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Found 114 results

  1. I visited the chocolate factory already more than four years ago. Inside it was partly very dark - much darker than it looks in the photos. The plaster had fallen from the ceiling; a gray damp mud lay on the floor and stuck stubbornly to the shoes. After the owner died, the factory was closed over 20 years ago. The widow of the manufacturer still lives in a dilapidated house next to the factory. In the past years, the condition has worsened a lot. Meanwhile, the roof of the former factory has almost completely collapsed. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
  2. A abandoned mine in Czech... 2 visit's 1. The Moos Factory 01 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 2. The Moos Factory 02 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 3. The Moos Factory 03 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 4. The Moos Factory 04 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 5. The Moos Factory 05 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr revisit: 6. The Moos Factory revisit 01 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 7. The Moos Factory revisit 02 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 8. The Moos Factory revisit 03 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 9. The Moos Factory revisit 04 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 10. The Moos Factory revisit 05 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 11. The Moos Factory revisit 06 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 12. The Moos Factory revisit 07 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr
  3. Hey Guys Thought I would share a video from an outing to Redhill, Enjoy!
  4. Spain URBEX in 360º

    Hi mates! I wolud like to share with you the visit I made to an abandoned coal factory with my new camera, a Samsung Gear 360. Hope you enjoy.
  5. This former slate factory started in 1897. In 1995 the factory was closed and it's still abandoned. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.
  6. I had a few days off last month so decided to go to Dyson. As you can see it was quite foggy which made the whole thing feel pretty creepy, solo explore as well. lotta fun. I will be doing a revisit at some point and hopefully with a drone The building, in Sheffield, closed its doors in 2006 and since then the gutted remains have been left to rust. The Dyson Group, founded by John Dyson, opened their first factory in Sheffield in 1834 at the tail end of the Industrial Revolution, before later moving to this site. Using new software to edit videos so should be a big improvement in quality!
  7. Good day mates! I have some new material for you. Some weeks ago we visited the factory that made fireproof bricks. The history of this factory started after the war but the factory grew more and more. The production process stopped in April 2015. Now the factory still has guards and a lot of equipment inside. The factory is gigant, so be prepared for a lot of photos. That's all, thanks for watching!
  8. Explored with @plod and a 28DL member. There wasn't much to the first few rooms we explored apart from tonnes of christmas trees & graffiti so I wasn't too sure about the place upon first impressions, but the main factory bit was quite interesting and very colourful. Some of the machinery and tiles were still there which I was surprised about given how far gone the place is now. Some of the smaller buildings had also been badly burned, I fell halfway through one of the floors but managed to save myself on a plank of wood I couldn't actually find any history of this place sadly, apart from the obvious stuff. 1
  9. The History Typhoo Tea Factory, founded by John Summer in 1903, was known as one of Birmingham's most prominent landmarks. The factory was used for tea production from the 1930's, surviving bombing by the Luftwaffe in WW2. Typhoo merged with Schweppes in 1968 and the following year merged with Cadbury to form Cadbury Scweppes. The factory eventually closed in 1978. The site, which is currently being used as a 148-space pay and display car park, has been granted planning permission as part of a £14 million project to be turned into a university campus for Birmingham City University. The Explore So after months and months of constantly checking this place, access finally popped up during a Birmingham trip with @plod and some other users from 28. We started the day off with the usual quote of "lets check typhoo again even though we won't get in", followed by our customary perimeter check for access and another visit to the boiler room, and surprisingly we managed to find an access point which had evidently come up fairly recently so our timing was spot on there. We spent a good 3 or 4 hours exploring the tea factory as well as S Rose & Co; there was a lot to look around (and we did get lost a few times, we had more trouble finding our way out than trying to find a way in!) although sadly nothing much was left there which was a bit disappointing as nobody would have guessed what it was by looking at the place, but it was still definitely worth the trip. Despite the failures it was a pretty successful day.
  10. History John Heath established his stationery business in 1852, delivering office products around the Birmingham area and later into other parts of the country. Kingfield Heath was formed in October 1999 by the acquisition of John Heath and Co, the oldest office products wholesaler in the UK, by Kingfield Wholesale Office Supplies. The Explore I've done this building a few times before, there isn't much left of it but there is still evidence of what it used to be- such as old VHS tapes and documents. Being in Digbeth it is extremely dodgy and has been turned into a drugs den (we did bump into a group of druggies on one visit there).
  11. Hi guys, this is my first post on this forum. My friend and I have been vlogging our urban exploration adventures and there has been a hugely positive response. Here is our vlog from our trip to Edingham Munitions Factory in Scotland. As a result we decided to expand and create a website and a number of new features. One being a blog. Here is a blog on our most recent trip to Edingham Munitions Military Factory in Scotland. https://offlimitsexploration.wordpress.com/2016/07/03/edingham-munitions-factory/ Enjoy!
  12. The old factory building (built 1906 – 1908) has a rich history. The original chocolate factory functioned as a temporary base for the American, German and Belgian army during the two World Wars. After World War II the factory was assigned a new goal, from then on it was used for the production of tin. Nowadays it's being restored in appartments. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8
  13. I visited this with Obscurity and a couple of non-members about a year ago. Well, they were next door. Apologies for it being so out of date but I only just got round to looking through my pics. The great thing about this place was the fact that we turned up to see a house called Villa Directeur and had no idea this factory (just 20 metres away from the villa) was abandoned as well. The other two in our group decided to stay in the villa re-arranging chairs and shit so they could get their 1 epic HDR shot (sorry guys but it’s fucking true!) while me and obs ran around in here finding all sorts. I know nothing about it other than it was an aluminium anodising factory which probably closed in Feb 2014 judging by the calendar next to the work station. "Anodising is an electrolytic passivation process used to increase the thickness of the natural oxide layer on the surface of metal parts. The process is called anodising because the part to be treated forms the anode electrode of an electrical circuit. Anodising increases resistance to corrosion and wear, and provides better adhesion for paint primers and glues than does bare metal." We only had about 20 or 30 minutes in here so the pictures are a bit shit, all hand helds but hopefully good enough to give you an idea of what was left behind. It was very much as though the whole company left without taking anything with them. Thought I’d share this for anyone who may have villa directeur on their map as it’s well worth a look if you’re passing. It was a year ago however so things may have changed now. 1. 2. 3. 4. 'Do not the cross the red line with the vehicle' or something like that 5. 6. A couple of small laboratories full of chemicals 7. 8. Changing room 9. Here's where it got pretty interesting 10. 11. 12. 13. Work station 14. 15. 16. A couple of offices full of stuff 17. 18. A former resident of Villa Directeur now lives in the factory 19. Here's a few shots of Villa Directeur 20. Most of the house had been trashed except this entrance all 21. The floor was a bit dirty when we turned up.... 22. However when me and obs got back from the factory the others had swept up and made everything look neat! Warning: Many chairs got moved in the making of these next 2 photos 23. The floor in here (and the rest of the house) was covered in fire extinguisher powder. It was clearly a nice house at one time but the factory was far more interesting for me, I could've easily spent a few hours in there. Thanks for looking ya smelly fuckers
  14. Belgium Rusty & Dusty

    Once in a while, I get actually excited about industrial locations, not that often to be honest but still. This was one of those moments, they even started demolishing parts of it, but still I thought it was worth a visit when the workmen had a day off. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.
  15. Textile factory

    Visiting an old and abandoned factory that whas founded by my great great grandfather.
  16. The Explore As far as the history goes this is still one of my all time favourite explores this.. to walk around a building were one of the most important inventions in the world happened was quite special.. unfortunately though the place is pretty trashed nowadays but a big varied site none the less. The History The Engineering site at Whetstone, near Leicester was opened in 1941 as a facility to engineer and test early Jet engines. The site was initially setup by jet engine inventor Frank Whittle's company Power Jets ltd. Their workshops produced a number of experimental jet engines. However In 1944 Power Jets was Nationalized and Frank whittle left the company in protest at his lack of control. Within two years the decision was taken to centralize research and new facilities were built at the National Gas Turbine establishment in Farnborough. The Whetstone site then passed into the control of the General Electric Company. By the late 1940s it became an important centre for the rapidly growing nuclear industry. The Atomic Power Division produced specialist components, prefabricated parts and control systems for the early nuclear industry. Research was at the cutting edge and The work carried out at whetstone fed into the program that created the worlds first commercial scale nuclear reactor. It went on to play an important role in the construction and development of the Magnox Reactors. Computer research was also an important part of the work conducted at Whetstone. In the late 1950's the site had two Early DEUCE computers. These were used for the calculation of engineering problems, conducting projections and simulations. As well as Writing programs for use in nuclear controls and further research into early computer science. Not a nice sign to stumble upon in the basement... These things went about 50ft into the ground, no idea what they were for and the bottom of them were flooded so couldn't get right down
  17. Tyre factory, Oct 2015

    Hi! One more report from Serbia for you! Today from abandoned tyre factory. It's still guarded but the owner of the factory doesn't care of buildings. In the end of this year by project there will be a mall. That's all for today but not for Serbia:)
  18. Hi! Some days ago I went back from Serbia. I didn't find here any repopts from that country, so I'll give you some information about abandoned places from there. The first place is the best maybe from the whole trip. It's an abandoned foundry. One part of it is easy to pass and not so interesting, another one is guarded. We were just about to enter when a guard noticed us. But he was friendly and after understanding that we are not gypsies let us pass. Echo of Soviet Jugoslavia. It was getting dark. After three hours inside we found a small door that led... to another part of the foundry, that was equal in size with that we were exploring! Such huge and nice place! Thank you for attention!
  19. After a nice long drive we finally found this place. History - The factory itself was owned by Sir Frank Whittle, who was born on the 1st of June 1907 and died in august 9 1996. he was a royal air force officer who was accredited for single handily inventing the turbojet engine, although the first actually working engines weren't invented until some years later. Frank had a long career in the RAF and through work related stress issues had mental breakdowns and eventually retire and received a knighthood and going to work for shells oil company as a engineering specialist. he later immigrated to the USA and in 1976 he accepted a position as a NAVAIR research professor of the naval academy. in 2002 he was nominated as the 42nd greatest Briton which after reading about him I would say I agree with. The company itself was founded on January 27th 1936. over the years the company moved to several locations in the uk and on march 28th 1944 frank Whittle was persuaded by the air ministry to nationalise the company and become Power Jets LTD. after the second world war the company was merged with the Turbine Division of the royal aircraft establishment to form the royal gas turbine establishment.
  20. Small burned down factory , not much to see only 3 pics and when I got there I was very disappointed because of the stupid stupid stupid staging. I took my pics but not pleased at all ... Also very boring location Abandoned Factory by Vancolen Kevin, on Flickr Abandoned Factory by Vancolen Kevin, on Flickr Abandoned Factory by Vancolen Kevin, on Flickr
  21. A bit of History: The plant started operating in 1855 and employed over 2000 workers at the hight of its trade. It has had other names over the years but Croda being the most commonly known in recent times. The plant unfortunately closed in 2009, which did cause over 100 staff to loose their jobs, but they very kindly spent £40 million on turning this danger hazard into a playground for us adventurers! The Explore: This one was explored with Raz and Fat Panda.. As we arrived, true to their nature, we had council workers opposite our entrance just wasting air as they sat there motionless in their van. We took a wander around the site and managed to find our way in after having a lovely chat with one of the local scum bags who just could not understand why we weren't going in to steal anything... Anyway after creeping around a little we came to the conclusion there was no secca onsite. Now with freedom to explore we wandered freely. Unfortunately I could not make it up the towers as my jelly legs would not allow me to but all in all it was a fun explore. This is the first report I have uploaded so any pointers would be great Thanks for looking this far
  22. I like many kinds of abandoned locations - churches, schools, hospitals - all the usual stuff. However nothing gets me going quite like abandoned industry, so when I was confronted with the old Wrigley's Gum factory I pretty much had a happy trouser accident - a simply enormous monolith of a factory spread over nine sprawling floors. Not having seen any photos of the place before I didn't know what to expect, and once inside I was in my element. I spent a large amount of time wandering around the huge place on my own, away from the other six in our group. Way more than I normally explore with and they were busy getting in everyone's shots (hence the reason we tagged the weekend the 'you're in my shot tour') so I quite enjoyed the peace and quiet and taking it at my own pace. Come to think of it, I explored a lot of the locations on my trip over on my own away from the groups I was with and I have to say it did wonders for my confidence. The old Wrigley's factory closed in 2003 when the brand new factory was built and opened nearby. It sits on a huge parcel of land and has had a 'sold' sign outside it for a while now but nothing has been done. It is also notable as by far and away the nicest smelling explore I have ever done - the majority of the factory has a very strong odour of Spearmint, and congealed on the floors are big pools of glucose and other raw gum making materials, which makes some floors incredibly sticky and other floors almost spongey. I loved this place, it's right up there with my favourite factories I have explored. I could of quite happily spent the entire day in there but we had other places to be. Thanks for looking, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/albums/72157659554640111
  23. Abandoned Pottery Factory - Sept 2015

    During our latest trip to France we visited an old factory where pottery etc were made. Although the place is abandoned for a while and most of the factory is empty, one building is (in urbex terms) well preserved. The combination of wood, sunlight, beautiful rooms and left pottery made this one of my favorite locations.
  24. Italy Knitwear Factory - 2015

    For me this place is the most beautiful lost place i have ever seen. I was speechless, and i really wished i could spend more time here. It is absolutely amazing :-)
  25. Hi everybody, This is my first thread on this forum so I hope you will like it! Visit this old factory/storage room a couple of months ago. It was not very easy to get in, little lucky that there was only 1 door still open, all others where locked or sealed with bricks. Here are some pictures: |1| |2| |3| |4| |5| |6| |7| Thanks for watching!
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