact same position And not a lot of vandalism, the building seems to be doing a good job of destroying itself with most of the damage caused by general decay. Had trouble lighting the place up with my sub standard 'army torch' so got a lot of dark photos & used the flash on some but i quite like some of the dark ones and it gives a good impression of how dark it was inside. History, Couldn't find a lot of history just a lot of stuff about a local action group wanting to restore the building to it's former glory, no offence to them but good luck with that... If i can find out anything else that's interesting/relevant i'll add it, If anyone else knows anything feel free to let me know... It opened in 1928 and only had one screen and a restaurant. By 1970 it had been renamed Odeon and the restaurant was turned into a second screen. There's also what looks like a nightclub called Clouds but the entrance was breezeblocked up (fucking breezeblocks again! ). The cinema closed in 1992 and the building has remained derelict since then. The site was bought by entrepreneur Simon Rigby in 2011, who has just bought Preston Guild Hall saving it from closure (which is disappointing, was looking forward to exploring the Guild Hall), but for some reason he's just left the cinema to rot for the past 3 years. Preston's filthiest hand dryer Had a look & think this is the first time it's been reported on OS woo!
  19. Old Odeon/Regal cinema, Colchester, Essex - October 2014 Intro This had been on my list for too long, unsure why as from what I could see, it was absolutely trashed and pretty much covered in faeces. But despite this I persevered and I'm glad I did. Despite it being trashed and a bit of a dump, it was pretty nice, loved the explore and it was definitely a long anticipated one! Been on my list for around a year. As always, pictures at the end, enjoy. History The old Odeon cinema was formerly the Regal cinema. It was designed by Cecil Masey, a well-known cinema architect, and built in 1931. It has a Spanish-style gabled front and originally had an 'atmospheric' interior and included a café, Wurlitzer organ, and full stage facilities, with flanking shops on the ground-floor frontage. It opened in February 1931, originally, with an Atmospheric style interior and seating 1,446, it was built for the local David Agar circuit. The designs by architect Cecil Masey also featured a café, and it was equipped with a Wurlitzer 2Manual/5Ranks organ and full stage facilities. Taken over by the County Cinemas chain in March 1935, they were taken over by the Oscar Deutsch chain of Odeon Theatres Ltd. in 1938. The Regal cinema was closed in 1944, when it was damaged by a fire, and it remained closed for three months while repairs were carried out. It was renamed 'Odeon' in September 1961. The building was extensively remodelled in 1964; 10 years later the interior was completely reconstructed to provide three screens, and it became the Odeon film centre; a fourth screen was added in 1987 and two more in 1991 when alterations to the building gave a 30 per cent increase in seating capacity. The old dressing rooms were used as a base for Hospital Radio Colchester from 1975 to 1990. In 1992 the Odeon was the only cinema in Colchester. Later, three additional screens were added, bringing the total to six. The cinema then closed on Sunday, October 13, 2002 when Odeon relocated to a new purpose built 8-screen multiplex nearby in Head Street. Live performances were presented at the Regal/Odeon as well as films - for example, on the 8th September 1964, the Rolling Stones played two concerts here! The interior was subdivided in 1974 and the cinema closed in 2002. Now empty, the building was put up for sale in March 2012 ('... Colchester's former Odeon cinema is up for sale with a price tag of £1.5 million ...', 6th March, Essex County Standard). James Bettley, an architectural historian, describes it as 'A distinctive building and an increasingly rare survival'. The old cinema is referred to in the prestigious architectural guide 'The buildings of England: Essex', written by Niklaus Pevsner in 1954 and updated by James Bettley in 2007. Cecil A Masey LRIBA (1880-1960) designed a large number of cinemas in England and was also joint architect in 1937, with famous architect Sir Edwin Lutyens, of the iconic National Theatre on the South Bank in London. He also designed the Phoenix Theatre in London. The building plans of the old Odeon cinema are held by the Essex Record Office in Chelmsford; they were produced by Masey for D Ager and others (owners), in association with builders W. Chambers and Son and Pitchers Construction Co. Ltd. The old Odeon cinema in Colchester has a well-documented history, with a section in 'On Screen Colchester: The Story of Colchester's Cinemas'. There is a film documentary, c 1930, of the building of the Colchester Regal cinema, held by the East Anglian Film Archive: http://www.eafa.org.uk/catalogue/212013 There is also some footage of Crouch Street, including the cinema, taken in 1961: http://www.eafa.org.uk/catalogue/212940 The cinema's Wurlitzer organ (Opus 1840) survives and its story is posted at http://www.theatreorgans.co.uk/featu.../Opus1840.html - made in 1928 in the US, it was installed in the Regal in 1931 and stayed there until 1963. The cinema played a significant role in people's lives before television. It is possible that more people went into the old Odeon than any other building in the town. Eric Rudsdale, the wartime diarist of Colchester, recorded his visit to the Regal; also see the personal recollections in 'New Regal brought welcome boost to the building industry' - http://www.gazette-news.co.uk/news/l...al_brought_wel... and 'A Young Boy's War in Addlestone and Ardleigh' by h albion, part of the BBC's WW2 People's War project, at http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ww2peop...a2045503.shtml http://www.colchesterhistoricbuildin...ldings_gallery Theatres trust archives: http://www.theatrestrust.org.uk/reso...eon-colchester Present Apart from the obvious muck, dirty and scummy rotting boards that have plastered the front façade, the only concern or two I'd have is the damp and maybe the cracks, it doesn't look like it's subsidence as such (at least I hope not) but it's very crumbly and you can see the crack relatively clearly. Although this probably just the damp having it's affect on the external walls. Inside it's relatively similar, from what I can gather the original 1930's ceiling has decayed more and a gaping whole has surfaced towards the front. The wooden boards are surprisingly strong and don't seem to have rotten as much as you'd expect, the lower levels haven't flooded and the only major let downs were the lack of seats and all the rubbish on both, the outside, and in the screens. Rubbish as in, decaying pigeon and pigeon poo, cider bottles and prams. As far as I could see, the only graffiti is around the front, on the windows. A building still possible to renovate, but I assume the cost would be phenomenal. Especially if they have to first secure £1.5 Million to buy the place before work even starts. Future The future of this once thriving building has remained uncertain for some time. The owner had bought the site a while ago and submitted plans to convert it into a night club in 2008 (what an original idea! ), he was then refused the application and begun looking at options of demolition and re-development into housing. (http://www.gazette-news.co.uk/news/9..._pull_it_down/) COLCHESTER’S former Odeon cinema is likely to be demolished and the site redeveloped. Steve Peri, owner of the rundown Crouch Street building says he has abandoned plans to convert the old building into a giant nightclub. Instead he is considering other options, such as building shops and homes on the site. The entrepreneur says with local clubs such as Route closing because of dwindling trade, he no longer feels a large nightclub would be viable. He explained: “To make the Odeon cinema into a nightclub, as it is, is not worth it. “We’re looking at other projects at the moment – maybe putting flats there or knocking it down, or maybe putting a bar and nightclub there, but not a superclub with a restaurant. “It’s going to cost quite a bit. We’re talking probably about 25 to 30 flats and retail units, plus underground parking. “We’re working on it at the moment and hope by the summer we can come up with a decision.†The cinema opened in 1931 and is not a listed building, though it is on Colchester Council’s local list of notable buildings. Its fabric has gradually deteriorated since it closed as a cinema in 2002. Steve Levy, of Victor Hawkins Jewellers, said he would be happy to see the cinema go. He felt Colchester Council should have taken action to keep it in better shape. Then, in October 2013, plans were submitted to re-develop the site, demolishing all of it, including the front façade. The facade of the building is set to be demolished and a new one re-built, albeit identical (we assume to allowed large construction vehicles through to the site). Its heart will be removed and replaced by a large imposing glass windowed building that will dominate the skyline of Colchester. This will not be in keeping with the local archecture of Britain’s oldest recorded town. Locals opposed the pans and began a petition: http://www.change.org/p/help-us-save...rom-demolition http://www.gazette-news.co.uk/news/1...for_old_Odeon/ A NEW vision for Colchester's old Odeon cinema site has been revealed by developers. Plans to build a hotel and apartment complex have been radically altered. Revised plans have ditched the hotel element and set the luxury apartments away from Crouch Street around a courtyard. The Art Deco façade of the former cinema will be kept and restored, and developers say once planning permission work can begin immediately. A few articles have been posted in attempt to convince the locals it will help the community: http://www.gazette-news.co.uk/news/1...Crouch_Street/ http://www.chelmsfordweeklynews.co.u..._oasis/?ref=mr What is supposed to be happening with the site: As far as I can tell, Colchester council have yet to confirm the plans, and were supposed to decide in November. My visit I'd read the past reports for about a year, so I was studying them to see what I could do different, how I could get in, and how I could find myself around. A mate wanted to come along with me again for some time and I suggested this after he saw a few pics from the ABC cinema in Southend, ever since then I've wanted to get into another cinema, and this one was the one I desperately wanted to say I had done before it's finally gone. Access was thoroughly enjoyable, I'm not sure why, but it was pretty easy and just relaxed. Externally, it looks quite aged and very derelict, but is very characteristic. We had a bit of a look around first of all, found our way in and had a very relax explore (apart from the pigeons of course, but it's a derelict cinema, there will be pigeons), enjoyed spying on the public in Crouch St as they wandered past oblivious. Wandered round a bit more, then headed it. Pictures This hadn't been reported since 2012 I believe, and thought, for those that went, it might be nice to see it again. I tried to get different pictures, or similar pictures but maybe with different lighting, just to try and get something different I suppose! I hope you enjoy, my camera was messing me about and I was getting rather annoyed with it. I don't know what's wrong with it, but it's annoying as. Externals Cheers
  20. Visiting an old cinema

    Few days ago I had the opportunity to visit an old abandoned cinema. The video is in spanish, if somebody has a question, ask! Enjoy!
  21. This Grade II listed building operated as a cinema from 1932 until 1976, and a Gala bingo hall from 1991 until 2010 since when it has been abandoned. All the seats are gone and the entire ground floor has been reduced to rubble for works which seem to have been discontinued. However you still get a sense of grandeur inside and one of the old projectors has been left behind. I only really photographed the auditorium and the projection room but there are heaps more little rooms and corridors to explore. Visited with Sentinel & Extreme Ironing, who didn't scare the shit out of me by shouting from the stage with a worker's torch when I was in the projection room. Pretty cool place that was way better than any of us were expecting and a relaxed wander about Projection Room Old projector Old seating area lit up with worker's lights which Sentinel found the switch for We found a box of these old chemical fire extinguisher charges downstairs.... Rubble on the ground floor... What’s left of the original entrance Thanks for looking
  22. Greetings OS, me again. Just got back from an ace tour with AndyK, Kriegaffe and a non-member. We also met up with Vals Darkroom for the weekend (Nice to meet you ) We visited some sweet locations and although this one has been a bit trashed it's still a nice place with a fair bit to offer Not a lot of history here but it seems as though this theatre was part of a complex of leisure facilities as there are a few other bits connected to it like a gym which has been bricked off from the theatre now.Enjoy: Cheers
  23. Hey again! Visited this one with Goldie, feel really lucky to have done it at this time because many people soon after found it sealed and completely inaccessible. Beauty of a place but at the same time a death trap.. Dry rot central! Only certain areas i could get to to take photos for fear of falling through the floor, doesn't seem long until it fully collapses! History 'n' bits: The Theatre opened on Monday the 29th of October 1894 with a variety show and could originally seat 1,935 people. In 1909, it was taken over by James Pringle and films were then part of the programme. The auditorium was reconstructed in 1911, to the plans of noted theatre architect Bertie Crewe and seating increased to 1,808. Re-opening on 11th September 1911, it then remained the leading theatre in Burnley until 1930. The Empire Theatre was closed in June 1955, but reopened under the independent Buxton Cinemas chain in December 1955. Sold to the Star Cinemas chain in December 1958, it became a bingo club in the mid-1960’s, when the bingo operation was transfered from the nearby Palace-Hippodrome Theatre. The Empire Theatre was designated a Grade II Listed building by English Heritage in 1996. In 2011, the building still stands unused. The future of one of Burnley’s most historic theatres is under threat after falling into a “dangerous†state. The former Empire Theatre in St James’s Street needs urgent repair work carrying out on the crumbling Victorian structure. Council officials have erected safety fencing around the Grade II listed building which has been named in the Theatre Trust’s top 10 at risk theatres in Britain since 2006. The “unknown†owners have been issued with a court summons over the condition of the property which officials papers said was “dangerous and requiring part demolition and works to ensure safety.†Sadly not many shots here.. will probably add some when i have time! Thanks for looking.
  24. This was a great fun place to explore, due to the nature of the place it's easy to turn into a big kid once inside. I visited at night with a couple of 28DL members juicerail and sentinel, we had a proper good giggle throughout and I promptly went back for some daytime shots on the roof the following day. There are two floors of bowling alleys to explore complete with stray bowling balls all over the place, unfortunately there's no skittles to aim at but it's easy enough to pretend. One of the bowling levels is covered in trash from illegal raves and squatters in years gone by but the other one is fairly clean in comparison, both have large bar areas and various adjoining rooms with all sorts of bowling paraphernalia to be found. Upstairs there is a maze-like laser quest level with fluorescent gun toting robots painted all over the walls and from here you can make your way up onto the roof. The roof is about as high as anywhere in Streatham so there's a decent enough view from up there and there's even a higher section at the back of the complex if you can be bothered although the view is less interesting from up there. The loft is accessible from one of the stairwells and was one of the highlights for me. You can walk above pretty much every inch of the old cinema's ceiling via a network of wooden walkways once used for maintenance. It's not the cleanest of places as the pigeons have been in here for a while but it's worth a good look in my opinion. History (ripped from juicerail's report): Streatham MegaBowl was formerly the Gaumont Palace cinema and opened in March 1932. Gaumont was a chain of cinemas which never really made it and was bought by Odeon. In July 1944 it was damaged by a German V1 rocket. In 1961 it closed as a cinema and the interior was reconstructed into bowling alleys over two levels, opening as the largest in Europe in January 1962. As a cinema it was not missed. There were others close by and the interior was described as having acoustic problems and echoes. A Lazer Quest was added at an upper level in later years before the whole place closed in early 2008. Since then there have been talks of redevelopment, but little has been confirmed. Here are my shots: Front of Building Bowling Lanes Credit goes to juicerail for taking this action shot One of the Bar areas Bowling shoe graveyard Application forms Employee Record, £120 for a week's work.... The Safe Daily Express from 1969 Ghostly Doors The Laser Quest level Laser Gun holsters What is 'unauthorised personnel'? The Hidden Room The Loft The Rooftop, both lower and upper levels Credit to Sentinel for taking this one in some pretty dreary weather conditions! You're welcome! Thanks for looking

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