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Found 64 results

  1. 2 part visit interesting place just a shame about the severe flooding,sorry about the picture quality she is a bit old Between 1889 and 1903 13 Mobilisation Centres were built as part of the London Defence Scheme. Their main function was as a store for guns, small arms ammunition, tools and other equipment required for the batteries and infantry. The North Weald Redoubt was the first of the mobilisation centres to be constructed and the only centre north of the Thames. It is situated on high ground to the south of North Weald Bassett. The fort is semicircular in shape approximately 500 feet across. In the ditch at the foot of the fort was an 8 foot high unclimbable or Dacoit steel fence. In an arc formation, were three magazines for cartridges and shells, with shafts to supply the guns above. There are four buildings situated infront of the fort,which were used as ongar radio now wrecked and falling apart hope i posted the link correct
  2. UK South & North Casemates, May 2012

    After a quick text to Wevsky one bright sunny Saturday morning Dover bound we went, Was a really laid back easy going visit the place is so quiet its eery ! History, a bit scarce to say the least but heres what little I could find; During a new fear of invasion from Napoleon III two new dry moats where added to the existing citadel defences. The northern and the southern moat both had their own casemates built. Between these there was also a defensive caponier built, but sadly this was filled in during the 1960's by the Dover Corporation and they gradually destroyed many parts of the Western Heights. The northern casemates are a lot larger than the southern casemates, with six separate rooms whereas the southern casemates had eight. So here goes with a few of my Pics taken on the Day, Difficult choosing them as this place is expansive to say the least and I took a fair few Sorry about the sheer amount of pics, I took hundreds and this is just a few of them
  3. Brief bit of history copied from the net... South Flank Casemates, Dover: During a new fear of invasion from Napoleon III two new dry moats where added to the existing citadel defences. The northern and the southern moat both had their own casemates built. Between these there was also a defensive caponier built, but sadly this was filled in during the 1960's by the Dover Corporation and they gradually destroyed many parts of the Western Heights. The southern casemates are a lot larger than the northern casemates, with eight separate rooms whereas the northern casemates only had six. The explore was a spur of the moment thing as i couldnt stand another day staring at the pc..SilverRainbow txt me to say he was free so we headed over to this spot.I first came here about a year and a half ago and only managed the south casemates as the north can only be reached via a crawl through some small chalk tunnels and a squeeze through the Pipe..going in was fine but knowing how tight it was made me a little edgy when wedged in the pipe..Eh have covered the access with anti climb paint as well as trying to seal it all up... On with some pics which i have tried not to go mad with .. South to start with..im sure you can tell which is the North ias theres no spray pain and crap Smashing day shame about that awful sunshine stuff
  4. UK North Entrance Dover, May 2011

    After a bit of planning with the mighty Space Invader this was my second trip to this worthy Napoleonic structure, the first having been aborted after a certain young chap that was with us fell from a few feet in the air and made enough noise to wake a major city , right on with a bit of history; The North Entrance to the Western Heights was the nearest to the town of Dover and most convenient for access, Accordingly, its defences were substantial, comprising two bridges and a tunnel. The entrance dates from the Royal Commission period of the 1860s, and replaced the entrance dating from Napoleonic times - a single bridge over a ditch,The two bridges crossed the twin ditches (or lines), which were separated by an earth bank – the tenaille. Neither bridge was fixed. The first of the two had a drop-down section hinged at the tenaille end, while the second had a section that could be raised. The roadway cut through the tenaille was ‘S’ shaped, so that artillery fire could not be brought to bear on the entrance to the tunnel from the approach road. Having crossed the two bridges, the road entered a tunnel, with a pair of massive doors at the outer end. These slid on rails from deep slots either side of the tunnel, and did away with the obvious weakness of hinges. The tunnel then turns sharp left, runs straight for 50m or so, then turns right towards the inner gateway. The road bed of the tunnel was laid with 6� cubes of oak most of which are still there and can be seen, probably to guard against sparks. Onwards with pics, still using my "Point & Shoot" for this one Thanks for taking the time to view my pics
  5. north entrance dover ,may 2011

    visited with silver rainbow, a little history The entrance was made up of two bridges crossing a dry moat separated by a central island. The inner bridge could be raised like a drawbridge and the main entrance further protected by two massive sliding doors that slid out from the sides of the gateway behind the drawbridge.The road then led through a tunnel into the main fortress. A new road was driven through the fortress in the 1960's bypassing the North Entrance and cutting through the dry moat. and on with the pics thanks for looking
  6. After a cracking day exploring with Skeleton Key, Priority 7 and Tstranger1066 we ended up in North Weald North Weald Redoubt In the late Victorian period (1889-1903) mobilisation centres were constructed around the London area in order to provide ready ammunition in order to defend the city. These centres were not designed as forts themselves, although they could have been armed if the need arose. Being a mobilisation centre, if the need for armament did become apparent, the North Weald Redoubt would have been armed with whatever guns were seen as appropriate at the time. Also on the site are two rare Allen William Turrets North Weald/Ongar Radio Transmitter It was originally built in 1920 and operated by Marconi's Wireless Telegraph Company. In September 1929, control passed to Imperial and International Communications when the telegraphic communications of the Empire were placed in the hands of a single operating company. The first radio-telegraphic services in 1921 connected London with Paris and Berne using Morse code. The transmitters were designed to operate simultaneously from 'A' station and the signals were mixed and radiated from one aerial on two different frequencies. The two Allen William Turrets Thanks for looking
  7. Well on hearing this place was accessible again, I was determind not to miss out this time as last time we went to do this we got news the place had been locked up again just 2 days before we intended to go! So this time at the earliest opportunity available we got ourselves up to London to have a look. I wasn't disappointed, the place is vast and although quite stripped, it's still quite interesting once you start having a nose around some of the side passages. Apologies to those that may be bored with seeing reports from here now after a big influx of them in the last week, but I was pretty pleased with how my photos came out, so thought they were worth posting. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13 14, 15. 16. 17. Thanks for looking Maniac.
  8. Thanks to Troglodyte for the invite...After a days txting and trying to work out how we'd get up there a time was arranged and Myself Urbanginger(cheers for the driving) Space invader met up with Troglodyte and well..a car full..I havnt seen much of the history posted ON this well visited of late site..I found some very interestung facts and info on the deep shelters in london and on this site,so rather than me try and cobble in my own words some of it im putting this link upwhich says it all. http://underground-history.co.uk/claphamn.php The lights where a pain in the arse with exposingsome areas but easier to get around,Id packed up beforewe found the office areas on the way out ,but heres a few pics of the night,thing is as huge and great as the place is one extremely long corridor looks identicle to another so sorry same looking pics all round.. Pics Had to be done... Thanks for looking..the size of this place really is amazing
  9. UK North Entrance - Dover - Feb 2011

    Had a nice trip to Dover the other day, and did the North Entrance for the first time. This has been covered quite a few times, so I will just quote the history from Underground Kent for those of you unfamiliar with this fortification. The weakest link in fortress defence is often the entrances, so it is hardly surprising that much ingenuity goes into their design. The North Entrance to the Western Heights was the nearest to the town of Dover and most convenient for access, either for supplies or by an attacking force. Accordingly, its defences were substantial, comprising two bridges and a tunnel. The entrance dates from the Royal Commission period of the 1860s, and superseded the entrance dating from Napoleonic times - a single bridge over a ditch. The two bridges crossed the twin ditches (or lines), which were separated by an earth bank – the tenaille. Neither bridge was fixed. The first of the two had a drop-down section hinged at the tenaille end, while the second had a section that could be raised. The roadway cut through the tenaille was ‘S’ shaped, so that artillery fire could not be brought to bear on the entrance to the tunnel from the approach road. Having crossed the two bridges, the road entered a tunnel, with a pair of massive doors at the outer end. These slid on rails from deep slots either side of the tunnel, and did away with the obvious weakness of hinges. The tunnel then turns sharp left, runs straight for 50m or so, then turns right towards the inner gateway. The road bed of the tunnel was laid with 6� cubes of oak, probably to guard against sparks.
  10. History has been done (but not to death ) bet I could find out stuff what has not been posted but after 18 hrs up in the sheep country my head has gone west !.....on with the pics...
  11. Right i posted a detached bastion report this is the north entrance leading onto the road that you see on the trail thru the moat going towards detached..Not going into history its Napoleonic as id finally managed to get in here i thought id post a short report.. Visited with uncle bulgaria who didnt quite manages to get in ..i think hed had to much dinner as the gap was small!!Right on with some pics of whats behind those doors you can see from the road!! Oh look inside the doors you can see from the road..how the dickens did i get in there!! Right nothing ground breaking or epic..but i had wandered past the north entrance from the road and the moat and thought how the ferk do you get in there!!Well now i know,thanks for looking
  12. North entrance was originally accessed via two drawbridges and a central island/pathway. Once Military road was re-routed and cut through a section of the North Lines the entrance was no longer used and as of the late 1960’s the remains have been left to decay. The two bridges have been burnt down leaving only the beams as a reminder of the beautifully engineered North Entrance. The North Entrance still remains hidden underground. The main point of access is via a metal door which is locked and not open to the public with no signs of it ever being opened up. However, where there’s a will, there’s a way. Via the rear entrance we managed to gain entry to the underground tunnels, gun rooms, galleries, three large water tanks and unlined tunnels to carry the pipes. Visited this site with Frosty and fortknox0 And here’s one just for Frosty
  13. hey guys, firstly id like to give Frosty a huge thumbs up for showing me this place, so happy i finally seen it. also present on this trip was Fortknox0, cheers for a good day out guys i love this place, the huge amount of graffiti is a shame but it is a really cool place to photograph as all my photos were taken in the natural light. Three large casemates lay hidden on the North side of the Citadel's Western Outworks. Originally they would have consisted of two floors and were used as a barracks. The second floor is no longer present but the edges and a couple of beama are still in place to date. We didn't get the chance to see south casemates which funnily enough is located on South side of the Western Outworks . The rain started pooring and the security from the nearby immigration centre started searching so we decided it was a good time to leave. anyway here are a couple of pictures
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